ICDs Effective in Young Patients (CME/CE)
(MedPage Today) -- In pediatric patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, implantable cardioverter-defibrillators can terminate ventricular tachyarrhythmias, but with a high complication rate, researchers found. (Source: MedPage Today Cardiovascular)
Source: MedPage Today Cardiovascular - April 2, 2013 Category: Cardiology Source Type: news

UCLA study finds heart failure medications highly cost-effective
A UCLA study shows that heart failure medications recommended by national guidelines are highly cost-effective in saving lives and may also provide savings to the health care system.   Heart failure, a chronic, progressive disease, affects millions of individuals and results in considerable morbidity, the use of extensive health care resources and substantial costs.   Currently online, the study will be published in the April 2 print issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology. Researchers studied the incremental health and cost benefits of three common heart failure medications that are recommende...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - March 28, 2013 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Editorial: Trastuzumab induced cardiomyopathy-wider implications for cardio-oncology
Source: Heart Area: News This editorial in 'Heart' notes the twofold rise in incidence of breast cancer over the past 20 years and that treatments have become significantly more effective and mortality has fallen by 50% over the last 30 years, though this has required more aggressive treatment regimens. The authors discuss anthracyclines, HER-2, anthracyclines plus trastuzumab and recent clinical studies, and note a number of unresolved issues:   (1) How big a problem is chemotherapy cardiomyopathy in routine clinical practice (2) Do we have effective means of early diagnosis? (3) Are there effective pharmace...
Source: NeLM - Cardiovascular Medicine - March 14, 2013 Category: Cardiology Source Type: news

Largely Present In Women, 'Broken Heart Syndrome' Is Often Triggered By Stress
Even though a newly recognized cardiomyopathy, which mainly impacts women, is typically treatable, Tako-tsubo cardiomyopathy can also be deadly when compounded by other co-morbidities, such as heart failure, according to a study presented at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) Scientific Sessions. This condition, formally known as Tako-tsubo cardiomyopathy (TTC) and informally known as stress cardiomyopathy or broken heart syndrome, has abrupt onset of symptoms and is characterized by a distinctive left ventricular (LV) contraction profile... (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - March 12, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Heart Disease Source Type: news

Beware: Newly recognized heart cardiomyopathy is not always benign
(Minneapolis Heart Institute Foundation) Even though a newly recognized cardiomyopathy, which mainly impacts women, is typically treatable, Tako-tsubo cardiomyopathy can also be deadly when compounded by other co-morbidities, such as heart failure, according to a study being presented Mar. 9 at the American College of Cardiology Scientific Sessions. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - March 9, 2013 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Gd-Enhanced CMR for Cardiomyopathy Risk StratificationGd-Enhanced CMR for Cardiomyopathy Risk Stratification
Two reports add to the literature showing that gadolinium-enhanced cardiac magnetic resonance imaging can help risk-stratify patients with ischemic and nonischemic cardiomyopathy; one of them added a twist to the debate over the STICH viability study. Heartwire (Source: Medscape Today Headlines)
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - March 8, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Cardiology News Source Type: news

Gd-enhanced CMR risk-stratifies in ischemics, nonischemics; clinical value uncertain
Two reports add to the literature showing that gadolinium-enhanced cardiac magnetic resonance imaging can help risk-stratify patients with ischemic and nonischemic cardiomyopathy; one of them added a twist to the debate over the STICH viability study. (Source: theHeart.org)
Source: theHeart.org - March 8, 2013 Category: Cardiology Source Type: news

Scarring of Damaged Heart Muscle Predicts Death (CME/CE)
(MedPage Today) -- Fibrosis seen on enhanced cardiac MRI helps predict mortality among patients with dilated, nonischemic cardiomyopathy, even atop the standard clinical predictor of ejection fraction, a longitudinal study showed. (Source: MedPage Today Cardiovascular)
Source: MedPage Today Cardiovascular - March 6, 2013 Category: Cardiology Source Type: news

Scans That Gauge Heart Scarring May Spot High-Risk Patients
Advanced MRI could become aid in guiding cardiovascular treatment, study authors say Source: HealthDay Related MedlinePlus Page: Cardiomyopathy (Source: MedlinePlus Health News)
Source: MedlinePlus Health News - March 5, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Britain's youngest patient to get heart implant spends first birthday fighting for her life as she waits for transplant
Carina Marcangelo, from Esher, Surrey, has cardiomyopathy, a disease that damages the heart. She is currently on a life support machine and completely sedated. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - February 14, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Steroid therapy impedes Duchenne’s cardiomyopathy
Steroid therapy is associated with a considerable reduction in all-cause mortality and new-onset and progressive cardiomyopathy in patients with the debilitating X-linked disease Duchenne muscular dystrophy. (Source: MedWire News - Cardiology)
Source: MedWire News - Cardiology - February 11, 2013 Category: Cardiology Source Type: news

Patients’ Skin Cells are Transformed into Heart Cells to Create a ‘Disease-In-A-Dish’ - 2/4/13
Researchers at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and Sanford-Burnham Medical Research Institute in California have created a laboratory-grown cell model of an inherited heart condition known as arrhythmogenic right ventricular dysplasia/cardiomyopathy (ARVD/C). (Source: Johns Hopkins Medicine News)
Source: Johns Hopkins Medicine News - February 4, 2013 Category: Research Source Type: news

MyoKardia Appoints Industry Veteran Jonathan Fox, M.D., Ph.D., as Chief Medical Officer
SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO, Calif.--(Healthcare Sales & Marketing Network)--MyoKardia, Inc., a company focused on developing innovative therapeutics to treat genetic cardiovascular disease, today announced the appointment of Jonathan C. Fox, M.D., Ph.D., as Chief... Biopharmaceuticals, Cardiology, PersonnelMyoKardia, Jonathan C. Fox, cardiomyopathy, genetic cardiovascular disease (Source: HSMN NewsFeed)
Source: HSMN NewsFeed - January 30, 2013 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Skin Cells From Patients With Inherited Heart Condition Recreate The Adult-Onset Disease
Most patients with an inherited heart condition known as arrhythmogenic right ventricular dysplasia/cardiomyopathy (ARVD/C) don't know they have a problem until they're in their early 20s. The lack of symptoms at younger ages makes it very difficult for researchers to study how ARVD/C evolves or to develop treatments. A new stem cell-based technology created by 2012 Nobel Prize winner Shinya Yamanaka, M.D., Ph.D., helps solve this problem. With this technology, researchers can generate heart muscle cells from a patient's own skin cells... (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - January 28, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Heart Disease Source Type: news

Patients' own skin cells are transformed into heart cells to create 'disease in a dish'
Researchers have unveiled the first maturation-based "disease in a dish" model for arrhythmogenic right ventricular dysplasia/cardiomyopathy (ARVD/C). The model was created using induced pluripotent stem cells and a new method to mimic metabolic maturity. This model is likely more relevant to human ARVD/C than other models and therefore better suited for studying the disease and testing new treatments. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - January 27, 2013 Category: Science Source Type: news

Patients' own skin cells are transformed into heart cells to create 'disease in a dish'
(Sanford-Burnham Medical Research Institute) In a paper published Jan. 27 in Nature, researchers at Sanford-Burnham Medical Research Institute and Johns Hopkins University unveil the first maturation-based "disease in a dish" model for arrhythmogenic right ventricular dysplasia/cardiomyopathy (ARVD/C). The model was created using induced pluripotent stem cells and a new method to mimic metabolic maturity. This model is likely more relevant to human ARVD/C than other models and therefore better suited for studying the disease and testing new treatments. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 27, 2013 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

CRT May Help in Some Cases of Cardiomyopathy (CME/CE)
(MedPage Today) -- Some patients have a cardiomyopathy induced by left bundle branch block in the absence of structural heart disease that can be resolved with cardiac resynchronization therapy, a retrospective study suggested. (Source: MedPage Today Cardiovascular)
Source: MedPage Today Cardiovascular - January 25, 2013 Category: Cardiology Source Type: news

Evaluation of Arrhythmogenic Right Ventricular CardiomyopathyEvaluation of Arrhythmogenic Right Ventricular Cardiomyopathy
Speckle tracking echocardiography presents a feasible method of detecting subtle right or left ventricular dysfunction as an early sign of arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy. Cardiovascular Ultrasound (Source: Medscape Today Headlines)
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - January 24, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Cardiology Journal Article Source Type: news

Stem Cells, Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DCM) & Cardiomyopathies
Conclusion: ADMs delay or prevent development of DCM in dystrophin-deficient heart, but timing of stem cell transplantation may be critical for achieving benefit with cell therapy in DMDcardiac muscle.Stem Cell Research Reagents. (Source: Neuromics)
Source: Neuromics - January 21, 2013 Category: Neuroscience Tags: Cardiomyopathy DCM ADMs Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy nestin antibodies Aorta-derived mesoangioblasts nestin antibody Stem cell markers cardiomyocytes Source Type: news

Takotsubo cardiomyopathy as a delayed complication with a herbicide containing glufosinate ammonium in a suicide attempt: a case report - Tominaga K, Izumi M, Suzukawa M, Shinjo T, Izawa Y, Yonekawa C, Ano M, Yamashita K, Muronoi T, Mochiduki R.
Background. Glufosinate ammonium has a famous delayed complication as respiratory failure, however, delayed cardiogenic complication is not well known. Objectives. The aim of this study is to report a takotsubo cardiomyopathy as a delayed complication of g... (Source: SafetyLit: All (Unduplicated))
Source: SafetyLit: All (Unduplicated) - January 19, 2013 Category: Global & Universal Tags: Poisoning Source Type: news

Cardio Notes: Two Meds Key in PAD Surgery
(MedPage Today) -- Patients scheduled for a peripheral artery intervention do much better if they are already on statins and aspirin. Also this week, predictors of new-onset dilated cardiomyopathy. (Source: MedPage Today Primary Care)
Source: MedPage Today Primary Care - January 14, 2013 Category: Primary Care Source Type: news

Transplantation of Engineered Heart Tissue in Dilated CardiomyopathyTransplantation of Engineered Heart Tissue in Dilated Cardiomyopathy
Is a new bridge to heart transplantation on the horizon? European Journal of Heart Failure (Source: Medscape Today Headlines)
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - January 11, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Cardiology Journal Article Source Type: news

Stanford Researchers Use Stem Cells To Pinpoint Cause Of Common Type Of Sudden Cardiac Death
When a young athlete dies unexpectedly on the basketball court or the football field, it's both shocking and tragic. Now Stanford University School of Medicine researchers have, for the first time, identified the molecular basis for a condition called hypertrophic cardiomyopathy that is the most common cause for this type of sudden cardiac death. To do so, the Stanford scientists created induced pluripotent stem cells, or iPS cells, from the skin cells of 10 members of a family with a genetic mutation that causes the condition... (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - January 7, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Cardiovascular / Cardiology Source Type: news

New Hope for Stopping Sudden Cardiac Deaths
(Ivanhoe Newswire) – Sudden cardiac death in young athletes has been a problem since the year 490 B.C., when a young Greek soldier ran from Marathon to Athens and fell suddenly to his death. (Source: www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov) The sudden death of a young athlete is tragic, but for the first time researchers have identified the molecular basis for the condition that is the most common cause of sudden cardiac death, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. (Source: Medical Headlines From Ivanhoe.com)
Source: Medical Headlines From Ivanhoe.com - January 7, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Researchers use stem cells to pinpoint cause of common type of sudden cardiac death
When a young athlete dies unexpectedly on the basketball court or the football field, it's both shocking and tragic. Now researchers have, for the first time, identified the molecular basis for a condition called hypertrophic cardiomyopathy that is the most common cause for this type of sudden cardiac death. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - January 3, 2013 Category: Science Source Type: news

Stanford researchers use stem cells to pinpoint cause of common type of sudden cardiac death
(Stanford University Medical Center) When a young athlete dies unexpectedly on the basketball court or the football field, it's both shocking and tragic. Now Stanford University School of Medicine researchers have, for the first time, identified the molecular basis for a condition called hypertrophic cardiomyopathy that is the most common cause for this type of sudden cardiac death. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 3, 2013 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Revised Article-Cardiomyopathy
Cardiomyopathy refers to diseases of the heart muscle. These diseases have many causes, signs and symptoms, and treatments. (Source: National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute Health Topics)
Source: National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute Health Topics - January 7, 2011 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news