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Local DCIS Recurrence After Skipping Adjuvant Radiation Local DCIS Recurrence After Skipping Adjuvant Radiation
Omitting radiation after lumpectomy for pure ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) does not improve the chance of breast preservation in case of local recurrence, researchers from Canada have observed.Reuters Health Information (Source: Medscape General Surgery Headlines)
Source: Medscape General Surgery Headlines - September 6, 2017 Category: Surgery Tags: Hematology-Oncology News Source Type: news

COUNTERPOINT: Should Radiation Therapy After Surgery for Ductal Carcinoma In Situ Be Standard Practice?
To universally recommend breast irradiation for all women after excision of DCIS lesions ignores information now available to us that can spare the majority of women with DCIS the downsides of RT, but be applied in the treatment of DCIS patients at greater risk for invasive disease. (Source: CancerNetwork)
Source: CancerNetwork - August 15, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: William C. Wood, MD Tags: Breast Cancer Oncology Journal Source Type: news

POINT: Should Radiation Therapy After Surgery for Ductal Carcinoma In Situ Be Standard Practice?
At this time RT following BCS remains the standard of care for most patients. Current tools, including prognostic scores and tumor genetics, have failed to identify a cohort for whom RT confers no benefit with respect to invasive recurrences. (Source: CancerNetwork)
Source: CancerNetwork - August 15, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Camille Berriochoa, MD Carisa Bohnak, BS Chirag Shah, MD Nicole Chahine, BS Tags: Breast Cancer Oncology Journal Source Type: news

10 Facts Women Should Know About Endometrial Cancer
The most common cancer of the reproductive organs in American women is endometrial cancer. The American Cancer Society estimates that for the year 2017, around 61,380 new cases of cancer of the body of the uterus will be diagnosed and about 10,920 women will die from cancers of the uterine body. These figures include both endometrial cancers and uterine sarcomas. Since endometrial cancer is a fairly common cancer in women, the more women know the facts about this disease, the greater their chance of knowing what symptoms to be aware of in order to have it diagnosed as early as possible, improving the likelihood of surviva...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - June 5, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Bilateral mastectomy not needed for DCIS
Women with ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) who choose bilateral mastectomy...Read more on AuntMinnie.comRelated Reading: How accurate are DCIS predictions from radiologists? Overdiagnosis claims not supported, ACR, SBI say ASTRO: Radiation boost cuts local recurrence in DCIS patients New treatment guidelines issued for DCIS Needle biopsy hormone testing unnecessary for DCIS (Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines)
Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines - April 28, 2017 Category: Radiology Source Type: news

Why You Should Always Ask For A Second Opinion
Two years ago, when actress-singer Rita Wilson was 58, she underwent a double mastectomy and had this to say about it: Getting a second opinion saved her life. Wilson was right to insist on a second opinion, according to a Mayo Clinic study released this month. Of 286 patients who sought a second opinion from the clinic over a two-year period, 88 percent received a diagnosis that was either modified or completely different from the first one they received. Sixty-six percent of patients received a refined diagnosis and 22 percent received a completely different one, the study found.  Only 12 percent received confirmati...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - April 26, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Dramatic Increase in Incidence of Penile Cancer Precursor Dramatic Increase in Incidence of Penile Cancer Precursor
The rates of penile carcinoma in situ, a premalignant precursor of penile cancer, have increased dramatically in recent years in England.Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Hematology-Oncology Headlines)
Source: Medscape Hematology-Oncology Headlines - March 28, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: Hematology-Oncology News Source Type: news

Mayo Clinic tests vaccine to provide immune response against early breast lesion
(Mayo Clinic) Only about 35 percent of precancerous breast lesions morph into cancer if untreated, but physicians cannot identify which lesions are potentially dangerous. So all women diagnosed with ductal carcinoma in situ undergo traditional therapy of surgery and possibly hormonal therapy and radiation. Now, Mayo Clinic researchers are about to test a vaccine that they hope will replace standard therapies and prevent recurrence for some, if not all, these patients. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 1, 2017 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Mayo Clinic to test vaccine designed to provide immune response against early breast lesions
JACKSONVILLE, Fla. ? Only about 35 percent of precancerous breast lesions morph into cancer if untreated, but physicians cannot identify which lesions are potentially dangerous. So all women diagnosed with ductal carcinoma in situ undergo traditional therapy of surgery and possibly hormonal therapy and radiation. Now, Mayo Clinic researchers are about to test a vaccine [...] (Source: Mayo Clinic Florida News)
Source: Mayo Clinic Florida News - January 31, 2017 Category: Hospital Management Source Type: news

New Research Shows Breast Cancer Precursor Treatment Causes Women to Live Longer
This study is particularly important because DCIS treatment includes radiotherapy, which can cause damage to nearby organs More and more people are becoming aware they have DCIS because it is something that shows up in breast cancer screenings—so more women are able to get treated if they have this form of cancer. For more information on the study, please visit “Women treated for precursor of breast cancer can expect to live as long as other women.” Follow NN/LM SCR on Twitter and like us on Facebook. (Source: Network News)
Source: Network News - January 31, 2017 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: NN/LM South Central Region Tags: Consumer Health General (all entries) Patient Safety Public Health Research Source Type: news

Medical News Today: Women with noninvasive breast cancer live as long as other women
Women diagnosed with ductal carcinoma in situ have a slightly higher risk of dying from breast cancer, but a significantly lower all-mortality risk. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - January 30, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Breast Cancer Source Type: news

Women treated for early signs of breast cancer live LONGER
Women over the age of 50 with ductal carcinoma in situ - a precursor of breast cancer - were 10 per cent more likely to be alive ten years after their diagnosis than health women, Dutch researchers found. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - January 28, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Women treated for precursor of breast cancer can expect to live as long as other women
Women over 50 who have been treated for ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS), a precursor of breast cancer, are more likely to be alive ten years later than women in the general population, according to new research. Researchers say these results should provide reassurance to women who are diagnosed with the disease. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - January 27, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

Good News for Older Women With Early Form of Breast Cancer
FRIDAY, Jan. 27, 2017 -- Older women treated for a very early form of breast cancer, called ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS), do not have an overall increased risk of early death compared to their peers, a new study finds. " Being diagnosed with DCIS... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - January 27, 2017 Category: Journals (General) Source Type: news

Women treated for precursor of breast cancer can expect to live as long as other women
(ECCO-the European CanCer Organisation) Women over 50 who have been treated for ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS), a precursor of breast cancer, are more likely to be alive ten years later than women in the general population, according to new research presented at the European Cancer Congress 2017. Researchers say these results should provide reassurance to women who are diagnosed with the disease. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - January 27, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Study: Mammography Results in Overdiagnosis, No Reduction in Advanced Disease
Breast cancer screening was not associated with any reduction in the incidence of advanced cancer, and overdiagnosis of invasive tumors and ductal carcinoma in situ is a common problem, according to a new study conducted in Denmark. (Source: CancerNetwork)
Source: CancerNetwork - January 9, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Dave Levitan Tags: Breast Cancer News Screening Source Type: news

Reoperation Rates 3-Fold Higher After DCIS Than IBC Reoperation Rates 3-Fold Higher After DCIS Than IBC
Patients undergoing breast-conserving surgery had reoperation rates 3 times higher when when their diagnosis was ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) than when it was invasive breast cancer (IBC).Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Hematology-Oncology Headlines)
Source: Medscape Hematology-Oncology Headlines - January 9, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: Hematology-Oncology News Source Type: news

New ASTRO Guidelines for APBI in Early-Stage Breast Cancer New ASTRO Guidelines for APBI in Early-Stage Breast Cancer
The new guideline extends the candidates for accelerated partial-breast irradiation (APBI) to younger women and those with ductal carcinoma in situ.Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - November 23, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Hematology-Oncology News Source Type: news

Older DCIS Patients Have Low Rates of Tamoxifen, AI Usage
The initiation of and adherence to tamoxifen or aromatase inhibitors (AIs) such as anastrozole is low among older women with estrogen receptor-positive ductal carcinoma in situ. (Source: CancerNetwork)
Source: CancerNetwork - November 1, 2016 Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Dave Levitan Tags: Breast Cancer News Source Type: news

Should DCIS Patients Get a Radiation Boost? Should DCIS Patients Get a Radiation Boost?
Pooled analysis of 4000 patients with ductal carcinoma in situ shows that a radiation boost reduces local recurrence.Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - September 29, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Hematology-Oncology News Source Type: news

Young Age and DCIS Tied to Increased Risk of Breast Tumor Recurrence Young Age and DCIS Tied to Increased Risk of Breast Tumor Recurrence
In women ages 40 and younger, the presence of ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) next to an invasive tumor is associated with an increased risk of ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence (IBTR), according to a recently published study.Reuters Health Information (Source: Medscape General Surgery Headlines)
Source: Medscape General Surgery Headlines - September 16, 2016 Category: Surgery Tags: Hematology-Oncology News Source Type: news

Current Trends in the Management of Ductal Carcinoma In Situ
This review will summarize the current trends in the diagnosis and management of DCIS and will highlight ongoing trials that are shaping future management of this entity. (Source: CancerNetwork)
Source: CancerNetwork - September 15, 2016 Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: E. Shelley Hwang, MD, MPH Tristen S. Park, MD Tags: Breast Cancer Oncology Journal Review Article Source Type: news

Common breast cancer test may not be worth the cost, UCLA study suggests
A genomic test widely used to help determine whether women with a common form of breast cancer should undergo radiation is not cost effective, according to a new UCLA Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center study. The Oncotype DX DCIS test is given to women with ductal carcinoma in situ, which means the cancer has not spread to any other tissues, to help them choose the best treatment by better identifying the potential of tumors to come back.Oncotype DX DCIS reduces the number of women undergoing radiation therapy, which is good because it decreases the number of women exposed to possibly harmful side effects. However, UCLA J...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - September 13, 2016 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Guidelines Establish Minimum Negative Margins in DCIS
­Three medical organizations including ASCO have issued a guideline on margins in breast conserving surgery for patients with ductal carcinoma in situ. (Source: CancerNetwork)
Source: CancerNetwork - August 18, 2016 Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Anna Azvolinsky Tags: Breast Cancer News Source Type: news

New Guidelines Set Safe Surgery Margins for Some Breast Cancers
FRIDAY, Aug. 12, 2016 -- New surgery guidelines for certain breast cancer patients could reduce both unnecessary surgeries and recurrence rates, three U.S. cancer groups say. The guideline is for treatment of women with ductal carcinoma in situ... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - August 15, 2016 Category: Journals (General) Source Type: news

New DCIS consensus guideline could curb unnecessary breast surgery and reduce health system costs
(American Society for Radiation Oncology) Three leading national cancer organizations today issued a consensus guideline for physicians treating women who have ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) treated with breast-conserving surgery with whole breast irradiation. The new guideline has the potential to save many women from unnecessary surgeries while reducing costs to the health care system. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - August 15, 2016 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Needle biopsy hormone testing unnecessary for DCIS
Patients with ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) breast cancer don't need hormone...Read more on AuntMinnie.comRelated Reading: Delayed rad therapy puts women with DCIS at risk ASBrS: No, we're not overtreating DCIS Rates of high-grade DCIS increase with age Various DCIS treatments produce similar survival rates Kopans: JAMA Oncology paper misinterprets DCIS data (Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines)
Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines - August 10, 2016 Category: Radiology Source Type: news

Are provider-related factors affecting the likelihood of breast preservation?
( The JAMA Network Journals ) Do regional practice patterns for radiotherapy for ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) breast cancer increase the likelihood of mastectomy when there is a second breast cancer in women who did not receive radiotherapy at the initial DCIS diagnosis? (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - July 21, 2016 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Medical News Today: Aggressive breast cancer identified with new technique
A combination of math and imaging can distinguish aggressive forms of ductal carcinoma in situ - or stage 0 breast cancer - from non-aggressive forms. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - July 3, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Breast Cancer Source Type: news

New technology helps ID aggressive early breast cancer
Researchers have developed a new technology that can identify aggressive forms of ductal carcinoma in situ, or stage 0 breast cancer, from non-aggressive varieties. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - June 30, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

New technology helps ID aggressive early breast cancer
(University of Michigan Health System) Researchers at the University of Michigan developed a new technology that can identify aggressive forms of ductal carcinoma in situ, or stage 0 breast cancer, from non-aggressive varieties. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 30, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Testing After DCIS Needle Biopsies: $35 Million BoondoggleTesting After DCIS Needle Biopsies: $35 Million Boondoggle
Testing core needle biopsy specimens of ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) for hormone receptors is wasteful because testing is better done after surgery. Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape General Surgery Headlines)
Source: Medscape General Surgery Headlines - June 24, 2016 Category: Surgery Tags: Hematology-Oncology News Source Type: news

Duke Breast Cancer Expert Named One of TIME’s 100 Most Influential People for 2016
Contact: Samiha KhannaPhone: 919-419-5069Email: samiha.khanna@duke.eduhttps://www.dukehealth.org FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE on Thursday, April 21, 2016 DURHAM, N.C. -- Shelley Hwang, M.D., chief of breast surgery at the Duke Cancer Institute, has been named one of TIME’s 100 most influential people for 2016 as a pioneer in her field. One of the world’s foremost experts in early-stage breast cancers, Hwang has become an international leader calling for research to guide treatment for ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS), in which abnormal cells are detected in the lining of a milk duct, but haven’t spread to other t...
Source: DukeHealth.org: Duke Health Features - April 22, 2016 Category: Pediatrics Tags: Duke Medicine Source Type: news

Delayed rad therapy puts women with DCIS at risk
Women being treated for ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) are at higher risk...Read more on AuntMinnie.comRelated Reading: Socioeconomic factors affect patient care in radiology Racial discrepancies persist in breast cancer diagnoses Choosing Wisely boosts use of short-course breast radiation therapy Accelerated RT with boost works well for breast cancer patients ASTRO publishes guidelines for accelerated whole-breast RT (Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines)
Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines - April 18, 2016 Category: Radiology Source Type: news

Early stage breast cancer does need treatment, study finds
Kathleen Doheny, HealthDay News Early stage breast cancers known as DCIS, ductal carcinoma in situ, should be treated with surgery, not a "wait-and-watch" approach, according to a new study. (Source: Health News - UPI.com)
Source: Health News - UPI.com - April 15, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Early Stage Breast Cancer Does Need Treatment, Study Finds
FRIDAY, April 15, 2016 -- Early stage breast cancers known as DCIS (ductal carcinoma in situ) should be treated with surgery, not a "wait-and-watch" approach, according to new research. Experts have debated whether to treat early DCIS or simply... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - April 15, 2016 Category: Journals (General) Source Type: news

ASBrS: No, we're not overtreating DCIS
More than 50% of women diagnosed with ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) that...Read more on AuntMinnie.comRelated Reading: 5 ways imaging can reduce breast cancer overdiagnosis Could a pill improve breast cancer diagnosis? New study to tackle personalized breast screening Mammo false-positive rate highest in younger women Rates of high-grade DCIS increase with age (Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines)
Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines - April 15, 2016 Category: Radiology Source Type: news

ACR and SBI Continue to Recommend Regular Mammography Starting at Age 40
Washington, DC (Oct. 20, 2015) — As our shared goal is to save the most lives possible from breast cancer, the American College of Radiology (ACR) and Society of Breast Imaging (SBI) continue to recommend that women get yearly mammograms starting at age 40. New American Cancer Society (ACS) breast cancer screening guidelines, and previous data used by the United States Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) to create their recommendations, state that starting annual mammography at age 40 saves the most lives. “The ACS has strongly reaffirmed that mammography screening saves lives. The new ACS guidelines show ...
Source: American College of Radiology - April 13, 2016 Category: Radiology Source Type: news

Immune Microenvironment of Breast Ductal Carcinoma In SituImmune Microenvironment of Breast Ductal Carcinoma In Situ
This study investigates the immunobiology of DCIS breast cancers. How does the antitumor immune response evolve as tumors progress from in situ to invasive and then metastatic lesions? Modern Pathology (Source: Medscape Today Headlines)
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - April 13, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Pathology & Lab Medicine Journal Article Source Type: news

Pathologists Often Disagree on Biopsy FindingsPathologists Often Disagree on Biopsy Findings
Pathologists largely agree when identifying invasive breast cancer on breast biopsy slides, but agreement is much lower when those slides suggest atypia or ductal carcinoma in situ, a new study has found. Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - March 30, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Internal Medicine News Source Type: news

Janice Dickinson reveals she has been diagnosed with breast cancer
The supermodel tells Daily Mail Online how she has been diagnosed with early stage ductal carcinoma in situ. But Dickinson, 61, said she is determined to beat the disease and will soon have surgery. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - March 29, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Breast Biopsy Study Points to Need for a New "Gold Standard" (FREE)
By Joe Elia Edited by David G. Fairchild, MD, MPH, and Jaye Elizabeth Hefner, MD Breast biopsy findings, the gold standard for diagnosis, can vary widely among pathologists, especially with atypia and ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS), according … (Source: Physician's First Watch current issue)
Source: Physician's First Watch current issue - March 21, 2016 Category: Primary Care Source Type: news

10-year DCIS recurrence risk dwindles with age
BOSTON – Recurrence rates of cancer following breast-conserving surgery for ductal carcinoma in situ differ significantly with patient age, with younger women having a three-fold higher 10-year... (Source: Family Practice News)
Source: Family Practice News - March 21, 2016 Category: Primary Care Source Type: news

What Is Breast Cancer Stage Zero?
Is Stage Zero breast cancer really cancer or not? Find out what the staging means for ductal or lobular carcinoma in situ in diagnosis and treatment. (Source: About.com Breast Cancer)
Source: About.com Breast Cancer - March 9, 2016 Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: breastcancer.guide at about.com Tags: health Source Type: news

Women Often Overestimate Odds That Early Breast Cancer Will Return, Spread (U.S. News and World Report)
This article contains commentary fr... (Source: National Comprehensive Cancer Network)
Source: National Comprehensive Cancer Network - March 8, 2016 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Dana-Farber using new grant to study less-is-more approach to breast cancer
For years, oncologists have aggressively treated an early form of non-invasive breast cancer with surgery and radiation, carving out any part of the breast that was deemed to be a future risk. But with a $13.3 million grant from the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute will study whether such aggressive treatments are necessary for ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS), and if a wait-and-see approach leads to better outcomes for the patient. Approximately 60,000… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines - February 8, 2016 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Jessica Bartlett Source Type: news

DCIS Prognostic Score Associated With Radiotherapy Survival BenefitDCIS Prognostic Score Associated With Radiotherapy Survival Benefit
A simple prognostic score identifies women with ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) who will derive a survival benefit from radiotherapy after breast-conserving therapy, according to a longitudinal study. Reuters Health Information (Source: Medscape Radiology Headlines)
Source: Medscape Radiology Headlines - February 5, 2016 Category: Radiology Tags: Hematology-Oncology News Source Type: news

What's the best treatment for very early signs of breast cancer? Duke U. researchers want to know
With help from a $13.4 million award, Duke medical researchers will try to learn more about how to treat women with very early signs of breast cancer – an issue of no small debate in the oncology world. Specifically, the research will look at ductal carcinoma in situ, or DCIS, a collection of abnormal cells found in breast ducts, but that have not spread. Some 60,000 women are diagnosed annually with DCIS, however there is growing research that indicates these women would never develop breast… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - February 4, 2016 Category: Biotechnology Authors: Jason deBruyn Source Type: news

Study Aims to Resolve How To Manage Pre-Cancers of the Breast
This study will provide so many answers to questions that are critical to resolve,” Hwang said. “One of the key features is the assessment of patient-reported outcomes with each approach, as we believe how patients view their disease and their care must be central to any advances in cancer treatment.” The funding award for the DCIS study has been approved pending completion of a business and programmatic review by PCORI staff and issuance of a formal award contract. PHOTO: Shelley Hwang, M.D., Duke Cancer Institute and Duke Department of Surgery. CREDIT: Duke Health. (Source: DukeHealth.org: Duke Health Features)
Source: DukeHealth.org: Duke Health Features - February 4, 2016 Category: Pediatrics Tags: Duke Medicine Source Type: news

MD Anderson shares in $13.4 million award to study treatment for low-grade DCIS
(University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center) Researchers at the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer will share in a funding award of $13.4 million with hopes of answering one of the biggest questions in the current management of breast cancer: do women with the earliest form of the disease, ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS), need invasive surgery? (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - February 2, 2016 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news