Hispanics With HIV Face Higher Risk for HPV-Related Cancer
WEDNESDAY, Oct. 24, 2018 -- HIV-infected Hispanics have an increased risk for human papillomavirus (HPV)-related cancers than Hispanics in the general population, according to a study published online Oct. 22 in Cancer. Ana P. Ortiz, Ph.D., from the... (Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News)
Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News - October 24, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Woman who fought cancer twice as teenager now works at the same hospital she was treated in
Catherine Pointer, 26, is now working as an expert researcher at Southampton General Hospital, where she was treated for leukaemia when she was 14 and 17 years old. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - October 24, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Cancer warning - how your height could reveal your risk of deadly tumours
CANCER symptoms vary depending on which part of the body is affected by a tumour. Your height could reveal whether you ’re at risk of a deadly tumour, it’s been claimed. Are you more likely to get cancer if you’re tall or short? (Source: Daily Express - Health)
Source: Daily Express - Health - October 24, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Millions of women at risk of cervical cancer by missing smear tests
Samme Allen, a business consultant from Kingston, was diagnosed with cervical cancer after putting off a smear test for 10 years. She said she didn't feel the need to 'go to the doctor'. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - October 24, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Medical Bills'Toxic' for Some Breast Cancer Patients
WEDNESDAY, Oct. 24, 2018 -- Many women living with advanced breast cancer face significant financial strains -- from paying for their care to simply covering monthly bills, a new survey finds. Researchers found that of the more than 1,000 women... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - October 24, 2018 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

Q & A with Tamira Moon, 2018 40 Under Forty honoree
Atlanta Business Chronicle  has named our 2018 40 Under Forty honorees. These up-and-comers will be celebrated at an awards event Nov. 8 at the Fox Theatre in Midtown. Here’s a Q&A with one of the honorees, Tamira Moon, program director, Georgia Comprehensive Cancer Control Program: Q: You’ve been selected one of Atlanta Business Chronicle’s 40 Under Forty honorees for 2018. How can other young leaders win similar accolades for their achievements? A: Pursue a career that aligns with your… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines - October 24, 2018 Category: American Health Source Type: news

Bayer, Orion drug shown to delay spread of prostate cancer
German drugmaker Bayer and Finland's Orion said on Wednesday a study showed a prostate cancer drug they are jointly developing can delay the spread of the disease to other parts of the body, boosting Orion's shares. (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - October 24, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news

Largest census of cancer genes to help understand drug targets
Researchers at the Wellcome Sanger Institute have created the first comprehensive summary of all genes known to be involved in human cancer, the "Cancer Gene Census". Describing all genes strongly implicated in causing cancer, the Census also describes how they function across all forms of this disease. Reported in Nature Reviews Cancer, the resource catalogues over 700 genes, to help scientists understand the causes of cancers, find drug targets and design treatments. (Source: World Pharma News)
Source: World Pharma News - October 24, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Tags: Featured Research Research and Development Source Type: news

Tall people at greater risk of cancer 'because they have more cells'
Report suggests link between height and cancer risk could simply be because there are more cells for something to go wrong inTaller people have a greater risk of cancer because they are bigger and so have more cells in their bodies in which dangerous mutations can occur, new research has suggested.A number of studies havepreviously found a link betweena lofty stature and a greater risk of developing some form of cancer, with research suggesting that for every 10cm of height within the typical range for humans, the risk increases by about 10%. A similar link has also been found in dogs, with bigger breeds having a greater r...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - October 24, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Nicola Davis Tags: Cancer research Science Medical research Health Society Source Type: news

Lapatinib (Tykerb)
Title: Lapatinib (Tykerb)Category: MedicationsCreated: 10/24/2018 12:00:00 AMLast Editorial Review: 10/24/2018 12:00:00 AM (Source: MedicineNet Cancer General)
Source: MedicineNet Cancer General - October 24, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

FDA Too Quick to Call BPA Chemical Safe, Health Experts Say
Title: FDA Too Quick to Call BPA Chemical Safe, Health Experts SayCategory: Health NewsCreated: 10/23/2018 12:00:00 AMLast Editorial Review: 10/24/2018 12:00:00 AM (Source: MedicineNet Cancer General)
Source: MedicineNet Cancer General - October 24, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Why Cancer Risk Is Higher in Taller Folk
Title: Why Cancer Risk Is Higher in Taller FolkCategory: Health NewsCreated: 10/23/2018 12:00:00 AMLast Editorial Review: 10/24/2018 12:00:00 AM (Source: MedicineNet Cancer General)
Source: MedicineNet Cancer General - October 24, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Medical Bills 'Toxic' for Some Breast Cancer Patients
Title: Medical Bills 'Toxic' for Some Breast Cancer PatientsCategory: Health NewsCreated: 10/24/2018 12:00:00 AMLast Editorial Review: 10/24/2018 12:00:00 AM (Source: MedicineNet Cancer General)
Source: MedicineNet Cancer General - October 24, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Health Tip: What to Expect From a Breast Biopsy
Title: Health Tip: What to Expect From a Breast BiopsyCategory: Health NewsCreated: 10/24/2018 12:00:00 AMLast Editorial Review: 10/24/2018 12:00:00 AM (Source: MedicineNet Cancer General)
Source: MedicineNet Cancer General - October 24, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

ASTRO: Blood test confirms HPV-related cancer remission
A biomarker blood test can accurately determine if patients with oropharyngeal...Read more on AuntMinnie.comRelated Reading: ASTRO: Prostate RT works better than expected in black men ASTRO: SABR is effective for oligometastatic cancers ASTRO: Weekly breast radiation therapy is safe ASTRO: AI's rad therapy future is in predicting outcomes ASTRO: SBRT works well for less risky prostate cancer (Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines)
Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines - October 24, 2018 Category: Radiology Source Type: news

Phase III trial of darolutamide in patients with non-metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer meets primary endpoint (for specialized target groups only)
The safety and tolerability observed in the trial were consistent with previously published data on darolutamide (Source: Bayer Company News)
Source: Bayer Company News - October 24, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Utah cancer registry receives renewal from National Cancer Institute
(Huntsman Cancer Institute) Huntsman Cancer Institute (HCI) and the University of Utah (U of U) will receive up to $28 million over the next 10 years from the National Cancer Institute (NCI) to continue its participation in the NCI's Surveillance Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) program, if all contract options are exercised. The work is conducted through the Utah Cancer Registry (UCR) at the U of U, in collaboration with the Utah Department of Health. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - October 24, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Suppression of DKK3 protein thwarts pancreatic tumor progression and prolongs survival
(University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center) Researchers at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center have shed new light on why pancreatic tumors are so resistant to therapy. The answer may lie in treating a protein found in the scar-type tissue called stroma which often surrounds the tumors. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - October 24, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Antibiotic explorers
(Harvard University) In clinical trials, tetracycline antibiotics have proven effective in treating some pathological inflammation and cancer. And yet, despite promising results, exactly how the treatment works remained elusive. Now, after much painstaking exploration, we have an answer as well as a new technique to find similar answers numerous other drugs. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - October 24, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

2018 NCRI Cancer Conference
(National Cancer Research Institute) 2018 NCRI Cancer Conference -- the UK's largest cancer conference is only a few weeks away. It will take place from Sunday 4 to Tuesday 6 November in Glasgow, UK. Registration for bona fide journalists is free. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - October 24, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Largest census of cancer genes to help understand drug targets
(Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute) Researchers at the Wellcome Sanger Institute have created the first comprehensive summary of all genes known to be involved in human cancer. Reported in Nature Reviews Cancer, the Cancer Gene Census catalogues over 700 genes, and describes how they function, to help scientists understand the causes of cancers, find drug targets and design treatments. This paves the way for improvements in personalised medicine. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - October 24, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Chemotherapy drug paclitaxel also acts as an immune response modulator
(Funda ç ã o de Amparo à Pesquisa do Estado de S ã o Paulo) By finding that the cancer drug also activates a key cellular receptor in the innate immune system, a study at the Center for Research in Inflammatory Diseases (CRID), in Brazil, may lead to new treatment strategies. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - October 24, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Drug improves survival in metastatic breast cancer
(Northwestern University) The drug palbociclib, used in combination with standard treatment, improved survival for women with hormone receptor-positive metastatic breast cancer, according to a large phase III clinical trial. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - October 24, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Helping blood cells regenerate after radiation therapy
(Massachusetts Institute of Technology) MIT researchers have devised a way to help blood cells regenerate faster, by stimulating a particular type of stem cell to secrete growth factors that help blood cell precursor cells differentiate into mature blood cells. This could help repopulate blood cells in cancer patients who receive bone marrow irradiation. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - October 24, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Data does the heavy lifting: Encouraging new public health approaches to promote the health benefits of muscle-strengthening exercise (MSE)
(Elsevier) According to a new study in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine, almost 75 percent of US adults do not comply with public health guidelines recommending two or more muscle-strengthening exercise (MSE) sessions a week, with nearly 60 percent of the population doing no MSE at all. Using the data from a nationally representative sample of US adults, the investigators also linked low-to-moderately frequent MSE with fewer reported health conditions such as diabetes, obesity, and cancer. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - October 24, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

A flavonoid found in citrus fruits helps keep the heart strong in cancer patients
(Natural News) Rutin is a natural pigment found in fruits and vegetables. A study published in the Journal of Asian Natural Products Research found that this flavonoid can protect the heart from damage caused by chemotherapy, making it a potentially effective means to counter the side effects that cancer patients experience from chemo treatment. The researchers created... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - October 24, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Infographic: Ablation for cancer treatment
Learn more ablation for cancer treatment. Other health tip infographics: mayohealthhighlights.startribune.com? (Source: News from Mayo Clinic)
Source: News from Mayo Clinic - October 24, 2018 Category: Databases & Libraries Source Type: news

Medical Bills 'Toxic' for Some Breast Cancer Patients
(Source: Cancercompass News: Other Cancer)
Source: Cancercompass News: Other Cancer - October 24, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Medical Bills 'Toxic' for Some Breast Cancer Patients
(Source: Cancercompass News: Breast Cancer)
Source: Cancercompass News: Breast Cancer - October 24, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Colorectal cancer on the rise in young adults
Rates of colorectal cancer are rising by 6% per year in young adults Related items fromOnMedica Chemicals in green vegetables show to prevent bowel cancer Many trusts not offering genetic bowel cancer test Long-term antibiotic use linked to heightened risk of colorectal adenomas Developing and using a tool to improve outcomes in colorectal cancer Colorectal cancer risk link to ‘inflammatory’ foods (Source: OnMedica Latest News)
Source: OnMedica Latest News - October 24, 2018 Category: UK Health Source Type: news

A - Fib Patients With Cancer Less Likely to See Cardiologist
Those who do see a cardiologist are more likely to fill anticoagulant Rx; have reduced risk for stroke (Source: The Doctors Lounge - Oncology)
Source: The Doctors Lounge - Oncology - October 24, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: Cardiology, Oncology, Pharmacy, Journal, Source Type: news

Health Tip: What to Expect From a Breast Biopsy
(Source: Cancercompass News: Breast Cancer)
Source: Cancercompass News: Breast Cancer - October 24, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Thermal Ablation Acceptable for Early Lung Cancer
Regarding overall survival, thermal ablation non - inferior to radiation for primary treatment (Source: Pulmonary Medicine News - Doctors Lounge)
Source: Pulmonary Medicine News - Doctors Lounge - October 24, 2018 Category: Respiratory Medicine Tags: Oncology, Pulmonology, Radiology, Journal, Source Type: news

Tall people are 'at greater risk of cancer' as they have more cells in their body
Researchers said that being taller increases the risk of contracting cancer more for women. The findings suggest that having more cells in your body is the reason for the higher cancer risk. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - October 23, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Obesity Associated With Risk of Early-onset CRC in Women
A study published online in JAMA Oncology found a connection between obesity and an increased risk of early-onset colorectal cancer among women younger than age 50. (Source: AAFP News)
Source: AAFP News - October 23, 2018 Category: Primary Care Source Type: news

AstraZeneca expands cancer immunotherapy with Innate deal
The drugmaker is buying a 9.8 percent stake in biotech company Innate Pharma, which is run by former AstraZeneca executive Mondher Mahjoubi (Source: PharmaManufacturing.com)
Source: PharmaManufacturing.com - October 23, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

A Day in the Life of a New York City Community Health Worker
October 23, 2018Rosaura guides her clients through a challenging health system during the most vulnerable moments in their lives.Last week I shadowed Rosaura Polanco, a community health worker in the South Bronx in New York City, where she provides underserved women with health education and essential health services. Having only seen examples of community health workers operating in sub-Saharan Africa, I asked Rosaura what unites them around the world, despite their differing roles and contexts.“Empathy,” she replied. “I practice empathy, for everything, all the time.”Rosaura works forGrameen Prima...
Source: IntraHealth International - October 23, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: mnathe Source Type: news

SLU researcher wins $4.5 million in grants to study side effects of chemo, opioids
A Saint Louis University scientist will use $4.5 million in grant money from the National Institutes of Health for separate studies on the side effects of chemotherapy and those from opioids. Daniela Salvemini, a SLU professor of pharmacology and physiology who focuses on pain research, will use a more than $2.8 million NIH grant to study chemotherapy-induced cognitive impairment (CICI), or so-called "chemo-brain," that can be experienced by cancer patients. CICI is a major neurotoxi c side effect… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - October 23, 2018 Category: Biotechnology Authors: Diana Barr Source Type: news

SLU researcher wins $4.5 million in grants to study side effects of chemo, opioids
A Saint Louis University scientist will use $4.5 million in grant money from the National Institutes of Health for separate studies on the side effects of chemotherapy and those from opioids. Daniela Salvemini, a SLU professor of pharmacology and physiology who focuses on pain research, will use a more than $2.8 million NIH grant to study chemotherapy-induced cognitive impairment (CICI), or so-called "chemo-brain," that can be experienced by cancer patients. CICI is a major neurotoxi c side effect… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines - October 23, 2018 Category: American Health Authors: Diana Barr Source Type: news

SLU researcher wins $4.5 million in grants to study side effects of chemo, opiods
A Saint Louis University scientist will use $4.5 million in grant money from the National Institutes of Health for separate studies on the side effects of chemotherapy and those from opioids. Daniela Salvemini, a SLU professor of pharmacology and physiology who focuses on pain research, will use a more than $2.8 million NIH grant to study chemotherapy-induced cognitive impairment (CICI), or so-called "chemo-brain," that can be experienced by cancer patients. CICI is a major neurotoxi c side effect… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - October 23, 2018 Category: Biotechnology Authors: Diana Barr Source Type: news

SLU researcher wins $4.5 million in grants to study side effects of chemo, opiods
A Saint Louis University scientist will use $4.5 million in grant money from the National Institutes of Health for separate studies on the side effects of chemotherapy and those from opioids. Daniela Salvemini, a SLU professor of pharmacology and physiology who focuses on pain research, will use a more than $2.8 million NIH grant to study chemotherapy-induced cognitive impairment (CICI), or so-called "chemo-brain," that can be experienced by cancer patients. CICI is a major neurotoxi c side effect… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care News Headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care News Headlines - October 23, 2018 Category: Health Management Authors: Diana Barr Source Type: news

Second proton therapy system coming to Barnes Jewish Hospital in early 2020
A new type of medical scanning technology that would provide precise, radiation therapy for cancer patients will be coming to Barnes-Jewish Hospital and Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis in 2020. The technology known as pencil-beam scanning will deliver extremely precise treatments of proton therapy, a type of radiation therapy used to treat cancers of the head, chest, spine and other sensitive areas, as well as pediatric cancers. Siteman Cancer Center is also the home to another… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines - October 23, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Brian Robbins Source Type: news

Second proton therapy system coming to Barnes Jewish Hospital in early 2020
A new type of medical scanning technology that would provide precise, radiation therapy for cancer patients will be coming to Barnes-Jewish Hospital and Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis in 2020. The technology known as pencil-beam scanning will deliver extremely precise treatments of proton therapy, a type of radiation therapy used to treat cancers of the head, chest, spine and other sensitive areas, as well as pediatric cancers. Siteman Cancer Center is also the home to another… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - October 23, 2018 Category: Biotechnology Authors: Brian Robbins Source Type: news

Celery is an underappreciated vegetable: This nutritional superhero targets cancer cells at a molecular level
(Natural News) When you think of disease-fighting foods, celery might not be the first one that comes to mind. Sure, it’s a green vegetable, but it’s one that most of us take for granted. We might use it when making broth, soup or a sauce, but it’s rarely the star of a dish. However, studies... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - October 23, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Thermal Ablation Acceptable for Early Lung Cancer
TUESDAY, Oct. 23, 2018 -- Thermal ablation (TA) is a safe, effective treatment for stage 1 non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), according to a study recently published in Radiology. Johannes Uhlig, M.D., from the Yale School of Medicine in New Haven,... (Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News)
Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News - October 23, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

A-Fib Patients With Cancer Less Likely to See Cardiologist
TUESDAY, Oct. 23, 2018 -- Atrial fibrillation (AF) patients with cancer are less likely to see a cardiologist and fill prescriptions for anticoagulants, according to a study published in the Oct. 16 issue of the Journal of the American College of... (Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News)
Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News - October 23, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

States Act to Safeguard Young Cancer Patients' Chances to Have Children States Act to Safeguard Young Cancer Patients' Chances to Have Children
Some states now require health insurance plans to cover fertility preservation care when medically necessary treatment jeopardizes fertility.Kaiser Health News (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - October 23, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Hematology-Oncology News Source Type: news

Predicting Tumor Patterns Using Ubiquitin Pathway Genes
Professor Han Liang speaks withCancer Network about the ubiquitin pathway and its role in cancer research. (Source: CancerNetwork)
Source: CancerNetwork - October 23, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Bryant Furlow Source Type: news

How Do Cardiovascular Risks Change Over Time in Breast Cancer Survivors?
In this study, researchers evaluated changes in CVD risk factors and 10-year CVD risk from before to after a breast cancer diagnosis, and compared it with women who remained free of such a diagnosis. (Source: CancerNetwork)
Source: CancerNetwork - October 23, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Dave Levitan Source Type: news