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Director of Cancer Services talks new Nash UNC Health Care cancer center
After starting construction roughly a year ago, Nash UNC Health Care has opened its new cancer center in Rocky Mount. (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines - February 5, 2018 Category: American Health Authors: Jennifer Henderson Source Type: news

Bristol-Myers Squibb swings to Q4 loss on tax reform charge
Pharma company sees success in lung cancer treatment study (Source: FT.com - Drugs and Healthcare)
Source: FT.com - Drugs and Healthcare - February 5, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Tessa Therapeutics Announces Opening of Recruitment Sites Across the United States for its Phase III Nasopharyngeal Cancer Immunotherapy Trial
With the Stanford Cancer Institute joining as a clinical trial partner, Tessa's Phase III trial for nose cancer (nasopharyngeal cancer) is now widely accessible across multiple locations in the U.S. The therapy is based on Tessa's Virus-Specific T cell ... Biopharmaceuticals, Oncology Tessa Therapeutics, nasopharyngeal cancer, T cell immunotherapy (Source: HSMN NewsFeed)
Source: HSMN NewsFeed - February 5, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Cellphones Pose Little Cancer Risk, Studies Suggest
MONDAY, Feb. 5, 2018 -- Your odds for getting cancer from your cellphone are slim -- but U.S. government researchers report that they can't completely rule out the possibility. Two new studies conducted by the National Toxicology Program (NTP)... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - February 5, 2018 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

Melanoma Rates Rising for Boomers, Falling Among Young
MONDAY, Feb. 5, 2018 -- It looks like public health efforts to warn younger Americans about the dangers of tanning beds and sun exposure are paying off. Rates of the deadly skin cancer known as melanoma have dropped among Americans aged 15 to 44, a... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - February 5, 2018 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

The association of sense of coherence and supernatural beliefs with death anxiety and death depression among Romanian cancer patients - Roxana P, Violeta E, Ion D, Iuliana P, Doina A.
The aim of this cross-sectional study was to examine the association of supernatural beliefs and sense of coherence with death anxiety and death depression in a Romanian sample of cancer patients. We found support for the TMT worldview defence hypothesis p... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - February 5, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Social Etiologies and Disparities Source Type: news

Don't know responses to cognitive and affective risk perception measures: exploring prevalence and socio-demographic moderators - Janssen E, Verduyn P, Waters EA.
OBJECTIVES: Many people report uncertainty when appraising their risk of cancer and other diseases, but prior research about the topic has focused solely on cognitive risk perceptions. We investigated uncertainty related to cognitive and affective risk que... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - February 5, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Research Methods, Surveillance and Codes, Models Source Type: news

Tanzania:Doc Explains Colorectal Is a Worrisome Health Issue
[Daily News] WHILE national records cite cervical cancer as the second most troublesome disease in Tanzania behind breast cancer, the Aga Khan hospital has slotted colorectal cancer in the position. (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - February 5, 2018 Category: African Health Source Type: news

Nigeria:Of Cancer Control and Access to Treatment!
[Guardian] It is my view, as we mark this 2018, World Cancer Day, that 'The first step in addressing cancer's global impact will be to recognize that the disease affects people living in all countries, under all economic conditions.' This statement is a global reality, and must be addressed by all and efforts should be put in place to work towards realising "a world where cancer is prevented or cured and every survivor is healthy." (ASCO's vision)! "Cancer's death toll is high worldwide, but the burden is tilted more (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - February 5, 2018 Category: African Health Source Type: news

Could Your Colonoscopy Raise Your Risk for Appendicitis?
MONDAY, Feb. 5, 2018 -- A colonoscopy can save your life by detecting and removing colon cancer, but it might also trigger appendicitis, a new study suggests. Experts aren't sure exactly why that happens, and, fortunately, it's rare. And it... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - February 5, 2018 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

Nigeria:Govt Plans Nationwide Screening for Cancers
[Vanguard] Abuja -THE Minister of Health, Prof. Isaac Adewole, yesterday, said the Federal Government had concluded plans to roll out nationwide screening for most common types of cancers. (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - February 5, 2018 Category: African Health Source Type: news

Facebook head in Europe has incurable blood cancer
British tech executive Nicola Mendelsohn, 46, explained how she was diagnosed with  follicular lymphoma after finding a lump in her groin. She is calling for more research into the blood cancer. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - February 5, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Prostate cancer victims still dying of embarrassment
Men are still dying of prostate cancer because they are too embarrassed to visit a doctor, a study of patients in England has revealed. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - February 5, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Kate Winslet saved my life: Brave mother delayed cancer treatment to save unborn daughter
A MOTHER who delayed crucial cancer treatment to have her baby is free of the disease after film stars Leonardo DiCaprio and Kate Winslet helped raise cash for her treatment. Gemma Nuttall, 29, was told she had an aggressive ovarian cancer after her first pre-natal scan, but she refused life-saving treatment as it would have killed her unborn child. (Source: Daily Express - Health)
Source: Daily Express - Health - February 5, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Exercise May Help Lung Cancer Surgery Go More Smoothly
Title: Exercise May Help Lung Cancer Surgery Go More SmoothlyCategory: Health NewsCreated: 2/2/2018 12:00:00 AMLast Editorial Review: 2/5/2018 12:00:00 AM (Source: MedicineNet Cancer General)
Source: MedicineNet Cancer General - February 5, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Pancreatic Cancer vs Pancreatitis Symptoms Signs
Pancreatic Cancer vs. Pancreatitis Symptoms and Signs (Source: eMedicineHealth.com)
Source: eMedicineHealth.com - February 5, 2018 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

Is the mammography debate an example of 'fake science'?
In today's world of "fake news" and "alternative facts," is the debate over...Read more on AuntMinnie.comRelated Reading: What are the risks of risk-based breast cancer screening? Women overestimate breast cancer risk, prefer biopsy USPSTF's breast cancer screening recs dampen compliance Most women prefer annual breast cancer screening Women still value mammography's benefits over 'harms' (Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines)
Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines - February 5, 2018 Category: Radiology Source Type: news

Nigeria:Nigeria Plans Nationwide Screening of Citizens for Cancer
[Premium Times] The Minister of Health, Isaac Adewole, on Sunday said the Federal Government has concluded plans to roll out nationwide screening for most common types of cancer. (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - February 5, 2018 Category: African Health Source Type: news

Drinking hot tea associated with a 5-fold increased risk for esophageal cancer
(American College of Physicians) Consuming hot tea at high temperatures is associated with an increased risk for esophageal cancer in those who also drink alcohol and smoke cigarettes. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - February 5, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Adding crizotinib to radiation therapy may help preserve hearing in patients with NF2
(Massachusetts General Hospital) A Massachusetts General Hospital research team reports that the use of crizotinib to block a specific molecular pathway both enhanced the radiosensitivity of tumors in mouse models of NF2, allowing a reduction in radiation dosage, and inhibited the growth of cultured tumor cells from NF2 patients. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - February 5, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Aging immune system may explain age-related cancer risk increase
(University of Dundee) Study published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences suggests aging immune system plays a larger role in cancer incidence than previously thought. Findings may explain higher likelihood of men developing cancer than women. This epidemiological research could have major implications for global fight against cancer if borne out by further studies. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - February 5, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Damon Runyon Cancer Research Foundation grants fellowship, breakthrough scientist awards
(Damon Runyon Cancer Research Foundation) The Damon Runyon Cancer Research Foundation, a non-profit organization focused on supporting innovative early career researchers, named 15 new Damon Runyon Fellows at its fall Fellowship Award Committee review. The recipients of this prestigious, four-year award are outstanding postdoctoral scientists conducting basic and translational cancer research in the laboratories of leading senior investigators across the country. The Committee also named six new recipients of the Damon Runyon-Dale F. Frey Award for Breakthrough Scientists. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - February 5, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Farm sunshine, not cancer: Replacing tobacco fields with solar arrays
(Michigan Technological University) Michigan Tech researchers contend that tobacco farmers could increase profits by converting their land to solar farms, which in turn provides renewable energy generation. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 5, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Scientists target glioma cancer stem cells, which could improve patient survival
(Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center) Brain tumors are responsible for 25 percent of cancer-related deaths in children and young adults. Despite initial response to treatment, most aggressive brain tumors eventually recur and are ultimately incurable. Multiple studies suggest that cancer stem cells within these tumors resist therapy and are responsible for tumor recurrences. Researchers at Dartmouth's Norris Cotton Cancer Center have devised a strategy to treat these tumors by identifying a secretion-mediated pathway that's essential for maintaining glioma cancer stem cells. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 5, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Moffitt researchers identify new target to reduce risk of GVHD
(H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center& Research Institute) Moffitt Cancer Center researchers are trying to identify new drug targets to reduce the risk of GVHD. Their new study, published last week in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, shows a drug that targets the protein JAK2 may reduce the risk of GVHD. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 5, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

PSMA PET/CT clearly differentiates prostate cancer from benign tissue
(Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging) Using nuclear medicine, German researchers have found a way to accurately differentiate cancerous tissue from healthy tissue in prostate cancer patients. The research is highlighted in the February issue of The Journal of Nuclear Medicine and demonstrates that the maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax) on 68Ga-PSMA PET/CT scans correlates with PSMA-expression in primary prostate cancer. By this means, researchers were able to generate an SUVmax cutoff for the differentiation of cancerous and benign prostate tissue. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 5, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Loved one's death could spur aggressive measures against breast cancer
(Ohio State University) A woman's memories of a loved one's experience with cancer could play a significant role in how she approaches breast cancer prevention in her own life, a new study has found. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 5, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Opioid cessation may be more successful when depression is treated
(Saint Louis University) Opioid cessation in non-cancer pain may be more successful when depression is treated to remission, a Saint Louis University study shows. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 5, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Health indicators for newborns of breast cancer survivors may vary by cancer type
(UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center) In a study published in the International Journal of Cancer, researchers from the UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center analyzed health indicators for children born to young breast cancer survivors in North Carolina. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 5, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

UA Cancer Center team targets tumor suppressor to treat 'triple-negative' breast cancer
(University of Arizona Health Sciences) A team led by UA Cancer Center researchers Agnieszka Witkiewicz, MD, and Erik Knudsen, PhD, screened for drugs that could target triple-negative breast cancer tumors, producing several new therapeutic candidates for this difficult-to-treat cancer. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 5, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Experts on what needs to be done on prostate cancer
The UK's top experts on prostate cancer, including surgery specialist Professor Roger Kirby, lay out what needs to be done to tackle the disease, which claims 11,819 lives in Britain every year. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - February 5, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Melanoma Rates Rising for Boomers, Falling Among Young
(Source: Cancercompass News: Other Cancer)
Source: Cancercompass News: Other Cancer - February 5, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Could Your Colonoscopy Raise Your Risk for Appendicitis?
(Source: Cancercompass News: Colorectal Cancer)
Source: Cancercompass News: Colorectal Cancer - February 5, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Mediterranean diet linked with lower risk of prostate cancer
(Natural News) A study carried out by a team of scientists from Spain discovered that following a Mediterranean diet lowers the risk of developing prostate cancer. In the study, they analyzed the association of Mediterranean dietary patterns with prostate cancer risk. In conducting the study, the research team used the data from the Multicase-Control Study... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - February 4, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

In The U.S. Virgin Islands, Health Care Remains In A Critical State
In September, two Category 5 hurricanes devastated the region. Now, its hospitals can no longer provide major surgery, cancer treatment or specialized care, forcing daily staff cuts and revenue loss.(Image credit: Greg Allen/NPR) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - February 4, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Greg Allen Source Type: news

Alarming study finds 90% of store receipts contain toxic chemicals that promote diseases such as autism, cancer, diabetes and obesity
(Natural News) You might want to skip the receipt the next time you buy something. According to a recent study, over “90 percent of receipts contain chemicals linked to infertility, autism and type-2 diabetes.” Dubbed the “gender-bending” chemical, Bisphenol A (BPA) and the “healthier alternative” called Bisphenol S (BPS) are used on 93 percent of... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - February 4, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Ribosomes found to induce somatic cell pluripotency
(Kumamoto University) In 2012, a Japanese research group discovered that human skin cells acquire pluripotency when introduced to lactic acid bacteria (Lactobacillus acidophilus). Now, the same group of researchers have found that the cause of somatic cell conversion into pluripotent stem cells is the ribosome, a protein synthesizing cellular organelle. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - February 4, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Old drug may have new tricks for fighting cancer
(Arizona State University) Results show that the drug ibrutinib acts as a potent kinase inhibitor for ERBB4, limits growth in human cancer cells in the laboratory, and reduces tumor size in mice. The sensitivity of ERBB4 to ibrutinib is similar to that of BTK, the original target of the drug. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 4, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

So men are dying because they don ’t have women’s brains? Show me the evidence
Mortality rates for prostate cancer are rising, but not because of any neurological determinismIt is the crossover moment. For the first time, more men are dying of prostate cancer than women are from breast cancer. Any GP surgery will offer a blood test to check a man ’s prostate-specific antigen (PSA) indicating cancer. All men have to do is ask.The trouble is that, as we all know, men are from Mars. They don ’t go to GPs, don’t talk about illness and believe in their own invincibility. Men with their compartmentalised brains are inherently greater risk-takers and believe they will beat the odds. In any...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - February 4, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Will Hutton Tags: Neuroscience Gender World news Women UK news Cancer Health Society Cancer research Medical research Life and style Feminism Source Type: news

The 'pre-hab' gym classes for cancer patients
The initiative is part of a £200 million NHS England strategy to transform cancer care and comes after research at Southampton University saw bowel-cancer patients benefit from exercise. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - February 3, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

The DNA database that is key to beating our rarest diseases
The future now holds hope for children like Sam Ward, and doctors say many other people are set to benefitJillian Hastings Ward gave birth to her second child, Sam, almost four years ago. For the first few months of his life, the boy appeared to be in good health. “Then we realised that he was not making proper visual contact, and discovered he was blind,” Hastings Ward recalls. Subsequent diagnosis also revealed that Sam was not progressing intellectually. “His brain just couldn’t join the dots,” she says. Today Sam has the mental development of a six-month-old child.At the time of his diagno...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - February 3, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Robin McKie Observer science editor Tags: Genetics Biology Science UK news Source Type: news

Active Surveillance OK For Non-Muscle Invasive Bladder Cancer (CME/CE)
(MedPage Today) -- Select patients with low risk of progression can avoid repeat surgeries (Source: MedPage Today Hematology/Oncology)
Source: MedPage Today Hematology/Oncology - February 3, 2018 Category: Hematology Source Type: news

Tatas to begin 17 cancer care centres across Assam from 2019
The group will sign a Memorandum of Understanding during the ongoing 'Advantage Assam' summit with the state government. (Source: The Economic Times)
Source: The Economic Times - February 3, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Tatas to begin 17 cancer care cantres across Assam from 2019
The group will sign a Memorandum of Understanding during the ongoing 'Advantage Assam' summit with the state government. (Source: The Economic Times)
Source: The Economic Times - February 3, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Epigenetics holds key to link between obesity and colorectal cancer
In a new study, cells in the guts of obese mice showed epigenetic changes that may promote colorectal cancer. (read more) (Source: Environmental Factor - NIEHS Newsletter)
Source: Environmental Factor - NIEHS Newsletter - February 3, 2018 Category: Environmental Health Source Type: news

Cancer Risk From Cellphone Radiation Is Small, Studies Show
Extensive research on rats and mice suggest that there is a minimal chance of getting cancer. But the case isn ’ t closed yet. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - February 3, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: DENISE GRADY Tags: Radiation Tumors Cellular Telephones Rats National Toxicology Program Food and Drug Administration Source Type: news

Cancer from cellphones? New studies say no need to hang up
Scientists say they could not find hard evidence for concern about brain tumors linked to cellphone radiation (Source: Health News: CBSNews.com)
Source: Health News: CBSNews.com - February 3, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Exercise May Help Lung Cancer Surgery Go More Smoothly
(Source: Cancercompass News: Other Cancer)
Source: Cancercompass News: Other Cancer - February 3, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Cellphones Are Still Safe for Humans, Researchers Say
New studies on rats and mice suggest that if there is any cancer risk from cellphones, it is small. But the case isn ’ t closed yet. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - February 2, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: DENISE GRADY Tags: Radiation Tumors Cellular Telephones Rats National Toxicology Program Food and Drug Administration Source Type: news

'You could feel it in your veins, like how cold it was': Using paint and selfies to cope with chemo
After being diagnosed with Stage III breast cancer when she was just 24, Lauren Sylliboy said the enormity of her illness didn't hit her right away. But exactly 14 days after her first chemotherapy treatment, that changed. Her hair started falling out and Sylliboy said she looked in the mirror and realized her illness was showing. (Source: CBC | Health)
Source: CBC | Health - February 2, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Radio/Unreserved Source Type: news