Delayed Initial Radioiodine Therapy in Thyroid Cancer Delayed Initial Radioiodine Therapy in Thyroid Cancer
The initiating time of radioiodine therapy in differentiated thyroid cancer may impact the individual response to therapy.Clinical Endocrinology (Source: Medscape Today Headlines)
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - May 14, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Diabetes & Endocrinology Journal Article Source Type: news

Researchers identify the most accurate risk prediction models for selecting whom to screen
(American College of Physicians) Four risk prediction models have been shown to be most accurate for selecting the highest risk ever-smokers for lung cancer screening. Researchers suggest that this data can be used to inform future lung cancer screening guidelines. The findings are published in Annals of Internal Medicine. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - May 14, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

'Universal antibodies' disarm various pathogens
(German Cancer Research Center (Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum, DKFZ)) Scientists from the German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ) have been studying how the immune system succeeds in keeping pathogens in check. For the first time, the researchers have now discovered antibodies that are capable of disarming not only one specific bacterium but a whole variety of microorganisms at once. The newly discovered antibodies recognize a tiny sugar structure found on the surface of various germs. Thus, a limited number of antibodies is sufficient to control a wide variety of microorganisms. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 14, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Study hints at new target to improve immune therapy in triple-negative breast cancer
(University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus) University of Colorado Cancer Center study shows that Eya3 may regulate the immune response to a tumor, implying that anti-Eya3 therapies may improve checkpoint inhibitors against triple-negative breast cancer. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - May 14, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Deadly cancers show early, detectable differences from benign tumors
(Duke University Medical Center) Do metastatic cancer tumors 'break bad' or are they 'born bad'? In a study publishing the week of May 14 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, researchers found that in the colorectal tumors they examined, invasive cancers are born to be bad, and this tendency can potentially be identified at early diagnosis. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - May 14, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy in long-term survivors of childhood cancer
(JAMA Network) A new study assesses chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy in 121 long-term survivors of childhood cancer to detail clinical, functional, neurophysiological and patient-reported outcomes of the condition. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - May 14, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Study picks out children with incurable brain cancer who could benefit from adult therapy
(Institute of Cancer Research) Children with incurable brain tumors could benefit from potentially life-extending treatment if genetic testing was used to personalize therapy as it is in many adults, major new research reports.Scientists analyzed the DNA of children taking an adult cancer drug on a clinical trial deemed to have 'failed,' and found that many with particular genetic traits had actually responded well to treatment.Some of these children survived more than a year longer than others on the trial. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - May 14, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

New approach to cancer research aims to accelerate studies and reduce cost
(University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center) A new model for improving how clinical trials are developed and conducted by bringing together academic cancer experts and pharmaceutical companies is being tested by research experts at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - May 14, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Better equipped in the fight against lung cancer
(University of Erlangen-Nuremberg) Lung cancer is the third most common type of cancer in Germany and the disease affects both men and women. However, immunotherapies are successful in only 20 percent of cases. Researchers at Friedrich-Alexander-Universit ä t Erlangen-N ü rnberg (FAU) have now discovered a special mechanism that regulates tumour growth in lung cancer. This opens up new possibilities in the treatment of lung cancer patients. The results were published in the journal Oncoimmunology. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - May 14, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Nanomedicine -- Targeting cancer cells with sugars
(Ludwig-Maximilians-Universit ä t M ü nchen) Globally, cancer is the second leading cause of death, also because the efficiency of chemotherapeutics is inadequate due to poor delivery to the tumor. Professor Olivia Merkel and her team develop targeted nanocarrier systems to increase the delivery rates of therapeutic formulations and their specific uptake into the target cells. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - May 14, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

University of Alberta cyclotron could supply province's demand for medical isotopes
(University of Alberta Faculty of Medicine& Dentistry) University of Alberta scientists have taken a critical step towards supplying Alberta's demand for medical isotopes. Their newly published findings could have major implications for other health jurisdictions across North America as well.Researchers at the university's Medical Isotope and Cyclotron Facility used a particle accelerator known as a cyclotron to produce enough isotopes for up to 1,000 diagnostic procedures in a day. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - May 14, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

First description of mEAK-7 gene could suggest path toward therapies for cancer
(University of California - Los Angeles) UCLA-led study has characterized the mechanism of the human equivalent of the gene, EAK-7, that plays a role in determining how long worms will live. Researchers are calling it mammalian EAK-7, or mEAK-7, and have shown that it regulates the process that dictates cell growth and human development. Findings could lead to new therapies that would work by slowing or blocking mEAK-7's process, which could control the spread and growth of cells responsible for diseases. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - May 14, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Scientists find missing factor in gene activation
(University of California - San Diego) Scientists have unraveled a mystery on how genes are activated. Human genes are blocked by structures known as nucleosomes, components that package DNA inside cells. How do these roadblocks clear out to allow genes to be turned on? Scientists have identified a key factor that unravels nucleosomes and clears the way for gene activation. They say the finding is useful in understanding diseases such as cancer, which can be caused by improper gene activity. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - May 14, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

UTA researcher patents 'roach motel' for cancer
(University of Texas at Arlington) The University of Texas at Arlington has successfully patented in Europe an implantable medical device that attracts and kills circulating cancer cells that was invented by a faculty member. This cancer trap can be used for early diagnosis and treatment of metastasized cancer. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 14, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

New 'Scoring' System for Advanced Colorectal Cancer
(Johns Hopkins Medicine) Georgios Margonis, M.D., Ph.D., a surgical oncology fellow at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, and Matthew Weiss, M.D., surgical director of the Johns Hopkins Liver and Pancreas Cancer Multidisciplinary Clinics, report advances in efforts to improve the treatment and prognosis of colorectal cancers that have spread to the liver. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 14, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Rhino horn used to comfort the terminally ill in Vietnam
(Faculty of Science - University of Copenhagen) From treating cancer and erectile dysfunction to managing hangovers, the horns of endangered wild rhinoceros are widely used as a medical cure-all in parts of Asia. A new Danish-Vietnamese study from the University of Copenhagen uncovers new reasons for why Vietnamese consumers buy illegal rhino horn. This knowledge can now be used in campaigns to save endangered rhinoceros. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 14, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Researchers uncover up to 100 potential drug targets for cancer
(University of Copenhagen The Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences) In a new study based on mouse cells internationally leading protein researchers have identified several new potential targets using state-of-the-art technology, many of which could be employed for future treatment of different types of cancers and diseases. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 14, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New computational strategy designed for more personalized cancer treatment
(Johns Hopkins University) Mathematicians and cancer scientists have found a way to simplify complex biomolecular data about tumors, in principle making it easier to prescribe the appropriate treatment for a specific patient. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 14, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Elastic microspheres expand understanding of embryonic development and cancer cells
(University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign) A new technique that uses tiny elastic balls filled with fluorescent nanoparticles aims to expand the understanding of the mechanical forces that exist between cells, researchers report. A University of Illinois-led team has demonstrated the quantification of 3D forces within cells living in petri dishes as well as live specimens. This research may unlock some of the mysteries related to embryonic development and cancer stem cells, i.e., tumor-repopulating cells. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - May 14, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

What financial markets, cancer cells, and global warming have in common
(University of Erlangen-Nuremberg) A team of biophysicists from Friedrich-Alexander-Universit ä t Erlangen-N ü rnberg (FAU) presents a mathematically concise method for comparing different pricing models in their latest publication in Nature Communications. This enables researchers to predict more accurately how parameters such as the volatility of stock prices change over time. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 14, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Tumor-like spheres help scientists discover smarter cancer drugs
(Scripps Research Institute) The technique makes use of tiny, three-dimensional ball-like aggregates of cells called spheroids. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 14, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Duane A. Mitchell, M.D., Ph.D., World-Renowned Immunotherapy Expert to...
Director of the University of Florida Brain Tumor Immunotherapy Program will share his unique perspective on the role of immunotherapy in treating brain cancer(PRWeb May 14, 2018)Read the full story at https://www.prweb.com/releases/2018/05/prweb15484641.htm (Source: PRWeb: Medical Pharmaceuticals)
Source: PRWeb: Medical Pharmaceuticals - May 14, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

University of Colorado Cancer Center Study Hints at New Target to...
Eya3 inhibition could be an attractive strategy to increase effectiveness of anti-PD-L1 immunotherapies against triple-negative breast cancer.(PRWeb May 14, 2018)Read the full story at https://www.prweb.com/releases/2018/05/prweb15477653.htm (Source: PRWeb: Medical Pharmaceuticals)
Source: PRWeb: Medical Pharmaceuticals - May 14, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

University of Colorado Cancer Center Study Hints at New Target to...
Eya3 inhibition could be an attractive strategy to increase effectiveness of anti-PD-L1 immunotherapies against triple-negative breast cancer.(PRWeb May 14, 2018)Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2018/05/prweb15477653.htm (Source: PRWeb: Medical Pharmaceuticals)
Source: PRWeb: Medical Pharmaceuticals - May 14, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Duane A. Mitchell, M.D., Ph.D., World-Renowned Immunotherapy Expert to...
Director of the University of Florida Brain Tumor Immunotherapy Program will share his unique perspective on the role of immunotherapy in treating brain cancer(PRWeb May 14, 2018)Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2018/05/prweb15484641.htm (Source: PRWeb: Medical Pharmaceuticals)
Source: PRWeb: Medical Pharmaceuticals - May 14, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Getting Off Biopsy Train in Prostate Cancer
(MedPage Today) -- MRI may replace tissue sampling for many patients; some Gleason 7s may only need watching (Source: MedPage Today Hematology/Oncology)
Source: MedPage Today Hematology/Oncology - May 13, 2018 Category: Hematology Source Type: news

CVD Risk Elevated in Endometrial Ca Survivors (CME/CE)
(MedPage Today) -- Call for careful monitoring, risk management for up to 10 years after cancer diagnosis (Source: MedPage Today Cardiovascular)
Source: MedPage Today Cardiovascular - May 13, 2018 Category: Cardiology Source Type: news

Brain cancer to get more funding in tribute to Tessa Jowell, says No 10
Research funding will double to £40m and all NHS hospitals will perform gold standard tumour diagnosis testsBrain cancer research will have its government funding doubled to £40m and gold standard tumour diagnosis tests will be rolled out to all NHS hospitals, in tribute toDame Tessa Jowell, Downing Street announced on Sunday.No 10 announced it would fulfil two key campaign aims of the late former Labour cabinet minister, including a national rollout of a brain cancer diagnosis test, gold standard dye, used to identify tumours.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - May 13, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Jessica Elgot Tags: Cancer research Medical research Science Tessa Jowell Politics NHS Hospitals Labour Theresa May Jeremy Hunt Health policy Conservatives UK news Source Type: news

Tap water in Fayetteville, North Carolina tainted with carcinogen, new analysis reveals
(Natural News) The good news for Fayetteville, North Carolina is that there is no GenX in their public drinking water supply despite the nearby presence of the Chemours chemical plant. The bad news is that their tap water showed high levels of another cancer-causing chemical called 1,4-dioxane, an article in The Fayetteville Observer stated. The... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - May 13, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Politicians pay tribute to Tessa Jowell after death from cancer
Former Labour cabinet minister praised for Sure Start, London Olympics and campaigning for cancer researchThe dignity and courage of Tessa Jowell was praised by politicians across the spectrum on Sunday, after her family revealed she had died of brain cancer.Paying tribute to Jowell, Downing Street announced it would double its investment in brain cancer research to £40m and roll out a new gold standard of tests for brain cancer to all NHS hospitals, a key focus of Jowell’s campaigning in the last months of her life.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - May 13, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Jessica Elgot Tags: Tessa Jowell Labour Cancer Cancer research Politics UK news Science Source Type: news

Your body might thank you for that (one) glass of red … says DR MICHAEL MOSLEY
A new study last week concluded that drinking a glass of red wine a night reduces the risk of developing prostate cancer by about 12 per cent. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - May 13, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

The 'people politician': Tessa Jowell obituary
Former Labour cabinet minister, described as ‘the ultimate sensible loyalist’ by Tony Blair, was not afraid to speak her mindUntil the revelation of her brain tumour last September, Tessa Jowell, Lady Jowell, the former secretary of state for culture, media and sport, who has died aged 70, was best known outside Westminster as the minister for the Olympics in the run-up to the hugely successful London games in 2012. It was directly as a result of her enthusiasm and personal pressure on the then prime minister, Tony Blair, that the UK first mounted its bid and then subsequently won the competition to stage the e...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - May 13, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Julia Langdon Tags: Tessa Jowell Politics Cancer Cancer research Health Medical research Science Society Labour Source Type: news

Medical News Today: What to know about multinodular goiter
A multinodular goiter is an enlarged thyroid gland with several nodules. It may not cause any symptoms, but a large goiter can cause difficulty breathing or swallowing or be related to hyperthyroidism. Learn more about the symptoms, causes, and treatments for multinodular goiter, and its relation to cancer here. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - May 13, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Endocrinology Source Type: news

Shield Your Kids From the Sun's Damaging Rays
SUNDAY, May 13, 2018 -- Sun damage puts children and teens at risk for deadly melanoma, so parents need to protect their youngsters from the sun and teach them about sun safety, oncologists say. " Don't assume children cannot get skin cancer because... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - May 13, 2018 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

Kenya:Kericho Signs Agreement to Set Up Cancer Centre
[Nation] Plans by Kericho County government to set up a cancer centre in the region has begun after the devolved unit signed an agreement with a Belgium firm on Friday. (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - May 13, 2018 Category: African Health Source Type: news

Bowel cancer warning - how often should you poo for a healthy gut?
BOWEL cancer symptoms can include stomach pain, a change in bowel habits, and finding blood in your stool. But, does how often you poo or use the toilet reveal if you ’re at risk? This is how often a ‘healthy’ person poos. (Source: Daily Express - Health)
Source: Daily Express - Health - May 13, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Shield Your Kids From the Sun's Damaging Rays
(Source: Cancercompass News: Other Cancer)
Source: Cancercompass News: Other Cancer - May 13, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Zika and Screening; MRI for Biopsy: It's PodMed Double T! (with audio)
(MedPage Today) -- This week's topics include crowdfunding for stem cell therapies, USPSTF recommendations for prostate cancer screening, MRI guided biopsy of the prostate, and testing blood for Zika virus (Source: MedPage Today Public Health)
Source: MedPage Today Public Health - May 12, 2018 Category: American Health Source Type: news

Michael Pollan: ‘I was a very reluctant psychonaut’
The bestselling author and activist has been exploring the use of psychedelic drugs in medical research for his book How to Change Your Mind. And yes, he had to try them for himselfMichael Pollan first became interested in new research into psychedelic drugs in 2010, when a front-page story in theNew York Timesdeclared, “Hallucinogens Have Doctors Tuning in Again”. The story revealed how in a large-scale trial researchers had been giving terminally ill cancer patients large doses of psilocybin – the active ingredient in magic mushrooms – to help them deal with their “existential distress&rdquo...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - May 12, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Tim Adams Tags: Drugs Medical research Psychology Health, mind and body books Science Society Source Type: news

Ireland's leader apologizes for cervical cancer scandal
Ireland's prime minister has apologized and pledged an investigation into the controversy over inaccurate cervical cancer screening tests (Source: ABC News: Health)
Source: ABC News: Health - May 12, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Health Source Type: news

Pancreatic cancer: Weight loss and combating diabetes can reduce your risk
PANCREATIC cancer symptoms include stomach and back pain, nausea and blood clots. For diabetes type 2 sufferers, they are at greater risk of developing the condition owing to their symptoms. You should do this to lower your risk. (Source: Daily Express - Health)
Source: Daily Express - Health - May 12, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

USPSTF Recommends That PSA Screening Be an Individual Decision
The US Preventive Services Task Force issued a final recommendation on prostate cancer screening, including that men aged 55 to 69 years should make an individual decision on whether or not to be screened. (Source: CancerNetwork)
Source: CancerNetwork - May 11, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Dave Levitan Tags: Genitourinary Cancers SiteTerms/www.cannabissciencetech.com/News Prostate Cancer Source Type: news

Setback to Roche Hopes for Tecentriq as Fails Key Cancer Trial Setback to Roche Hopes for Tecentriq as Fails Key Cancer Trial
Roche's hopes of its Tecentriq (atezolizumab) immunotherapy catching rival medicines from Merck and Bristol-Myers Squibb were dealt a blow on Thursday after it failed a key combination trial.Reuters Health Information (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - May 11, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Medscape Today News Source Type: news

Potential Role for Vaccines, Checkpoint Inhibitors in Chemoprevention of Lynch Syndrome
Researchers from MD Anderson say their study results " open the field of immunoprevention in LS to checkpoint inhibitors as an immune interception strategy. " (Source: CancerNetwork)
Source: CancerNetwork - May 11, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Leah Lawrence Tags: Colorectal Cancer Gastrointestinal Cancer News Source Type: news

CRC Polyps May Allow for Immune Checkpoint Inhibitors in Premalignant Lesions
Colorectal carcinomas in LS patients appear in background of mismatch repair (MMR) deficiency, show a unique immune profile, and response to immunotherapy. (Source: CancerNetwork)
Source: CancerNetwork - May 11, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Leah Lawrence Tags: Colorectal Cancer Gastrointestinal Cancer News Source Type: news

Many cancer docs OK medical pot despite lack of studies
Most oncologists say they don't know enough about medical marijuana to provide an informed opinion to patients, but many still give it their blessing, a new survey reveals (Source: Health News: CBSNews.com)
Source: Health News: CBSNews.com - May 11, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Marriage may be good for catching melanoma early
(Reuters Health) - Married people may be more likely to spot a deadly skin cancer sooner than their counterparts who aren't part of a couple, a U.S. study of melanoma patients suggests. (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - May 11, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news

Personalize Decisions on PSA Screening for Men Ages 55-69
On May 8, the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force posted its new final recommendation statement and three final evidence reviews on screening for prostate cancer, advising individual screening for men ages 55-69 and no screening for those who are older. (Source: AAFP News)
Source: AAFP News - May 11, 2018 Category: Primary Care Source Type: news

UCLA faculty voice: A hangover pill? Tests on drunk mice show promise
UCLAYunfeng LuYunfeng Lu is a professor of chemical and biomolecular engineering in the UCLA Samueli School of Engineerg.  Thiscolumn appeared in the Conversation.“Civilization begins with distillation,” said William Faulkner, a writer and drinker. Although ourthirst for alcohol dates back to the Stone Age, nobody has figured out a good way to deal with the ensuing hangover after getting drunk.As a chemical engineering professor and wine enthusiast, I felt I needed to find a solution. As frivolous as this project may sound, it has serious implications. Between 8 and10 percent of emergency room visits in Am...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - May 11, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Uric Acid: Both High and Low are Hazardous
(MedPage Today) -- Increased risks of all-cause, cardiovascular, and cancer mortality (Source: MedPage Today Cardiovascular)
Source: MedPage Today Cardiovascular - May 11, 2018 Category: Cardiology Source Type: news