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Quantifying Nuclear DNA Mutation Rates in Stem Cells Doesn't Tell Us the Degree to which those Mutations Contribute to Aging
The study noted here provides numbers for the mutation rates in muscle stem cells, the stochastic damage that occurs over time as small numbers of errors slip past the highly efficient molecular machinery of cellular replication and DNA repair. The researchers used single cell genomic sequencing, a very useful and still comparatively new capability. It produces a much more detailed view of the state of nuclear DNA inside a cell population, showing the enormous variations in stochastic mutational damage that takes place over the years. Every cell has thousands of different areas of damage in their DNA, and it is becoming ap...
Source: Fight Aging! - February 24, 2018 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Medicine, Biotech, Research Source Type: blogs

TET2 Overexpression Enhances Neurogenesis and Cognitive Function in Old Mice
Heterochronic parabiosis is the process of linking the circulatory systems of an old and young animal. It improves measures of aging in the older individual, and worsens measures of aging in the younger individual. Researchers use this technique to try to pinpoint the important signaling and other cell behavior changes that take place with advancing age. This isn't just a matter of looking at signals in the bloodstream, however. Researchers can analyze any of the changing gene expression patterns and biochemical relationships inside cells, as they respond to the altered environment. That is the case in the open access pape...
Source: Fight Aging! - February 23, 2018 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Medicine, Biotech, Research Source Type: blogs

A physician sees end-of-life care through a religious lens
In my second year of residency, I was on the hematology/oncology service where we were taking care of a pleasant lady in her 80s who was admitted with pancreatic cancer. It was apparent that the disease had spread rapidly, and when we discussed her at rounds, we knew that she likely had a few months to live, at best. We also knew, however, that there were life-extending treatment options we could provide. When we walked into her room and presented these to her, she was attentive and listened respectfully, and she ultimately decided not to pursue any more treatment. What struck me was how content she was with the decision a...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - February 22, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/chiduzie-madubata" rel="tag" > Chiduzie Madubata, MD < /a > Tags: Physician Hospital-Based Medicine Palliative Care Source Type: blogs

Injectable Hydrogel Responds to Tumors to Release Chemo and Immunotherapies
Scientists at the University of North Carolina and North Carolina State University have developed an injectable polymer hydrogel that breaks down in response to reactive oxygen species (ROS) produced by tumor cells. During its controlled degradation, the hydrogel releases a chemotherapeutic drug and an immunotherapy to kill surrounding tumor cells. Cancer immunotherapies have shown significant promise in treating a variety of cancer types. However, some cancers lack the characteristics that make immunotherapies effective, and these are called low-immunogenic tumors. One way to make immunotherapies more effective involves t...
Source: Medgadget - February 22, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Conn Hastings Tags: Materials Oncology Source Type: blogs

Diet and depression
Just this week, I have seen three patients with depression requiring treatment. Treatment options include medications, therapy, and self-care. Self-care includes things like sleep, physical activity, and diet, and is just as important as meds and therapy — sometimes more… In counseling my patients about self-care, I always feel like we don’t have enough time to get into diet. I am passionate about diet and lifestyle measures for good health, because there is overwhelming evidence supporting the benefits of a healthy diet and lifestyle for, oh, just about everything: preventing cardiovascular disease, can...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - February 22, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Monique Tello, MD, MPH Tags: Anxiety and Depression Behavioral Health Healthy Eating Mental Health Source Type: blogs

What If The Pathologist Is Wrong?
And they won't review all the tests. This is a two part misadventure.First I was horrified by thisfirst story where two women were found to have been misdiagnosed by a pathologist at a hospital in Ireland. Their original breast cancer diagnoses were incorrect. One woman was diagnosed with DCIS in 2010 and had a mastectomy. Based on the original pathology she was not required to have any additional treatment. In 2012, to the surprise of her and her doctor, her cancer came back." Her original 2010 biopsy had shown invasive cancer but this had been missed.The hospital said this was a mistake that any pathologist could ha...
Source: Caroline's Breast Cancer Blog - February 22, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: breast cancer treatment cancer diagnosis medical errors pathology report Source Type: blogs

Sunquest Signs Contract to Provide LIS Support for 124 Hospitals in Australia
Sunquest Information Systems is embarking on a project that has the potential to change the face of lab computing. It has signed a contract to provide lab computing support for all of the hospitals in the state of Queensland, Australia, which has a population of about 4.5 million people (see:Queensland Health partners with Sunquest for Laboratory Information System). Below is an excerpt from the press release:The contemporary enterprise laboratory information system (LIS) and services will support improved care responsiveness, safety and healthcare outcomes for the millions of Queenslanders served by the state's 124 ho...
Source: Lab Soft News - February 22, 2018 Category: Laboratory Medicine Authors: Bruce Friedman Tags: Clinical Lab Industry News Clinical Lab Testing Digital Imaging in Pathology Genomic Testing Healthcare Information Technology Healthcare Innovations Lab Industry Trends LIS Definitions and Strategy LIS Vendor News Pathology Informatics Source Type: blogs

DAMPs May Link Age-Related Mitochondrial Dysfunction and Chronic Inflammation
Mitochondria-derived damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs) are a range of DNA and protein fragments that are thought to be generated as a result of mitochondrial damage, insufficient mitochondrial quality control, or some combination of the two. Mitochondria are the power plants of the cell, each cell having its own small herd of these descendants of ancient symbiotic bacteria. They have long since evolved into integrated cellular components, but retain a little of their original DNA. There is copious evidence to point to a sizable role for mitochondria in the harms caused by aging. In the SENS view, the most import...
Source: Fight Aging! - February 22, 2018 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

It Looks Like The Telstra Health Developed National Cancer Registry Is Almost There!
This popped up a few days ago: Major component of Australia's cancer register still without go-live By Justin Hendry on Feb 14, 2018 1:37PM Planning will recommence after delivery of first phase.The replacement of Australia ’s outdated bowel screening register remains without a go-live date almost a year after a complex data migration process stalled the original launch. Australia ’s new Telstra-built cancer screening register is a single platform that will replace the paper-based national bowel screening register as well as the eight separate cervical cancer screening registers operated by the state...
Source: Australian Health Information Technology - February 22, 2018 Category: Information Technology Authors: Dr David More MB PhD FACHI Source Type: blogs

How Would One Go About Building a Company to Bring Cheap Senolytics to the World?
Let us for a moment choose to believe that the dasatinib and quercetin combination is a senolytic treatment that does as well in humans as it does in mice. This is to say it kills about 25-50% of senescent cells in the tissues usually most affected by oral medications, meaning the kidney, liver, and cardiovascular system, and some unknown but lower fraction elsewhere. Whether or not this is the case has yet to be determined; the first pilot studies are still running at Betterhumans, and they likely won't tell us the size of the effect in terms of fraction of cells removed. Viable assays for cellular senescence that can be ...
Source: Fight Aging! - February 21, 2018 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Activism, Advocacy and Education Source Type: blogs

Andrographolide and bone destruction
This study shows that andrographolide inhibits the development of osteoclasts ( = the cells that chew away at our bones, which is fine in a healthy situation, not fine in cancer where everything goes nutso), while increasing the presence of osteoblasts (bone builders). The researchers say that the current therapies used to treat osteolytic diseases have many unwanted side effects. And they’re not just referring to bisphosphonates (which can cause osteonecrosis of the jaw) but also to new treatments such as the monoclonal antibody denosumab, Denosumab can cause low calcium levels, weakness, constipation, bac...
Source: Margaret's Corner - February 21, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Margaret Tags: Blogroll Source Type: blogs

Where has the time gone?
(Source: Breast Cancer? But Doctor....I hate pink!)
Source: Breast Cancer? But Doctor....I hate pink! - February 21, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: blogs

Journal Articles on Your Smartphone with The Case App: Interview with Co-Founder Eric Kowalcyk
Keeping up to date on the latest academic journal articles and publications can be challenging for researchers focused on bringing their own innovations and projects to life. With many different journals publishing articles daily, research article aggregators like PubMed have become the go-to solution. Recognizing the limited bandwidth and increasing mobility of researchers, Case, a new app available today on iOS and Android, is seeking to take the next step by creating a mobile solution for research article searching and sharing. The Case mobile app is designed to both consolidate the effort of tracking the latest journal...
Source: Medgadget - February 20, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Michael Batista Tags: Exclusive Informatics Medicine Source Type: blogs

Journal Articles on Your Smartphone with The Case App: Interview with Co-Founder Eric Kowalchyk
Keeping up to date on the latest academic journal articles and publications can be challenging for researchers focused on bringing their own innovations and projects to life. With many different journals publishing articles daily, research article aggregators like PubMed have become the go-to solution. Recognizing the limited bandwidth and increasing mobility of researchers, Case, a new app available today on iOS and Android, is seeking to take the next step by creating a mobile solution for research article searching and sharing. The Case mobile app is designed to both consolidate the effort of tracking the latest journal...
Source: Medgadget - February 20, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Michael Batista Tags: Exclusive Informatics Medicine Source Type: blogs

An Energetic Exploration of the Biochemistry of Cellular Senescence is Underway
In 2011 a research group published the results from an animal study that demonstrated, in a way that couldn't be ignored, that the accumulation of senescent cells is a significant cause of aging and age-related disease. In fact, the evidence for this to be the case had been compelling for a very long time - this demonstration came nearly a decade after Aubrey de Grey, on the basis of the existing evidence at the time, included cellular senescence as one of the causes of aging in the first published version of his SENS research proposals. Yet nothing had been done to move ahead and achieve something with this knowledge. Tha...
Source: Fight Aging! - February 20, 2018 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Medicine, Biotech, Research Source Type: blogs

New Treatment for Breast Cancer Could Help Some Women Avoid Surgery
Most women diagnosed with early stage breast cancer typically have surgery to remove the tumor, followed by three to six weeks of radiation. But there’s an exciting new development in breast cancer treatment – a first-of-its kind radiation therapy system for early stage cancers that may cut the number of treatments to only a few days. And, one day, the inventors say, it might even eliminate the need for surgery altogether for some patients. It’s called the GammaPod, invented by scientists at the University of Maryland School of Medicine. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) recently cleared the way...
Source: Life in a Medical Center - February 20, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Authors: UMMC Admin Tags: Cancer breast cancer cancer treatment Cedric X. Yu Elizabeth Nichols GammaPod UMMC Source Type: blogs

A Health Tech ’s Secret Weapon: The People Under The Hood
By DAVID SHAYWITZ, MD The recently-announced acquisition of the oncology data company Flatiron Health by Roche for $2.1B represents a robust validation of the much-discussed but infrequently-realized hypothesis that technology entrepreneurs who can turn health data into actionable insights can capture significant value for this accomplishment. Four questions underlying this deal (a transaction first reported, as usual, by Chrissy Farr) are: (1) What is the Flatiron business model? (2) What makes Flatiron different from other health data companies? (3) Why did Roche pay so much for this asset? (4) What are the le...
Source: The Health Care Blog - February 20, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: John Irvine Tags: Uncategorized David Shaywitz Flatiron Health Human Oncology Source Type: blogs

Am I properly trained for grief?
It’s 2:02 p.m. when my pager beeps. I pull it out and read: “Juan may have just passed. Going in now.” As a social worker in the region’s only cancer specialty hospital, I provide emotional support for patients and their families — including talking about their wishes for end-of-life care. Juan is a sixty-five-year-old Ecuadorian man with stage 4 pancreatic cancer. I’ve known him for about a year. Polite and easy to talk to, he often listens to Spanish sermons as he walks through the halls, IV pole at his side. Over the months, we’ve grown close. He’s told me about his life i...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - February 20, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/sara-bybee" rel="tag" > Sara Bybee, LCSW < /a > Tags: Conditions Critical Care Source Type: blogs

The miscalculated fear of an opioid crisis in Haiti
Opioids are an essential class of drugs used in pain management. In recent years, complex mechanisms pertaining to their abusive use have prompted a deadly crisis which is unfolding in the United States. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention stated that 91 Americans lose their lives daily due to an overdose of opioid drugs. This public health crisis has inspired much apprehension even among Haitian diaspora in the United States. Although needed painkillers are notably lacking in developing countries, the fear of a similar path has led a high-profile personality to advise against their use in Haiti. Indeed, he...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - February 20, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/kenny-moise" rel="tag" > Kenny Moise, MD < /a > Tags: Policy Pain Management Primary Care Source Type: blogs

How The Post Cancer Brain Works
I have lots of aches and pain. This is a proven fact. You can ask any of my doctors. And I am also a klutz. And I have the battle scars to prove it.Last week, I tripped over my father's wheelchair in the waiting room of the chemotherapy department. How embarrassing. In front of maybe 40 people waiting for their appointments. They all noticed.This is what happened. We arrived at the hospital and my father grabbed a wheelchair. He has a bad leg so he pushes a wheelchair around instead of using a cane or walker. It's easier for him. He checked in for his appointment and we sat down to wait for him to be called. He parked the ...
Source: Caroline's Breast Cancer Blog - February 20, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: brainless cancer bonds falls klutziness more pain Source Type: blogs

Chronic disease is making medical education worse
Remarkable improvements in advanced life-saving therapies have brought chronic disease management to the forefront of American health care. Today, we see more patients that have complicated conditions. Often, these patients are admitted to the hospital with acute symptoms related to chronically managed conditions such as heart failure, lung diseases or cancer. These patients can end up in the intensive care units and require critical care such as ventilators, dialysis and other support devices. Recovering from long-term dependence on these therapies could take months or even years, if patients are able to recover at all. T...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - February 20, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/jason-j-han" rel="tag" > Jason J. Han, MD < /a > Tags: Education Medical school Public Health & Policy Source Type: blogs

Arterys FDA Clearance for Liver AI and Lung AI Lesion Spotting Software
Arterys, a San Francisco, California firm, won FDA clearance for its Arterys Oncology AI suite. The cleared software aids in finding lesions within CT images of the lungs (Lung AI) and in both CT and MRI when assessing the liver (Liver AI). It uses artificial intelligence methods to segment lesions and nodules, and in evaluations versus certified radiologists it performed as well as them. The online software, accessible using a browser, allows a radiologist to measure and track the progress of tumors and suspected tumors. Because it doesn’t require any on-site infrastructure, it is inherently easy to setup and begin ...
Source: Medgadget - February 19, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: Radiology Source Type: blogs

Fermented foods to beat back SIBO and dysbiosis
If you’ve been following the Wheat Belly discussions, you already know that efforts to cultivate healthy bowel flora in the wake of wheat/grain elimination is a key factor in regaining health. While I’ve emphasized the importance of a high-potency (e.g., 50 billion or more CFUs per day), multi-species probiotic supplement and prebiotic fibers, I’ve not focused on the importance of fermented foods. This issue comes to light in particular with our experience in battling small intestinal bacterial overgrowth, or SIBO. Dysbiosis, or disrupted composition of bowel flora in the colon, is exceptionally common, e...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - February 19, 2018 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr. Davis Tags: Undoctored Wheat Belly Lifestyle bowel flora fermented foods grain-free Inflammation kefir kimchi kombucha probiotic sibo small intestinal bacterial overgrowth yogurt Source Type: blogs

Is red wine good actually for your heart?
Have you ever topped off your glass of cabernet or pinot noir while saying, “Hey, it’s good for my heart, right?” This widely held impression dates back to a catchphrase coined in the late 1980s: the French Paradox. The French Paradox refers to the notion that drinking wine may explain the relatively low rates of heart disease among the French, despite their fondness for cheese and other rich, fatty foods. This theory helped spur the discovery of a host of beneficial plant compounds known as polyphenols. Found in red and purple grape skins (as well as many other fruits, vegetables, and nuts), polyphenols ...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - February 19, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Julie Corliss Tags: Health Healthy Eating Heart Health Prevention Source Type: blogs

Is red wine actually good for your heart?
Have you ever topped off your glass of cabernet or pinot noir while saying, “Hey, it’s good for my heart, right?” This widely held impression dates back to a catchphrase coined in the late 1980s: the French Paradox. The French Paradox refers to the notion that drinking wine may explain the relatively low rates of heart disease among the French, despite their fondness for cheese and other rich, fatty foods. This theory helped spur the discovery of a host of beneficial plant compounds known as polyphenols. Found in red and purple grape skins (as well as many other fruits, vegetables, and nuts), polyphenols ...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - February 19, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Julie Corliss Tags: Health Healthy Eating Heart Health Prevention Source Type: blogs

Towards Lasting Therapeutic Manufactories that Operate Inside the Body
Gene therapies involve delivering instructions into cells to ensure that specific proteins are manufactured, either temporarily or permanently. This is effectively a hijacking or programming of cellular mechanisms. There is another approach, which is to deliver suitable DNA machinery into the body, capable of manufacturing the desired proteins outside cells. This isn't helpful for all types of protein, but in many cases it is. That machinery needs protection, however: naked, it would be quickly removed by the immune system or otherwise broken down. One possibility is to employ engineered bacteria, which removes the need to...
Source: Fight Aging! - February 19, 2018 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

Quackademic medicine versus being “ science-based ”
A couple of weeks ago, I was interviewed by the a reporter from the Georgetown student newsletter about its integrative medicine program. It got me to thinking how delusion that one’s work is science-based can lead to collaborations with New Age “quantum” mystics like Deepak Chopra. "Integrative medicine" doctors engaging in what I like to refer to as quackademic medicine all claim to be "evidence-based" or "science-based." The words apparently do not mean what integrative medicine academics think they mean. The post Quackademic medicine versus being “science-based&rdqu...
Source: Respectful Insolence - February 19, 2018 Category: Surgery Authors: Orac Tags: Bad science Cancer Clinical trials Complementary and alternative medicine Integrative medicine Pseudoscience Quackery acupuncture Aviad Haramati Chopra Center Deepak Chopra featured Georgetown University Hakima Amri homeopathy Source Type: blogs

A Good Book Ruined By A Bit of Reality
I am a bookworm. As a child I always wanted to go to the library and didn't mind that if I read my newly selected books on the way home I might start to be a bit woozy from the wiggly New England roads. (Highways are much better for car reading.)In times of stress (read'medical disasters'among other things) I often turn to books as my personal form of avoidance. This was fine until my medical maladies kept interfering with my reading enjoyment. That would really suck.During college, after thyroid cancer, with my small paperback book collection, I would avoid studying or read in bed something less enlightening than any requ...
Source: Caroline's Breast Cancer Blog - February 18, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: books cancer stigma coping reading Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, February 19th 2018
Fight Aging! provides a weekly digest of news and commentary for thousands of subscribers interested in the latest longevity science: progress towards the medical control of aging in order to prevent age-related frailty, suffering, and disease, as well as improvements in the present understanding of what works and what doesn't work when it comes to extending healthy life. Expect to see summaries of recent advances in medical research, news from the scientific community, advocacy and fundraising initiatives to help speed work on the repair and reversal of aging, links to online resources, and much more. This content is...
Source: Fight Aging! - February 18, 2018 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

Does Vitamin D Deficiency Contribute to Brain Disorders?
In this study published in July 2017, researchers looked at the vitamin D levels and cognitive function in patients who experienced psychosis. They found an association between low levels of vitamin D and decreased processing speed and verbal fluency. The authors suggested the next step should be randomized controlled trials of vitamin D supplementation in those with psychosis and vitamin D deficiency. Another study, published in Psychiatry Research in August 2017, looked at whether vitamin B12, homocysteine folic acid, and vitamin D might be connected to childhood obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). Fifty-two children an...
Source: World of Psychology - February 17, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Janet Singer Tags: Alternative and Nutritional Supplements Brain and Behavior Health-related Memory and Perception Mental Health and Wellness Brain Disorder Mental Illness Vitamin D Vitamin Deficiency Source Type: blogs

Nanomachines Create Clots Inside Vessels Feeding Cancer Tumors
Researchers from Arizona State University and National Center for Nanoscience and Technology of the Chinese Academy of Sciences have developed a remarkable new way of killing tumors. They’ve developed robot-like nanoscale devices that cling to the walls of tumor vessels, release a clotting agent, and block the tumor from receiving nutrients. These nanorobots, which consist of sheets made of strings of DNA, have DNA aptamers that target a protein produced only by certain tumor types. The sheets are rolled up into cylinders and thrombin, the clotting enzyme, is attached to the interior of the newly formed tubes. W...
Source: Medgadget - February 16, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: Nanomedicine Oncology Source Type: blogs

Comparing Prognostic Breast Cancer Tests
Back in the late 2000's, I heard about the new Oncotype Dx test that was just coming available for women who had early stage breast cancer and could help in the decision making process - whether to chemotherapy or not. The test was supposed to tell your risk of recurrence. That was great news (of course I was not eligible because of my medical history...) and many women found their risk and made the big chemotherapy decision.New research has looked at the results of these tests and compared them. They looked at these four tests: Oncotype Dx Recurrence Score, PAM50-based Prosigna Risk of Recurrence Score (ROR), Breast Cance...
Source: Caroline's Breast Cancer Blog - February 16, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: breast cancer treatment cancer recurrence test results Source Type: blogs

You don ’t know what your patient’s end-of-life wishes are
As I walked in the room, I noticed it immediately: Norman was worse. The recurrent invasive cancer in his neck was impairing the drainage of fluid from his face making it difficult for him to turn his head, and it had progressed overnight. Despite his alarming appearance, he seemed calm. There were no more cancer-specific treatment options: the surgeons had declined to operate again; he had received maximum dose radiation; and the risks of chemotherapy outweighed any potential benefits. His pain required doses of opioids high enough that he often fell asleep in the middle of conversations. Because of his tracheostomy, Norm...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - February 16, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/lauge-sokol-hessner" rel="tag" > Lauge Sokol-Hessner, MD < /a > Tags: Physician Hospital-Based Medicine Palliative Care Source Type: blogs

Machine Learning for Building Personalized Cancer Nanomedicines: Interview with Dr. Daniel Heller
Dan Heller Researchers at the Sloan Kettering Institute and the Weill Cornell Graduate School of Medical Sciences in New York have developed a machine learning approach to design personalized nanoparticle therapies for cancer. Personalized cancer therapies aim to provide a treatment that is tailored to the genetic makeup of a patient’s tumor. They can still cause side effects, however, when they accumulate in certain off-target tissues. Nanoparticles can help to increase drug accumulation in the tumor, and reduce off-target tissue exposure, helping to increase drug effectiveness and reduce side effects. This research...
Source: Medgadget - February 15, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Conn Hastings Tags: Exclusive Nanomedicine Oncology Source Type: blogs

Treatment Resistance Breast Cancer
Most breast cancers are hormone receptor positive or (ER+) and are treated with multiple therapies including chemotherapy and hormone therapies including tamoxifen and aromatase inhibitors. But the problem is then that after they metastasize,  a third of them become resistance to treatment and will cause your demise." Such endocrine therapies, including tamoxifen and aromatase inhibitor drugs, can prevent recurrence of early breast cancer, and can slow the progression of metastatic disease. However, in about one-third of patients with metastatic ER-positive breast cancer, treatment with endocrine therapies l...
Source: Caroline's Breast Cancer Blog - February 15, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: breast cancer treatment cancer research clinical trials metastatic cancer Source Type: blogs

How to welcome back a colleague who is in recovery
It can be awkward or difficult to welcome back a colleague who has been absent for reasons related to mental health. These issues, historically, have been taboo, and are loaded with stigma. It is hard to know how to act toward a colleague who has returned from treatment for a mental health issue. Do I ask about it? Do I pretend that nothing happened? Do I say that I hope they are feeling better? Usually, none of these options feels right. This difficulty is particularly true when colleagues return from being treated for problems with drugs or alcohol. The stigma in our society against people suffering from addiction is ram...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - February 15, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Peter Grinspoon, MD Tags: Addiction Behavioral Health Mental Health Workplace health Source Type: blogs

Inscrutable Genes
" In most cases, the molecular consequences of disease, or trait-associated variants for human physiology, are not understood. " from: Manolio TA, Collins FS, Cox NJ, Goldstein DB, Hindorff LA, Hunter DJ, et al. Finding the missing heritability of complex diseases. Nature 2009;461:747 –53. The 1960s was a wonderful decade for the field of molecular genetics. Hundreds of inherited metabolic diseases were being studied. Most of these diseases could be characterized by a simple inherited mutation in a disease-causing gene. Back then, we thought we understood genetic diseases. Here ’s how it all might hav...
Source: Specified Life - February 15, 2018 Category: Information Technology Tags: genetic heterogeneity genetics multi-step pathogenesis precision medicine Source Type: blogs

Injection Assembles into Nanocarrier Implant for Long-Term Delivery of Nanomedicines
A good deal of the field of nanomedicine is focused on delivering drugs to specific sites within the body, such as specific organs or cancer tumors. While many nanomedicines have well developed targeting mechanisms, they often are best delivered a small amount at a time. Yet, continuous slow-release of nanomedicines has typically required the use of polymer matrix implants that don’t degrade very gracefully. Now researchers at Northwestern University have developed an unusual new liquid material that, after being injected, assembles into a gel containing drug nanocarriers that can then release themselves at a pr...
Source: Medgadget - February 14, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: Materials Nanomedicine Source Type: blogs

Why IVF treatment does not increase your risk of getting cancer
(Source: Dr.Malpani's Blog)
Source: Dr.Malpani's Blog - February 14, 2018 Category: Reproduction Medicine Source Type: blogs

What ’s love got to do with it: lessons from a dying physician
They came from all corners of the globe to bid him farewell. He looked cachetic, his frail form interrupted by swelling in his abdomen and legs, a result of end-stage pancreatic cancer. It was Dr. Yeat’s last week in the hospital before being transferred to a nearby hospice.  He was now on morphine, and despite severe fatigue and difficulty breathing, he always managed a smile. Some of his visitors were former colleagues; others were friends, previous medical trainees, and mentees. Amidst moments of laughter, crying, and sober reflection, each recounted one anecdote after another of their encounters with Dr. Yea...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - February 14, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/charles-a-odonkor" rel="tag" > Charles A. Odonkor, MD < /a > Tags: Physician Hospital-Based Medicine Oncology/Hematology Source Type: blogs

Doctors As Patients
I think doctor's make the worst patients. A friend's father, she told me, was a doctor but ignored his own cancer symptoms and said he was fine until he wasn't. I have never met a doctor who rushed to be a patient....But I think the best training for a doctor is to be a patient - particularly a patient of the disease or ailment they treat. This would provide so much more understanding for them.Here is the story ofa British breast cancer surgeon who was diagnosed with breast cancer in 2015 and finally returned to work in 2017. She never expected to face this diagnosis. I don't anyone ever does." Doctors face particular...
Source: Caroline's Breast Cancer Blog - February 14, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: being a patient breast cancer treatment doctors surgery Source Type: blogs

Andrographolide and parthenolide kill myeloma stem cells
This study shows that parthenolide AND andrographolide do just that: they go after the ruffians. The abstract calls them two “potent anti-MM-CSC agents.” Potent…I like that! Okay, I’m going to see if I can extract some gems from the full study. As we’ve seen, it’s not enough to target the circulating plasma cells. If we want to get rid of the myeloma weed, we must go after the stem cells, the “clone troopers” (Star Wars, anyone?  No, I’m not really a fan, but I do remember that expression…). The only way to prevent relapses is to kill the cloners! Parthenol...
Source: Margaret's Corner - February 14, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Margaret Tags: Blogroll andrographolide CSC myeloma parthenolide Source Type: blogs

DNA Machinery that can Sabotage the Blood Supply of Tumors
Researchers have been building simple molecular machines out of DNA for some years now. This approach to molecular machinery is well suited to applications that involve conditional activation based on the proteins present in the surrounding environment; a lot of the necessary functional parts already exist in DNA and just have to be assembled in the right way. The Oisin Biotechnologies cell-killing technology is a smaller example of the type than the approach here, in which sizable DNA containers are constructed. They carry a cargo that will disrupt local blood flow, and are triggered into opening by cancerous cell surface...
Source: Fight Aging! - February 14, 2018 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

Weaponizing the Biochemistry of Huntington's Disease as a General Cancer Therapy
An interesting observation that has arisen over the years of epidemiological study of human age-related disease is that there are a number of distinct inverse relationships between incidence of cancer and incidence of some forms of neurodegeneration. This was in the news a few years ago in the case of Alzheimer's disease for example. Why would people with a higher risk of cancer suffer lower rates of Alzheimer's disease, however? We can only speculate at this point, but the more recent discovery I'll point out here adds fuel for that speculation. The Alzheimer's-cancer relationship is modest in size and somewhat complex in...
Source: Fight Aging! - February 14, 2018 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Medicine, Biotech, Research Source Type: blogs

2018 Forecast: Another Theranos, Hospital Hiring Slows & Successful HIT Exits
By BOB KOCHER, MD and BRYAN ROBERTS For what is now an annual tradition, we are once again attempting to be healthcare soothsayers. We are proud to share with you our 10 healthcare predictions for 2018. In 2017, amaz-ingly, eight of our predictions came true. For 2018, we are betting on the following: 1. Another Theranos We think at least one healthcare information technology company with an enterprise value of more than $1 billion (not including Outcome Health, which we could not have predicted tanking so spectacularly quickly) will be exposed as not having product results to support their hype. It will also expose e...
Source: The Health Care Blog - February 13, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: John Irvine Tags: Uncategorized Bob Kocher Bryan Roberts Venrock Capital Source Type: blogs

Intermountain Precision Genomics to Develop Hereditary Cancer Gene Panels
The emerging healthcare model which is dominated by a small number of very large health systems will be characterized, in part, by in-house, sophisticated genomic and molecular lab testing by these systems. This is because these large health systems will have the capital to invest in their own"laboratories of excellence" within their system. Such is the case withIntermountain Healthcare which has its own in-house genomics laboratory called Intermountain Precision Genomics. Intermountain Health is one of the giant health systems with 37,000 employees, 22 hospitals, and more than 185 clinics. Here is the missi...
Source: Lab Soft News - February 13, 2018 Category: Laboratory Medicine Authors: Bruce Friedman Tags: Clinical Lab Industry News Clinical Lab Testing Genomic Testing Healthcare Business Healthcare Innovations Lab Industry Trends Lab Processes and Procedures Medical Consumerism Pathology Informatics Reference Laboratories Test Kits and Source Type: blogs

Managing Chaos: Lessons Learned From the Emergency Department
By: Teresa Chan, MD, FRCPC, MHPE T. Chan is assistant professor, Division of Emergency Medicine, Department of Medicine, Michael G. DeGroote School of Medicine & Faculty of Health Sciences, and program director, Clinician Educator Area of Focused Competence Program, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. “We need a doctor in Resusc 1 STAT!” “I’m worried that my child has an ear infection.” “Dr. Chan, can you take a look at this ECG for Bed 8?” “Doc, do you think I have cancer?” In a single shift, I may hear all of these … and more. As an academic eme...
Source: Academic Medicine Blog - February 13, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Authors: Guest Author Tags: Featured Guest Perspective emergency department multi-patient environments organizing information patients Source Type: blogs

Doctor Questions
We are always told to write down your list of questions for your doctors and even bring someone to write down the answers. This can be appropriate for when you are first diagnosed with something nasty. But it doesn't hold true for regular follow ups with  your other doctors.Over the years, I have learned not only to bring a list of doctor questions to appointments. But I have also learn to break it down into as few as possible, into two categories.Category one is for the list of issues you have noted since last seeing them. For example you had the flu in November for ten days. Or have been under a lot of stress from w...
Source: Caroline's Breast Cancer Blog - February 13, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: coping doctor appointments doctor questions Source Type: blogs

Inhibition of Wnt Signaling as a Treatment for Osteoarthritis
Researchers here find that inhibition of Wnt signaling can improve the state of cartilage and joint function in a mouse model of osteoathritis. Wnt and its closely related proteins are a complex topic, but the short version is that they are involved in the regulation of growth, regeneration, and embryonic development. They are also significant in cancer, as well as in other, less dramatic ways in which regeneration can run wild or fail, producing fibrosis and functional problems rather than a useful restoration of tissue. Numerous research groups are investigating ways in which Wnt signaling can be adjusted to produce bene...
Source: Fight Aging! - February 13, 2018 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

There are Many Possible Paths to Immunotherapy for Senescent Cell Destruction
Rising numbers of senescent cells are one of the root causes of aging, a process that arises from the normal operation of youthful metabolism, yet results in accumulated damage and failure over time. Senescent cells generate signaling that degrades tissue function, breaks down and remodels tissue structure, spurs chronic inflammation, and alters the behavior of surrounding cells for the worse. Evidence shows their presence to be a contributing cause of a range of common fatal age-related conditions. In a youthful body, near all cells that become senescent and fail to self-destruct as a result are promptly eliminated by the...
Source: Fight Aging! - February 12, 2018 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs