Trastuzumab Increases PFS in Women With HER2/neu Uterine Cancer Trastuzumab Increases PFS in Women With HER2/neu Uterine Cancer
This well-done study should prompt oncologists to consider adding trastuzumab to carboplatin-paclitaxel treatment for women with advanced HER2/neu-positive uterine cancer, says Dr Maurie Markman.Medscape Oncology (Source: Medscape Today Headlines)
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - July 13, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Hematology-Oncology Commentary Source Type: news

Airline Crew Have Higher Cancer Rates
Flight attendants had increased rates of breast, uterine, cervical, gastrointestinal, skin and thyroid cancers. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - July 5, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: NICHOLAS BAKALAR Tags: Airlines and Airplanes Flight Attendants Radiation Cancer Biorhythms Source Type: news

Flight Attendants May Have Higher Cancer Rates Flight Attendants May Have Higher Cancer Rates
U.S. flight attendants may be more likely than other Americans to develop several types of cancer including tumors of the breast, uterus, cervix, thyroid and skin, new research suggests.Reuters Health Information (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - June 26, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Medscape Today News Source Type: news

Flight attendants get more uterine, thyroid and other cancers, study finds
(Source: CNN.com - Health)
Source: CNN.com - Health - June 26, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Flight attendants may have higher cancer rates
(Reuters Health) - U.S. flight attendants may be more likely than other Americans to develop several types of cancer including tumors of the breast, uterus, cervix, thyroid and skin, new research suggests. (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - June 26, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news

Flight Attendants Have Higher Rates of Many Cancers, Study Says
Flight attendants are exposed to a number of known cancer-causing risks, but few studies have rigorously quantified that risk, and researchers say they are an understudied occupational group. The Harvard Flight Attendant Health Study (FAHS), begun in 2007, addresses some of the gaps in understanding health risks among flight attendants. In the latest report, published in the journal Environmental Health, researchers found that flight attendants had higher rates of many cancers, including breast cancer and melanoma, compared to the general population. The FAHS included more than 5,300 flight attendants who were recruited th...
Source: TIME: Health - June 26, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alice Park Tags: Uncategorized Cancer healthytime Source Type: news

US flight attendants at elevated risk of several forms of cancer
(Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health) US flight attendants have a higher prevalence of several forms of cancer, including breast cancer, uterine cancer, gastrointestinal cancer, thyroid cancer, and cervical cancer, when compared with the general public, according to new research from Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - June 25, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Power morcellation: Questions linger for controversial tech
Dr. Amy Reed’s tragic case brought to light the cancer risks posed by power morcellation. Her death hasn’t stopped lingering questions about the technology. Power morcellators were used for 20 years to laparoscopically remove fibroids, benign tumors of the uterus, raising not a single adverse event report with the FDA. That all changed in 2013, when Dr. Amy Reed, an attending physician at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, underwent a myomectomy using power morcellation at nearby Brigham & Women’s Hospital. Reed’s fibroids were not benign, but instead a malignant form of cancer called uterine...
Source: Mass Device - June 1, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Sarah Faulkner Tags: Gynecological Legal News News Well Recalls Regulatory/Compliance Surgical Cancer eximissurgical johnsonandjohnson powermorcellators Source Type: news

Obesity may make women more vulnerable to a host of cancers, especially if they gain weight quickly
Compared to women of normal weight, those with obesity are 24% more likely to develop one of a handful of cancers linked to the condition, and their chances of developing cancers of the kidney or endometrium were around twice as high as those of normal-weight women, new research has found.In a... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - May 23, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Melissa Healy Source Type: news

Study: Uterine cancer survivors have greater risk of cardiovascular problems
Survivors of uterine cancer are more likely to face cardiovascular problems several years after treatment, according to a study. (Source: Health News - UPI.com)
Source: Health News - UPI.com - May 8, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Uterine cancer survivors are more likely to have cardiovascular problems
(Oxford University Press USA) A new study in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute indicates that survivors of uterine cancer are more likely to experience cardiovascular problems years after treatment. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - May 8, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

UCLA research may explain some causes of infertility and miscarriage
A new study in the journal Nature Cell Biology has uncovered information about a key stage that human embryonic cells must pass through just before an embryo implants. The research, led by UCLA biologist Amander Clark, could help explain certain causes of infertility and spontaneous miscarriage.Infertility affects around 10 percent of the U.S. population, and roughly 15 to 20 percent of all pregnancies in the U.S. end in miscarriage. In many cases, the causes of infertility and miscarriage are unknown.A team led by Clark, a UCLA professor of molecular cell and developmental biology and member of the  Eli and Edythe Br...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - April 25, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

MRI helps distinguish fibroids from uterine cancer
T2-weighted MR images are effective for distinguishing between uterine fibroids...Read more on AuntMinnie.comRelated Reading: Fewer women are getting hysterectomies SIR: Women unaware of UFE as fibroid treatment option Study: UFE can help restore fertility SIR: UFE use still lags hysterectomy for fibroids Under scrutiny: Pregnancy after uterine fibroid embolization (Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines)
Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines - April 25, 2018 Category: Radiology Source Type: news

TIME 100 ’s Giuliano Testa: We Should Think About Infertility As a ‘Wellbeing Issue’
Dr. Giuliano Testa, a transplant surgeon at Baylor University Medical Center at Dallas who led the medical team that performed the first successful uterus transplants in the United States, said Tuesday that he hopes “what we are doing is going to shed light on infertility for women.” “I personally never knew it was such a widespread issue,” Testa said at the TIME 100 Gala on Tuesday. “We should be thinking about it not just as a birth, but a wellbeing issue.” Testa attended the TIME 100 Gala after being named by TIME magazine as one of the most influential people in the world for his rol...
Source: TIME: Health - April 24, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alexandra Sifferlin Tags: Uncategorized onetime T1002018 Source Type: news

New Drug Combo Ups Survival in HER2/neu Uterine Serous Cancer
WEDNESDAY, April 18, 2018 -- For patients with human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)/neu-positive uterine serous carcinoma, adding intravenous trastuzumab to treatment with carboplatin-paclitaxel is associated with increased... (Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News)
Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News - April 18, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

New drug combo improves survival of women with rare uterine cancer
(Johns Hopkins Medicine) Adding the monoclonal antibody drug trastuzumab -- already used to treat certain breast cancers -- to the chemotherapy regimen of women with a rare form of uterine cancer lengthens the amount of time their tumors are kept from growing, according to Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers conducting a small phase II trial of the regimen, testing its safety and value (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - April 10, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Embolx wins $2m NIH grant for pressure-directed embolization therapy
Embolx said today that it landed a $2 million grant from the National Cancer Institute to fund development of its next-generation Sniper balloon occlusion microcatheter. The Sunnyvale, Calif.-based medical device company has developed a drug-delivery system that administers therapies into targeted areas of the body by controlling pressure. Embolx’s Sniper balloon is designed to treat cancerous tumors, benign prostatic hyperplasia and uterine fibroids, according to the company. Get the full story at our sister site, Drug Delivery Business News. The post Embolx wins $2m NIH grant for pressure-directed emboliz...
Source: Mass Device - April 6, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Sarah Faulkner Tags: Drug-Device Combinations Funding Roundup Pharmaceuticals Research & Development embolx National Institutes of Health (NIH) Source Type: news

Does Trastuzumab Plus Carbo/Paclitaxel Up PFS in Advanced HER2+ Uterine Carcinoma?
At SGO 2018, an early study showed ‘encouraging’ PFS with trastuzumab added to combination carboplatin/paclitaxel for advanced HER2/neu-overexpressing uterine serous carcinoma. (Source: CancerNetwork)
Source: CancerNetwork - March 30, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Bryant Furlow Tags: Gynecologic Cancers News Conferences/SGO Source Type: news

Symptoms of Uterine Cancer vs Fibroids
Symptoms of Uterine Cancer vs. Fibroids (Source: eMedicineHealth.com)
Source: eMedicineHealth.com - March 23, 2018 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

Eximis Surgical raises $5m for minimally-invasive tissue removal tool
Eximis Surgical raised $5.1 million as part of a $10.2 million equity round, according to a form filed with the SEC last week. Nearly 30 investors have contributed to the offering, the Colorado-based company reported. Eximis Surgical is developing a surgical tool called XCor, which is designed for minimally-invasive specimen removal in laparoscopic surgery. The company touted its technology as reducing surgery times and lessening the risks associated with traditional tissue removal methods, like morcellation. Power morcellators, used to shred and remove tissue, have been linked to the spread of cancerous cells th...
Source: Mass Device - March 5, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Sarah Faulkner Tags: Funding Roundup Surgical Covidien eximissurgical Source Type: news

A Second Baby Has Been Born Via Uterus Transplant in the U.S.
A second woman in the U.S. born without a uterus has given birth to a baby, thanks to a uterus transplant. The birth took place at Baylor University Medical Center at Dallas, a part of Baylor Scott & White, which performed the first birth via uterus transplant late last year. The baby, born in February, is a girl. The hospital is not revealing the identity of the mother, but says the pregnancy and birth were uncomplicated. The birth is the second in the hospital’s ongoing uterus transplant clinical trial. The women in the trial have absolute uterine factor infertility (AUI), which means their uterus is nonfunctio...
Source: TIME: Health - March 4, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alexandra Sifferlin Tags: Uncategorized fertility healthytime onetime Source Type: news

New guidelines for breast cancer survivors push "cheap hormone pills" with horrible side effects like nausea, vomiting and uterine cancer
(Natural News) New, insidious cancer care guidelines were put forth by The United Kingdom’s National Institute for Health Care Excellence (NICE). The guidelines instruct breast cancer survivors to take cheap hormone pills on a daily basis for up to ten years following chemotherapy (if the patient survives the chemotherapy). The current recommendations suggest a steady... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - January 31, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Researchers find link between breast cancer and two gene mutations
(Springer) Individuals with Lynch syndrome, a genetic condition that has long been known to carry dramatically increased risk of colorectal cancer and uterine cancer, now also have an increased risk of breast cancer. This is the conclusion of a study in the journal Genetics in Medicine which is published by Springer Nature. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - January 19, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Personal Health: When Cancer Strikes Twice
In many cases, the development of a second cancer resulted from the same risk factors that likely precipitated the first malignancy. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - December 25, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: JANE E. BRODY Tags: Cancer Smoking and Tobacco Lung Cancer Colon and Colorectal Cancer Clinical Trials Breast Cancer Pancreatic Cancer Uterine Cancer Source Type: news

Severe intimate partner physical violence as a risk factor for inadequate cervical cancer screening - Rafael RMR, Moura ATMS.
With the aim of assessing the occurrence of severe intimate partner physical violence as a risk factor for inadequate screening of uterine cervical cancer, a case-control study was performed with a multidimensional questionnaire in a sample of 640 users of... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - December 25, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Economics of Injury and Safety, PTSD, Injury Outcomes Source Type: news

2017 ’ s Year In Health News: Medical Breakthroughs, Opioid Crisis And More
CBS Local — There’s been plenty of progress in the medical world this year, and as a result we now know that more Americans than ever have high blood pressure, but also that coffee everyday is actually good for you. Here’s a look back at the year in health. Opioid Crisis The opioid crisis has dominated much of the health news cycle. President Trump declared the opioid crisis a national emergency earlier this year. Drug overdoses are now the leading cause of death for people under 50 in the United States. New Guidelines for High Blood Pressure The American Heart Association revised its guidelines for high ...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - December 20, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Health News best of 2017 Samantha Lazarus Bennet Source Type: news

Electron microscope images reveal how cells absorb a vital mineral
(Columbia University Medical Center) Columbia University Medical Center (CUMC) researchers have obtained the first detailed snapshots of the structure of a membrane pore that enables epithelial cells to absorb calcium. The findings could accelerate the development of drugs to correct abnormalities in calcium uptake, which have been linked to cancers of the breast, endometrium, prostate, and colon. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - December 20, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

FDA Review Confirms Risk from Power Morcellators in Spreading Uterine Cancer
The FDA confirms that power morcellation used for laparoscopic myomectomy or hysterectomy for uterine fibroids is associated with increased risk for spreading cancer. The review... (Source: Physician's First Watch current issue)
Source: Physician's First Watch current issue - December 18, 2017 Category: Primary Care Source Type: news

Uterine Cancer Sarcoma
Uterine Cancer: Sarcoma (Source: eMedicineHealth.com)
Source: eMedicineHealth.com - November 29, 2017 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

Advancing women's health through scientific mobility
A Marie Skłodowska-Curie fellowship grant has enabled an ambitious young French researcher to make important advances in identifying a possible genetic association between endometriosis (when tissue that normally grows inside the uterus grows outside) and a higher risk of developing melanoma, a skin cancer. (Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre)
Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre - November 8, 2017 Category: Research Source Type: news

Growing Up with a Psychotic Mother
I was ten when my mother had her first psychotic break. It was May. I was looking forward to lazy summer days at the pool, an art camp, a stack of Babysitters Club books, and daydreaming about my first crush, a boy with a splay of freckles and a mop of dark hair. Instead, I was forced to grow up too soon. This meant wearing deodorant and shaving my arm pits. It also meant seeing my mother in a state of complete psychosis, one in which she thought maybe she had killed the postman or the neighbor girl. “I didn’t. Mean. Tokillthepostman.” Her words were all wrong, strung together in a series of hiccups a...
Source: Psych Central - November 6, 2017 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Leslie A. Lindsay Tags: Bipolar Depression Essays Family General Personal Stories Psychology Bipolar Disorder delusions hallucinations Hospitalization involuntary hospitalization Manic Depression Manic Episode Psychosis psychotic mania Source Type: news

FDA: Don't Remove Uterine Fibroids With Ultrasonic Aspirators FDA: Don't Remove Uterine Fibroids With Ultrasonic Aspirators
The agency's nonbinding recommendation points to the same risk posed by power morcellators -- the inadvertent dispersion of occult cancer. ACOG disagrees with the new guidance.News Alerts (Source: Medscape Hematology-Oncology Headlines)
Source: Medscape Hematology-Oncology Headlines - October 31, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: Ob/Gyn & Women ' s Health News Alert Source Type: news

Living With Cancer: Endometrial cancer
Endometrial cancer? Endometrial cancer begins in the layer of cells that form the lining (endometrium) of the uterus. It?is often detected at an early stage, because it frequently produces abnormal vaginal bleeding, which prompts women to see their health care providers. If endometrial cancer is discovered early, surgically removing the uterus often cures it. Learn [...] (Source: News from Mayo Clinic)
Source: News from Mayo Clinic - October 27, 2017 Category: Databases & Libraries Source Type: news

‘ Damaged for the rest of my life ’: Woman says surgeons mistakenly removed her breasts and uterus
Elisha Cooke-Moore had been told she had cancer-causing genes. The 36-year-old mother said an obstetrician-gynecologist noted that the results of her genetic testing showed she had a 50 percent chance of getting breast cancer and up to an 80 percent chance of getting uterine cancer, so she underwent a recommended double mastectomy and hysterectomy to try to beat the odds. But Cooke-Moore, […]Related:World leaders rehearse for a pandemic that will come ‘sooner than we expect’Conjoined twins survived one of the world’s rarest surgeries. Now they’re preparing t...
Source: Washington Post: To Your Health - October 24, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Scientists track ovarian cancers to site of origin: Fallopian tubes
(Johns Hopkins Medicine) Some scientists have suspected that the most common form of ovarian cancer may originate in the fallopian tubes, the thin fibrous tunnels that connect the ovaries to the uterus. Now, results of a study of nine women suggest that the genomic roots of many ovarian tumors may indeed arise in the fallopian tubes, potentially providing insights into the origin of ovarian cancer and suggesting new ways for prevention and intervention of this disease (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - October 23, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Cervical cancer survivor has given birth after surgery
Rachel Bainbridge, 29, from Hucknall, Nottinghamshire, had her cervix removed but uterus left intact after having key-hole surgery, which allowed her to become pregnant and go into remission. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - October 12, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Science Saturday: Microbes may hold key to detecting endometrial cancer
Researchers at Mayo Clinic are studying vaginal microbes directly within the uterine environment to investigate how they might influence the development of endometrial cancer. Results from the researchers' vaginal microbe study?were published?online Nov. 25, 2016, in the journal Genome Medicine. "We set out to discover whether there is a microbiome component in the malignancy of [...] (Source: News from Mayo Clinic)
Source: News from Mayo Clinic - September 30, 2017 Category: Databases & Libraries Source Type: news

Why Hormone Replacement Therapy May Be Safer Than You Think
The pendulum has swung from one extreme to the other when it comes to hormone replacement therapy (HRT) to treat symptoms of menopause. At first, the replacement hormones—mostly a combination of estrogen and progestin to replace what the body stops making after menopause—were seen as a panacea. Doctors thought they could not only relieve hot flashes and night sweats, but also prevent chronic aging diseases like heart problems and weakening bones. But studies then found that the supplement hormones could lead to a higher risk of breast cancer—and that they didn’t protect the heart after all. In the l...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - September 12, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alice Park Tags: Uncategorized Drugs estrogen Hormone Therapy hormones for menopause hot flashes night sweats progestin Reproductive Health treating menopause Source Type: news

50% Of Men Don't Know Where The Vagina Is, According To UK Study
September is Gynecological Cancer Awareness month, which aims to bring more attention and understanding of five cancers: ovarian, uterine, cervical, vaginal and vulvar. (Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News)
Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News - September 3, 2017 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Bruce Y. Lee, Contributor Source Type: news

This tissue paper is made from actual organ tissues
[Image from Northwestern University]Northwestern University researchers have created biomaterials made from animal organs and tissues that could potentially support natural hormone production in young cancer patients and aid wound healing. The materials, aptly named tissue papers, are made from structural proteins that are excreted by cells and give organs their forms and structures. The tissue papers are thin and flexible enough that they can be formed into origami birds.` Researchers used ovarian, uterine, kidney, liver, muscle and heart proteins to create different types of tissue papers. The tissues were collected...
Source: Mass Device - August 24, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Danielle Kirsh Tags: Regenerative Medicine Research & Development Wound Care MedTech Northwestern University organ tissue Source Type: news

Johnson & Johnson Ordered To Pay $417 Million In Lawsuit Linking Baby Powder To Cancer
LOS ANGELES (AP) — A Los Angeles jury on Monday ordered Johnson & Johnson to pay a record $417 million to a hospitalized woman who claimed in a lawsuit that the talc in the company’s iconic baby powder causes ovarian cancer when applied regularly for feminine hygiene. The verdict in the lawsuit brought by the California woman, Eva Echeverria, marks the largest sum awarded in a series of talcum powder lawsuit verdicts against Johnson & Johnson in courts around the U.S. Echeverria alleged Johnson & Johnson failed to adequately warn consumers about talcum powder’s potential cancer risks. She used...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - August 22, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Health News baby powder Johnson & Johnson Source Type: news

For post-menopausal women, vaginal estrogens do not raise risk of cancer, other diseases
This study, the first to examine potential adverse health effects in users of vaginal estrogen compared with non-users, suggests that vaginal estrogen therapy is a safe treatment for genitourinary symptoms such as burning, discomfort, and pain during intercourse associated with menopause.AUTHORSThe paper ’s authors are Dr. Carolyn Crandall of UCLA; Kathleen Hovey of the State University of New York at Buffalo; Christopher Andrews of the University of Michigan; Dr. Rowan Chlebowski of City of Hope; Marcia Stefanick of Stanford University; Dr. Dorothy Lane of the State University of New York at Ston y Brook; Dr. Jan Sh...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - August 16, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Report: Olympus study of next-gen power morcellator draws criticism
Olympus (TYO:7733) is receiving criticism after moving forward with plans to revitalize its powered morcellator devices, with a new 140-patient trial planned, according to a Philadelphia Inquirer report. Power morcellators, which use a cutting tip to shred and remove uterine tissue, have been implicated in the spread of a lethal cancer that can masquerade undetected as benign fibroids. The devices designed to be used to remove benign uterine fibroids, but when used on malignant tissue, can spread cancerous cells throughout the abdomen. Olympus won FDA 510(k) clearance for a next-generation laparoscopic PK morcellator,...
Source: Mass Device - August 14, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Fink Densford Tags: Clinical Trials Oncology Source Type: news

Cancer warning: Eating large amounts of THESE foods could be deadly
CANCER of the endometrium - the lining of the uterus or womb - is one of the most common in women. However eating particular foods, such as mushrooms, liver and shellfish could up your risk, thanks to a metal they contain, cadmium. (Source: Daily Express - Health)
Source: Daily Express - Health - August 10, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Report: MDUFA will relax med device adverse event reporting rules
The newly House-passed medical device FDA user fee agreement could allow medical device makers to delay reporting dangerous malfunctions, according to a New York Times report. While makers would still be required to quickly report injuries or deaths related to their products, they would be given more time to file reports on device malfunctions which have the potential for injuries, according to the report. The draft, which passed the House yesterday, looks to speed medical devices to the market faster than before, and includes a provision which says the FDA should permit companies to report technical errors every months, r...
Source: Mass Device - July 13, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Fink Densford Tags: Food & Drug Administration (FDA) Source Type: news

Report: MDUFA will relax med device malfunction reporting rules
Updated headline from ‘adverse events’ to ‘malfunctions’ after receiving clarity on the wording of the MDUFA agreement from AdvaMed. The newly House-passed medical device FDA user fee agreement could allow medical device makers to delay reporting malfunctions, according to a New York Times report. While makers would still be required to quickly report injuries or deaths related to their products, they would be given more time to file reports on device malfunctions which have the potential for injuries, according to the report. The draft, which passed the House yesterday, looks to speed medical devic...
Source: Mass Device - July 13, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Fink Densford Tags: Food & Drug Administration (FDA) Source Type: news

Profound Medical to pay $6m for Philips ’ Sonalleve MR-HIFU biz
Profound Medical (TSX:PRN) said today that it agreed to put up about $6 million worth of its own shares to acquire the Sonalleve MR-HIFU business from Royal Philips (NYSE:PHG). Toronto-based Profound said the deal calls for it to put up 7.4 million shares at 84.9¢ (C$1.10) apiece, representing a 22% premium over its closing price yesterday. The total deal value is $6.3 million (C$8.1 million) The agreement also has earn-outs pegged to future revenues of 5% to 7% of Sonnalleve sales through 2020, the company said. Philips, which already sells Profound’s Tulsa-Pro prostate ablation system, also pledged t...
Source: Mass Device - June 30, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Brad Perriello Tags: Imaging Mergers & Acquisitions Wall Street Beat Women's Health Profound Medical Inc. royalphilips Source Type: news

Olympus settles power morcellator suit
An Olympus (TYO:7733) subsidiary agreed to settle a lawsuit filed over the power laparoscopic morcellator used in a gynecological surgery. Plaintiffs Betty and Elvis Dobson alleged that the Olympus KS PlasmaSORD used in Betty’s 2010 hysterectomy spread myxoid leiomyosarcoma cells in her abdomen and pelvis. Power morcellators use small, rotating blades to break up large tissue masses into fragments and are commonly used to remove benign uterine fibroids in women. Although the FDA approved morcellators in 1995, it wasn’t until 2013 that the late Dr. Amy Reed exposed the risk after undergoing a...
Source: Mass Device - June 13, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Brad Perriello Tags: Legal News Women's Health Olympus Source Type: news