David Frost: Hello, Good Evening and Farewell; When Miranda Met Bruce; David Attenborough's Rise of Animals; Peaky Blinders; Science Britannica – review
It's been a week for TV's grey knights, with Frost, Brucie – and Attenborough's brief history of spinesDavid Frost: Hello, Good Evening and Farewell (ITV1) | ITVPlayerWhen Miranda Met Bruce (BBC1) | iPlayerDavid Attenborough's Rise of Animals (BBC2) | iPlayerPeaky Blinders (BBC2) | iPlayerScience Britannica (BBC2) | iPlayerSuch was David Frost's unprecedented success on television in both Britain and America that his weekly bicontinental commute at the height of his fame was said (wrongly) to have put him in the Guinness Book of Records as the most travelled man on the planet. Meanwhile Bruce Forsyth is apparently th...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - September 21, 2013 Category: Science Authors: Andrew Anthony Tags: Documentary Culture Television & radio Brian Cox Reviews Miranda Hart David Attenborough Drama The Observer Entertainment Factual TV Science amp; radio Source Type: news

Stephen Hawking: brain could exist outside body
At premiere of film about his life, physicist says it's theoretically possible to copy brain on to computer to provide life after deathStephen Hawking has said he believes brains could exist independently of the body, but that the idea of a conventional afterlife is a fairy tale.Speaking at the premiere of a documentary film about his life, the theoretical physicist said: "I think the brain is like a program in the mind, which is like a computer, so it's theoretically possible to copy the brain on to a computer and so provide a form of life after death."However, this is way beyond our present capabilities. I thin...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - September 21, 2013 Category: Science Tags: theguardian.com World news Physics Stephen Hawking Science Source Type: news

Ray Dolby, audio engineer who pioneered noise reduction, dies at 80
Dolby Laboratories founder's work in music, television and film won him Oscar, Grammy and Emmy awardsRay Dolby, the engineer who pioneered the noise reduction in audio recordings that produced clearer sound for music and cinema, died on Thursday. He was 80.Dolby, whose name became synonymous with home sound systems and cinema, and won an Oscar, a Grammy and two Emmys for his work, died at his home in San Francisco, said the company he founded, Dolby Laboratories Inc.Dolby had been suffering from Alzheimer's disease in recent years and had been diagnosed with leukemia in July."Though he was an engineer at heart, my fat...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - September 13, 2013 Category: Science Tags: theguardian.com United States Music Music industry Obituaries News Electronics and electrical engineering Film Science World news Source Type: news

Better Hygiene Could Raise Risk of Alzheimer’s
A study by researchers at Cambridge University has found that high-income, highly industrialized countries with large urban areas and better hygiene and sanitation have much higher rates of Alzheimer's disease. (Source: WebMD Health)
Source: WebMD Health - September 6, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Cleanliness does not 'cause dementia'
Conclusion This study suggests that proxy measures for exposure to microbes and living in sanitary and hygienic environments may be associated with increased rates of Alzheimer’s disease. The researchers point out that their study, as with all epidemiological studies based on survey data, are limited in as much as they can only provide information on correlations and cannot be interpreted as proving one factor causes another. Relying on survey data, especially data from different countries, is also limited by the fact that it is collected in different ways. It is important to evaluate the source of the data – t...
Source: NHS News Feed - September 5, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Neurology Lifestyle/exercise Source Type: news

Alzheimer's: could good hygiene and less contact with bacteria pose 'greater risk'?
Cambridge University's study pinpointed a significant relationship between a nation’s cleanliness and the number of Alzheimer’s patients. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - September 5, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

King Richard III had a roundworm infection, scientists claim
Researchers from Cambridge University analyse soil sample from pelvis and find eggs where intestine would have beenRichard III suffered from a roundworm infection, according to research carried out on his skeleton.The body of the king, who ruled England from 1483-85, was discovered last year by archaeologists at the University of Leicester, and scientists have since been undertaking careful analysis of the remains.A team of researchers led by Dr Piers Mitchell, of the Department of Archaeology and Anthropology at Cambridge University, used a powerful microscope to examine soil samples taken from the skeleton's pelvis and s...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - September 4, 2013 Category: Science Tags: theguardian.com Infectious diseases News Medical research Microbiology Richard III UK news Monarchy Science Source Type: news

Sir Michael Stoker obituary
Director of the Imperial Cancer Research Fund laboratories who turned the ICRF into a world-renowned organisatonSir Michael Stoker, who has died aged 95, was an outstanding cell biologist and a pioneer in the use of mammalian cells grown in the laboratory for the study of cancer. He also, in his characteristically unassuming way, had a major influence on the development of biomedical research in Britain through his involvement in many scientific organisations, especially as director of research at the Imperial Cancer Research Fund (now subsumed into Cancer Research UK).In the early 1950s, as a lecturer in pathology at Camb...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - August 27, 2013 Category: Science Authors: Walter Bodmer Tags: The Guardian Obituaries Biology Medical research Cancer Medicine Science Source Type: news

Solar-powered travel: opening up new routes across sky, sea and land
A new generation of solar-powered vehicles is making extraordinary journeys around the world and pushing the boundaries of technical knowledgeThe wings of the experimental aircraft arch more than 63 metres, the same span as an Airbus A340, but they look frail, supported on the airstrip by wheeled struts. They are covered in a patina of 11,268 photovoltaic cells, which look dark blue in the grey predawn. The four 10-horsepower propellers they power now start to spin silently. Bertrand Piccard, a 55-year-old explorer and psychiatrist, dons his helmet and oxygen mask and completes his final checks. The Solar Impulse quietly t...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - August 25, 2013 Category: Science Tags: World news Solar power Engineering Travel Road transport Oceans Technology Features Politics Air transport The Observer Environment Transport policy Science Source Type: news

Food addiction: does it really exist?
Research suggests that sugar and fat may be addictive – but the findings are controversial. Which foods do you find hardest to resist, and have you experienced withdrawal symptoms?In pictures: super unhealthy fast foodWe seem to be addicted to everything these days: phones, sex, shopping … and junk food. There is, of course, a vast difference between serious clinical addiction and figure-of-speech addiction ("I'm totally addicted to sherbet lemons at the moment"). Of course we need food to live, but can we become dependent on certain unhealthy foods in the same way that we can on drugs?Rats can't res...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - August 20, 2013 Category: Science Authors: Amy Fleming Tags: Nutrition theguardian.com Blogposts Health & wellbeing Food drink Features Life and style Science Source Type: news

The role of stem cells in skin maintenance
All organs in our body rely on stem cells in order to maintain their function. The skin is our largest organ and forms a shield against the environment. New research results from BRIC, University of Copenhagen and Cambridge University, challenge current stem cell models and explains how the skin is maintained throughout life. The results have just been published in the recognized journal Cell Stem Cell. New knowledge challenge stem cell models The skin consists of many different cell types, including hair cells, fat- and sweat glands... (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - August 19, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Dermatology Source Type: news

Shining stem cells reveals how our skin is maintained
(University of Copenhagen) All organs in our body rely on stem cells in order to maintain their function. The skin is our largest organ and forms a shield against the environment. New research results from BRIC, University of Copenhagen and Cambridge University, challenge current stem cell models and explains how the skin is maintained throughout life. The results have just been published in the recognized journal Cell Stem Cell. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - August 15, 2013 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Cocaine may affect the way the body stores fat
Conclusion This study suggests that despite taking in more calories, and eating more fat and carbohydrates, cocaine users have a lower fat mass than non-users. The researchers suggest that this shows some underlying difference in how their bodies process fats, possibly due to lowered levels of leptin, rather than having a reduced appetite. There are some points to note when interpreting these findings: The researchers did not assess the men’s physical activity to see if this could account for the cocaine users’ reduced fat mass. They suggest that as the cocaine users’ lean mass (which includes muscle...
Source: NHS News Feed - August 12, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Lifestyle/exercise Food/diet Mental health Source Type: news

Girls who are autistic have more 'masculine' brains, scientists claim
Cambridge University researchers conducting one of the largest brain imaging studies of gender differences in autism found evidence of 'neuroanatomical masculinisation' in autistic females. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - August 10, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Anorexia and autism - are they related?
Girls with anorexia nervosa have some of the traits observed in people with autism, researchers at the Autism Research Centre at Cambridge University reported in the journal Molecular Autism. As background information, the authors explained that anorexia nervosa ('anorexia') is an eating disorder in which the patient refuses to maintain a minimum body weight (15% below expected body weight). There is also an abnormal preoccupation with food and weight... (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - August 10, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Eating Disorders Source Type: news

Arctic methane catastrophe scenario is based on new empirical observations | Nafeez Ahmed
Critics of new Nature paper on costs of Arctic warming ignore latest science on permafrost methane at everyone's perilLast week, the journal Nature published a new paper warning of a $60 trillion price tag for a potential 50 Gigatonne methane pulse from the East Siberian Arctic Shelf (ESAS) over 10-50 years this century. The paper, however, prompted many to suggest that its core scenario - as Arctic permafrost thaws it could increasingly unleash dangerous quantities of methane from sub-ice methane hydrates in as quick as a decade - is implausible. The Washington Post's Jason Samenow argued that "most everything known ...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - July 31, 2013 Category: Science Authors: Nafeez Ahmed Tags: theguardian.com Blogposts Arctic Climate change Environment Polar regions Source Type: news

Moon may influence sleep, study finds
Even if moonlight isn't streaming through your curtains, the phase of the moon may affect how well you sleepScience and myth rarely agree, but new research suggests that the lunar cycle could have an effect on the quality of sleep.The study by researchers at the University of Basel in Switzerland found that even in the absence of moonlight, participants slept less deeply and for shorter periods during the full moon than at other lunar phases. It is a phenomenon already known in other organisms as the "circalunar rhythm", but has never before been shown in humans.Christian Cajochen, who was the lead researcher on ...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - July 26, 2013 Category: Science Authors: Simon Roach Tags: Biology World news The moon Health guardian.co.uk & wellbeing Human biology Society UK news Life and style Sleep Science Source Type: news

Forget willpower - the easiest way to lose weight is to remove temptation in the first place
Research by Cambridge University has found that the best way to avoid temptation is to not face it in the first place. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - July 24, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

MitoQ: Anti-wrinkle cream that claims to REVERSE ageing discovered by accident
MitoQ - which claims to soften the skin while lightening and actually reversing the signs of ageing - was discovered by scientists at Cambridge University. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - July 18, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Navigating 18th-century science: Board of Longitude archive digitised | Rebekah Higgitt
Today the complete archive of the Board of Longitude is being launched online, with stories of innovation, exploration and endeavour - and much more than just John HarrisonToday Lord Rees will be launching the digitised archive of the Board of Longitude at Cambridge University Library. Stuffed full of the correspondence and work of those who preceded him as Astronomer Royal, it also contains letters and papers of artisans, inventors, expeditionary astronomers and maritime explorers. For those not familiar with the story of the 18th-century search for a means to determine longitude at sea, this video, gives an introduction ...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - July 18, 2013 Category: Science Authors: Rebekah Higgitt Tags: Digital media Blogposts Museums Libraries guardian.co.uk History of science Source Type: news

Dementia rates dropping
Conclusion This study suggests that the prevalence of dementia in over 65s in 2011 is lower than would have been expected.  The study had many strengths, including the large number of people it interviewed from different areas and the consistent research methods adopted in 1991 and again in 2011, particularly using the same criteria to diagnose dementia at both time points. This means we can be relatively sure that its conclusions are reliable. That said, it does have some limitations to consider. The response rate in 2011 (56%) was much lower than in 1991 (80%). The study authors offer a number of explanations for ...
Source: NHS News Feed - July 17, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Neurology Older people Medical practice Source Type: news

Stem cell research in Cambridge
Report of the collaboration between Cambridge University and the pharma industry mentions the Cambridge Stem Cell Institute's work on stem cells in multiple sclerosis. Business Weekly Stem cells - A to Z of MS (Source: Multiple Sclerosis Trust)
Source: Multiple Sclerosis Trust - July 1, 2013 Category: Neurology Source Type: news

Stephen Emmott Q&A: 'Windfarms are not the answer to our problems'
The author of Ten Billion on how we might avert a population catastrophe, his attempts to replicate photosynthesis, and why G8 leaders ought to wear tiesWatch Stephen Emmott reading extracts from his book. Reading this on mobile? Click hereWhy have scientists and politicians been slow and reluctant to confront population growth?It might be useful to first distinguish between growth and behaviour. The problem is less the current number of us in itself (yet) but more the way the majority of the 7 billion of us live and consume. This is principally the cause of almost every global problem we face. Critically, every one of the...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - June 30, 2013 Category: Science Authors: Tim Adams Tags: Energy Population World news Food Technology Physics Energy efficiency Energy research Ethical and green living Q & amp;As The Observer Environment Science Source Type: news

Martin Bernal obituary
Scholar of Chinese history and politics whose most controversial work, Black Athena, explored the origins of ancient GreeceMartin Bernal, who has died aged 76, was a scholar of China and modern politics, but his contentious work on ancient Greece brought him most to the public eye. He maintained that the cultural roots of Greek civilisation derived not just from Indo-Europeans invading from the north, but substantially, as ancient authors affirmed, from Egypt, the Phoenician cities of the eastern Mediterranean and west Asia.In place of what he saw as the racist "Aryan" theory of Greek origins prevalent from the e...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - June 21, 2013 Category: Science Authors: Gregory Blue Tags: Obituaries Classics History Greece Linguistics Archaeology guardian.co.uk China Egyptology History and history of art Languages Education Source Type: news

SfE President-elect named in the Queen’s Birthday Honours list
The Society for Endocrinology would like to offer its warm congratulations to Professor Stephen O’Rahilly, who has been awarded a knighthood for services to medical research in the Queen’s Birthday Honours list. Inaugurated as a Fellow of The Royal Society in 2003 and elected to the Academy of Medical Sciences in 1999, Professor O’Rahilly is Professor of Clinical Biochemistry and Medicine, Department of Clinical Biochemistry at Cambridge University, Co-Director of the Wellcome Trust-MRC IMS, and the President-elect of the Society for Endocrinology. His appointment as Knight Bachelor complement...
Source: Society for Endocrinology - June 18, 2013 Category: Endocrinology Source Type: news

Cambridge University Hospitals appoints interim chief nurse
Cambridge University Hospitals Foundation Trust has appointed a new interim chief nurse, the trust has announced. (Source: Nursing Times Breaking News)
Source: Nursing Times Breaking News - June 14, 2013 Category: Nursing Source Type: news

Denise Cummins Selected for APS Fellow Status
Dr. Cummins, author of Good Thinking (Cambridge University Press, 2012) was selected for Fellow status in the Association for Psychological Science in recognition of sustained outstanding contributions to the advancement of psychological science.read more (Source: Psychology Today Work Center)
Source: Psychology Today Work Center - June 13, 2013 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Dr. Denise Cummins, Ph.D. Tags: Education Psych Careers Work 10 years Association for Psychological Science fellow status fellows outstanding contributions to science psychology science award science fellow teaching service Source Type: news

Pomegranate, Green Tea, Turmeric And Broccoli May Help Fight Prostate Cancer
British researchers have scientifically proven that broccoli, turmeric, green tea and pomegranate help fight the most common cancer in men in the United States and the United Kingdom - prostate cancer. Professor Robert Thomas, who works as an oncologist at Bedford Hospital and Addenbrooke's, part of Cambridge University Hospitals, and team conducted a six-month human study involving 203 adult males, all of them with prostate cancer... (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - June 10, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Prostate / Prostate Cancer Source Type: news

Electric shocks to brain help students solve maths problems, scientists say
Psychologists find students do puzzles 27% faster after non-invasive procedure than those who had no treatmentPeople who struggle with maths problems might fare better after a course of gentle electric shocks to the brain, scientists have claimed.Psychologists at Oxford University found that students scored higher on mental arithmetic tasks after a five-day course of brain stimulation.If future studies prove that it works – and is safe – the cheap and non-invasive procedure might be used routinely to boost the cognitive power of those who fall behind in maths, the scientists said. Researchers led by Roi Cohen K...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - May 16, 2013 Category: Science Authors: Ian Sample Tags: University of Oxford Psychology News guardian.co.uk Mathematics Higher education UK news Science Source Type: news

Joe Farman obituary
Scientist whose discovery of the depletion of the ozone layer sparked global action to phase out dangerous chemicalsJoe Farman, who has died aged 82, was the leader of a small group of scientists who made one of the most important discoveries in recent history. In 1985, they published a landmark paper on the ozone layer, the protective skin that filters the sun's ultraviolet rays and without which the rays can cause cancers and eye damage. Their research showed that the ozone layer was being rapidly depleted over the Antarctic.Just two years later, world governments signed the Montreal protocol, a treaty phasing out the us...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - May 16, 2013 Category: Science Authors: Fiona Harvey Tags: Obituaries Ozone layer guardian.co.uk Physics Environment Science Source Type: news

Human embryonic stem cells created from adult tissue for first time
The cells, made with cloning technique behind Dolly the sheep, have the potential to regenerate damaged organs and tissuesScientists have used the cloning technique that led to Dolly the sheep to turn human skin into embryonic stem cells – which can make any tissue in the body.The US team overcame technical problems that had frustrated researchers for more than a decade to create batches of the body's master cells from donated skin.The work will spark fresh interest in the use of cloning in medical research, and reignite the controversy over a procedure that demands a supply of human eggs, and the creation and destru...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - May 15, 2013 Category: Science Authors: Ian Sample Tags: Embryos Ethics Biology World news guardian.co.uk Medical research Human biology UK news Stem cells Science Source Type: news

At last, we'll find out what's going on in a teenager's head: Scientists will study brains to see how they change as we mature
Scientists at Cambridge University have begun a £5.4million study to understand the workings of the adolescent brain, personified by Harry Enfield's Kevin The Teenager (pictured). (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - May 15, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Stephen Hawking's boycott hits Israel where it hurts: science | Hilary Rose and Steven Rose
What really winds up Israel is that this rejection comes from a famous scientist, and it is science that drives its economy, prestige and military strengthStephen Hawking's decision to boycott the Israeli president's conference has gone viral. Over 100,000 Facebook shares of the Guardian report at last count. Whatever the subsequent fuss, Hawking's letter is unequivocal. His refusal was made because of requests from Palestinian academics. Witness the speed with which the pro-Israel lobby seized on Cambridge University's initial false claim that he had withdrawn on health grounds to denounce the boycott movement, and their ...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - May 13, 2013 Category: Science Authors: Hilary Rose and Steven Rose Tags: Stephen Hawking Science policy Israel Palestinian territories Source Type: news

Stephen Hawking's boycott hits Israel where it hurts: science | Hilary Rose and Steven Rose
What really winds up Israel is that this rejection comes from a famous scientist, and it is science that drives its economy, prestige and military strengthStephen Hawking's decision to boycott the Israeli president's conference has gone viral. Over 100,000 Facebook shares ofthe Guardian report at last count. Whateverthe subsequent fuss, Hawking's letter is unequivocal. His refusal was made because of requests from Palestinian academics.Witness the speed with which the pro-Israel lobby seized on Cambridge University's initial false claim that he had withdrawn on health grounds to denounce the boycott movement, and their emb...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - May 13, 2013 Category: Science Authors: Hilary Rose and Steven Rose Tags: Stephen Hawking Science policy Israel Palestinian territories Source Type: news

Stephen Hawking: Furore deepens over Israel boycott
Political motive revealed after Cambridge University first claimed scientist's non-attendance was on medical grounds Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - May 9, 2013 Category: Science Authors: Harriet Sherwood and Matthew Kalman in Israel, and Sam Jones Tags: Stephen Hawking Israel Palestinian territories Middle East and North Africa Science World news Source Type: news

Stephen Hawking: Furore deepens over Israel boycott
Political motive revealed after Cambridge University first claimed scientist's non-attendance was on medical groundsThe celebrated physicist Stephen Hawking became embroiled in a deepening furore today over his decision to boycott a prestigious conference in Israel in protest over the state's occupation of Palestine.Hawking, a world-renowned scientist and bestselling author who has had motor neurone disease for 50 years, cancelled his appearance at the high-profile Presidential Conference, which is personally sponsored by Israel's president, Shimon Peres, after a barrage of appeals from Palestinian academics.Continue readi...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - May 9, 2013 Category: Science Authors: Harriet Sherwood and Matthew Kalman in Israel, and Sam Jones Tags: Stephen Hawking Israel Palestinian territories Middle East and North Africa Science World news Source Type: news

Royal Society scientists angered by Prince Andrew's election as fellow
Some of the Royal Society's 1,450 fellows are unhappy at Duke of York's election and say 'royal fellows' should be phased outAfter more than 350 years of largely happy association with assorted royalty, Britain's pre-eminent scientific institution, the Royal Society, faces unprecedented dissent from members after Prince Andrew was elected to become a fellow.While the objections to the prince centre mainly on his slightly chequered career as a royal, a small number of the 1,450 or so Royal Society fellowship are asking the wider question of whether it is time for an institution based on science to end the practice of honour...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - May 5, 2013 Category: Science Authors: Peter Walker Tags: Royal Society Prince Andrew News guardian.co.uk UK news Monarchy Science Source Type: news

White House warned on imminent Arctic ice death spiral | Nafeez Ahmed
National security officials worried by rapid loss of Arctic summer sea ice overlook threat of permanent global food shortagesSenior US government officials are to be briefed at the White House this week on the danger of an ice-free Arctic in the summer within two years.The meeting is bringing together Nasa's acting chief scientist, Gale Allen, the director of the US National Science Foundation, Cora Marett, as well as representatives from the US Department of Homeland Security and the Pentagon. This is the latest indication that US officials are increasingly concerned about the international and domestic security implicati...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - May 2, 2013 Category: Science Authors: Nafeez Ahmed Tags: Blogposts Arctic guardian.co.uk Climate change Obama administration Environment Polar regions Science Source Type: news

Scientist Roy Spencer is wrong: fossil fuels are expensive
Fossil fuel prices are artificially depressed by the trillions of dollars of subsidies they receive every year.Catholic Online interviewed Roy Spencer last week. Spencer is a climate scientist at the University of Alabama at Huntsville, and one of the few climate scientists who is considered a 'sceptic'. Like virtually all climate scientists, he acknowledges that humans are causing some global warming; however, Spencer is one of very few climate scientists who believe the human contribution to global warming is too small to worry about.In the interview, Spencer repeated a great many long-debunked climate myths, which I hav...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - May 1, 2013 Category: Science Authors: Dana Nuccitelli Tags: Blogposts guardian.co.uk Climate change Environment Science Source Type: news

The International Reaction to DSM 5
International reaction to DSM 5 is uniformly negative and puzzled by the fact that so many of its suggestions fly in the face of common sense.read more (Source: Psychology Today Anxiety Center)
Source: Psychology Today Anxiety Center - April 25, 2013 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Allen J. Frances, M.D. Tags: Anxiety Cognition Depression Psychiatry American Psychiatric Association apa assault rifle autism cambridge university clinicians common sense consistent tone dsm 5 dsm5 Essentials of Psychiatric Diagnosis german society gr Source Type: news

(Don't) Respect my Authority | Jon Butterworth | Life & Physics
A venue, a role, an award, can lend authority. But it's only a loan.Next month there will be a TEDxCERN event. We'll also be linking to it with an event at UCL, and one of my colleagues is speaking about Planck data.Such events aren't without their critics. There are many excellent TED and TEDx talks out there, well delivered, well produced and applauded by well-heeled audiences. However, this in itself lends authority to the occasional fraudster or fruit-loop who may slip through. But... well, surely the point is to think, not to accept a thought because of the platform on which it has been presented. It's reasonable to e...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - April 13, 2013 Category: Science Authors: Jon Butterworth Tags: Blogposts UCL (University College London) guardian.co.uk Science and scepticism TED Physics MMR Source Type: news

'I lack my family's science gene'
Her father was a chemist, her mother a microbiologist, and her siblings all inherited a love of science – as did most of her children. Judith Lennox, however, headed resolutely to the arts. She describes what it's like to be the odd one out in your familyMy father told me about nuclear fission at the kitchen table in our house in Salisbury. I was, I think, about five. I remember that I thought I understood at the time, but then it slipped away, my comprehension disintegrating as rapidly as an unstable isotope, a process, alas, to be repeated regularly during my education.My father was a research c...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - April 12, 2013 Category: Science Tags: The Guardian Family Parents and parenting Features Life and style Science Source Type: news

Robert G. Edwards, 1925-2013: Robert G. Edwards, Nobel Winner for In Vitro Fertilization, Dies at 87
Dr. Edwards, a physiologist working out of the University of Cambridge in England, changed the prospects for infertile couples and forged a brand-new industry.     (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - April 11, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: By GINA KOLATA Tags: In Vitro Fertilization Reproduction (Biological) Cambridge University Deaths (Obituaries) Great Britain Infertility Nobel Prizes Pregnancy and Childbirth Edwards, Robert G Source Type: news

Robert G. Edwards, Nobel Winner for In Vitro Fertilization, Dies at 87
Dr. Edwards, a physiologist working out of the University of Cambridge in England, changed the prospects for infertile couples and forged a brand-new industry.     (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - April 10, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: By GINA KOLATA Tags: In Vitro Fertilization Reproduction (Biological) Cambridge University Deaths (Obituaries) Great Britain Infertility Nobel Prizes Pregnancy and Childbirth Edwards, Robert G Source Type: news

Steven Weinberg: 'I wanted to be on the in – privy to all the secrets of physics'
The Nobel prize-winning physicist on his quest to write the universal textbook, containing all the laws of natureA chemistry set may be little more than a toy, but for Nobel prize-winning physicist Steven Weinberg, the "bangs and stinks" he produced inspired his quest for the universal textbook, a volume that would explain the laws of nature in a few basic principles.Born in New York in 1933, Weinberg was the first of his family to attend university. His father would have preferred him to follow a career in medicine, but the hand-me-down chemistry set put paid to any medical future. To explain the behaviour of th...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - March 3, 2013 Category: Science Authors: Brian Clegg Tags: Particle physics Features Cern The Observer Interviews Science Source Type: news

Swine flu jab narcolepsy risk is very small
Conclusion This study confirms that the Pandemrix vaccine against swine flu is associated with a very small risk of narcolepsy in children and young people. As the authors point out, this risk may have been overestimated if children with narcolepsy who had been vaccinated were more rapidly referred than others because of increased awareness of the link. The methods used were practical for a rapid assessment of risk, but as this was essentially a case series analysis they are limited by a number of factors: The rates calculated are dependent on the accurate diagnosis and identification of the cases of narcolepsy. By usin...
Source: NHS News Feed - February 27, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Medication Medical practice Swine flu Source Type: news

All school children in Britain should be tested for mental health illnesses, say experts
Scientists at Cambridge University said they had devised a computer test that could reliably identify those at high risk from mental illnesses as early as 11-years-old. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - February 1, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Rapid DNA Sequencing Used with Clinical Laboratory Tests to Halt MRSA Outbreak in English Hospital
Advanced DNA sequencing is poised to provide pathologists with a new tool for the management of infection control in hospitals This may be a first for medical laboratory medicine. In England,  researchers used real-time advanced DNA sequencing to contain an infectious disease outbreak at a hospital. Rapid gene sequencing technology allowed them to bring the [...] (Source: Dark Daily)
Source: Dark Daily - February 1, 2013 Category: Laboratory Medicine Authors: jude Tags: Digital Pathology Instruments & Equipment Laboratory Instruments & Laboratory Equipment Laboratory News Laboratory Operations Laboratory Pathology Cambridge News Cambridge University Hospitals Cambridge University Hospitals NHS Foundation Source Type: news

Man flu: an enigma wrapped in a damp towel | Stuart Jeffries
I'm not sure that research focusing on the preoptic nucleus will settle things – it's really a matter for the psychology of illnessIt's a truth universally acknowledged that men are pathetic. Around this time of year, the man in your life will get the merest sniffle and retire to bed until the middle of next month. He'll take all the toilet rolls, the box set of Game of Thrones and a punchably pitiful look that says, like some Vietnam vet, "You weren't there, man. You wouldn't understand." He'll also take his mobile phone, for reasons that will become clear in a moment.Meanwhile, you will continue heroicall...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - January 25, 2013 Category: Science Authors: Stuart Jeffries Tags: Comment Infectious diseases Health guardian.co.uk Medical research Microbiology Society Flu Gender Science Comment is free Source Type: news