Cambridge University Library dusts off Darwin and Newton for display
Pages of books scribbled on by now famous owners are among rare items in 600th anniversary exhibitionCambridge University Library is celebrating its 600th anniversary by putting some of its greatest treasures on display – including volumes that have become more precious because their owners scribbled all over them.Sir Isaac Newton did not so much add notes to his own first edition of Principia Mathematica as an entire extra text, gluing in additional pages running to hundreds of words. William Morris spoke for generations of enraged authors when he scored out a line in the printed text of his translation of Beowulf, ...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - March 8, 2016 Category: Science Authors: Maev Kennedy Tags: Exhibitions University of Cambridge Books Culture Art and design UK news Charles Darwin Isaac Newton Science Source Type: news

Perfectly preserved bronze age wheel unearthed in Cambridgeshire
Archaeologists carefully excavating wheel made of oak planks almost 3,000 years ago at site being called a Fenland PompeiiThe largest and most perfectly preserved bronze age wheel ever discovered in the UK, made of oak planks almost 3,000 years ago, has emerged from a site in Cambridgeshire dubbed a Fenland Pompeii.“This site is one continuing surprise, but if you had asked me, a perfectly preserved wheel is the last thing I would have expected to find,” said the site director, Mark Knight, from the Cambridge university archaeology unit. “On this site objects never seen anywhere else tend to turn up in mu...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - February 19, 2016 Category: Science Authors: Maev Kennedy Tags: Archaeology UK news Science Source Type: news

'Statins for the brain' could prevent millions of Alzheimer’s Disease cases
Cambridge University scientists say in future all adults over 30 could be offered the drugs to keep their brain healthy for as long as possible. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - February 12, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Gravitational waves discovery: I was right, says Stephen Hawking
Cambridge University cosmologist says breakthrough tallies with predictions he made more than 40 years ago The discovery of gravitational waves could “revolutionise astronomy”, Prof Stephen Hawking said as he congratulated scientists on their groundbreaking work.The top cosmologist said the breakthrough tallied with predictions he made more than 40 years ago at Cambridge University. Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - February 11, 2016 Category: Science Authors: Press Association Tags: Gravity Science Space Physics Astronomy Albert Einstein World news Source Type: news

New guidelines to drink less alcohol will 'make no difference' says Theresa Marteau
Cambridge University academic Professor Theresa Marteau, a member of the Alcohol Guidelines Development Group, said the advice is ‘unlikely to have a direct impact on drinking’. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - February 11, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Keep cancer alive to stop it spreading, say scientists
Keeping cells alive around a tumour stops it expanding, the University of Cambridge has discovered (Source: Telegraph Health)
Source: Telegraph Health - February 4, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: cure cambridge university health cells treatment tumour wellcome trust cancer spread stop science Source Type: news

Tony Buffery obituary
My father, Tony Buffery, who has died aged 76, was a notable neuropsychologist once described by Clive James as having “a mind from outer space”. While at Cambridge University in the 1960s, he was a member of the Footlights and Beyond the Fringe revues, and began a career as a writer and performer.The younger son of Winifred, a typist, and George, who worked on the railways, Tony was born in Birmingham, weighing an astonishing 14lb. He gained a place at Mosley grammar school, where he excelled not only academically but in the javelin. He went to Hull University, then Cambridge to do his PhD with a thesis entitl...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - January 26, 2016 Category: Science Authors: Joanna Ferguson Tags: Neuroscience Comedy Clive James Source Type: news

World's First Massacre Scene? Scientists Make Grisly Discovery In Kenya
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Source: Science - The Huffington Post - January 22, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Stone-age massacre offers earliest evidence of human warfare
Researchers say remains of 27 murdered tribespeople in Kenya prove attacks were normal part of hunter-gatherer relations Some 10,000 years ago a woman in the last stages of pregnancy met a terrible death, trussed like a captive animal and dumped into shallow water at the edge of a Kenyan lagoon. She died with at least 27 members of her tribe, all equally brutally murdered, in the earliest evidence of warfare between stone age hunter-gatherers. The fossilised remains of the victims, still lying where they fell, preserved in the sediment of a marshy pool that dried up thousands of years ago, were found by a team of scientist...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - January 20, 2016 Category: Science Authors: Maev Kennedy Tags: Archaeology Kenya Africa Anthropology Evolution Science World news Source Type: news

Stephen Hawking reflects on the Earth's chances of sustaining life – video
Physicist and cosmologist Prof Stephen Hawking, at his first Australian public lecture, appears at the Sydney Opera House from Cambridge University in England via hologram technology. Hawking reflects on the state of the universe and why he believes we need to set up colonies in outer space. Before his BBC Reith Lecture on black holes, Hawking discusses the danger inherent in progress and the chances of disaster on Earth Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - January 19, 2016 Category: Science Authors: Guardian Staff Tags: Stephen Hawking Physics Science Space BBC Source Type: news

Low cost, safe and accurate test could help diagnose rare childhood cancers
(University of Cambridge) A non-invasive, low cost blood test that could help doctors diagnose some types of malignant childhood tumour has been developed by researchers at the University of Cambridge and Addenbrooke's Hospital, Cambridge University Health NHS Foundation Trust. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - December 15, 2015 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Innovations in Science: China Changing the Face of Global Research
On December 10 when this year's Nobel Prize winners assemble in Stockholm for the annual award ceremony, there is one particular Laureate in the science categories whose award may very well signal the start of a trend. Youyou Tu, of the China Academy of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Beijing, is one of the co-winners of this year's Nobel Prize in medicine for her work in "discoveries concerning a novel therapy against Malaria". Born in Ningbo, Zhejiang, China in 1930, she has no postgraduate degree (it was not offered in China prior to 1979), has not had any overseas research or study experiences and is not a memb...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - December 4, 2015 Category: Science Source Type: news

Changes and improvements to the website coming in 2016
Conclusion In conclusion, the project to introduce a new CRM system greatly enhances the Society and members’ ability to communicate with each other and exchange data and information. It will ensure the Society continues to offer and provide the highest level of security of member data. It will provide a world-class online membership facility. The improved website will see an easier navigation experience and access to information, with an enhanced professional feel and look, seeking continually to have the website accurately reflect the status of the Society as a leading scientific Learned Society. Overall this is a ...
Source: The Nutrition Society - December 2, 2015 Category: Nutrition Authors: Mark Hollingsworth - CEO Blog Source Type: news

HIMSS Awards Cambridge University Hospitals Stage 6 Status of the International Electronic Medical Record Adoption Model
Healthcare Information and Management Systems Society has awarded Cambridge University Hospitals (CUH) with Stage 6 of the international Electronic Medical Record Adoption Model (EMRAM). The Healthcare Information and Management Systems Society (HIMSS) is an international organisation dedicated to improving healthcare quality, safety, cost-effectiveness and access, through the best use of IT. (Source: eHealth News EU)
Source: eHealth News EU - November 12, 2015 Category: Information Technology Tags: Featured Development Research and Development Source Type: news

Changes in the law mean sugar will be be cheaper and more widely available than ever
EU policy reforms will make sugar cheaper, and the low prices will make it even more profitable for companies to add it to processed foods, Cambridge University experts warn. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - October 30, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Sperm donor children are fine without fathers, says Cambridge University
Study finds single mothers who used sperm banks did not suffer any greater social, psychological or emotional problems than a traditional family unit (Source: Telegraph Health)
Source: Telegraph Health - October 18, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: family tradional sperm Cambridge University mum mother backlash single Source Type: news

Lessons Learned From Trends in Insufficient Sleep Across the United States
This article originally appeared on the Amerisleep blog. Rosie Osmun is the Creative Content Manager at Amerisleep, a progressive memory foam mattress brand focused on eco-friendly sleep solutions. Rosie writes more posts on the Amerisleep blog about the science of sleep, eco-friendly living, leading a healthy lifestyle and more. -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website. (Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post)
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - October 16, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Nigeria: PHN, HSDF, Cambridge University, Others Form Partnership On Health Sector
[This Day] A new private sector initiative has emerged in the health sector to tackle the gaps in the industry and develop the next generation of healthcare leaders who will excel in governance, management and quality healthcare service provision (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - October 13, 2015 Category: African Health Source Type: news

Why being a summer baby is good for your health
The Cambridge University research also revealed girls born in summer started puberty later. Early puberty has been linked with a higher risk of heart disease, diabetes and breast cancer. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - October 13, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Why being a summer baby is good for your health: People born in June, July and August are 'heavier at birth and taller as adults'
The Cambridge University research also revealed girls born in summer started puberty later. Early puberty has been linked with a higher risk of heart disease, diabetes and breast cancer. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - October 12, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

People born in summer are taller than those with winter birthdays
Conceiving babies in the autumn could make children taller and healthier, new research from Cambridge University (Source: Telegraph Health)
Source: Telegraph Health - October 12, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: cambridge university summer babies taller height healthier winter Source Type: news

Weekend Roundup: Syrian Refugee Crisis Triggers Bombs and Backlash
This week the refugee crisis caused by Syria's horrific civil war moved to the next stage. Though prompted into action to curb the carnage, the U.S. and Russia are at odds over whom to bolster and whom to bomb. With no end to the conflict in sight, the influx of asylum seekers in Europe continues to swell and the prospect of permanent settlement there for the displaced grows. In even the most welcoming countries a political backlash is in the making. German Chancellor Angela Merkel's popularity at home is falling for the first time as compassion reaches its limits. In Sweden, the anti-immigrant right-wing party now tops th...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - October 3, 2015 Category: Science Source Type: news

Paying the price for caring
Imagine struggling to make the decision to go on strike … and being given an ASBO. Or tweeting your plan to bring bacon sandwiches to your colleagues on a picket line … and then watching as the union is sued for thousands of pounds. Or working in a job where your skills can mean life or death to the public … and seeing agency staff being drafted in to cover you on strike. Sounds excessive? Maybe even a bit dangerous? Well, these are real plans that the government is currently pushing through as part of the Trade Union Bill in Great Britain. The bill will severely restrict working people’s ab...
Source: UNISON Health care news - October 1, 2015 Category: UK Health Authors: HarrisonDi Tags: Article Magazine trade union bill trade union bill 2015 Source Type: news

Epic EHR adds to UK hospital's financial mess
The rollout of a $300M Epic EHR implementation at Cambridge University Hospitals in the UK is making a bad financial situation worse, according to news reports from across the pond. Both CEO Keith M. McNeil and CFO Paul James of Cambridge have resigned, and the finances are under investigation. Electronic Health Records read more (Source: Healthcare IT News)
Source: Healthcare IT News - September 28, 2015 Category: Information Technology Authors: Bernie Monegain Tags: Online Only Electronic Health Records Network Infrastructure Quality and Safety Source Type: news

Addenbrooke's recovery could take 'years', warns McNeil
Cambridge University Hospitals Foundation Trust’s recently departed chief executive has warned he ‘does not know how the trust will cope’ this winter and that its problems could take years to address. (Source: HSJ)
Source: HSJ - September 25, 2015 Category: UK Health Source Type: news

Support for ex-Cambridge chief 'not significant enough' for reinstatement
WORKFORCE: The result of a consultant vote at Cambridge University Hospitals Foundation Trust has been declared ‘not significant enough’ to justify calling for the chief executive’s reinstatement. (Source: HSJ)
Source: HSJ - September 25, 2015 Category: UK Health Source Type: news

The government is to blame for the situation at Addenbrooke’s Hospital, says UNISON
Commenting on the news today (Tuesday) that Addenbrooke’s Hospital has been placed into special measures, U‎NISON General Secretary Dave Prentis said: “This is a shocking indictment of the government’s cavalier attitude towards the NHS, that a hospital like Addenbrooke’s – with its world class reputation – should find itself in special measures. “A persistent underfunding of the NHS is to blame. It’s a crisis entirely of the government’s making. Cambridge University Hospitals Trust is the 15th NHS trust to be put into special measures‎, but through no fault of t...
Source: UNISON Health care news - September 22, 2015 Category: UK Health Authors: Charlotte Jeffs Tags: News Press release health NHS Source Type: news

Addenbrooke's trust placed in 'special measures' by regulators
Cambridge University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, one of the largest in the country, has been been placed in special measures after inspectors found a range of problems, including major shortages of nurses and midwives. (Source: Nursing Times Breaking News)
Source: Nursing Times Breaking News - September 22, 2015 Category: Nursing Source Type: news

Addenbrooke's Hospital in special measures after Care Quality Commission inspection
'Inadequate' Cambridge University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust requires 'urgent improvement' as inspectors find 'serious' problems had been ignored (Source: Telegraph Health)
Source: Telegraph Health - September 22, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Care Quality Commission Cambridge University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust CQC special measures Addenbrooke's Hospital Source Type: news

Cambridge University reveals tricks to help you to eat less but still feel full
Trying to shed the last few pounds but to no avail? FEMAIL has worked with Frida Harju, nutritionist at health and fitness app Lifesum, for her tips to make yourself feel fuller for longer. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - September 17, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

SMALLER plates CAN help you shed pounds by 'slashing 159 calories a day'
A study by Cambridge University scientists and published in the influential Cochrane Library is the most conclusive evidence to date that people do eat more if they have bigger portions in front of them. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - September 14, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Autism: Reading the Mind in the Eyes
Scientists at the University of Cambridge University have published new results in the journal PLoS ONE from the largest ever study of people with autism taking the 'Reading the Mind in the Eyes' test. Whilst typical adults showed the predicted and now well-established sex difference on this test, with women on average scoring higher than men, in adults with autism this typical sex difference was conspicuously absent. Instead, both men and women with autism showed an extreme of the typical male pattern on the test, providing strong support for the 'extreme male brain' theory of autism. (Source: Disabled World)
Source: Disabled World - September 14, 2015 Category: Disability Tags: Autism Facts & Information Source Type: news

How hopping may help with osteoporosis risk in older people
ConclusionThis was a randomised controlled trial assessing the effect on hip bone density of hopping as a form of weight-bearing exercise in older men. The study found the hopping exercise to be of significant benefit to certain parts of the hip. But this study was performed in healthy men with no health concerns. The study had a number of strengths and limitations. Strengths are that it was randomised in design, and the fact there was concealed allocation to the intervention group and blinded assessors, reducing the risk of bias. The researchers also performed calculations to estimate the number of participants neede...
Source: NHS News Feed - September 11, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Older people Lifestyle/exercise Source Type: news

Men and women with autism have 'extreme male' scores on the 'eyes test' of mindreading
(University of Cambridge) Scientists at the University of Cambridge University have published new results in the journal PLoS ONE from the largest ever study of people with autism taking the 'Reading the Mind in the Eyes' test. Whilst typical adults showed the predicted and now well-established sex difference on this test, with women on average scoring higher than men, in adults with autism this typical sex difference was conspicuously absent. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 7, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Television and computer use 'linked to lower GCSE grades'
Conclusion This study assessed the associations between activity level, screen time, non-screen time and GCSE results in British adolescents. The main finding was an extra hour of time spent watching television or on the computer was associated with lower grades at GCSE level. An extra hour of reading or homework was associated with better performance. Screen time was still associated with poorer scores after adjusting for measured physical activity levels and reading or homework. This study has taken a fair sample size from two regions in the UK. But about 15% of participants had incomplete data and weren't included in t...
Source: NHS News Feed - September 4, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Toys aimed at girls 'steering women away from science careers'
Leading physicist Dame Athene Donald says toys aimed at girls emphasise passivity, and that early influences affect academic choices Toys aimed at young girls are steering them away from science and engineering before they even reach school age, according to a leading British researcher. Dame Athene Donald, professor of experimental physics at Cambridge University, said that toys marketed at girls often lead to passive play, instead of stoking the imagination and encouraging the children to develop more creative skills. Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - September 3, 2015 Category: Science Authors: Ian Sample Science editor Tags: Science The gender gap Women Children Education Society Physics Athene Donald University of Cambridge Higher education Source Type: news

Teenagers who watch screens in free time 'do worse in GCSEs'
Cambridge University study suggests that 14-year-olds who spend even an hour a day watching TV or online fall behind peers Teenagers who spend hours on screens during their free time, either watching TV, playing computer games or surfing the internet, appear to achieve lower grades at GCSE, according to a study published on Friday.Research from Cambridge University suggests that 14-year-olds who spend an hour a day on screens during their leisure time score nine fewer points at GCSE when the sum of their grades is calculated – the equivalent of dropping two grades from a B to a D. Two extra hours results in 18 fewer ...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - September 3, 2015 Category: Science Authors: Sally Weale Education correspondent Tags: Schools Education Children Society Computing Technology Medical research Science GCSEs Exams Source Type: news

Genetic Tags Can Pass Trauma From One Generation to the Next
This study makes it clear that epigenetic tags can be passed from one generation to the other. Yehuda said that this presents researchers with "an opportunity to learn a lot of important things about how we adapt to our environment and how we might pass on environmental resilience." Recent research at Cambridge University found that some tags are still present following fertilization of an egg by sperm. While genes are obviously transmitted during reproduction, how tags that are unique to a parent's traumatic experience can influence the genetic information of their children remains a mystery. It has already been...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - September 2, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Why did I get involved?
There are over 40,000 UNISON activists working hard to look after their colleagues at work. But they don’t get paid, can risk the wrath of their managers and sometimes even their own workmates. Here they tell us why they got involved, in their own words. The accidental activistThe helperThe confidence builderThe pay campaignersThinking about getting more active in your workplace? The accidental activist “I became active by accident. There was a pay dispute and I was asked by the union just to gather the views of my colleagues and to update them. I had no intention of being an activist. “I went ...
Source: UNISON Health care news - September 2, 2015 Category: UK Health Authors: HarrisonDi Tags: Magazine activist activists activists' learning campaigning equal pay organising Source Type: news

Patient born with insensitivity to pain acquires neuropathic pain following childbirth
(Faculty of 1000) A medical case report of a female patient who had felt no pain since childhood but who, following childbirth, was left with a variety of pain symptoms, has given insights into the manifestation of neuropathic pain. The clinicians involved, Professor Geoff Woods and colleagues from Cambridge University Hospitals, also claim that their findings reveal a great deal about the subjective nature of pain. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - August 24, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Warnings of a dementia epidemic may be unfounded
This study adjusted the results to take age, sex and social deprivation into account. This comparison study from the UK was the largest, with the others ranging from 707 to 7,528 people. The Spanish research compared cohort studies that were conducted with the shortest time gap between them – just seven years – whereas others, such as the Gothenburg study, spanned three decades. The age range for the studies was 55-70 at the start of the cohorts.  What were the results? The overall prevalence of dementia measured in the UK from 2008-11 was nearly a fifth (22%) lower than the prevalence from...
Source: NHS News Feed - August 21, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Neurology Older people Source Type: news

Dementia risk has fallen by a quarter in two decades
A Cambridge University study suggests that predictions of a dementia ‘epidemic’ appear to be unfounded, with the chance of over-65s having dementia decreasing by almost a quarter. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - August 21, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Middle-aged winning battle against dementia, Cambridge University study finds
Dementia 'epidemic' predicted in Nineties has failed to materialise because middle-aged now live far healthier lives than previous generations (Source: Telegraph Health)
Source: Telegraph Health - August 21, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Cambridge University baby boomers Department of Health Dementia NHS middle-aged Source Type: news

Cambridge University scientists help to uncover 500-year-old Chinese cave 'graffiti' which 'predicted' climate change
A team of international scientists, including a group from the University of Cambridge, has uncovered unique ‘graffiti’ in a Chinese cave from 500 years ago – which has also unknowingly ‘predicted’ a pattern of climate change yet to come. (Source: The Independent - Science)
Source: The Independent - Science - August 19, 2015 Category: Science Tags: Science Source Type: news

Drinking soda causes diabetes even in people who aren't obese, study finds
(NaturalNews) Drinking sugar-sweetened beverages such as sodas can increase the risk of type 2 diabetes even in people of healthy weight, according to a study conducted by researchers from Cambridge University and published in the British Medical Journal.The study also found an... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - August 9, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

New 'Brain Training' App Could Help People With Schizophrenia
This study, published in the journal Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B, found that 22 patients who played the memory game made significantly fewer errors and needed significantly fewer attempts to remember the location of different patterns specific tests. They also improved their scores on the Global Assessment of Functioning (GAF) scale, which doctors use to rate the social, occupational and psychological functioning of adults. Importantly, the patients also said they enjoyed the game and were motivated to play it across the eight hours of cognitive training. The researchers said this was important, since...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - August 3, 2015 Category: Science Source Type: news

New 'Brain Training' App Could Help People With Schizophrenia
This study, published in the journal Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B, found that 22 patients who played the memory game made significantly fewer errors and needed significantly fewer attempts to remember the location of different patterns specific tests. They also improved their scores on the Global Assessment of Functioning (GAF) scale, which doctors use to rate the social, occupational and psychological functioning of adults. Importantly, the patients also said they enjoyed the game and were motivated to play it across the eight hours of cognitive training. The researchers said this was important, since...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - August 3, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Peak, Cambridge University launch study-backed brain training game
Peak, the London-based brain training game startup that raised $7 million in April, is launching a new game in its brain training app, and backing it up with a small peer-reviewed study published in the journal Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B. The game was actually developed for the study by researchers Barbara Sahakian and […] (Source: mobihealthnews)
Source: mobihealthnews - August 3, 2015 Category: Information Technology Authors: Jonah Comstock Tags: Consumer brain training game brain training game app Cambridge University memory game Peak Wizard Source Type: news