E. coli found on 24% of chicken from seven UK chain stores
(NaturalNews) One in four chicken products bought in the UK contains killer antibiotic-resistant E. coli bacteria, according to Cambridge University research. The superbug was found in poultry samples taken from top grocery chains ASDA, Aldi, Co-op, Morrisons, Sainsbury's, Tesco and... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - September 12, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Cambridge University Press Launches Cambridge Core
Cambridge Core, the new academic platform from Cambridge University Press has now been launched, bringing together all CUP academic content in one place for the first time. Cambridge Core replaces the Press’s two main platforms – Cambridge Journals Online and Cambridge Books Online, including over 360 journals and 30,000 ebooks. All content from Cambridge Histories Online, Cambridge Companions Online, Shakespeare Survey Online, and partner publisher content from University Publishing Online is also available on the new platform. Every stage of Cambridge Core’s development has been informed by detailed res...
Source: News from STM - September 8, 2016 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: STM Publishing News Source Type: news

The fate of Arctic sea ice – Science Weekly podcast
The extent of the Arctic sea ice continues to drop, but how accurate are the predictions that measure it? And what could happen if it finally disappears?In his latest bookA Farewell to Ice,Peter Wadhams, professor of ocean physics at Cambridge University, explores the current crisis faced by Arctic sea ice, and in doing so makes some alarming predictions. But how accurate are these? And do they even matter, when the potential ramifications of the total disappearance of Arctic sea ice are considered? Joining Ian Sample in the studio this week alongside Professor Wadhams, areDr David Schroeder, at the Centre for Polar Observ...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - September 6, 2016 Category: Science Authors: Presented by Ian Sample and Produced by Max Sanderson Tags: Science Climate change Oceans Environment Source Type: news

Wiley Online Library Platform Now Accessible Via OASIS
Discussions are also underway regarding partnerships with other key academic publishers, including Taylor & Francis Group, Cambridge University Press and World Scientific. “Providing librarians with options to select ebooks from multiple platforms and publishers in OASIS gives them extra flexibility to navigate their very dynamic environment,” said Kevin Sayar, Senior Vice President and General Manager, ProQuest Books. “Enriching the platforms with exacting metadata, unique collection management tools and expert consultation from our Collections development staff creates an incredibly powerful resourc...
Source: News from STM - September 2, 2016 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: STM Publishing News Tags: Digital Featured Source Type: news

Giving diabetic women an artificial pancreas could prevent stillbirths and save thousands of lives
Sixteen women with type 1 diabetes were the first in the world to go through pregnancy with an artificial pancreas in a trial by Cambridge University researchers. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - August 17, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

You're more likely to catch a cold in the morning - especially if you work shifts: Study reveals a disrupted body clock is less able to fight infection
Cambridge University researchers found the body is more susceptible to infections at the start of the day and believe the internal body clock alters how the virus is able to breed and spread. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - August 15, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Gene patterns may explain brain's Alzheimer's vulnerability
Conclusion This type of exploratory science is needed to fully understand complex diseases such as Alzheimer's, which so far have not responded well to treatment. The more we know about how a disease begins and develops, the better chance scientists have of finding ways to treat or prevent it. This research explores one possible contributing factor to Alzheimer's disease. It doesn't provide an early way of telling who will get it – the theory is that everyone has similar regions in their brains that are more vulnerable to protein overgrowth than other regions. And this is not an easy option for a treatmen...
Source: NHS News Feed - August 11, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Neurology Source Type: news

New test could be key to treating prostate cancer
The model – developed by Cambridge University scientists – takes information doctors already receive about cancer patients and uses it to put them into one of five groups in order of severity. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - August 2, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Cambridge University study suggests the average person walks less than half a mile a day
The average person now walks 181 miles a year – less than half a mile a day – Department of Transport figures show. A recent study warned lack of activity raises the risk of early death by 60 per cent. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - July 29, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Our Sedentary Lifestyles Cost About 5 Million Lives A Year
By Kate Kelland LONDON (Reuters) - A study of one million people has found that physical inactivity costs the global economy $67.5 billion a year in healthcare and productivity losses, but an hour a day of exercise could eliminate most of that. Sedentary lifestyles are linked to increased risks of heart disease, diabetes and cancer, researchers found, but activity - such as brisk walking - could counter the higher likelihood of early death linked with sitting for eight or more hours a day. Such inactivity is estimated to cause more than 5 million deaths a year - almost as many as smoking, which the World Health Organi...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - July 28, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Our Sedentary Lifestyles Cost About 5 Million Lives A Year
By Kate Kelland LONDON (Reuters) - A study of one million people has found that physical inactivity costs the global economy $67.5 billion a year in healthcare and productivity losses, but an hour a day of exercise could eliminate most of that. Sedentary lifestyles are linked to increased risks of heart disease, diabetes and cancer, researchers found, but activity - such as brisk walking - could counter the higher likelihood of early death linked with sitting for eight or more hours a day. Such inactivity is estimated to cause more than 5 million deaths a year - almost as many as smoking, which the World Health Organi...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - July 28, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

An hour of exercise a day may compensate for an 'office lifestyle'
Conclusion This study helps to disentangle the effects of having a sedentary lifestyle and being physically active. Previous studies have had conflicting results, with some saying that sitting for long periods can be counteracted by taking exercise, while others disagreed. The advantage of this study is that it looks at time spent sitting as well as time spent being physically active, and calculates how both are linked to mortality and to each other. The study has many strengths, not least its size. It includes data from 1,005,791 people from 16 studies. The researchers applied a standardised protocol and asked study aut...
Source: NHS News Feed - July 28, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Lifestyle/exercise Heart/lungs Source Type: news

A desk job could make you 60% more likely to die earlier
Researchers from Cambridge University say adults who sit down for at least eight hours every day must do at least an hour ’s daily exercise to undo all the harm. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - July 27, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Simon Ross joins Manchester University Press as CEO
Manchester University Press is delighted to announce that after an international search and appointment process Simon Ross, formerly Cambridge University Press’s deputy managing director for academic publishing, has been appointed as Chief Executive Officer of Manchester University Press (MUP). The Chair of Manchester University Press Board, Professor Alistair Ulph, said: “I am delighted that Simon Ross has been appointed to succeed Frances Pinter as CEO of Manchester University Press. He is an outstanding appointment, who brings a clear vision for how he wishes to grow and diversify the range of outputs MUP wi...
Source: News from STM - July 27, 2016 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: STM Publishing News Tags: European Featured Source Type: news

Teen brains can show signs of schizophrenia or depression years before symptoms develop
Cambridge University experts mapped young people's brains, revealing the changes that can signal mental health problems. Experts hope this will shed light on the origins of mental illness. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - July 25, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Cambridge University study shows a varied diet can prevent diabetes
Diets containing all five food groups are 18 per cent more costly than diets containing three food groups or fewer, according to research by the Universities of Cambridge and California. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - July 21, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Alzheimer's breakthrough as experts discover 'HOW to control plaques buildup in the brain'
Scientists at Cambridge University have identified - and shown it may be possible to control - the process which leads to the rapid build-up of amyloid-beta plaques that are a hallmark of Alzheimer's. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - July 20, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Q&A: Young African talent will set science agenda
Each nation should back its 100 brightest and best, says Cambridge University boss Leszek Borysiewicz. (Source: SciDev.Net)
Source: SciDev.Net - July 18, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Q & A: Young African talent will set science agenda
Each nation should back its 100 brightest and best, says Cambridge University boss Leszek Borysiewicz. (Source: SciDev.Net)
Source: SciDev.Net - July 18, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Why don't I have a dad? Agony of single mums' IVF children
Cambridge University researchers found 39 per cent of children were 'neutral' about not having a father around, but 27 per cent had 'mixed feelings' and 8 per cent felt 'negatively' about it. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - July 4, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Anatomy specimens reveal story of infanticide, stillbirth and poverty
Study of 18th and 19th century infant anatomy specimens in UK museums and teaching collections reveals a tragic and sometimes dubious historyThe dubious means by which 18th and 19th century anatomists obtained the bodies of babies and infants to dissect has been revealed in a study by two Cambridge scientists.Specimens procured as a result of grave-robbing, infanticide or mothers so poor they were prepared to sell their dead babies, ended up in many museums of anatomy, including the collection of Cambridge University. In a new study, Piers Mitchell and Jenna Dittmar, of the Cambridge Department of Archaeology and Anthropol...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - July 1, 2016 Category: Science Authors: Maev Kennedy Tags: Human biology Anatomy and physiology Science Museums UK news Source Type: news

Cambridge University study reveals TUESDAY is when we get the best night's sleep
Analysis of heart rate data by Finnish company Firstbeat - collected from almost 5,000 men and women - showed while Tuesday night’s sleep isn’t the longest, it is the most restorative. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - June 27, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Brain scans find differences in 'badly behaved' teen boys
Conclusion This interesting study raises a lot of questions about the way the brain develops in childhood and adolescence, and whether its development is different in those with conduct disorder. However, it doesn't give us answers as to why this might happen. The results suggest there are differences in the development of these children's brains, which may play a part in their condition. However, as with all observational studies, we can't tell from the study whether these brain differences are the cause of the conduct disorder. The study also showed that substance abuse and deprivation were more common among boys with ...
Source: NHS News Feed - June 16, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Neurology Mental health Pregnancy/child Source Type: news

Scans show possible link between brain development and antisocial behaviour
‘Striking’ structural differences seen in study which compared brain scans of young men with antisocial behavioural problems with their healthy peers Brain scans have highlighted “striking” differences between the brains of young men with antisocial behavioural problems and those of their better-behaved peers.The structural changes, seen as variations in the thickness of the brain’s cortex or outer layer of neural tissue, may result from abnormal development in early life, scientists at Cambridge University claim. Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - June 16, 2016 Category: Science Authors: Ian Sample Science editor Tags: Neuroscience Medical research Men's health & wellbeing Children Mental health Society Source Type: news

Cutting PCSO numbers has a real cost
UNISON reiterated its call for an end to cuts to police community support officers (PCSOs) after new research revealed that their presence on the streets helped to deter criminals and reduce crime. The union welcomed the research by the Cambridge University Institute of Criminology, which showed that high-visibility patrols cut time levels. National officer Ben Priestley said: “We now have further proof that PCSOs cut crime. Every £10 invested in the role saves the criminal justice system £56. And he added: “The public will no doubt be wondering why the government has slashed PCSO numbers ...
Source: UNISON meat hygiene - June 15, 2016 Category: Food Science Authors: Amanda Kendal Tags: Article PCSOs police and justice police community support officers Source Type: news

Cambridge University professor suggests women are more likely to suffer anxiety than men
People from North America and Western Europe are more likely to be affected than those in other parts of the world, Cambridge researchers found. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - June 10, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Women nearly twice as likely to have anxiety as men
Scientists from Cambridge University have published a review in Brain & Behaviour which suggests that women are more susceptible to anxiety disorders - possibly because of hormonal differences, or possibly due to the demands of work and childcare. BBC News (Source: Society for Endocrinology)
Source: Society for Endocrinology - June 7, 2016 Category: Endocrinology Source Type: news

Cambridge University scientists reveals wine glass size does matter to the brain
Scientists at the University of Cambridge believe that people drink wine more quickly if served in a bigger glass because the brain is fooled into thinking there is more to consume. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - June 7, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Cambridge University scientists reveal women are more likely to be stressed than men
Scientists at Cambridge University have found that women are 1.9 times as likely to suffer as men, a trend which persists throughout their lifetimes. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - June 6, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Race Delusion: Lies That Divide Us
Jack Moreh, Learning and Education - Brain Functions Development Concept David Livingstone Smith is a Professor of Philosophy at the University of New England in Biddeford, Maine. He earned his Ph.D. from the University of London, Kings College, where he worked on Freud's philosophy of mind and psychology. His current research is focused on dehumanization, race, propaganda, and related topics. David is the author of seven books and numerous academic papers. His most recent book Less Than Human: Why We Demean, Enslave and Exterminate Others (St. Martin's Press, 2011) was awarded the 2012 Anisfield-Wolf award for nonfiction...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - May 31, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Regional dialects are dying out – it’s enough to get you blarting
Britons are increasingly speaking like southern Englanders, according to an app produced by Cambridge University. Here’s a guide to some bostin’ words and phrases at risk of extinctionNever mind whether you take it with jam or cream, does your “scone” rhyme with “gone” or “stone”? Chances are, it’s the former. Basically the “stone” pronunciation of scone is almost gone. Still with me?According to the first set of results from an app mapping changes in English dialects launched in January by the University of Cambridge, regional accents are dying out. The Eng...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - May 30, 2016 Category: Science Authors: Chitra Ramaswamy Tags: Language Science University of Cambridge Higher education Apps Technology Source Type: news

Big Data to Knowledge Updates
BD2K Updates 05/06/2016 Distributed to The NN/LM All Staff listserv featuring links to learning opportunities and related “big” data articles. Data Science Opportunities NCATS Launches the Biomedical Data Translator program: Applications due June 1, 2016. Awards will be made by September 30, 2016. For more information please visit https://ncats.nih.gov/files/NCATS-Translator-FY16-FOA.pdf. Please direct all inquiries to: translator-questions@nih.gov.  Data Science Events Duke University, in partnership with the National Library of Medicine and the NIH Office of the Associate Dire...
Source: The Cornflower - May 9, 2016 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Darlene Kaskie Tags: General Source Type: news

The 100 best nonfiction books: No 15 – The Double Helix by James D Watson (1968)
An astonishingly personal and accessible account of how Cambridge scientists Watson and Francis Crick unlocked the secrets of DNA and changed the worldJim Watson was just 24 when, in collaboration with Francis Crick, he decoded the structure of DNA, “the molecule of life”. This was a 20th-century watershed, the solution to one of the great enigmas of the life sciences that would revolutionise biochemistry. In human history, without exaggeration, nothing would ever be the same again.Watson arrived at the Cavendish Laboratory, Cambridge University, during the autumn of 1951 looking for success, fame and the love ...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - May 9, 2016 Category: Science Authors: Robert McCrum Tags: Science and nature Books Culture Genetics Biology Source Type: news

Scientists grow embryos in a lab for TWICE as long as thought possible
Scientists at Cambridge University and a team at Rockefeller University in New York have achieved the remarkable feat of growing a human embryo in a laboratory for 13 days for the first time. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - May 4, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Fat Labradors give clues to obesity epidemic
Researchers at Cambridge University identify a mutation in POMC gene which is strongly linked with weight, obesity and appetite in Labradors. Results were published in Cell Metabolism. BBC News (Source: Society for Endocrinology)
Source: Society for Endocrinology - May 4, 2016 Category: Endocrinology Source Type: news

Gene breakthrough promises 'bespoke' breast cancer treatment
"Breast cancer treatment breakthrough after 'milestone' genetic discovery," says The Independent, about widely reported research investigating genetic mutations in people with breast cancer. The researchers took samples of cancer cells from 560 people with breast cancer (556 women and four men). They compared the DNA from the cancerous cells with DNA from normal cells. They found 93 genes that had mutated in the cancer cells and concluded that they could have caused normal tissue to become cancerous. They also found 12 genetic patterns linked with breast cancer. These findings have been called "groundbreaki...
Source: NHS News Feed - May 3, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Cancer Genetics/stem cells Source Type: news

California, Riverside and Cambridge University research whether money can buy you hapiness
Researchers from the California and Cambridge found no matter how much people earned, or how much debt they had, a buffer of easily accessible cash was associated with greater happiness. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - April 21, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

UK dementia rates have fallen sharply in men
Conclusion The figures from this study are striking, particularly the drop in the incidence of dementia in older men. However, we don't know what is behind this dramatic drop. While it would be great to think that it's because men in their 80s are smoking less, exercising more and generally living healthier lives, we don't know whether this is true or if it can completely account for the big drop in dementia rates. It's possible that the figures for men aged 80 and over are less reliable than those for younger age groups, as there were fewer men of this age interviewed. For example, only 205 men aged over 85 were i...
Source: NHS News Feed - April 20, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Neurology Older people Source Type: news

How Your Genes Can Influence When You Lose Your Virginity
Losing your virginity may seem like a product of circumstance, but according to a new study, the age at which you become sexually active can be—at least in part—determined by your DNA. The study, published in the journal Nature, found that while the age of first sexual experience is influenced more by factors like peer behavior and family background, genetics could account for 25% of variation. As Cambridge University epidemiologist John Perry put it, it’s “one quarter nature, three quarters nurture,” the Guardian reports. Some of the sections of DNA found to be connected with age of first sex...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - April 18, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Sarah Begley Tags: Uncategorized Genetics Source Type: news

Is your DNA making you promiscuous? Genes may influence sexual activity
Geneticists at Cambridge University studied 380,000 people to look for genes that lie behind when people start having sex and how their sexual behaviour continues in later life. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - April 18, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Why your BRAIN could be making you fat
A new Cambridge University study has found that overweight people make diet choices 'divorced' from their knowledge about healthy food. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - April 14, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

PART 1: A Wide-Ranging Conversation with Physicist Geoffrey West about Life, Evolution and US Presidential Politics
GEOFFREY BRIAN WEST (photo courtesy GB West) Redmayne as Hawking. Cumberbatch as Turing. If the timing were right, Christopher Lee would have been superb in the big-screen story of British-born theoretical physicist Geoffrey West. (I've interviewed both.) While Lee was knighted by the Windsors for his service to drama and charity, West was dubbed Time magazine's "One of the 100 Most Influential People in the World." He is best known for his exploration of scaling laws as they pertain to biology, and to cities and companies. Kleiber's law was a particular inspiration. West has also been described as "striking...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - April 13, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Pitoti Digital Rock-Art wins an EU Prize for Cultural Heritage
(University of Cambridge) Researchers from Cambridge University are amongst the winners of the 2016 European Union Prize for Cultural Heritage / Europa Nostra Awards, Europe's highest honor in the heritage field. Of the 28 total winners, four projects are from the UK, including Prehistoric Picture Project Pitoti: Digital Rock-Art led by Dr. Frederick Baker and Dr. Christopher Chippindale of the Division of Archaeology, University of Cambridge. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 7, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Embryos with defective cells 'can still develop healthily'
Conclusion This mouse study helps to advance scientific understanding of how some embryos containing a mix of euploid and aneuploid cells develop normally and others do not. This looks to be related to the proportion of euploid and aneuploid cells early on in the cells' development, and their specific location. However, though the researchers saw clear implications for the assessment of embryo vitality in human fertility clinics, this research is at too early a stage to be able to accurately predict outcomes for human foetal development. Follow-up studies in people are needed to test whether this mice observation happens ...
Source: NHS News Feed - March 30, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Pregnancy/child Genetics/stem cells Source Type: news

How we ignore doctors' genetic test warnings and just leave it to fate
Research by Cambridge University established that people tend to ignore warnings from genetic testing and accept their fate. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - March 16, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Sir Patrick Bateson: Zoologists Should Not 'Hog' Upcoming Royal Society Evolution Meeting
SIR PAUL PATRICK GORDON BATESON (photo, Cambridge University/courtesy PPG Bateson) With knighthood comes responsibility, and Sir Patrick Bateson takes the honor seriously. He was knighted by Queen Elizabeth in 2003 for his service to biology and continues to serve by advancing public understanding of science, by bringing people together, educating. Bateson is one of the organizers of the upcoming Royal Society evolution meeting, for example, a scientific discussion that, in his words, "should impact on how we all think about humanity as a whole." And he's told me that zoologists -- he's one himself -- should not...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - March 11, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Why good cholesterol can be BAD for you, damaging the heart as much as smoking
Until this Cambridge University study it was thought a a high level of so-called 'good', or HDL cholesterol, was associated with a lower risk of heart disease. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - March 11, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Cambridge University Library dusts off Darwin and Newton for display
Pages of books scribbled on by now famous owners are among rare items in 600th anniversary exhibitionCambridge University Library is celebrating its 600th anniversary by putting some of its greatest treasures on display – including volumes that have become more precious because their owners scribbled all over them.Sir Isaac Newton did not so much add notes to his own first edition of Principia Mathematica as an entire extra text, gluing in additional pages running to hundreds of words. William Morris spoke for generations of enraged authors when he scored out a line in the printed text of his translation of Beowulf, ...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - March 8, 2016 Category: Science Authors: Maev Kennedy Tags: Exhibitions University of Cambridge Books Culture Art and design UK news Charles Darwin Isaac Newton Science Source Type: news

Perfectly preserved bronze age wheel unearthed in Cambridgeshire
Archaeologists carefully excavating wheel made of oak planks almost 3,000 years ago at site being called a Fenland PompeiiThe largest and most perfectly preserved bronze age wheel ever discovered in the UK, made of oak planks almost 3,000 years ago, has emerged from a site in Cambridgeshire dubbed a Fenland Pompeii.“This site is one continuing surprise, but if you had asked me, a perfectly preserved wheel is the last thing I would have expected to find,” said the site director, Mark Knight, from the Cambridge university archaeology unit. “On this site objects never seen anywhere else tend to turn up in mu...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - February 19, 2016 Category: Science Authors: Maev Kennedy Tags: Archaeology UK news Science Source Type: news