Children with dystonia can walk again with the help of a brain implant
The research from University College London, Great Ormond Street Hospital, and Cambridge University found that the effects were strongest in the youngest patients. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - December 19, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Partnership between Overleaf and Cambridge University Press provides a new academic authoring experience
Overleaf, an innovative provider of scientific writing and publishing tools, today announced a partnership with Cambridge University Press (CUP) – the publishing business of the University of Cambridge. Through this new partnership authors of three Cambridge journals (see below) are able to write and collaborate using LaTeX into pre-formatted templates, and directly submit manuscripts created in the Overleaf platform to the journals involved. This will simplify the submission process for authors and offer an easier and faster way to collaborate and write articles. The next phase of this implementation will allow CUP ...
Source: News from STM - December 7, 2016 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: STM Publishing News Tags: Editorial Featured Source Type: news

The University Press Redux Conference to continue
Following the success of the founding University Press Redux conference, organised by Liverpool University Press (LUP) and held in March 2016, The Association of Learned and Professional Society Publishers (ALPSP) are delighted to announce they will now be partnering with presses to deliver the event every two years. The next event to be held in spring 2018 will be hosted and curated by UCL Press in London. The inaugural University Press Redux conference was arranged by LUP in association with the Academic Book of the Future project. Over 150 delegates gathered to discuss the past, present and future of institutional press...
Source: News from STM - November 29, 2016 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: STM Publishing News Tags: European Featured Source Type: news

Spectacular bronze age gold torc unearthed in Cambridgeshire field
Gigantic item found by a metal detectorist is among recent finds in England and Wales reported to archaeological authoritiesA gigantic gold torc, so big one expert thinks it may have been worn to protect a pregnant woman, has been found by a metal detectorist in a ploughed field in Cambridgeshire. It was made from 730 grams of almost pure gold more than 3,000 years ago, and is regarded as the best found in England in more than a century.The workmanship closely resembles one from nearby Grunty Fen, found in 1844 by a man cutting peat,now in the collection of the archaeology museum of Cambridge University. However, like many...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - November 28, 2016 Category: Science Authors: Maev Kennedy Tags: Archaeology Heritage British Museum Culture Museums UK news Source Type: news

More 'motherese' an infant hears the better its language development  
Dr Victoria Leong, a researcher at Cambridge University said speaking in a soothing sing-song voice – dubbed ‘motherese’ – helps the baby to enter a state where it is more receptive to learning. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - November 17, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Inability to store fat safely increases diabetes risk
Being unable to store excess fat safely in the body increases the risk of type 2 diabetes, heart attacks and strokes, Cambridge University research suggests. (Source: BBC News | Health | UK Edition)
Source: BBC News | Health | UK Edition - November 14, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Tube map for A-level maths aims to drive smart thinking
All aboard the Number line!Mathematics is the most popular A-level in the UK. But it ’s not turning out the right kind of mathematician.“There is a frustration in maths faculties that students are arriving with top marks and yet they can’t bring together different ideas. They are so very fluent but cannot problem-solve off-piste,” says Lynne McClure of Cambridge University.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - November 14, 2016 Category: Science Authors: Alex Bellos Tags: Mathematics Education Science A-levels Sixth form Schools Source Type: news

Australia Joins The Hunt For Aliens With A Huge Dish Telescope
Scientists in Australia are aiming a huge dish telescope at Proxima Centauri, one of our close solar neighbors, joining the search for extraterrestrial intelligence.  Proxima Centauri is a red dwarf star a mere 4.25 light years from us, where an Earth-like planet ― dubbed Proxima b ― is believed in orbit. Proxima b may have temperatures that could allow liquid water to exist there, scientists speculate.  The next logical jump is speculation that Proxima b may be habitable. The Parkes Radio Telescope (pictured below) in New South Wales will lend a hand, er, dish to the mix, scanning for radio frequencies ...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - November 12, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

A Superbug That Threatens People With Cystic Fibrosis Is Spreading Globally
In this study, researchers from Cambridge and the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute sequenced the genomes of more than 1,000 samples of mycobacteria from 517 CF patients at specialist clinics in Europe, the United States and Australia. They found that the majority of patients had picked up transmissible forms of M. abscessus that had spread globally. Further analysis suggested the infection may be transmitted within hospitals via contaminated surfaces and through the air, the researchers said - presenting a serious challenge to infection control practices in hospitals. Because the superbug has already become resistant to man...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - November 10, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

A Superbug That Threatens People With Cystic Fibrosis Is Spreading Globally
In this study, researchers from Cambridge and the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute sequenced the genomes of more than 1,000 samples of mycobacteria from 517 CF patients at specialist clinics in Europe, the United States and Australia. They found that the majority of patients had picked up transmissible forms of M. abscessus that had spread globally. Further analysis suggested the infection may be transmitted within hospitals via contaminated surfaces and through the air, the researchers said - presenting a serious challenge to infection control practices in hospitals. Because the superbug has already become resistant to man...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - November 10, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Cancer treatment immunotherapy could be made more effective, Cambridge University scientists say
Immunotherapy teaches the body to attack tumours, but fails when patients develop a condition called cancer cachexia, researchers from Cambridge University found. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - November 8, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

[Perspective] Roger Y. Tsien (1952 –2016)
The world of biological chemistry lost one of its most creative pioneers when Roger Y. Tsien died on 24 August 2016 at the age of 64 while biking on a challenging trail in Eugene, Oregon, where he and his wife Wendy had their home. Tsien, who shared the 2008 Nobel Prize in Chemistry, was a professor in the Departments of Pharmacology and of Chemistry and Biochemistry at the University of California, San Diego (UCSD). Born in New York City and raised in Livingston, New Jersey, Roger had special talents that were manifested early—he won the Westinghouse Science Talent Search at age 16 for his original research project,...
Source: ScienceNOW - October 6, 2016 Category: Science Authors: Stephen J. Lippard Tags: Retrospective Source Type: news

Why we ARE what we eat: Defective gene makes some people choose high fat foods
A variant in the melanocortin-4 receptor - found in the area of the brain that controls appetite - makes sugary foods more unappealing, experts from Cambridge University found. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - October 4, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

You Will Never View Violence In Dreams The Same Way
By Dr. Angel Morgan via DreamsCloud In recent years, dream sharing has become more frequent and popular online. When reading these dream narratives, I have found there are some commonly repeated questions about violence in dreams that deserve commentary and discussion. For the sake of dream education, let's get this conversation started. The most general question I see posted after sharing a dream with violence (and usually some kind of gory death) in it, is "Why am I dreaming this??!!" Usually there are other added comments such as, "I would never hurt that person," or, "I am not a violent per...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - October 4, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Japanese scientist wins Nobel medicine prize for work on “ self-eating ” cell mechanism
(Reuters) – Japan’s Yoshinori Ohsumi won the 2016 Nobel prize for medicine for ground-breaking experiments with yeast which exposed a key mechanism in the body’s defenses where cells degrade and recycle their components. Understanding the science behind the process, called “autophagy” or “self-eating”, has led to a better understanding of diseases such as cancer, Parkinson’s and type 2 diabetes, the prize committee said in its statement on Monday. “Ohsumi’s discoveries led to a new paradigm in our understanding of how the cell recycles its content,” it said....
Source: Mass Device - October 4, 2016 Category: Medical Equipment Authors: MassDevice Tags: Research & Development Source Type: news

Mediterranean diet in the UK would save 20,000 lives a year
Researchers from Cambridge University evaluated the effects of an olive oil, fish and nut-rich diet on the health of ordinary people in England - and found it could prevent deaths. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - September 29, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

A Mediterranean diet in the UK would save 20,000 lives a year as one in eight deaths from heart attack and stroke could be prevented by the change
Researchers from Cambridge University evaluated the effects of an olive oil, fish and nut-rich diet on the health of ordinary people in England - and found it could prevent deaths. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - September 29, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

In praise of the humble fruit fly
Drosophila, the hard-working fruit fly widely used in genetics research, is a lot more like us than we might care to think. Time we got to know the little pestIn a series of rooms in theFly Facility of the Department of Genetics at Cambridge University, around 5m fruit flies are kept in test tubes at any given time. They ’re stored at different temperatures to determine varying lengths of life cycle – at 25C, it’s about 10 days; at cooler temperatures as long as five weeks.Out in the wild, there is no pest quite so sympathetic to human needs as the humble fruit fly. It may have spent the summer feasting o...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - September 25, 2016 Category: Science Authors: Andrew Anthony Tags: Medical research Genetics Science Alzheimer's Biology Insects Source Type: news

E. coli found on 24% of chicken from seven UK chain stores
(NaturalNews) One in four chicken products bought in the UK contains killer antibiotic-resistant E. coli bacteria, according to Cambridge University research. The superbug was found in poultry samples taken from top grocery chains ASDA, Aldi, Co-op, Morrisons, Sainsbury's, Tesco and... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - September 12, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Cambridge University Press Launches Cambridge Core
Cambridge Core, the new academic platform from Cambridge University Press has now been launched, bringing together all CUP academic content in one place for the first time. Cambridge Core replaces the Press’s two main platforms – Cambridge Journals Online and Cambridge Books Online, including over 360 journals and 30,000 ebooks. All content from Cambridge Histories Online, Cambridge Companions Online, Shakespeare Survey Online, and partner publisher content from University Publishing Online is also available on the new platform. Every stage of Cambridge Core’s development has been informed by detailed res...
Source: News from STM - September 8, 2016 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: STM Publishing News Source Type: news

The fate of Arctic sea ice – Science Weekly podcast
The extent of the Arctic sea ice continues to drop, but how accurate are the predictions that measure it? And what could happen if it finally disappears?In his latest bookA Farewell to Ice,Peter Wadhams, professor of ocean physics at Cambridge University, explores the current crisis faced by Arctic sea ice, and in doing so makes some alarming predictions. But how accurate are these? And do they even matter, when the potential ramifications of the total disappearance of Arctic sea ice are considered? Joining Ian Sample in the studio this week alongside Professor Wadhams, areDr David Schroeder, at the Centre for Polar Observ...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - September 6, 2016 Category: Science Authors: Presented by Ian Sample and Produced by Max Sanderson Tags: Science Climate change Oceans Environment Source Type: news

Wiley Online Library Platform Now Accessible Via OASIS
Discussions are also underway regarding partnerships with other key academic publishers, including Taylor & Francis Group, Cambridge University Press and World Scientific. “Providing librarians with options to select ebooks from multiple platforms and publishers in OASIS gives them extra flexibility to navigate their very dynamic environment,” said Kevin Sayar, Senior Vice President and General Manager, ProQuest Books. “Enriching the platforms with exacting metadata, unique collection management tools and expert consultation from our Collections development staff creates an incredibly powerful resourc...
Source: News from STM - September 2, 2016 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: STM Publishing News Tags: Digital Featured Source Type: news

Giving diabetic women an artificial pancreas could prevent stillbirths and save thousands of lives
Sixteen women with type 1 diabetes were the first in the world to go through pregnancy with an artificial pancreas in a trial by Cambridge University researchers. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - August 17, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

You're more likely to catch a cold in the morning - especially if you work shifts: Study reveals a disrupted body clock is less able to fight infection
Cambridge University researchers found the body is more susceptible to infections at the start of the day and believe the internal body clock alters how the virus is able to breed and spread. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - August 16, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Gene patterns may explain brain's Alzheimer's vulnerability
Conclusion This type of exploratory science is needed to fully understand complex diseases such as Alzheimer's, which so far have not responded well to treatment. The more we know about how a disease begins and develops, the better chance scientists have of finding ways to treat or prevent it. This research explores one possible contributing factor to Alzheimer's disease. It doesn't provide an early way of telling who will get it – the theory is that everyone has similar regions in their brains that are more vulnerable to protein overgrowth than other regions. And this is not an easy option for a treatmen...
Source: NHS News Feed - August 11, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Neurology Source Type: news

New test could be key to treating prostate cancer
The model – developed by Cambridge University scientists – takes information doctors already receive about cancer patients and uses it to put them into one of five groups in order of severity. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - August 2, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Cambridge University study suggests the average person walks less than half a mile a day
The average person now walks 181 miles a year – less than half a mile a day – Department of Transport figures show. A recent study warned lack of activity raises the risk of early death by 60 per cent. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - July 29, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Our Sedentary Lifestyles Cost About 5 Million Lives A Year
By Kate Kelland LONDON (Reuters) - A study of one million people has found that physical inactivity costs the global economy $67.5 billion a year in healthcare and productivity losses, but an hour a day of exercise could eliminate most of that. Sedentary lifestyles are linked to increased risks of heart disease, diabetes and cancer, researchers found, but activity - such as brisk walking - could counter the higher likelihood of early death linked with sitting for eight or more hours a day. Such inactivity is estimated to cause more than 5 million deaths a year - almost as many as smoking, which the World Health Organi...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - July 28, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Our Sedentary Lifestyles Cost About 5 Million Lives A Year
By Kate Kelland LONDON (Reuters) - A study of one million people has found that physical inactivity costs the global economy $67.5 billion a year in healthcare and productivity losses, but an hour a day of exercise could eliminate most of that. Sedentary lifestyles are linked to increased risks of heart disease, diabetes and cancer, researchers found, but activity - such as brisk walking - could counter the higher likelihood of early death linked with sitting for eight or more hours a day. Such inactivity is estimated to cause more than 5 million deaths a year - almost as many as smoking, which the World Health Organi...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - July 28, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

An hour of exercise a day may compensate for an 'office lifestyle'
Conclusion This study helps to disentangle the effects of having a sedentary lifestyle and being physically active. Previous studies have had conflicting results, with some saying that sitting for long periods can be counteracted by taking exercise, while others disagreed. The advantage of this study is that it looks at time spent sitting as well as time spent being physically active, and calculates how both are linked to mortality and to each other. The study has many strengths, not least its size. It includes data from 1,005,791 people from 16 studies. The researchers applied a standardised protocol and asked study aut...
Source: NHS News Feed - July 28, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Lifestyle/exercise Heart/lungs Source Type: news

A desk job could make you 60% more likely to die earlier
Researchers from Cambridge University say adults who sit down for at least eight hours every day must do at least an hour ’s daily exercise to undo all the harm. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - July 28, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Simon Ross joins Manchester University Press as CEO
Manchester University Press is delighted to announce that after an international search and appointment process Simon Ross, formerly Cambridge University Press’s deputy managing director for academic publishing, has been appointed as Chief Executive Officer of Manchester University Press (MUP). The Chair of Manchester University Press Board, Professor Alistair Ulph, said: “I am delighted that Simon Ross has been appointed to succeed Frances Pinter as CEO of Manchester University Press. He is an outstanding appointment, who brings a clear vision for how he wishes to grow and diversify the range of outputs MUP wi...
Source: News from STM - July 27, 2016 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: STM Publishing News Tags: European Featured Source Type: news

Teen brains can show signs of schizophrenia or depression years before symptoms develop
Cambridge University experts mapped young people's brains, revealing the changes that can signal mental health problems. Experts hope this will shed light on the origins of mental illness. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - July 26, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Cambridge University study shows a varied diet can prevent diabetes
Diets containing all five food groups are 18 per cent more costly than diets containing three food groups or fewer, according to research by the Universities of Cambridge and California. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - July 21, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Alzheimer's breakthrough as experts discover 'HOW to control plaques buildup in the brain'
Scientists at Cambridge University have identified - and shown it may be possible to control - the process which leads to the rapid build-up of amyloid-beta plaques that are a hallmark of Alzheimer's. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - July 20, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Q&A: Young African talent will set science agenda
Each nation should back its 100 brightest and best, says Cambridge University boss Leszek Borysiewicz. (Source: SciDev.Net)
Source: SciDev.Net - July 18, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Q & A: Young African talent will set science agenda
Each nation should back its 100 brightest and best, says Cambridge University boss Leszek Borysiewicz. (Source: SciDev.Net)
Source: SciDev.Net - July 18, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Why don't I have a dad? Agony of single mums' IVF children
Cambridge University researchers found 39 per cent of children were 'neutral' about not having a father around, but 27 per cent had 'mixed feelings' and 8 per cent felt 'negatively' about it. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - July 4, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Anatomy specimens reveal story of infanticide, stillbirth and poverty
Study of 18th and 19th century infant anatomy specimens in UK museums and teaching collections reveals a tragic and sometimes dubious historyThe dubious means by which 18th and 19th century anatomists obtained the bodies of babies and infants to dissect has been revealed in a study by two Cambridge scientists.Specimens procured as a result of grave-robbing, infanticide or mothers so poor they were prepared to sell their dead babies, ended up in many museums of anatomy, including the collection of Cambridge University. In a new study, Piers Mitchell and Jenna Dittmar, of the Cambridge Department of Archaeology and Anthropol...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - July 1, 2016 Category: Science Authors: Maev Kennedy Tags: Human biology Anatomy and physiology Science Museums UK news Source Type: news

Cambridge University study reveals TUESDAY is when we get the best night's sleep
Analysis of heart rate data by Finnish company Firstbeat - collected from almost 5,000 men and women - showed while Tuesday night’s sleep isn’t the longest, it is the most restorative. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - June 27, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Brain scans find differences in 'badly behaved' teen boys
Conclusion This interesting study raises a lot of questions about the way the brain develops in childhood and adolescence, and whether its development is different in those with conduct disorder. However, it doesn't give us answers as to why this might happen. The results suggest there are differences in the development of these children's brains, which may play a part in their condition. However, as with all observational studies, we can't tell from the study whether these brain differences are the cause of the conduct disorder. The study also showed that substance abuse and deprivation were more common among boys with ...
Source: NHS News Feed - June 16, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Neurology Mental health Pregnancy/child Source Type: news

Scans show possible link between brain development and antisocial behaviour
‘Striking’ structural differences seen in study which compared brain scans of young men with antisocial behavioural problems with their healthy peers Brain scans have highlighted “striking” differences between the brains of young men with antisocial behavioural problems and those of their better-behaved peers.The structural changes, seen as variations in the thickness of the brain’s cortex or outer layer of neural tissue, may result from abnormal development in early life, scientists at Cambridge University claim. Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - June 16, 2016 Category: Science Authors: Ian Sample Science editor Tags: Neuroscience Medical research Men's health & wellbeing Children Mental health Society Source Type: news

Cutting PCSO numbers has a real cost
UNISON reiterated its call for an end to cuts to police community support officers (PCSOs) after new research revealed that their presence on the streets helped to deter criminals and reduce crime. The union welcomed the research by the Cambridge University Institute of Criminology, which showed that high-visibility patrols cut time levels. National officer Ben Priestley said: “We now have further proof that PCSOs cut crime. Every £10 invested in the role saves the criminal justice system £56. And he added: “The public will no doubt be wondering why the government has slashed PCSO numbers ...
Source: UNISON meat hygiene - June 15, 2016 Category: Food Science Authors: Amanda Kendal Tags: Article PCSOs police and justice police community support officers Source Type: news

Cambridge University professor suggests women are more likely to suffer anxiety than men
People from North America and Western Europe are more likely to be affected than those in other parts of the world, Cambridge researchers found. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - June 10, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Women nearly twice as likely to have anxiety as men
Scientists from Cambridge University have published a review in Brain & Behaviour which suggests that women are more susceptible to anxiety disorders - possibly because of hormonal differences, or possibly due to the demands of work and childcare. BBC News (Source: Society for Endocrinology)
Source: Society for Endocrinology - June 7, 2016 Category: Endocrinology Source Type: news

Cambridge University scientists reveals wine glass size does matter to the brain
Scientists at the University of Cambridge believe that people drink wine more quickly if served in a bigger glass because the brain is fooled into thinking there is more to consume. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - June 7, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Cambridge University scientists reveal women are more likely to be stressed than men
Scientists at Cambridge University have found that women are 1.9 times as likely to suffer as men, a trend which persists throughout their lifetimes. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - June 6, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Race Delusion: Lies That Divide Us
Jack Moreh, Learning and Education - Brain Functions Development Concept David Livingstone Smith is a Professor of Philosophy at the University of New England in Biddeford, Maine. He earned his Ph.D. from the University of London, Kings College, where he worked on Freud's philosophy of mind and psychology. His current research is focused on dehumanization, race, propaganda, and related topics. David is the author of seven books and numerous academic papers. His most recent book Less Than Human: Why We Demean, Enslave and Exterminate Others (St. Martin's Press, 2011) was awarded the 2012 Anisfield-Wolf award for nonfiction...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - May 31, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Regional dialects are dying out – it’s enough to get you blarting
Britons are increasingly speaking like southern Englanders, according to an app produced by Cambridge University. Here’s a guide to some bostin’ words and phrases at risk of extinctionNever mind whether you take it with jam or cream, does your “scone” rhyme with “gone” or “stone”? Chances are, it’s the former. Basically the “stone” pronunciation of scone is almost gone. Still with me?According to the first set of results from an app mapping changes in English dialects launched in January by the University of Cambridge, regional accents are dying out. The Eng...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - May 30, 2016 Category: Science Authors: Chitra Ramaswamy Tags: Language Science University of Cambridge Higher education Apps Technology Source Type: news

Big Data to Knowledge Updates
BD2K Updates 05/06/2016 Distributed to The NN/LM All Staff listserv featuring links to learning opportunities and related “big” data articles. Data Science Opportunities NCATS Launches the Biomedical Data Translator program: Applications due June 1, 2016. Awards will be made by September 30, 2016. For more information please visit https://ncats.nih.gov/files/NCATS-Translator-FY16-FOA.pdf. Please direct all inquiries to: translator-questions@nih.gov.  Data Science Events Duke University, in partnership with the National Library of Medicine and the NIH Office of the Associate Dire...
Source: The Cornflower - May 9, 2016 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Darlene Kaskie Tags: General Source Type: news