Elephants are conscious beings with BODY awareness, new experiments reveal... are they smarter than humans?
(Natural News) “Dumbo” may be a misnomer. Elephants may be more intelligent than we thought — and trust us,  we already thought very highly of these gentle giants. A team from Cambridge University said in a new study that elephants have high levels of self-awareness; an ability that doesn’t develop in human children until at... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - April 21, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Two older drugs could be 'repurposed' to fight dementia
Conclusion This early stage experimental research has demonstrated a beneficial neurological effect of trazodone and dibenzoylmethane on mice with diseases mimicking neurodegenerative diseases. It is important to acknowledge that this is animal research and therefore the drugs might not have the same effect when they are trialled on humans. That being said, trazodone is already an approved drug for depression and sleep problems and has therefore already passed safety tests. If the mechanisms of neurodegeneration in humans and mice are similar, it is possible trazodone could be used in the future in treating Alzheimer's and...
Source: NHS News Feed - April 20, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Older people Neurology Medication Source Type: news

Climate change and risk to fossil fuel industry: Sustainability train has left the station
(Cambridge University Press) Two seminal articles by energy experts in the latest issue of MRS Energy and Sustainability (MRS E&S) examine the climate-related risks facing the fossil fuel industry and conclude that the sustainability train has already well and truly left the station -- and is not coming back. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 18, 2017 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Eating for two 'harms the health of mum and baby'
Cambridge University researchers discovered how sugary foods eaten during pregnancy may permanently disrupt crucial processes in the mother and child. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - April 6, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Moderate drinking may reduce heart disease risk
Conclusion This study paints a more complicated picture than the "Pint a day keeps the doctor away" story proffered by The Sun. It seems to confirm the findings of other studies, which have shown that non-drinkers tend to have a higher risk of cardiovascular diseases than people who drink moderately. It suggests that some cardiovascular diseases (mainly those directly affecting the heart) seem to have a stronger link to a possible protective effect from alcohol than other vascular diseases, such as mini-strokes and bleeding in the brain. However, this can't be concluded with certainty due to the study design. We ...
Source: NHS News Feed - March 23, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Heart/lungs Food/diet Lifestyle/exercise Source Type: news

‘Golly’, ‘cassette’ and ‘croquet’: the words we no longer use
A new study sheds light on how the English language is changing – but what shapes the vocabulary du jour?A huge ongoing study by Lancaster University and Cambridge University has discovered what, in fact, we probably knew already: thatword-usage changes continuously under the pressures of historical malaise, new sensitivities, the new machineries of life and fashion.“Golly” is fast going. No need to ask why. Good thing, too. And “gosh” is long gone; it’s one of those euphemistic items of religious vocabulary (along with “blimey” and “gadzooks”) that we largely god...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - March 15, 2017 Category: Science Authors: John Sutherland Tags: Language Science Source Type: news

Pruitt Earns A Failing Grade When It Comes To Climate Science
EPA Administrator Scott Pruitt said on CNBC: “I think that measuring with precision human activity on the climate is something very challenging to do, and there’s tremendous disagreement about the degree of impact, so no, I would not agree that it’s a primary contributor to the global warming that we see.” This is consistent with Pruitt’s previous public statements and writings on climate change. It is also false and misleading. There is not “tremendous disagreement” among scientists but a strong consensus that humans are the primary cause of recent climate change. The consensus ...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - March 14, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

Awesome still massively popular but say goodbye to tar-rah matey
(Lancaster University) The study, by Lancaster University and Cambridge University Press, looks at the most characteristic words of informal chit-chat in today's Britain. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - March 13, 2017 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Strong Industry Growth leads to Maverick extending its expertise and support for 2017
Recent client demand for specific expertise and support across all three of its core service areas has resulted in Maverick Publishing Specialists Ltd., the strategic consultancy and outsource services company, adding a number of senior level expert Associates over the last 3 months. Further strengthening its ability to provide Board level and specialist support in Marketing, Sales, Market Research, and all areas of Content and Technology consultancy, Maverick is seeing an Industry in strong growth mode. Recent additions to its Publishing support team include Ruth King, as Affiliate Senior Associate, Open Access. With deep...
Source: News from STM - March 11, 2017 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: STM Publishing News Tags: European Featured Source Type: news

Artificial mouse embryos created
Conclusion This early-stage research offers a good insight into the development of mouse embryos and the sequence of biological steps that take place up to the point of implantation in the womb and immediately afterwards. They could provide an insight into the early stages of human life. However, this does not mean that the creation of artificial human life is now possible: The study was carried out on mice stem cells, which have a very different biological make-up to humans so the processes may not be identical with human cells. While the artificial mouse embryo seemed to behave like a natural one, it is unlikely it c...
Source: NHS News Feed - March 3, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Genetics/stem cells Source Type: news

Medical News Today: Breakthrough: Scientists create mouse embryo
Researchers from Cambridge University in the United Kingdom have managed to create a self-organizing structure that looks and behaves like a mouse embryo. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - March 3, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Stem Cell Research Source Type: news

Artificial embryo shows potential for medical therapies, not babies
Trying to mimic the early stages of reproduction, Cambridge University researchers cultivated two types of mouse stem cells in a Petri dish and watched an embryo emerge -- one that closely resembled a natural mouse embryo in its architecture, its development process and its ability to assemble itself. (Source: CNN.com - Health)
Source: CNN.com - Health - March 2, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Liquid hydrogen may be way forward for sustainable air travel
(Cambridge University Press) With sustainable solutions in mind, a new study published by eminent physicist Jo Hermans in MRS Energy and Sustainability--A Review Journal (MRS E&S) looks at the energy efficiency of current modes of transportion. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 23, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Cocaine use raises the risk of dementia
Regular use of the illegal drug causes excessive amounts of iron to accumulate in parts of the brain and causes cell death - a known cause of dementia, Cambridge University experts found. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - February 21, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Dedicated Scholarly Publishing Conference Programme Announced
Speakers from Wiley, Elsevier and Taylor & Francis are among the prestigious names participating in LBF’s dedicated academic publishing conference, The Research and Scholarly Publishing Forum, this year. The popular conference, now in its third year, will be hosted by co-chairs Mandy Hill, Managing Director of Academic Publishing at Cambridge University Press, and Helen Dobson, Scholarly Communications Manager at the University of Manchester. The half-day conference offers delegates a compact schedule of lively panel debates, ‘in conversation with’ sessions, keynote speeches and networking, and is pro...
Source: News from STM - February 16, 2017 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: STM Publishing News Tags: European Events Source Type: news

Do Charles Darwin's private letters contradict his public sexism?
He declared that women ’s brains were “analogous to those of animals”, but conducted scholarly personal correspondence with women, new book revealsCharles Darwin may have held less hostile views about women than previously thought, according to a new book out this month. Drawing on letters between the father of evolutionary science and the women he knew, the book reveals close ties between the scientist, his family and leading feminist figures in the 19th century, including medical pioneer Elizabeth Garrett Anderson and social reformer Josephine Butler.Darwin and Women by Samantha Evans, published by Camb...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - February 8, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Danuta Kean Tags: Books Biography Culture Charles Darwin Science Feminism Women Evolution Biology Source Type: news

Putting on just half a stone can raise diabetes risk
Scientists at Cambridge University say that if everyone aged 30 to 60 maintained their weight, one in five cases of type 2 diabetes could be prevented. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - February 7, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Why advances in treating those with brain injuries require advances in respecting their rights
This article was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article. -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website. (Source: Science - The Huffington Post)
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - January 29, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

Burnt toast ISN'T dangerous - unless you have 320 slices
Acrylamide is created when some foods are cooked for long periods at high temperature. But adults don't consume enough to be at risk, a Cambridge University statistician claims. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - January 23, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

How statistics lost their power – and why we should fear what comes next | William Davies
The ability of statistics to accurately represent the world is declining. In its wake, a new age of big data controlled by private companies is taking over – and putting democracy in perilIn theory, statistics should help settle arguments. They ought to provide stable reference points that everyone – no matter what their politics – can agree on. Yet in recent years, divergent levels of trust in statistics has become one of the key schisms that have opened up in western liberal democracies. Shortly before the November presidential election, a study in the US discovered that68% of Trump supporters distruste...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - January 19, 2017 Category: Science Authors: William Davies Tags: Government data Technology Politics Office for National Statistics UK news Smartphones Source Type: news

Trust backed to exit special measures after 'wake up call'
Cambridge University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust has been recommended to leave the “special measures” regime by the Care Quality Commission, after it was rated as “good” in its last inspection. (Source: Nursing Times)
Source: Nursing Times - January 18, 2017 Category: Nursing Source Type: news

Teaching trust recommended to exit special measures after 'wake up call'
Cambridge University Hospitals Foundation Trust has been recommended to leave special measures by the Care Quality Commission, after it was rated good in its last inspection. (Source: HSJ)
Source: HSJ - January 18, 2017 Category: UK Health Source Type: news

Updated: Prestigious teaching trust exits special measures
Cambridge University Hospitals Foundation Trust has been recommended to leave special measures by the Care Quality Commission, after it was rated good in its last inspection. (Source: HSJ)
Source: HSJ - January 18, 2017 Category: UK Health Source Type: news

How can publishers help librarians? Cambridge University Press leads the way with a metadata revolution
It’s no secret that library budgets have been slashed in recent years, and the burdens of trying to do more with less are growing for librarians and information professionals. But what is it that adds most stress to the lives of cataloguers and librarians? Quite possibly it is unhappy users; users that cannot find resources within library catalogues and consequently cannot use these resources within publishers’ platforms. Cambridge University Press is listening to these concerns and has embarked on a huge project to improve the discoverability of resources and ensure that the MARC (MAchine-readable cataloging)&...
Source: News from STM - January 16, 2017 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: STM Publishing News Tags: European Featured Source Type: news

On the Verge of Immortality, Or Are We Stuck with Death? A New Direction For Research Could Provide the Answers--and More
How long can human beings live? Is there an outside limit? Do we know enough about aging to break through possible biological barriers? Is the current approach to curing "age associated diseases" like Alzheimer's flawed? Experts are sharply divided. In 1962 eminent biologist Leonard Hayflick discovered that normal human fetal cells replicate a limited number of times. This phenomenon promptly acquired the moniker the "Hayflick Limit." Later, biologists Calvin Harley and Carol Greider provided the molecular explanation for the Hayflick limit with their discovery that telomeres, the DNA biological materi...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - January 13, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Cambridge University Press Appoints new Academic Senior Vice President
Academic and educational publisher Cambridge University Press has appointed Brigitte Shull as Senior Vice President for Academic Publishing in the Americas. Brigitte Shull, who was most recently the Vice President of Management, Business, Economics, and Political Science Publishing at Springer Nature, will take up the role in January and report to Managing Director, Academic, Mandy Hill. She will be responsible for the overall management and direction for Cambridge University Press’ Academic business in the Americas. In accepting the position, she said: “It is a great honor to join Cambridge University Press- a...
Source: News from STM - January 5, 2017 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: STM Publishing News Tags: Featured World Source Type: news

John Stewart obituary
My husband, John Stewart, who has died aged 73 from cancer, was reader emeritus in gravitational physics at Cambridge University, and a fellow of King ’s College for more than 40 years.John was born and brought up in Pinner, at that time in Middlesex. His father, James Stewart, was a Glaswegian who had been apprenticed at John Brown ’s shipyard but left Scotland in the 1930s and thereafter worked mainly for United Dairies as an engineer. His mother, Hilda (nee Hale), was a London-trained nurse from Merthyr Vale in south Wales. John was the eldest of their three sons.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - December 22, 2016 Category: Science Authors: Mary Stewart Tags: Physics Science Education University of Cambridge UK news Source Type: news

Children with dystonia can walk again with the help of a brain implant
The research from University College London, Great Ormond Street Hospital, and Cambridge University found that the effects were strongest in the youngest patients. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - December 19, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Partnership between Overleaf and Cambridge University Press provides a new academic authoring experience
Overleaf, an innovative provider of scientific writing and publishing tools, today announced a partnership with Cambridge University Press (CUP) – the publishing business of the University of Cambridge. Through this new partnership authors of three Cambridge journals (see below) are able to write and collaborate using LaTeX into pre-formatted templates, and directly submit manuscripts created in the Overleaf platform to the journals involved. This will simplify the submission process for authors and offer an easier and faster way to collaborate and write articles. The next phase of this implementation will allow CUP ...
Source: News from STM - December 7, 2016 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: STM Publishing News Tags: Editorial Featured Source Type: news

The University Press Redux Conference to continue
Following the success of the founding University Press Redux conference, organised by Liverpool University Press (LUP) and held in March 2016, The Association of Learned and Professional Society Publishers (ALPSP) are delighted to announce they will now be partnering with presses to deliver the event every two years. The next event to be held in spring 2018 will be hosted and curated by UCL Press in London. The inaugural University Press Redux conference was arranged by LUP in association with the Academic Book of the Future project. Over 150 delegates gathered to discuss the past, present and future of institutional press...
Source: News from STM - November 29, 2016 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: STM Publishing News Tags: European Featured Source Type: news

Spectacular bronze age gold torc unearthed in Cambridgeshire field
Gigantic item found by a metal detectorist is among recent finds in England and Wales reported to archaeological authoritiesA gigantic gold torc, so big one expert thinks it may have been worn to protect a pregnant woman, has been found by a metal detectorist in a ploughed field in Cambridgeshire. It was made from 730 grams of almost pure gold more than 3,000 years ago, and is regarded as the best found in England in more than a century.The workmanship closely resembles one from nearby Grunty Fen, found in 1844 by a man cutting peat,now in the collection of the archaeology museum of Cambridge University. However, like many...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - November 28, 2016 Category: Science Authors: Maev Kennedy Tags: Archaeology Heritage British Museum Culture Museums UK news Source Type: news

More 'motherese' an infant hears the better its language development  
Dr Victoria Leong, a researcher at Cambridge University said speaking in a soothing sing-song voice – dubbed ‘motherese’ – helps the baby to enter a state where it is more receptive to learning. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - November 17, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Inability to store fat safely increases diabetes risk
Being unable to store excess fat safely in the body increases the risk of type 2 diabetes, heart attacks and strokes, Cambridge University research suggests. (Source: BBC News | Health | UK Edition)
Source: BBC News | Health | UK Edition - November 14, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Tube map for A-level maths aims to drive smart thinking
All aboard the Number line!Mathematics is the most popular A-level in the UK. But it ’s not turning out the right kind of mathematician.“There is a frustration in maths faculties that students are arriving with top marks and yet they can’t bring together different ideas. They are so very fluent but cannot problem-solve off-piste,” says Lynne McClure of Cambridge University.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - November 14, 2016 Category: Science Authors: Alex Bellos Tags: Mathematics Education Science A-levels Sixth form Schools Source Type: news

Australia Joins The Hunt For Aliens With A Huge Dish Telescope
Scientists in Australia are aiming a huge dish telescope at Proxima Centauri, one of our close solar neighbors, joining the search for extraterrestrial intelligence.  Proxima Centauri is a red dwarf star a mere 4.25 light years from us, where an Earth-like planet ― dubbed Proxima b ― is believed in orbit. Proxima b may have temperatures that could allow liquid water to exist there, scientists speculate.  The next logical jump is speculation that Proxima b may be habitable. The Parkes Radio Telescope (pictured below) in New South Wales will lend a hand, er, dish to the mix, scanning for radio frequencies ...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - November 12, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

A Superbug That Threatens People With Cystic Fibrosis Is Spreading Globally
In this study, researchers from Cambridge and the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute sequenced the genomes of more than 1,000 samples of mycobacteria from 517 CF patients at specialist clinics in Europe, the United States and Australia. They found that the majority of patients had picked up transmissible forms of M. abscessus that had spread globally. Further analysis suggested the infection may be transmitted within hospitals via contaminated surfaces and through the air, the researchers said - presenting a serious challenge to infection control practices in hospitals. Because the superbug has already become resistant to man...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - November 10, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

A Superbug That Threatens People With Cystic Fibrosis Is Spreading Globally
In this study, researchers from Cambridge and the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute sequenced the genomes of more than 1,000 samples of mycobacteria from 517 CF patients at specialist clinics in Europe, the United States and Australia. They found that the majority of patients had picked up transmissible forms of M. abscessus that had spread globally. Further analysis suggested the infection may be transmitted within hospitals via contaminated surfaces and through the air, the researchers said - presenting a serious challenge to infection control practices in hospitals. Because the superbug has already become resistant to man...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - November 10, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Cancer treatment immunotherapy could be made more effective, Cambridge University scientists say
Immunotherapy teaches the body to attack tumours, but fails when patients develop a condition called cancer cachexia, researchers from Cambridge University found. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - November 8, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

[Perspective] Roger Y. Tsien (1952 –2016)
The world of biological chemistry lost one of its most creative pioneers when Roger Y. Tsien died on 24 August 2016 at the age of 64 while biking on a challenging trail in Eugene, Oregon, where he and his wife Wendy had their home. Tsien, who shared the 2008 Nobel Prize in Chemistry, was a professor in the Departments of Pharmacology and of Chemistry and Biochemistry at the University of California, San Diego (UCSD). Born in New York City and raised in Livingston, New Jersey, Roger had special talents that were manifested early—he won the Westinghouse Science Talent Search at age 16 for his original research project,...
Source: ScienceNOW - October 6, 2016 Category: Science Authors: Stephen J. Lippard Tags: Retrospective Source Type: news

Why we ARE what we eat: Defective gene makes some people choose high fat foods
A variant in the melanocortin-4 receptor - found in the area of the brain that controls appetite - makes sugary foods more unappealing, experts from Cambridge University found. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - October 4, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

You Will Never View Violence In Dreams The Same Way
By Dr. Angel Morgan via DreamsCloud In recent years, dream sharing has become more frequent and popular online. When reading these dream narratives, I have found there are some commonly repeated questions about violence in dreams that deserve commentary and discussion. For the sake of dream education, let's get this conversation started. The most general question I see posted after sharing a dream with violence (and usually some kind of gory death) in it, is "Why am I dreaming this??!!" Usually there are other added comments such as, "I would never hurt that person," or, "I am not a violent per...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - October 4, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Japanese scientist wins Nobel medicine prize for work on “ self-eating ” cell mechanism
(Reuters) – Japan’s Yoshinori Ohsumi won the 2016 Nobel prize for medicine for ground-breaking experiments with yeast which exposed a key mechanism in the body’s defenses where cells degrade and recycle their components. Understanding the science behind the process, called “autophagy” or “self-eating”, has led to a better understanding of diseases such as cancer, Parkinson’s and type 2 diabetes, the prize committee said in its statement on Monday. “Ohsumi’s discoveries led to a new paradigm in our understanding of how the cell recycles its content,” it said....
Source: Mass Device - October 3, 2016 Category: Medical Equipment Authors: MassDevice Tags: Research & Development Source Type: news

Mediterranean diet in the UK would save 20,000 lives a year
Researchers from Cambridge University evaluated the effects of an olive oil, fish and nut-rich diet on the health of ordinary people in England - and found it could prevent deaths. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - September 29, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

A Mediterranean diet in the UK would save 20,000 lives a year as one in eight deaths from heart attack and stroke could be prevented by the change
Researchers from Cambridge University evaluated the effects of an olive oil, fish and nut-rich diet on the health of ordinary people in England - and found it could prevent deaths. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - September 29, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

In praise of the humble fruit fly
Drosophila, the hard-working fruit fly widely used in genetics research, is a lot more like us than we might care to think. Time we got to know the little pestIn a series of rooms in theFly Facility of the Department of Genetics at Cambridge University, around 5m fruit flies are kept in test tubes at any given time. They ’re stored at different temperatures to determine varying lengths of life cycle – at 25C, it’s about 10 days; at cooler temperatures as long as five weeks.Out in the wild, there is no pest quite so sympathetic to human needs as the humble fruit fly. It may have spent the summer feasting o...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - September 25, 2016 Category: Science Authors: Andrew Anthony Tags: Medical research Genetics Science Alzheimer's Biology Insects Source Type: news

E. coli found on 24% of chicken from seven UK chain stores
(NaturalNews) One in four chicken products bought in the UK contains killer antibiotic-resistant E. coli bacteria, according to Cambridge University research. The superbug was found in poultry samples taken from top grocery chains ASDA, Aldi, Co-op, Morrisons, Sainsbury's, Tesco and... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - September 12, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Cambridge University Press Launches Cambridge Core
Cambridge Core, the new academic platform from Cambridge University Press has now been launched, bringing together all CUP academic content in one place for the first time. Cambridge Core replaces the Press’s two main platforms – Cambridge Journals Online and Cambridge Books Online, including over 360 journals and 30,000 ebooks. All content from Cambridge Histories Online, Cambridge Companions Online, Shakespeare Survey Online, and partner publisher content from University Publishing Online is also available on the new platform. Every stage of Cambridge Core’s development has been informed by detailed res...
Source: News from STM - September 8, 2016 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: STM Publishing News Source Type: news

The fate of Arctic sea ice – Science Weekly podcast
The extent of the Arctic sea ice continues to drop, but how accurate are the predictions that measure it? And what could happen if it finally disappears?In his latest bookA Farewell to Ice,Peter Wadhams, professor of ocean physics at Cambridge University, explores the current crisis faced by Arctic sea ice, and in doing so makes some alarming predictions. But how accurate are these? And do they even matter, when the potential ramifications of the total disappearance of Arctic sea ice are considered? Joining Ian Sample in the studio this week alongside Professor Wadhams, areDr David Schroeder, at the Centre for Polar Observ...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - September 6, 2016 Category: Science Authors: Presented by Ian Sample and Produced by Max Sanderson Tags: Science Climate change Oceans Environment Source Type: news

Wiley Online Library Platform Now Accessible Via OASIS
Discussions are also underway regarding partnerships with other key academic publishers, including Taylor & Francis Group, Cambridge University Press and World Scientific. “Providing librarians with options to select ebooks from multiple platforms and publishers in OASIS gives them extra flexibility to navigate their very dynamic environment,” said Kevin Sayar, Senior Vice President and General Manager, ProQuest Books. “Enriching the platforms with exacting metadata, unique collection management tools and expert consultation from our Collections development staff creates an incredibly powerful resourc...
Source: News from STM - September 2, 2016 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: STM Publishing News Tags: Digital Featured Source Type: news

Giving diabetic women an artificial pancreas could prevent stillbirths and save thousands of lives
Sixteen women with type 1 diabetes were the first in the world to go through pregnancy with an artificial pancreas in a trial by Cambridge University researchers. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - August 17, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news