Women with polycystic ovary syndrome are more likely to have a child with autism
Women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) are more likely than other women to have an autistic child, according to an analysis of NHS data carried out by a team at Cambridge University ’ s Autism Research Centre. The research is published today in the journal Translational Psychiatry. The team stressed that the likelihood of having an autistic child is still very low, even among women with PCOS – but finding this link provides an important clue in understanding one of the multiple causal factors in autism. (Source: University of Bristol news)
Source: University of Bristol news - August 2, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Tags: Health, Research; Faculty of Health Sciences, Faculty of Health Sciences, Bristol Medical School; Press Release Source Type: news

Women with PCOS found to be ‘more likely to have autistic child’
Women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) are more likely than other women to have an autistic child, according to an analysis of NHS data carried out by Cambridge University. (Source: Nursing Times)
Source: Nursing Times - August 1, 2018 Category: Nursing Source Type: news

Former refugee among winners of Fields medal – the 'Nobel prize for maths'
Caucher Birkar grew up on a farm near the Kurdish city of Marivan in Iran and spoke little English when he began his PhDAn Kurdish man who came to Britain as a refugee after fleeing conflict two decades ago is one of four men who have been awarded the Fields medal, considered the equivalent of a Nobel prize for mathematics.The winners of the prize, presented at the International Congress of the International Mathematical Union in Rio de Janeiro, have been announced as Prof Caucher Birkar, 40, from Cambridge University, Prof Akshay Venkatesh, 36, an Australian based at Princeton and Stanford in the US, Prof Alessio Figalli,...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - August 1, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Nicola Davis and Naaman Zhou Tags: Mathematics Science University of Cambridge Education Higher education Refugees University of Nottingham Source Type: news

Women with PCOS are 35% more likely to have a child with autism
Experts today described the new Cambridge University study as an 'important piece of new evidence' as the medical community remains flummoxed by the cause of ASD. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - August 1, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Women with polycystic ovary syndrome more likely to have a child with autism
(University of Cambridge) Women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) are more likely than other women to have an autistic child, according to an analysis of NHS data carried out by a team at Cambridge University's Autism Research Centre. The research is published today in the journal Translational Psychiatry. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - August 1, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Mothers in some areas of England are more likely to have a C-section
Official figures revealed nearly a third of all births at Cambridge University Hospitals FT are elective Caesareans. In contrast, the rate is just 3.6 per cent at the Dorset County Hospital FT. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - July 26, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

How the sex of your baby may predict pregnancy complications!
Cambridge University researchers discovered the sex of a baby controls levels of a metabolite that plays an important role in all bodily cells in the pregnant mother's blood. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - July 12, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

How my wife’s death inspired invention of cancer breathalyser
AN inventor whose breathalyser cancer detector scooped Britain ’s top engineering award has told how his own wife’s fatal illness inspired him. Billy Boyle, a Cambridge University graduate, lost his wife Kate at 36 to colon cancer on Christmas Day 2014. (Source: Daily Express - Health)
Source: Daily Express - Health - June 29, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

'Breathalyser' that could save thousands of lives by scoops Britain's top engineering award
Inventor Billy Boyle, a Cambridge University graduate, says the miracle device was inspired by his wife's late diagnosis and death from colon cancer. Mr Boyle says his goal is to save 100,000 lives. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - June 28, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Mountain-dwellers near Everest have forearms 1cm shorter than lowland people, study finds
Researchers led by Cambridge University PhD student Stephanie Payne compared the length of people arms in Nepal and found those living at altitude have significantly shorter forearms. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - June 19, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Shelford Group trust signs £107m IT deal
Cambridge University Hospitals Foundation Trust has signed a £107m contract with Northern Ireland company to provide IT support services. (Source: HSJ)
Source: HSJ - June 14, 2018 Category: UK Health Source Type: news

For Women With Early Breast Cancer, Herceptin Treatment Can Be Much Shorter
A large, new study shows that the treatment regimen, typically recommended for a year, can be just as effective at 6 months, reducing serious side effects and costs. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - May 16, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: DENISE GRADY Tags: Breast Cancer Herceptin (Drug) American Society of Clinical Oncology Cambridge University side effects Genentech Inc Source Type: news

Impact of weather and well-timed cultural management techniques on organic weed control
(Cambridge University Press) Weed management can be a tough challenge in organic cropping systems since growers don't have herbicides in their weed control arsenal. New research published in the journal Weed Science, though, shows that weather conditions and well-timed cultural management techniques can help fill the void by making crops more competitive. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 15, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Matter: In Ancient Skeletons, Scientists Discover a Modern Foe: Hepatitis B
From 15 sets of skeletal remains, researchers have recovered DNA from the oldest viruses known to have infected humans — and have resurrected some strains in the laboratory. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - May 9, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: CARL ZIMMER Tags: Hepatitis Genetics and Heredity Skeletons Viruses Bones Bronze Age Liver Cancer Epidemics Cambridge University Nature (Journal) University of Copenhagen eLife (Journal) Source Type: news

High cholesterol increases Alzheimer's proteins in the brain
Researchers from Cambridge University found that cholesterol in the brain triggers the formation of protein plaques that have previously been associated with Alzheimer's. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - May 7, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

High cholesterol increases the build up of Alzheimer's proteins in the brain by 20 times
Researchers from Cambridge University found that cholesterol in the brain triggers the formation of protein plaques that have previously been associated with Alzheimer's. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - May 7, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Woman with Down's contributes to Alzheimer's research
Amy is part of a Cambridge University study to find a treatment for Alzheimer's. (Source: BBC News | Health | UK Edition)
Source: BBC News | Health | UK Edition - May 7, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Resilience: The Science of Mastering Life ’s Greatest Challenges
Dr. Steven Southwick and Dr. Dennis Charney (Cambridge University Press) (Source: Yale Science and Health News)
Source: Yale Science and Health News - May 3, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Taylor & Francis and Cambridge University Press Join Blockchain for Peer Review Project
Two more publishers have joined the initiative, announced in March 2018, which focuses on the problems of research reproducibility, recognition of reviewers and the rising burden of the peer-review process. The project will develop a protocol where information about peer review activities (submitted by publishers) are stored on a blockchain. This will allow the review process to be independently validated, and data to be fed to relevant vehicles to ensure recognition and validation for reviewers. By sharing peer review information, while adhering to laws on privacy, data protection and confidentiality, we hope to foster in...
Source: News from STM - April 26, 2018 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: STM Publishing News Tags: Digital Source Type: news

Cambridge University Press and Code Ocean Announce Partnership
Cambridge University Press (the Press), one of the world’s leading University Presses, has partnered with Code Ocean, a platform that enables authors of articles in Press journals to publish and share code associated with their research and readers to view and run that code from within articles. Code Ocean, a computational reproducibility platform, enables authors to openly publish their code on the platform, thereby making it free for others to access, download and share. Sharing the code and data underlying research is an important step in demonstrating that the results presented in research articles can be reprodu...
Source: News from STM - April 23, 2018 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: STM Publishing News Tags: Editorial Source Type: news

Rising diabetes means 15 MILLION people living with health problems
The Academy of Medical Sciences warning comes just weeks after Cambridge University researchers found that one in four Britons were living with several health complaints. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - April 19, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Springer Nature, Cambridge University Press, Thieme and ResearchGate announce new cooperation to make it easier to navigate the legal sharing of academic journal articles
In a cooperation agreement announced today, three publishers and ResearchGate will work together on the sharing of articles on the scholarly collaboration platform in a way that protects the rights of authors and publishers. The agreement ultimately involves publishers who want to help and support content sharing and believe that working with ResearchGate, the largest professional network for scientists and academics, is one of the important means to achieving this. As part of the agreement: ResearchGate and publishers will cooperate in educating users about their rights in relation to copyright-protected content by provi...
Source: News from STM - April 19, 2018 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: STM Publishing News Tags: Digital Featured Source Type: news

Rising diabetes has left 15 MILLION people living with 2 or more serious health problems
The Academy of Medical Sciences warning comes just weeks after Cambridge University researchers found that one in four Britons were living with several health complaints. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - April 19, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Ten glasses of wine a week can cut two years off life, experts warn
Drinking ten glasses of wine a week can cut life expectancy by two years, a major study from Cambridge University says. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - April 13, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Deadly cost of extra drink: 10 glasses of wine a week can cut two years off your life, experts warn  
Drinking ten glasses of wine a week can cut life expectancy by two years, a major study from Cambridge University says. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - April 13, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Alan Baker obituary
Distinguished mathematician who won the Fields medal for his contribution to number theoryIn 1966 the start of a new era in number theory was marked by Alan Baker, who has died aged 78, joining the department of pure mathematics at Cambridge University. With a cascade of papers, he had published solutions to a series of problems from a line of inquiry that went back to the third-century mathematicianDiophantus of Alexandria. On the basis of this exceptional work, in 1970 Alan was awarded the Fields medal, one of the discipline ’s highest distinctions.The interest of Diophantus ’s approach to equations lies in w...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - April 9, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Gisbert W üstholz Tags: Mathematics University of Cambridge People in science UCL (University College London) Source Type: news

Clara Santato awarded 2018 MRS Communications Lecture
(Cambridge University Press) We are delighted to announce to Clara Santato, Polytechnique Montr é al, has been awarded the 2018 MRS Communications Lecture. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 3, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Locals share their memories at Stephen Hawking ’s funeral
Huge turnout at service, as those who knew him reminisce about the great physicistRain had been promised but, as with many of the gloomiest predictions made for the young Stephen Hawking, the threatened deluge did not come.Indeed, despite the solemnity of the occasion, the Cambridge funeral of a man who throughout his life seemed to command as much admiration from the lay public as from his academic peers was something of a celebration.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - March 31, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Jamie Doward Tags: Stephen Hawking UK news Cambridge University of Cambridge Science Source Type: news

Stephen Hawking: crowds line streets of Cambridge for physicist's funeral
Service is being held at church near Gonville and Caius College, physicist ’s academic home for 52 yearsThe actor Eddie Redmayne gave a reading at the funeral of Prof Stephen Hawking, as well-wishers lined the streets and applause broke out as the renowned physicist ’s coffin was carried into the church.Redmayne, who played Hawking in the 2014 biographical drama The Theory of Everything, was among 500 guests invited to the University Church of St Mary the Great in Cambridge. He gave a biblical reading at the service and the astronomer royal Martin Rees also spoke.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - March 31, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Press Association Tags: Stephen Hawking UK news Cambridge University of Cambridge Science Source Type: news

Cambridge University Press Announces New Home for Authors
Cambridge University Press (the Press) has today announced the expansion of Author Hub into a new, integrated online platform for book authors. Since its launch in 2013, Author Hub has expanded to offer services for current and prospective authors spanning all three of the Press’s publishing groups – Academic, ELT and Education – to support them throughout the publishing process and offer an enhanced experience. Authors have been involved in testing Author Hub throughout its development to ensure it serves their needs. The following services will be available on the platform: Exclusive access to a wide r...
Source: News from STM - March 22, 2018 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: STM Publishing News Tags: Editorial Featured Source Type: news

Five-tier model may allow for more precise prostate cancer treatment
The Cambridge University Hospitals system in Britain has developed a five-tied model that will help medical personnel better treat prostate cancer patients. (Source: Health News - UPI.com)
Source: Health News - UPI.com - March 16, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Famed Physicist Stephen Hawking Has Died at the Age of 76
(LONDON) — Stephen Hawking, whose brilliant mind ranged across time and space though his body was paralyzed by disease, died early Wednesday, a University of Cambridge spokesman said. He was 76 years old. Hawking died peacefully at his home in Cambridge, England. The best-known theoretical physicist of his time, Hawking wrote so lucidly of the mysteries of space, time and black holes that his book, “A Brief History of Time,” became an international best seller, making him one of science’s biggest celebrities since Albert Einstein. “He was a great scientist and an extraordinary man whose work a...
Source: TIME: Science - March 14, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Robert Barr / AP Tags: Uncategorized onetime overnight remembrance Source Type: news

Sir John Sulston obituary
Pioneering biologist best known for his work on the human genome who was a fierce advocate of free access to scientific dataIn 2002 the biologist John Sulston, who has died of stomach cancer aged 75,shared a Nobel prize for physiology. He won it for elucidating the entire sequence in which the daughters of a single cell divide and sometimes disappear as an embryo grows into an adult in the tiny roundwormCaenorhabditis elegans. However, he is much better known for leading the British team that sequenced a third of the human genome, and for the fierce integrity with which he successfully argued that all genomic data should b...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - March 11, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Georgina Ferry Tags: Genetics Human Genome Project Biology Science Nobel prizes Science prizes People in science Cancer Cambridge University of Cambridge US news California Source Type: news

Thousands of prostate cancer patients could be spared surgery
Experts at Cambridge University have created a tool that calculates a man ’s chances of dying from the cancer with 90 per cent accuracy. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - March 10, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Pre-bunking: can you be ‘brainwashed’ into spotting fake news?
Cambridge University is recruiting thousands of people to play a fake-news simulator, in the hope they will learn to identify the real thingName: Pre-bunking.Age: A modern malaise/cure, still in its early infancy.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - February 20, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Guardian Staff Tags: Social media Psychology Science University of Cambridge Digital media Source Type: news

Research reveals why women have colder hands
A Cambridge University study revealed last week that women's hands suffer the cold more than men's because women have less muscle mass and more fatty tissue. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - February 20, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Excessive calcium in the brain may be behind Parkinson's
Researchers from Cambridge University found excessive levels of calcium triggers nerve cell death, despite the mineral being critical for communication in the brain. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - February 19, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Cambridge University Press expands partnership with AJE to include comprehensive suite of manuscript preparation service
Cambridge University Press has announced the expansion of its partnership with world-leading author services company American Journal Experts (AJE), to include a range of new manuscript preparation services. The Cambridge University Press & AJE site was launched in 2017 to offer language editing for prospective authors who are writing in English as a second language. Due to the success and high level of customer satisfaction with this service over the past year, Cambridge University Press and AJE have decided to expand the offering available to authors. In addition to language editing, authors will now be able to choos...
Source: News from STM - February 14, 2018 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: STM Publishing News Tags: Editorial Source Type: news

Swimming in cold water could relieve pain
Experts at Cambridge University and the University of East Anglia have called for research into cold-water therapy as a treatment for serious pain, in light of the sea curing debilitating pain. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - February 13, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Cambridge University is leading the way on pay, says UNISON
  Responding to the announcement today (Wednesday) that the University of Cambridge is to seek formal accreditation as a real living wage employer, UNISON’s head of higher education Donna Rowe-Merriman said: “Cambridge University’s commitment to give its lowest paid staff a fair wage is a move that urgently needs to be replicated in other universities across the UK. There is no place for low pay in higher education. “Almost 12,000 staff working in universities earn below the real living wage, trapping them in poverty. That’s in stark contrast to around 5,500 senior university st...
Source: UNISON Health care news - February 7, 2018 Category: UK Health Authors: Siobhan Cooley Tags: Article higher education university Source Type: news

Is hydrogen the fuel of the future?
(Cambridge University Press) As the race to find energy sources to replace our dwindling fossil fuel supplies continues apace, hydrogen is likely to play a crucial role in the future. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 6, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Collaborative Global Study Casts New Light on Breast Cancer ’s Genetic Roots; Will Soon Provide Anatomic Pathologists and Clinical Laboratories with New Tools to Diagnose and Treat Cancer
In the same way that BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations helped pathologists identify women with increased breast cancer risks in the late 1990s, this new study isolates an additional 72 mutations medical laboratories may soon use to diagnose breast cancer and assess risk factors For 20 years genetic scientists, anatomic pathologists, and medical laboratories have employed […] (Source: Dark Daily)
Source: Dark Daily - January 5, 2018 Category: Laboratory Medicine Authors: Jude Tags: Digital Pathology Laboratory Management and Operations Laboratory News Laboratory Pathology Laboratory Testing Management & Operations anatomic pathology breast cancer Cambridge University cancer screening Centre for Cancer Genetic Epi Source Type: news

All-natural pill can turbo-charge the Mediterranean diet
Researchers from Cambridge University have created a supplement known as 'Ateronon Heart', which combines the heart-health benefits of a key component in tomatoes with milk. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - December 19, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

In U.K., Bigger Wine Glasses for Bigger Thirsts
A study by researchers at the University of Cambridge found that the average size of wine glasses has increased sevenfold in 300 years. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - December 14, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: ALAN COWELL Tags: Wines Cambridge University Great Britain Alcoholic Beverages Bars and Nightclubs British Medical Journal Glassware Marteau, Theresa M. Source Type: news

Wine glasses have doubled in size since the 1990s
Wine glasses in Britain have doubled in size since the 1990s, and researchers at Cambridge University think it could be making people drink more. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - December 14, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Cases of meningitis W have rocketed by 922% in eight years
Shirali Patel, who achieved A* grades at Harrow, was forced to restart her medicine degree at Cambridge University after spending three months in hospital with meningitis W. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - December 12, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Alzheimer's falls 11% for every year spent in education
Researchers from Cambridge University found that the longer someone spends in school and university, the lower their risk of developing the condition. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - December 7, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

NHS cuts are blamed for 120,000 extra deaths
Researchers from Cambridge University likened the cuts to 'economic murder' and said NHS and social care funding means vulnerable patients are not receiving the help they need. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - November 16, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

GP appointments in Britain are among the shortest in Europe
GP consultation lengths in the UK are among the shortest in Europe, a study by Cambridge University and published in theBMJ Open has revealed. The study, calledInternational variations in primary care physician consultation time: a systematic review of 67 countries covered more than 28.5 million consultations showing that GP appointments last less than five minutes for half of the world population, ranging from 48 seconds in Bangladesh to 22.5 minutes in Sweden. Hide related content:  Show related contentread more (Source: Management in Practice)
Source: Management in Practice - November 9, 2017 Category: Practice Management Authors: Angela Sharda Tags: *** Editor ' s Pick Patient Access Patients Practice development Practice management Latest News Source Type: news