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Emergency Access Initiative
The National Library of Medicine (NLM) has activated the Emergency Access Initiative (EAI) in response to Hurricanes Irma and Harvey which devastated Florida and several Caribbean islands, as well as parts of South Carolina, Texas, and Louisiana. The EAI is a collaborative partnership between NLM and participating publishers to provide free access to full-text from more than 650 biomedical journals and more than 4,000 reference books and online databases to healthcare professionals and libraries affected by disasters. It serves as a temporary collection replacement and/or supplement for libraries affected by disasters that...
Source: NN/LM Middle Atlantic Region Blog - September 19, 2017 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Hannah Sinemus Tags: Disaster / Emergency Preparedness News from NLM/NIH Source Type: news

Owlstone Medical and UK ’s NHS Study Whether Breath Contains Useful Biomarkers That Could Be Used in Medical Laboratory Tests for Multiple Cancers
Owlstone Medical’s breath biopsy platform takes aim at breath biomarkers for an earlier diagnosis of cancer; could it supplant tissue biopsies sent to pathology labs? For many years, medical laboratory scientists and pathologists have known that human breath contains molecules and substances that have the potential to be used as biomarkers for detecting different diseases […] (Source: Dark Daily)
Source: Dark Daily - September 18, 2017 Category: Laboratory Medicine Authors: Jude Tags: Laboratory Instruments & Laboratory Equipment Laboratory News Laboratory Testing Uncategorized Addenbrooke’s Hospital Aviva Ventures Billy Boyle Cambridge University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust Cancer Research UK Cambridge Centre cl Source Type: news

Emergency Access Initiative Activated for Harvey and Irma
The National Library of Medicine (NLM) has activated the Emergency Access Initiative (EAI) for September 15, 2017 – October 14, 2017 in response to Hurricanes Irma and Harvey which devastated Florida and several Caribbean islands, as well as parts of South Carolina, Texas, and Louisiana. The EAI is a collaborative partnership between NLM and participating publishers to provide free access to full-text from more than 650 biomedical journals and more than 4,000 reference books and online databases to healthcare professionals and libraries affected by disasters. It serves as a temporary collection replacement and/or sup...
Source: MCR News - September 15, 2017 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: liaison Tags: Community College/Academic Libraries Health Sciences Public Libraries Source Type: news

Researchers find cereal rye is effective at reducing Amaranthus spp. density in soybean crops
(Cambridge University Press) Fall-planted cover crops are often used as part of an integrated weed control program in herbicide-resistant soybean crops. But researchers writing in the journal Weed Technology say not all cover crops are equally effective against Palmer amaranth, waterhemp and other Amaranthus spp. weeds. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - September 15, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Depression is physical illness claims Cambridge professor
According to a Cambridge University professor, an overactive immune system may trigger depression by causing widespread inflammation that leads to feelings of hopelessness and unhappiness. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - September 11, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Depression is a PHYSICAL illness, professor claims
According to a Cambridge University professor, an overactive immune system may trigger depression by causing widespread inflammation that leads to feelings of hopelessness and unhappiness. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - September 11, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Cambridge scientist Dr Emily Grossman has frozen her eggs
Dr Emily Grossman, a TV presenter and trained actress who has a double first from Cambridge University revealed her highly personal decision at the British Science Festival in Brighton. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - September 8, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Top Cambridge scientist, 38, has frozen her eggs
Dr Emily Grossman, a TV presenter and trained actress who has a double first from Cambridge University revealed her highly personal decision at the British Science Festival in Brighton. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - September 8, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Zika virus: an unlikely new anti-cancer candidate
Scientists at Cambridge University, funded by Cancer Research UK, are investigating the potential for Zika virus to be weaponised against brain tumour cells. The researchers have received funding to test the effect of Zika on glioblastoma, one of the … (Source: Pharmaceutical Technology)
Source: Pharmaceutical Technology - August 20, 2017 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Promoting evidence-based health care in Africa
Charles Shey Wiysonge, Director ofCochane  South Africa, gave an interview to the World Health Organization Bulletin. Here is a re-post , with premission, from their  recent publication.Charles Shey Wiysonge is devoted to encouraging better use of scientific evidence for health policies and programmes in African countries. He is the director of the South African Cochrane Centre, a unit of the South African Medical Research Council, and a professor of epidemiology and biostatistics at the department of Global Health in the Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences at Stellenbosch University in South Africa. He was C...
Source: Cochrane News and Events - August 17, 2017 Category: Information Technology Authors: Muriah Umoquit Source Type: news

Cambridge study finds relief mechanisms for OCD sufferers
Seeing someone run their hands under hot water helps control impulsive action. The findings, from Cambridge University, could lead to video-based apps designed as therapy for sufferers. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - August 10, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

WATCHING people wash hands relieves OCD sufferers
Seeing someone run their hands under hot water helps control impulsive action. The findings, from Cambridge University, could lead to video-based apps designed as therapy for sufferers. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - August 8, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

DNA provides new insights on the control of invasive Russian knapweed
(Cambridge University Press) A recent study featured in the journal Invasive Plant Science and Management sheds new light on the control of Russian knapweed, an invasive plant found in the western US. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - August 3, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

New treatment for breast cancer has fewer side effects
The findings by Cambridge University mean women could be treated for breast cancer (file pic) just as effectively but experience fewer unwelcome changes to their breasts. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - August 2, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Timing matters: How to use tillage more effectively for weed management
(Cambridge University Press) In a study featured in the most recent edition of the journal Weed Science, researchers examined the impact of tillage on four sites in the northeastern US that were tilled every two weeks during the growing season. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - July 25, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

7 medtech stories we missed this week: July 14, 2017
[Image from unsplash.com]From Novarad touting its VR-surgical guidance system to Zynex paying off its $2.2M loan, here are seven medtech stories we missed this week but thought were still worth mentioning. 1. Stimwave announces first patient in Brazil Stimwave announced in a July 5 press release that its first patients in Brazil have received Stimwave’s wireless pain relief device treatment for chronic pain. The patients are expected to receive the neuromodulation treatment as an alternative to opioid pain relief. The devices created by Stimwave deliver small pulses of energy to specific nerves to trigger a reac...
Source: Mass Device - July 14, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Danielle Kirsh Tags: Clinical Trials Diabetes Diagnostics Imaging Neuromodulation/Neurostimulation Pain Management Research & Development American Red Cross Nemaura Medical Novarad Owlstone Medical Stimwave Tactical Medical Zynex Inc. Source Type: news

Men and women react DIFFERENTLY to depression
Now in a study of depressed teenagers, Cambridge University researchers have found male and female brains of depressed patients respond differently to negative stimuli. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - July 11, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Scientists deploy GM sheep in fight to treat Huntington ’s disease
Transgenic flock brought to UK for research into incurable brain condition, which affects more than 6,700 people in the countryScientists at Cambridge University have co-opted an unusual ally in their battle to find treatments for an incurable degenerative ailment that affects thousands of people in the UK. They have taken charge of a flock of merino sheep that have been genetically modified to carry the gene for Huntington ’s disease.The research, led by neuroscientist Professor Jenny Morton, aims to understand how to pinpoint early symptoms of the brain condition, which affects more than 6,700 people in the UK.Cont...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - July 8, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Robin McKie Observer science editor Tags: Medical research Neuroscience Genetics UK news Source Type: news

'Angelina Jolie gene' breast cancer risk determined
The latest Cambridge University-led study of more than 10,000 women gives the most precise estimates to date of breast cancer risk for carriers of a BRCA mutation, researchers claim. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - June 20, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Is Palmer amaranth developing traits that make it harder to control?
(Cambridge University Press) New research featured in the journal Weed Science, shows 'life history' traits may be contributing to crop losses by making Palmer amaranth more aggressive and difficult to control. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - June 13, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Lab notes: ignore politics - we ’ve got some strong and stable science for you
It ’s been a week for overturning certainties, and the latest discovery of 300,000-year-old remains in Moroccan mine is no exception. Scientists believe that these arethe oldestHomo sapiens bones ever found and they challenge the very foundations of our understanding of human evolution. Put that alongside thediscovery of Kelt-9b, the hottest known giant planet (found using Kilodegree Extremely Little Telescopes, made with off-the-shelf components, which in itself is pretty amazing) and this week ’s been pretty damned interesting even without the distraction of a general election. But there were also a couple of...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - June 9, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Tash Reith-Banks Tags: Science Source Type: news

Brain training could help the heartbroken, says neuropsychologist
Computerised tests could train those suffering unrequited love to avoid actions they might later regret, says Cambridge University professor Barbara SahakianThe indignity of being dumped has rarely been helped by a clumsy poem or a drunken text sent after closing time, but there is at least hope for the heartbroken.Instead of making things worse with a helping of humiliation, the best response to unrequited love might be to train our brains to hold back on actions we might later regret.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - June 8, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Ian Sample Science editor Tags: Neuroscience Psychology Relationships Life and style Source Type: news

Keep women in academia by providing childcare, historian urges universities
Childcare is the single biggest problem for female academics, but too little is done to help, suggests Cambridge University historian Patricia FaraA leading British historian has called on universities to provide more support for childcare to reduce the number of women who leave academia before they reach the peak of their careers.Starting a family remains one of the greatest obstacles for women who are building their careers as university researchers, but too little is done to help them, said Patricia Fara, a historian at Cambridge University and president of the British Society for the History of Science.Continue reading...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - June 7, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Ian Sample Science editor Tags: Childcare Higher education Science Family Parents and parenting Children Life and style Society Women Work & careers Source Type: news

University professors now abusing ADHD drugs just like their students
(Natural News) Like their students, one in five university professors are seemingly hooked on using medications for attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) to keep up with the demands of their jobs, Cambridge University academic and neuroscientist Dr. Hannah Critchlow discussed at The Hay Festival. According to Dr. Critchlow, an increasing number of university professors were found to use these... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - June 6, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

How chemicals in shampoo and booze cause cancer
The chemicals, known as aldehydes, are made in our body in tiny amounts. Too much exposure to aldehydes, however, causes cancer by breaking down our ability to fix DNA, Cambridge University says. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - June 2, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Bigger wine glasses are encouraging us to drink more
Professor Theresa Marteau, based at Cambridge University, discovered the average size of glasses have increased by nearly 600 per cent in three centuries. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - May 29, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Gender stereotypes? Worry less, join in more, says world's first professor of play
Paul Ramchandanim, new Cambridge University academic set to lead research into child leisure activity, says parents ’ involvement more important than gender roles or games playedLittle girls in pink princess costumes and boys dressed as cowboys might strike many parents as a nightmare combination of gender stereotypes and unappealing role models. However, the Cambridge academic who has just been appointed the world ’s first professor of play has a message for them: relax.Paul Ramchandani, who was announced this week in the newly created professorship at Cambridge University, a post sponsored by Lego, believes p...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - May 27, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Hannah Devlin Science correspondent Tags: Psychology Children Parents and parenting Family Science Life and style Society Source Type: news

Beautiful scientists are not seen as highly competent
Researchers from Cambridge University say scientists such as Brian Cox (pictured) are not rated as highly as other researchers with similar abilities due to their good looks. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - May 22, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Research shows the impact of invasive plants can linger long after eradication
(Cambridge University Press) A new study featured in the journal Invasive Plant Science and Management shows the impact of weedy invaders can linger for years. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 18, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Plastic-eating bugs? It ’s a great story – but there’s a sting in the tail | Philip Ball
Breeding wax moth caterpillars to devour our waste sounds good. But they would attack bee colonies too, and ultimately put crops at riskCaterpillars that can munch up plastic bagshave just been identified, fuelling excited speculation that this could one day eliminate global pollution from plastic waste. The chance discovery, initially made by a scientist and amateur beekeeper whose plastic bag had been eaten through by the moth caterpillars, was reported this week by researchers at Cambridge University and the Spanish National Research Council.Related:Plastic-eating worms could help wage war on wasteContinue reading... (S...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - April 25, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Philip Ball Tags: Plastics Science Environment Bees Wildlife Insects Pollution UK news Research Higher education Source Type: news

Elephants are conscious beings with BODY awareness, new experiments reveal... are they smarter than humans?
(Natural News) “Dumbo” may be a misnomer. Elephants may be more intelligent than we thought — and trust us,  we already thought very highly of these gentle giants. A team from Cambridge University said in a new study that elephants have high levels of self-awareness; an ability that doesn’t develop in human children until at... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - April 21, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Two older drugs could be 'repurposed' to fight dementia
Conclusion This early stage experimental research has demonstrated a beneficial neurological effect of trazodone and dibenzoylmethane on mice with diseases mimicking neurodegenerative diseases. It is important to acknowledge that this is animal research and therefore the drugs might not have the same effect when they are trialled on humans. That being said, trazodone is already an approved drug for depression and sleep problems and has therefore already passed safety tests. If the mechanisms of neurodegeneration in humans and mice are similar, it is possible trazodone could be used in the future in treating Alzheimer's and...
Source: NHS News Feed - April 20, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Older people Neurology Medication Source Type: news

Climate change and risk to fossil fuel industry: Sustainability train has left the station
(Cambridge University Press) Two seminal articles by energy experts in the latest issue of MRS Energy and Sustainability (MRS E&S) examine the climate-related risks facing the fossil fuel industry and conclude that the sustainability train has already well and truly left the station -- and is not coming back. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 18, 2017 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Eating for two 'harms the health of mum and baby'
Cambridge University researchers discovered how sugary foods eaten during pregnancy may permanently disrupt crucial processes in the mother and child. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - April 6, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Moderate drinking may reduce heart disease risk
Conclusion This study paints a more complicated picture than the "Pint a day keeps the doctor away" story proffered by The Sun. It seems to confirm the findings of other studies, which have shown that non-drinkers tend to have a higher risk of cardiovascular diseases than people who drink moderately. It suggests that some cardiovascular diseases (mainly those directly affecting the heart) seem to have a stronger link to a possible protective effect from alcohol than other vascular diseases, such as mini-strokes and bleeding in the brain. However, this can't be concluded with certainty due to the study design. We ...
Source: NHS News Feed - March 23, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Heart/lungs Food/diet Lifestyle/exercise Source Type: news

‘Golly’, ‘cassette’ and ‘croquet’: the words we no longer use
A new study sheds light on how the English language is changing – but what shapes the vocabulary du jour?A huge ongoing study by Lancaster University and Cambridge University has discovered what, in fact, we probably knew already: thatword-usage changes continuously under the pressures of historical malaise, new sensitivities, the new machineries of life and fashion.“Golly” is fast going. No need to ask why. Good thing, too. And “gosh” is long gone; it’s one of those euphemistic items of religious vocabulary (along with “blimey” and “gadzooks”) that we largely god...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - March 15, 2017 Category: Science Authors: John Sutherland Tags: Language Science Source Type: news

Pruitt Earns A Failing Grade When It Comes To Climate Science
EPA Administrator Scott Pruitt said on CNBC: “I think that measuring with precision human activity on the climate is something very challenging to do, and there’s tremendous disagreement about the degree of impact, so no, I would not agree that it’s a primary contributor to the global warming that we see.” This is consistent with Pruitt’s previous public statements and writings on climate change. It is also false and misleading. There is not “tremendous disagreement” among scientists but a strong consensus that humans are the primary cause of recent climate change. The consensus ...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - March 14, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

Awesome still massively popular but say goodbye to tar-rah matey
(Lancaster University) The study, by Lancaster University and Cambridge University Press, looks at the most characteristic words of informal chit-chat in today's Britain. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - March 13, 2017 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Strong Industry Growth leads to Maverick extending its expertise and support for 2017
Recent client demand for specific expertise and support across all three of its core service areas has resulted in Maverick Publishing Specialists Ltd., the strategic consultancy and outsource services company, adding a number of senior level expert Associates over the last 3 months. Further strengthening its ability to provide Board level and specialist support in Marketing, Sales, Market Research, and all areas of Content and Technology consultancy, Maverick is seeing an Industry in strong growth mode. Recent additions to its Publishing support team include Ruth King, as Affiliate Senior Associate, Open Access. With deep...
Source: News from STM - March 11, 2017 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: STM Publishing News Tags: European Featured Source Type: news

Artificial mouse embryos created
Conclusion This early-stage research offers a good insight into the development of mouse embryos and the sequence of biological steps that take place up to the point of implantation in the womb and immediately afterwards. They could provide an insight into the early stages of human life. However, this does not mean that the creation of artificial human life is now possible: The study was carried out on mice stem cells, which have a very different biological make-up to humans so the processes may not be identical with human cells. While the artificial mouse embryo seemed to behave like a natural one, it is unlikely it c...
Source: NHS News Feed - March 3, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Genetics/stem cells Source Type: news

Medical News Today: Breakthrough: Scientists create mouse embryo
Researchers from Cambridge University in the United Kingdom have managed to create a self-organizing structure that looks and behaves like a mouse embryo. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - March 3, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Stem Cell Research Source Type: news

Artificial embryo shows potential for medical therapies, not babies
Trying to mimic the early stages of reproduction, Cambridge University researchers cultivated two types of mouse stem cells in a Petri dish and watched an embryo emerge -- one that closely resembled a natural mouse embryo in its architecture, its development process and its ability to assemble itself. (Source: CNN.com - Health)
Source: CNN.com - Health - March 2, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Liquid hydrogen may be way forward for sustainable air travel
(Cambridge University Press) With sustainable solutions in mind, a new study published by eminent physicist Jo Hermans in MRS Energy and Sustainability--A Review Journal (MRS E&S) looks at the energy efficiency of current modes of transportion. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 23, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Cocaine use raises the risk of dementia
Regular use of the illegal drug causes excessive amounts of iron to accumulate in parts of the brain and causes cell death - a known cause of dementia, Cambridge University experts found. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - February 21, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Dedicated Scholarly Publishing Conference Programme Announced
Speakers from Wiley, Elsevier and Taylor & Francis are among the prestigious names participating in LBF’s dedicated academic publishing conference, The Research and Scholarly Publishing Forum, this year. The popular conference, now in its third year, will be hosted by co-chairs Mandy Hill, Managing Director of Academic Publishing at Cambridge University Press, and Helen Dobson, Scholarly Communications Manager at the University of Manchester. The half-day conference offers delegates a compact schedule of lively panel debates, ‘in conversation with’ sessions, keynote speeches and networking, and is pro...
Source: News from STM - February 16, 2017 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: STM Publishing News Tags: European Events Source Type: news

Do Charles Darwin's private letters contradict his public sexism?
He declared that women ’s brains were “analogous to those of animals”, but conducted scholarly personal correspondence with women, new book revealsCharles Darwin may have held less hostile views about women than previously thought, according to a new book out this month. Drawing on letters between the father of evolutionary science and the women he knew, the book reveals close ties between the scientist, his family and leading feminist figures in the 19th century, including medical pioneer Elizabeth Garrett Anderson and social reformer Josephine Butler.Darwin and Women by Samantha Evans, published by Camb...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - February 8, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Danuta Kean Tags: Books Biography Culture Charles Darwin Science Feminism Women Evolution Biology Source Type: news

Putting on just half a stone can raise diabetes risk
Scientists at Cambridge University say that if everyone aged 30 to 60 maintained their weight, one in five cases of type 2 diabetes could be prevented. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - February 7, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Why advances in treating those with brain injuries require advances in respecting their rights
This article was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article. -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website. (Source: Science - The Huffington Post)
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - January 29, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

Burnt toast ISN'T dangerous - unless you have 320 slices
Acrylamide is created when some foods are cooked for long periods at high temperature. But adults don't consume enough to be at risk, a Cambridge University statistician claims. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - January 23, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

How statistics lost their power – and why we should fear what comes next | William Davies
The ability of statistics to accurately represent the world is declining. In its wake, a new age of big data controlled by private companies is taking over – and putting democracy in perilIn theory, statistics should help settle arguments. They ought to provide stable reference points that everyone – no matter what their politics – can agree on. Yet in recent years, divergent levels of trust in statistics has become one of the key schisms that have opened up in western liberal democracies. Shortly before the November presidential election, a study in the US discovered that68% of Trump supporters distruste...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - January 19, 2017 Category: Science Authors: William Davies Tags: Government data Technology Politics Office for National Statistics UK news Smartphones Source Type: news