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Cambridge University Press expands partnership with AJE to include comprehensive suite of manuscript preparation service
Cambridge University Press has announced the expansion of its partnership with world-leading author services company American Journal Experts (AJE), to include a range of new manuscript preparation services. The Cambridge University Press & AJE site was launched in 2017 to offer language editing for prospective authors who are writing in English as a second language. Due to the success and high level of customer satisfaction with this service over the past year, Cambridge University Press and AJE have decided to expand the offering available to authors. In addition to language editing, authors will now be able to choos...
Source: News from STM - February 14, 2018 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: STM Publishing News Tags: Editorial Source Type: news

Swimming in cold water could relieve pain
Experts at Cambridge University and the University of East Anglia have called for research into cold-water therapy as a treatment for serious pain, in light of the sea curing debilitating pain. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - February 13, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Cambridge University is leading the way on pay, says UNISON
  Responding to the announcement today (Wednesday) that the University of Cambridge is to seek formal accreditation as a real living wage employer, UNISON’s head of higher education Donna Rowe-Merriman said: “Cambridge University’s commitment to give its lowest paid staff a fair wage is a move that urgently needs to be replicated in other universities across the UK. There is no place for low pay in higher education. “Almost 12,000 staff working in universities earn below the real living wage, trapping them in poverty. That’s in stark contrast to around 5,500 senior university st...
Source: UNISON Health care news - February 7, 2018 Category: UK Health Authors: Siobhan Cooley Tags: Article higher education university Source Type: news

Is hydrogen the fuel of the future?
(Cambridge University Press) As the race to find energy sources to replace our dwindling fossil fuel supplies continues apace, hydrogen is likely to play a crucial role in the future. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 6, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Collaborative Global Study Casts New Light on Breast Cancer ’s Genetic Roots; Will Soon Provide Anatomic Pathologists and Clinical Laboratories with New Tools to Diagnose and Treat Cancer
In the same way that BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations helped pathologists identify women with increased breast cancer risks in the late 1990s, this new study isolates an additional 72 mutations medical laboratories may soon use to diagnose breast cancer and assess risk factors For 20 years genetic scientists, anatomic pathologists, and medical laboratories have employed […] (Source: Dark Daily)
Source: Dark Daily - January 5, 2018 Category: Laboratory Medicine Authors: Jude Tags: Digital Pathology Laboratory Management and Operations Laboratory News Laboratory Pathology Laboratory Testing Management & Operations anatomic pathology breast cancer Cambridge University cancer screening Centre for Cancer Genetic Epi Source Type: news

All-natural pill can turbo-charge the Mediterranean diet
Researchers from Cambridge University have created a supplement known as 'Ateronon Heart', which combines the heart-health benefits of a key component in tomatoes with milk. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - December 19, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

In U.K., Bigger Wine Glasses for Bigger Thirsts
A study by researchers at the University of Cambridge found that the average size of wine glasses has increased sevenfold in 300 years. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - December 14, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: ALAN COWELL Tags: Wines Cambridge University Great Britain Alcoholic Beverages Bars and Nightclubs British Medical Journal Glassware Marteau, Theresa M. Source Type: news

Wine glasses have doubled in size since the 1990s
Wine glasses in Britain have doubled in size since the 1990s, and researchers at Cambridge University think it could be making people drink more. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - December 14, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Cases of meningitis W have rocketed by 922% in eight years
Shirali Patel, who achieved A* grades at Harrow, was forced to restart her medicine degree at Cambridge University after spending three months in hospital with meningitis W. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - December 12, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Alzheimer's falls 11% for every year spent in education
Researchers from Cambridge University found that the longer someone spends in school and university, the lower their risk of developing the condition. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - December 7, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

NHS cuts are blamed for 120,000 extra deaths
Researchers from Cambridge University likened the cuts to 'economic murder' and said NHS and social care funding means vulnerable patients are not receiving the help they need. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - November 16, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

GP appointments in Britain are among the shortest in Europe
GP consultation lengths in the UK are among the shortest in Europe, a study by Cambridge University and published in theBMJ Open has revealed. The study, calledInternational variations in primary care physician consultation time: a systematic review of 67 countries covered more than 28.5 million consultations showing that GP appointments last less than five minutes for half of the world population, ranging from 48 seconds in Bangladesh to 22.5 minutes in Sweden. Hide related content:  Show related contentread more (Source: Management in Practice)
Source: Management in Practice - November 9, 2017 Category: Practice Management Authors: Angela Sharda Tags: *** Editor ' s Pick Patient Access Patients Practice development Practice management Latest News Source Type: news

Springer Nature blocks access to at least 1,000 articles in China
Springer Nature, which publishes science magazines Nature and Scientific American, said on Wednesday it had pulled access to a small number of articles in China to comply with regulations, adding that it viewed the move as regrettable but necessary. The decision comes after Britain’s Cambridge University Press (CUP) said in August it had removed from its website in China about 300 papers and book reviews published in the China Quarterly journal, after a request from the Chinese government. CUP, the publishing arm of elite Cambridge University, later reversed its decision and reposted the articles, following an outcry...
Source: News from STM - November 2, 2017 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: STM Publishing News Tags: Featured World Source Type: news

Building a sustainable future: Urgent action needed
(Cambridge University Press) We need to act urgently to increase the energy efficiency of our buildings as the world's emerging middle classes put increasing demands on our planet's energy resources. These are the findings of a new report, published in MRS Energy& Sustainability by authors Matthias M. Koebel, Jannis Wernery and Wim J. Malfait. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - October 30, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

1 in 5 women have variant that raises breast cancer risk
The Cambridge University study has shed more light on the BRCA1 gene, which Hollywood star Angelina Jolie famously inherited, before she had a mastectomy to reduce her risk. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - October 23, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Stephen Hawking ’s Thesis Is So Popular It Crashed Cambridge’s Website
Stephen Hawking wrote his Ph.D. thesis all the way back in 1966. But it’s still generating buzz more than half-a-century later. The physicist’s thesis about expanding universes, which he wrote at Cambridge University as a 24-year-old postgraduate student, was made freely available online for the first time ever Monday morning, and immediately incited a frenzy. More than 60,000 people — enough to periodically crash the university’s website — have already read it, the university said. The work was previously available through Cambridge’s library, but readers had to visit the facility in pe...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - October 23, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized onetime Physics Science Stephen Hawking Source Type: news

Stephen Hawking's expanding universes thesis breaks the internet
Demand for 1966 PhD work, made freely available for the first time, crashes Cambridge ’s repository websiteStephen Hawking ’s 1966 doctoral thesis has broken the internet after becomingavailable to the general public for the first time.Demand for the thesis, entitledProperties of Expanding Universes, was so great on Monday that it caused Cambridge University ’s repository site to go down. The site was still inaccessible at 7.30pm on Monday.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - October 23, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Mattha Busby Tags: Stephen Hawking University of Cambridge Science Space Education Higher education Internet Technology Source Type: news

The 180 breast cancer genes
The Cambridge University study has shed more light on the BRCA1 gene, which Hollywood star Angelina Jolie famously inherited, before she had a mastectomy to reduce her risk. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - October 23, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Stephen Hawking's 1966 doctoral thesis made available for first time
Cambridge University says Properties of Expanding Universes is already most-requested item in open access repositoryAnyone in the world can now download and read the doctoral thesis of a 24-year-old Cambridge postgraduate student, written in 1966; how many will fully understandProperties of Expanding Universes is another matter.Stephen Hawking hopes that giving free access to his early work will inspire others, not just to think and learn but to share research. He said: “By making my PhD thesis open access, I hope to inspire people around the world to look up at the stars and not down at their feet; to wonder about o...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - October 22, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Maev Kennedy Tags: Stephen Hawking University of Cambridge University of Oxford Education Higher education Science UK news Source Type: news

Andy Tay Kah Ping honored with inaugural MRS Bulletin Postdoctoral Publication Prize
(Cambridge University Press) MRS Bulletin has named Andy Tay Kah Ping, Stanford University, as the inaugural recipient of the MRS Bulletin Postdoctoral Publication Prize. This award recognizes postdoctoral researchers for their intellectual merit, the impact of their research and scholarship, and their interest in science writing and communication. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - October 20, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Study shows removing invasive plants can increase biodiversity in stream waters
(Cambridge University Press) Restoration projects to remove invasive plants can make a positive impact on native plant species. But a new study featured in the journal Invasive Plant Science and Management shows restoration has an additional benefit. Removal of invasive species growing alongside a stream or river can also improve the biodiversity of aquatic organisms. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - October 11, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Why it really is better for the elderly to die at home
Researchers from Cambridge University looked at the 'oldest old', aged over 85, at the end of their lives. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - October 5, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

EHI Awards Recognise Global Digital Exemplars
Four NHS foundation trusts are in the running for a new award to recognise the best global digital exemplar of the year. Cambridge University Hospitals, Royal Liverpool and Broadgreen University Hospitals, Oxford University Hospitals, and Royal Berkshire NHS foundation trusts have been shortlisted in the new category of the EHI Awards 2017. (Source: eHealth News EU)
Source: eHealth News EU - October 2, 2017 Category: Information Technology Tags: Featured Industry Business and Industry Source Type: news

Emergency Access Initiative
The National Library of Medicine (NLM) has activated the Emergency Access Initiative (EAI) in response to Hurricanes Irma and Harvey which devastated Florida and several Caribbean islands, as well as parts of South Carolina, Texas, and Louisiana. The EAI is a collaborative partnership between NLM and participating publishers to provide free access to full-text from more than 650 biomedical journals and more than 4,000 reference books and online databases to healthcare professionals and libraries affected by disasters. It serves as a temporary collection replacement and/or supplement for libraries affected by disasters that...
Source: NN/LM Middle Atlantic Region Blog - September 19, 2017 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Hannah Sinemus Tags: Disaster / Emergency Preparedness News from NLM/NIH Source Type: news

Owlstone Medical and UK ’s NHS Study Whether Breath Contains Useful Biomarkers That Could Be Used in Medical Laboratory Tests for Multiple Cancers
Owlstone Medical’s breath biopsy platform takes aim at breath biomarkers for an earlier diagnosis of cancer; could it supplant tissue biopsies sent to pathology labs? For many years, medical laboratory scientists and pathologists have known that human breath contains molecules and substances that have the potential to be used as biomarkers for detecting different diseases […] (Source: Dark Daily)
Source: Dark Daily - September 18, 2017 Category: Laboratory Medicine Authors: Jude Tags: Laboratory Instruments & Laboratory Equipment Laboratory News Laboratory Testing Uncategorized Addenbrooke’s Hospital Aviva Ventures Billy Boyle Cambridge University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust Cancer Research UK Cambridge Centre cl Source Type: news

Emergency Access Initiative Activated for Harvey and Irma
The National Library of Medicine (NLM) has activated the Emergency Access Initiative (EAI) for September 15, 2017 – October 14, 2017 in response to Hurricanes Irma and Harvey which devastated Florida and several Caribbean islands, as well as parts of South Carolina, Texas, and Louisiana. The EAI is a collaborative partnership between NLM and participating publishers to provide free access to full-text from more than 650 biomedical journals and more than 4,000 reference books and online databases to healthcare professionals and libraries affected by disasters. It serves as a temporary collection replacement and/or sup...
Source: MCR News - September 15, 2017 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: liaison Tags: Community College/Academic Libraries Health Sciences Public Libraries Source Type: news

Researchers find cereal rye is effective at reducing Amaranthus spp. density in soybean crops
(Cambridge University Press) Fall-planted cover crops are often used as part of an integrated weed control program in herbicide-resistant soybean crops. But researchers writing in the journal Weed Technology say not all cover crops are equally effective against Palmer amaranth, waterhemp and other Amaranthus spp. weeds. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - September 15, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Depression is physical illness claims Cambridge professor
According to a Cambridge University professor, an overactive immune system may trigger depression by causing widespread inflammation that leads to feelings of hopelessness and unhappiness. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - September 11, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Depression is a PHYSICAL illness, professor claims
According to a Cambridge University professor, an overactive immune system may trigger depression by causing widespread inflammation that leads to feelings of hopelessness and unhappiness. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - September 11, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Cambridge scientist Dr Emily Grossman has frozen her eggs
Dr Emily Grossman, a TV presenter and trained actress who has a double first from Cambridge University revealed her highly personal decision at the British Science Festival in Brighton. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - September 8, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Top Cambridge scientist, 38, has frozen her eggs
Dr Emily Grossman, a TV presenter and trained actress who has a double first from Cambridge University revealed her highly personal decision at the British Science Festival in Brighton. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - September 8, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Zika virus: an unlikely new anti-cancer candidate
Scientists at Cambridge University, funded by Cancer Research UK, are investigating the potential for Zika virus to be weaponised against brain tumour cells. The researchers have received funding to test the effect of Zika on glioblastoma, one of the … (Source: Pharmaceutical Technology)
Source: Pharmaceutical Technology - August 20, 2017 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Promoting evidence-based health care in Africa
Charles Shey Wiysonge, Director ofCochane  South Africa, gave an interview to the World Health Organization Bulletin. Here is a re-post , with premission, from their  recent publication.Charles Shey Wiysonge is devoted to encouraging better use of scientific evidence for health policies and programmes in African countries. He is the director of the South African Cochrane Centre, a unit of the South African Medical Research Council, and a professor of epidemiology and biostatistics at the department of Global Health in the Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences at Stellenbosch University in South Africa. He was C...
Source: Cochrane News and Events - August 17, 2017 Category: Information Technology Authors: Muriah Umoquit Source Type: news

Cambridge study finds relief mechanisms for OCD sufferers
Seeing someone run their hands under hot water helps control impulsive action. The findings, from Cambridge University, could lead to video-based apps designed as therapy for sufferers. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - August 10, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

WATCHING people wash hands relieves OCD sufferers
Seeing someone run their hands under hot water helps control impulsive action. The findings, from Cambridge University, could lead to video-based apps designed as therapy for sufferers. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - August 8, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

DNA provides new insights on the control of invasive Russian knapweed
(Cambridge University Press) A recent study featured in the journal Invasive Plant Science and Management sheds new light on the control of Russian knapweed, an invasive plant found in the western US. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - August 3, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

New treatment for breast cancer has fewer side effects
The findings by Cambridge University mean women could be treated for breast cancer (file pic) just as effectively but experience fewer unwelcome changes to their breasts. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - August 2, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Timing matters: How to use tillage more effectively for weed management
(Cambridge University Press) In a study featured in the most recent edition of the journal Weed Science, researchers examined the impact of tillage on four sites in the northeastern US that were tilled every two weeks during the growing season. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - July 25, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

7 medtech stories we missed this week: July 14, 2017
[Image from unsplash.com]From Novarad touting its VR-surgical guidance system to Zynex paying off its $2.2M loan, here are seven medtech stories we missed this week but thought were still worth mentioning. 1. Stimwave announces first patient in Brazil Stimwave announced in a July 5 press release that its first patients in Brazil have received Stimwave’s wireless pain relief device treatment for chronic pain. The patients are expected to receive the neuromodulation treatment as an alternative to opioid pain relief. The devices created by Stimwave deliver small pulses of energy to specific nerves to trigger a reac...
Source: Mass Device - July 14, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Danielle Kirsh Tags: Clinical Trials Diabetes Diagnostics Imaging Neuromodulation/Neurostimulation Pain Management Research & Development American Red Cross Nemaura Medical Novarad Owlstone Medical Stimwave Tactical Medical Zynex Inc. Source Type: news

Men and women react DIFFERENTLY to depression
Now in a study of depressed teenagers, Cambridge University researchers have found male and female brains of depressed patients respond differently to negative stimuli. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - July 11, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Scientists deploy GM sheep in fight to treat Huntington ’s disease
Transgenic flock brought to UK for research into incurable brain condition, which affects more than 6,700 people in the countryScientists at Cambridge University have co-opted an unusual ally in their battle to find treatments for an incurable degenerative ailment that affects thousands of people in the UK. They have taken charge of a flock of merino sheep that have been genetically modified to carry the gene for Huntington ’s disease.The research, led by neuroscientist Professor Jenny Morton, aims to understand how to pinpoint early symptoms of the brain condition, which affects more than 6,700 people in the UK.Cont...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - July 8, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Robin McKie Observer science editor Tags: Medical research Neuroscience Genetics UK news Source Type: news

'Angelina Jolie gene' breast cancer risk determined
The latest Cambridge University-led study of more than 10,000 women gives the most precise estimates to date of breast cancer risk for carriers of a BRCA mutation, researchers claim. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - June 20, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Is Palmer amaranth developing traits that make it harder to control?
(Cambridge University Press) New research featured in the journal Weed Science, shows 'life history' traits may be contributing to crop losses by making Palmer amaranth more aggressive and difficult to control. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - June 13, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Lab notes: ignore politics - we ’ve got some strong and stable science for you
It ’s been a week for overturning certainties, and the latest discovery of 300,000-year-old remains in Moroccan mine is no exception. Scientists believe that these arethe oldestHomo sapiens bones ever found and they challenge the very foundations of our understanding of human evolution. Put that alongside thediscovery of Kelt-9b, the hottest known giant planet (found using Kilodegree Extremely Little Telescopes, made with off-the-shelf components, which in itself is pretty amazing) and this week ’s been pretty damned interesting even without the distraction of a general election. But there were also a couple of...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - June 9, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Tash Reith-Banks Tags: Science Source Type: news

Brain training could help the heartbroken, says neuropsychologist
Computerised tests could train those suffering unrequited love to avoid actions they might later regret, says Cambridge University professor Barbara SahakianThe indignity of being dumped has rarely been helped by a clumsy poem or a drunken text sent after closing time, but there is at least hope for the heartbroken.Instead of making things worse with a helping of humiliation, the best response to unrequited love might be to train our brains to hold back on actions we might later regret.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - June 8, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Ian Sample Science editor Tags: Neuroscience Psychology Relationships Life and style Source Type: news

Keep women in academia by providing childcare, historian urges universities
Childcare is the single biggest problem for female academics, but too little is done to help, suggests Cambridge University historian Patricia FaraA leading British historian has called on universities to provide more support for childcare to reduce the number of women who leave academia before they reach the peak of their careers.Starting a family remains one of the greatest obstacles for women who are building their careers as university researchers, but too little is done to help them, said Patricia Fara, a historian at Cambridge University and president of the British Society for the History of Science.Continue reading...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - June 7, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Ian Sample Science editor Tags: Childcare Higher education Science Family Parents and parenting Children Life and style Society Women Work & careers Source Type: news

University professors now abusing ADHD drugs just like their students
(Natural News) Like their students, one in five university professors are seemingly hooked on using medications for attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) to keep up with the demands of their jobs, Cambridge University academic and neuroscientist Dr. Hannah Critchlow discussed at The Hay Festival. According to Dr. Critchlow, an increasing number of university professors were found to use these... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - June 6, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

How chemicals in shampoo and booze cause cancer
The chemicals, known as aldehydes, are made in our body in tiny amounts. Too much exposure to aldehydes, however, causes cancer by breaking down our ability to fix DNA, Cambridge University says. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - June 2, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Bigger wine glasses are encouraging us to drink more
Professor Theresa Marteau, based at Cambridge University, discovered the average size of glasses have increased by nearly 600 per cent in three centuries. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - May 29, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Gender stereotypes? Worry less, join in more, says world's first professor of play
Paul Ramchandanim, new Cambridge University academic set to lead research into child leisure activity, says parents ’ involvement more important than gender roles or games playedLittle girls in pink princess costumes and boys dressed as cowboys might strike many parents as a nightmare combination of gender stereotypes and unappealing role models. However, the Cambridge academic who has just been appointed the world ’s first professor of play has a message for them: relax.Paul Ramchandani, who was announced this week in the newly created professorship at Cambridge University, a post sponsored by Lego, believes p...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - May 27, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Hannah Devlin Science correspondent Tags: Psychology Children Parents and parenting Family Science Life and style Society Source Type: news