Coronavirus UK: London records just 24 new cases a day
Analysis by Public Health England and Cambridge University calculated that the 'R' reproduction rate has fallen to 0.4 in the capital, and could see cases eradicated within a fortnight. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - May 15, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Coronavirus UK: London's R rate was falling BEFORE lockdown
Analysis by Public Health England and Cambridge University shows the crucial reproduction rate, known as the R, peaked at 3 in the capital in late February. But it fell to 2.3 by lockdown on March 23. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - May 15, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

How the crucial coronavirus 'R' rate varies across England
It is the latest piece of evidence that northern towns are now bearing the brunt of the crisis. The real-time R tracking was conducted by researchers from Cambridge University and PHE. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - May 14, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

8million Brits with underlying conditions 'should be exempt from going straight back to work'
Experts at University College London and Cambridge University fear not protecting society's most vulnerable people could see UK's death toll rise to 73,000 within a year. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - May 13, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Ecotourism transforms attitudes to marine conservation
(Cambridge University Press) A study has shown how ecotourism in the Philippines has transformed people's attitudes towards marine conservation. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 4, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Coronavirus UK: Care home deaths may exceed hospital fatalities
Sir David Spiegelhalter, a Cambridge University statistician, warned that while deaths in hospitals have been steadily decreasing, outbreaks in homes may not have peaked yet. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - April 29, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Coronavirus tests: Cambridge University lab sets daily target of 30,000
It is part of the government's goal of achieving 100,000 tests each day by the end of April. (Source: BBC News | Health | UK Edition)
Source: BBC News | Health | UK Edition - April 8, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Chinese vs. Western Governance: The case of COVID-19
Emergency room nurses wear face masks at Second People's Hospital of Shenzhen in China. Credit: Man Yi/ UN News By Martin JacquesLONDON, Mar 26 2020 (IPS) During January the onslaught in the Western media, notably the US and the UK, against the Chinese government’s handling of the Covid-19 epidemic, was merciless. The Chinese government stood accused of an inhumane attitude towards its people, secrecy, a cover-up, and an overwhelming concern for its own survival above all other considerations. The actual evidence was thin bordering at times on the threadbare but this made little difference to the venom and bile of th...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - March 26, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Martin Jacques Tags: Democracy Global Headlines Health Coronavirus Source Type: news

Publishing in March: Cambridge World History of Violence
(Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History) The Cambridge World History of Violence will be published by Cambridge University Press in the UK as a four-volume set on March 26, 2020. Publication in North America will follow in May. Volume I: The Prehistoric and Ancient Worlds is co-edited by Mark Hudson, a researcher with the Eurasia3angle Group at the Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History (MPI-SHH). (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - March 25, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

The Coronavirus Outbreak Is a Critical Test for the European Union. So Far, It ’s Failing
When the clapping started, it was impossible not to feel moved. At 8 p.m. on March 17, people across the Netherlands leaned out of windows and congregated on doorstops to make a show of support for medical workers battling the coronavirus. First it was just a few claps, before the sound spread down my street in the Hague, working up to a crescendo of whistles and whoops. Fireworks sounded in the distance. A neighbor I had never spoken to waved from across the street. The warmth and goodwill was the epitome of what it means to be part of a community—a scene also playing out in Italy, Spain and France as stricken neigh...
Source: TIME: Health - March 18, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Charlotte McDonald-Gibson/The Hague Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 feature Londontime Source Type: news

What big data can tell us about plants
(Cambridge University Press) A new open-access journal from Cambridge University Press will provide an interdisciplinary forum for high quality research on groundbreaking discoveries and predictions in plant science. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 26, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Antibiotics in animals: More research urgently needed
(Cambridge University Press) Resistance to antibiotics has been declared a global health emergency -- and it's not just humans who are impacted by this public health crisis. Antibiotics used in food-producing animals contribute to the development of bacteria that are resistant to treatment, impacting animal health and potentially human health. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 21, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New journal to publish discoveries in biophysics
(Cambridge University Press) A new open access journal from Cambridge University Press -- QRB Discovery -- will provide an outlet for exciting new discoveries in the burgeoning field of biophysics. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 18, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Children with ADHD more likely to receive medication if they live in poorer areas
(Cambridge University Press) Children with ADHD from the poorest areas are significantly more likely to receive medication as children with ADHD from the most affluent areas, according to the first UK study of its kind. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - February 7, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

The International Association of Scientific, Technical and Medical Publishers launches ‘STM 2020 Research Data Year’
To accelerate the implementation of research data solutions, The International Association of Scientific, Technical and Medical Publishers (STM) has launched the ‘STM 2020 Research Data Year’ – a dedicated action plan to increase the number of journals with data policies, expand the number of journals depositing data links and grow the volume of citations to datasets. In any field of study, the sharing of data is one of the most fundamental aspects of maintaining the integrity of research. The availability of research data plays a vital role in ensuring reproducibility and the ongoing develop...
Source: News from STM - January 22, 2020 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: STM Publishing News Tags: Latest Source Type: news

Hope for OCD sufferers as study finds smearing faeces on a FAKE hand can help them overcome fears 
OCD sufferers may be terrified of germs, causing them to excessively wash. Researchers led by Cambridge University used the 'rubber hand illusion' to reduce the anxiety around exposure therapy. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - January 9, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Breast cancer breakthrough as Cambridge University scientists identify 350 DNA 'errors'
A study of 200,000 patients by the prestigious university in England identified 352 genetic mutations which influence whether a person develops the killer disease. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - January 7, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Microscopic devices made of 'DNA origami' make antibiotics work better, Cambridge University find
The microscopic devices are crafted from intricately folded strands of DNA that force drugs into contact with bacteria. University of Cambridge researchers found they slowed growth of E.coli. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - December 17, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Smits wins Batchelor Prize
(Cambridge University Press) 2020 Batchelor Prize awarded to Alexander J Smits of Princeton University (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - December 10, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Former Miss World finalist, 30, graduates from Cambridge University with a Master's degree 
Carina Tyrrell, 30, who achieved fourth place in Miss World pageant in 2014, has received an MPhil in public health from Cambridge University, and will return to Miss World as a judge next year. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - November 29, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Students accuse Cambridge university of 'greenwashing' ties with oil firms
Activists call Cambridge Zero initiative a ‘PR stunt to divert attention from links to fossil fuel industry’Student activists at Cambridge have accused the university of attempting to greenwash its relationship with oil and gas firms by stealing their group ’s name for a project led by an academic linked to the fossil fuel industry.Cambridge University is to launch its Cambridge Zero initiative at an event in London next week.The project ’s website, which is already live, touts it as a “bold response to the world’s greatest challenge”.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - November 23, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Damien Gayle and Anugraha Sundaravelu Tags: University of Cambridge Fossil fuels Fossil fuel divestment Environment Education Higher education Energy Greenhouse gas emissions Climate change Science Activism UK news Geoengineering Source Type: news

Switching to 'green' inhalers could reduce carbon footprint by 37-fold
The NHS is being urged to replace metered-dose inhalers after Cambridge University researchers found they had a carbon footprint 37 times that of dry powdered ones. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - October 30, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Here Are All the 2019 Nobel Prize Winners
The 2019 Nobel Prize announcements are underway this week, with the first prize, in the category of physiology or medicine, going to a trio of scientists for their work on cells’ ability to sense and react to oxygen availability. The Nobel Prize in physics, chemistry and literature have been announced and the prizes in peace and economic sciences will follow over the next few days. The awards are a recognition of work that advances each of the respective fields. Nobel winners are given a medal, a certificate and a cash award of about $900,000 (when multiple people win a single Nobel, they typically split the cash awa...
Source: TIME: Science - October 7, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Alex Fitzpatrick Tags: Uncategorized nobels onetime Research Success19 Source Type: news

Type 2 diabetes drug could offer hope for multiple sclerosis after a study on rats
Scientists from Cambridge University gave rats the blood-sugar lowering medication metformin for three months. They then stripped myelin from some of the nerves in the animals' brain. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - October 4, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Scientists Find the Skull of Humanity ’s Ancestor, on a Computer
By comparing fossils and CT scans, researchers say they have reconstructed the skull of the last common forebear of modern humans. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - September 11, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Carl Zimmer Tags: Paleontology Skull (Body Part) Fossils Neanderthal Man Evolution (Biology) Cambridge University Harvati, Katerina Africa Lahr, Marta Mirazon (1965- ) Mounier, Aurelien Nature (Journal) your-feed-science Source Type: news

Scientists Find the Skull of Humanity ’s Ancestor — on a Computer
By comparing fossils and CT scans, researchers say they have reconstructed the skull of the last common forebear of modern humans. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - September 10, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Carl Zimmer Tags: your-feed-science Paleontology Skull (Body Part) Fossils Neanderthal Man Evolution (Biology) Cambridge University Harvati, Katerina Africa Aurelien Mounier Marta Mirazon Lahr Nature (Journal) Source Type: news

Blood test is '100 times more sensitive at picking up on tumours in early-stage breast cancer'
Scientists from Cambridge University developed a tool that detects 'tumour DNA' in individual patients. It identified genetic mutations that were specific to 33 breast-cancer sufferers. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - August 8, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Exposure to oestrogen in the womb may increase a child's risk of autism
Scientists from Cambridge University tested the amniotic fluid of more than 200 pregnancies. They discovered four types of oestrogen hormones were higher in the babies who went on to develop autism. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - July 29, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

3D-Printed Flexible Mesh Eyed for Knee, Ankle Braces
While 3D-printing has allowed for the fabrication of materials that can customize certain types of prosthetics and other devices for medical use, typically they are made out of rigid materials, which limits the mobility of a patient using them. Now researchers at MIT have 3D-printed mesh materials that can offer more customization and flexibility for medical devices and braces that support parts of the body that need to flex, such as muscles and tendons. MIT engineers have 3D-printed stretchy mesh, with customized patterns designed to be flexible yet strong, for use in ankle and knee braces. (Image source: Felice Frankel...
Source: MDDI - July 24, 2019 Category: Medical Devices Tags: Design News Source Type: news

Cambridge University Researchers Recode E. Coli DNA to Create Living, Reproducing Bacteria with Entirely Synthetic DNA
Clinical pathologists may not see new diagnostics based on the technology anytime soon, but synthetic DNA could be immune to virus infections Can DNA of bacteria be manipulated to create new bacteria that can be used to manufacture useful things? Should scientists be creating life from lifelessness? Researchers at University of Cambridge in the UK […] (Source: Dark Daily)
Source: Dark Daily - July 17, 2019 Category: Laboratory Medicine Authors: Jude Tags: Laboratory Pathology Source Type: news

Locum Consultant in Diabetes & Endocrinology (Thyroid and General)
Applications are sought for a full time Locum Consultant post in Endocrinology (Thyroid& General) and Diabetic Medicine at Cambridge University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust (Addenbrooke’s Hospital).Endocrinology and Diabetes services at CUHFT are based in the Wolfson Diabetes and Endocrine Centre (WDEC). The WDEC is a dedicated ambulatory centre within the Wellcome Trust -MRC Institute of Metabolic Science (IMS), a purpose-built centre dedicated to research, education and clinical care in the area of metabolic disease.The successful candidate will be expected to contribute to Thyroid and General Endocri...
Source: Society for Endocrinology - July 11, 2019 Category: Endocrinology Source Type: news

A doctor with good bedside manner could HALVE the risk of dying in 10 years for diabetes patients
Researchers from Cambridge University believe that if patients trust their GP, they can openly discuss any problems. They are also more motivated to take their medication as prescribed. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - July 9, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

What makes a good excuse work? A Cambridge philosopher may have the answer
(University of Cambridge) The things we appeal to when making excuses are myriad: tiredness, stress, a looming work deadline, a wailing infant. But what do these various excuses have in common that allows us to recognize them all as plausible? A researcher from Cambridge University has suggested that the answers lie in what they all tell us about our underlying motivation. When excuses are permissible, it's because they show that while we acted wrongly, our underlying moral intentions were adequate. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 30, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Half of Ebola outbreaks undetected
(PLOS) An estimated half of Ebola virus disease outbreaks have gone undetected since it was discovered in 1976, according to research published in PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases. Although these tend to affect fewer than five patients, the study, led by Emma Glennon at Cambridge University, highlights the need for improved detection and rapid response, in order that outbreaks of Ebola and other public health threats are detected early and consistently. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - June 13, 2019 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Cambridge University Press publishes lexicon on J ü rgen Habermas
(Goethe University Frankfurt) A great honor for J ü rgen Habermas: in the year of his 90th birthday, Cambridge University Press has published an extensive lexicon about the philosopher and sociologist who was a professor at the Institute for Philosophy at Goethe University until 1994. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 3, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Energy storage in the Midwest and beyond: A timely analysis
(Cambridge University Press) As the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) released an update to last year's order on energy storage, MRS Energy& Sustainability today publishes a timely collection of papers that unpack the issue of energy storage in the Midwest and beyond. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 23, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Can anything ease my arthritic hands after years of pain? Dr Martin Scurr answers your questions
Sufferers can experience swelling and tenderness and a grating sound when they move. Also, I welcome the calls from Cambridge University researchers for more scans in pregnancy. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - April 23, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

This Genetic Mutation Makes People Feel Full — All the Time
Two new studies confirm that weight control is often the result of genetics, not willpower. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - April 18, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: GINA KOLATA Tags: Genetics and Heredity Obesity Weight DNA (Deoxyribonucleic Acid) Cambridge University Kaplan, Lee M Kathiresan, Sekar Great Britain Cell (Journal) Farooqi, Sadaf Wareham, Nick your-feed-science Source Type: news

Giving all pregnant women an extra ultrasound at 36 weeks could prevent C-sections
Around one in 25 woman have breech babies, and less than a tenth of these turn themselves around naturally. The new study was conducted by experts at Cambridge University. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - April 16, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Understanding how people respond to symptoms of a brain tumor
(King's College London) A recent study from King's College London and Cambridge University highlighted that people may experience multiple subtle changes before being diagnosed with a brain tumor. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - March 22, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Adulthood begins at 30: Scientists say that our brains are not fully grown-up in our twenties
The brain does not reach its full maturity until the age of 30 according to neuroscientists. Professor Peter Jones from Cambridge University says there is no strict definition for when adulthood starts. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - March 19, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

'Historical Google Earth' project captures a changing Britain
Cambridge University launches free digital archive of aerial photos going back to 1945A “historical Google Earth” featuring aerial photographs of Britain going back to 1945 has been made freely available by Cambridge University.The vast archive captures 70 years of change across urban and rural landscapes, from thebomb-scarred postwar period to the emergence of motorways and skyscrapers.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - February 22, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Aamna Mohdin Tags: Heritage Archaeology Photography Science Art and design UK news Culture University of Cambridge Source Type: news

It’s possible to be depressed while appearing happy – here’s why it’s particularly dangerous
While smiling depression is not a technical term, it is certainly possible to be depressed and manage to successfully mask the symptoms, writes Cambridge University researcher Olivia Remes. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - February 19, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Beer before wine WON'T make you feel fine: Order of drink makes no difference to hangover
The order of beverages has no bearing on severity of hangover, study showed. Instead, the more you drink, the worse the hangover, Cambridge University experts said. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - February 8, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Noisy gene atlas to help reveal how plants 'hedge their bets' in race for survival
(University of Cambridge) Plant scientists at the Sainsbury Laboratory Cambridge University have built a gene expression atlas that maps the 'noisy genes' of genetically identical plants. This is helping to explain why 'twin' plants, with identical genes, grown in identical environments continue to display unique characteristics all of their own. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - January 24, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Heart disease may begin in the WOMB
A study by Cambridge University found that adults who suffered low oxygen in the womb are more likely to show red flags for heart disease, like high blood pressure or stiff arteries. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - January 22, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Cambridge University scientists develop new test for breast cancer
The breakthrough enables GPs to use an online tool to predict a woman's risk, potentially decades in advance of symptoms. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - January 15, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Study finds recalling positive memories protects youngsters from depression
Researchers led by Cambridge University said training teenagers to control their emotions by recalling specific positive memories could make them more resilient to depression. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - January 14, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

The 'inspirational' mother behind a cancer breathalyser
Cambridge University engineering graduate Billy Boyle poured his entire heart into saving thousands from the disease following the death of his wife Kate Gross in December 2014. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - January 3, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news