Green recovery must end the reign of GDP, argue Cambridge and UN economists
(University of Cambridge) * University helps United Nations launch new " Ecosystem Accounting " : allowing governments to better include and reflect nature in their post-pandemic economic recovery. * " The extreme human and economic cost of the pandemic arise from a failure to manage natural capital. " (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - December 14, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

US Presidential Election Part 3: President Trump ’s Legacy of Mismanagement of the Pandemic
Credit: Whitehouse.GovBy Farhang JahanpourOXFORD, Dec 1 2020 (IPS) Covid-19 is on track to be the deadliest and one of the most catastrophic epidemics since the 1918-1919 flu pandemic, which infected about 500 million people or one-third of the world’s population at the time. The number of deaths was estimated somewhere between 17 and 50 million, and possibly as high as 100 million worldwide. The first observations of illness and mortality were documented in December 1917 at Camp Greene, North Carolina. To maintain morale, World War I censors minimized reports of casualties, but as newspapers in neutral Spain were f...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - December 1, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Farhang Jahanpour Tags: Democracy Global Geopolitics Headlines Health North America TerraViva United Nations Source Type: news

Charles Darwin ’s notebooks reported stolen from Cambridge University
Library staff believed manuscripts were ‘mis-shelved’ in 2000 but now think theft likely (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - November 25, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Charles Darwin: Notebooks worth millions lost for 20 years
Cambridge University Library launches an appeal to find the scientist's missing notes and sketches. (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - November 24, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Fireball: Visitors from Darker Worlds review – Werner Herzog dodges meteorites | Peter Bradshaw's film of the week
In his latest science doc, the existential film-maker considers the cataclysmic threat from space – as real now as it ever wasIn 2007,Werner Herzog made a movie about Antarctica calledEncounters at the End of the World, where he met the Cambridge University geographer and seismologist Clive Oppenheimer. The resulting partnership has opened up whole new adventures for Herzog in pop anthropology and the history of ideas. Together, Herzog and Oppenheimer madeInto the Inferno in 2016, with Oppenheimer largely in front of the camera and Herzog behind, supplying the unmistakable rasping voiceover with its occasional flouri...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - November 12, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Peter Bradshaw Tags: Documentary films Werner Herzog Culture Meteors Space Science Source Type: news

Cambridge University DROPS its estimate of daily coronavirus cases in England to 64,000
The MRC Biostatistics Unit, which works with Public Health England, has shrunk its estimate of new daily coronavirus infections by 17 per cent since the start of November. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - November 11, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Game 'pre-bunks' political misinformation by letting players undermine democracy
(University of Cambridge) An online game helps " inoculate " players against fake news by showing them how political misinformation is created and circulated. Launched today, Harmony Square has been created by Cambridge University psychologists with support from US Department of Homeland Security. Accompanying study shows that a single play reduces the perceived reliability of misinformation in users. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - November 6, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

The Future of LTC: The Continuing Evolution of the SNF
The American nursing facility has been in continuous evolution since its inception in the early 19th century. The early “old age homes” were places to save “formerly respectable people from the indignities of the almshouse” (Elon et al., “Post-Acute and Institutional LTC for the elderly,” in Reichel’s Care of the Elderly, 7th ed., Cambridge University Press, 2016:659–670). In the late 19th century thr ough the 20th century, nursing facilities were also places to convalesce from acute hospitalization. (Source: Caring for the Ages)
Source: Caring for the Ages - October 31, 2020 Category: Health Management Authors: Rebecca D. Elon Source Type: news

Artificial 'mini-lungs' grown in a lab let scientists watch how the coronavirus infects human cells
Researchers from Duke University and Cambridge University produced artificial lungs in two independent and separate studies to examine the spread of Covid-19. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - October 23, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Covid risk factors for ethnic minorities 'can't be changed overnight'
Dr Raghib Ali, a clinical epidemiologist at Cambridge University, was one of the main researchers behind a major Government race report into Covid-19 published today. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - October 22, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Fear of COVID-19 raises risk of depression among Soweto's deprived communities
(Cambridge University Press) A STUDY into the impact of the COVID-19 lockdown on the mental health of people in Soweto has found a significant link between symptoms of depression and how likely people felt they were to be infected. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - October 19, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Hesitancy about a COVID-19 vaccine is linked to beliefs about origin of the virus
(Cambridge University Press) More than a third of people (34%) in Turkey and one sixth of people (17%) in the UK are 'hesitant' about a COVID-19 vaccine, according to a study by UCL and Dokuz Eylul University in Turkey. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - October 19, 2020 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

People with poor numerical literacy 'more susceptible' to Covid-19 'fake news'
Cambridge University study also suggests older people less likely to believe coronavirus misinformationCoronavirus – latest updatesSee all our coronavirus coveragePeople with poor numerical literacy are more likely to believe Covid-19 misinformation, according to a survey conducted in five countries.Researchers at Cambridge University said the findings suggested improving people ’s analytical skills could help turn the tide against an epidemic of “fake news” surrounding the health crisis.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - October 13, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Natalie Grover Science correspondent Tags: Coronavirus outbreak 5G World news Science Source Type: news

Why crisis happen, and how systems react to turbulence: A manifesto for economic research
(IMT School for Advanced Studies Lucca) " The Rise and Fall of Business Firms " , the new book co-authored by Massimo Riccaboni of IMT School for Advanced Studies Lucca, recently released by Cambridge University Press, offers a theoretical framework of how innovation and competition shape the growth and decline of companies. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - September 9, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Autistic people's nerve cells differ before birth
(Elsevier) A new study now shows in human brain cells that Autism, a neurodevelopmental condition, can now be traced back to prenatal development, even though the disorder is not diagnosed until at least 18 months of age. The atypical development starts at the very earliest stages of brain organization, at the level of individual brain cells, according to scientists at King's College London and Cambridge University, UK. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - August 24, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

C19 Rapid Review Initiative expands to include 20 publishers and organizations
(Hindawi Limited) UCL Press, Springer Nature, MIT Press, and Cambridge University Press joined the C19 Rapid Review Initiative with a number of their titles, increasing the original group of nine publishers and organizations to 20. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - August 19, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

UK health leaders call for government to seek total elimination
Scientists predict 43 to 84 people will still be dying from Covid-19 every day by mid-AugustCoronavirus – latest updatesSee all our coronavirus coverageScientists advising the government have predicted that between 43 and 84 people will still be dying from Covid-19 every day by mid-August, as health leaders called on the government to adopt a “zero Covid” approach and seek total elimination of the virus.On Wednesday, the government ’s official dashboard showed 83 Covid-19 associated deaths and 763 newly lab-confirmed infections. Modellers from the MRC Biostatistics Unit at Cambridge University, howe...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - July 29, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Sarah Boseley and Denis Campbell Tags: Coronavirus outbreak Infectious diseases Medical research UK news Source Type: news

Viking Age Smallpox Complicates Story of Viral Evolution
An extinct version of the smallpox virus dating to 1,400 years ago prompts speculation about viruses becoming more lethal over time. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - July 23, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: James Gorman Tags: Smallpox Viruses Coronavirus (2019-nCoV) Evolution (Biology) Immune System DNA (Deoxyribonucleic Acid) Cambridge University Science (Journal) Genetics and Heredity your-feed-science Source Type: news

Inside the Global Quest to Trace the Origins of COVID-19 —and Predict Where It Will Go Next
It wasn’t greed, or curiosity, that made Li Rusheng grab his shotgun and enter Shitou Cave. It was about survival. During Mao-era collectivization of the early 1970s, food was so scarce in the emerald valleys of southwestern China’s Yunnan province that farmers like Li could expect to eat meat only once a year–if they were lucky. So, craving protein, Li and his friends would sneak into the cave to hunt the creatures they could hear squeaking and fluttering inside: bats. Li would creep into the gloom and fire blindly at the vaulted ceiling, picking up any quarry that fell to the ground, while his companion...
Source: TIME: Health - July 23, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Charlie Campbell/ Yuxi, Yunnan and Alice Park Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 feature Magazine Source Type: news

Cambridge University Press launches Cambridge Sustainability Commissions
(Cambridge University Press) What are the best ways to help people and societies adopt sustainable lifestyles? Where should charities, NGOs and decision-makers put money and effort? What can scientific research tell us about what works and what doesn't? How do we find that evidence in an ever-growing sea of global research? These are the pressing questions that will be addressed in the first of a new series of scientific assessments published by Cambridge University Press - Cambridge Sustainability Commissions. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - July 22, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

161 ways to prevent another pandemic: Cambridge University study
A study led by the University of Cambridge found shutting down wet markets - where Covid-19 is thought to have jumped to humans - would not be enough to prevent future outbreaks. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - June 25, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Coronavirus UK: London records just 24 new cases a day
Analysis by Public Health England and Cambridge University calculated that the 'R' reproduction rate has fallen to 0.4 in the capital, and could see cases eradicated within a fortnight. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - May 15, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Coronavirus UK: London's R rate was falling BEFORE lockdown
Analysis by Public Health England and Cambridge University shows the crucial reproduction rate, known as the R, peaked at 3 in the capital in late February. But it fell to 2.3 by lockdown on March 23. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - May 15, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

How the crucial coronavirus 'R' rate varies across England
It is the latest piece of evidence that northern towns are now bearing the brunt of the crisis. The real-time R tracking was conducted by researchers from Cambridge University and PHE. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - May 14, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

8million Brits with underlying conditions 'should be exempt from going straight back to work'
Experts at University College London and Cambridge University fear not protecting society's most vulnerable people could see UK's death toll rise to 73,000 within a year. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - May 13, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Ecotourism transforms attitudes to marine conservation
(Cambridge University Press) A study has shown how ecotourism in the Philippines has transformed people's attitudes towards marine conservation. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 4, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Coronavirus UK: Care home deaths may exceed hospital fatalities
Sir David Spiegelhalter, a Cambridge University statistician, warned that while deaths in hospitals have been steadily decreasing, outbreaks in homes may not have peaked yet. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - April 29, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Coronavirus tests: Cambridge University lab sets daily target of 30,000
It is part of the government's goal of achieving 100,000 tests each day by the end of April. (Source: BBC News | Health | UK Edition)
Source: BBC News | Health | UK Edition - April 8, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Chinese vs. Western Governance: The case of COVID-19
Emergency room nurses wear face masks at Second People's Hospital of Shenzhen in China. Credit: Man Yi/ UN News By Martin JacquesLONDON, Mar 26 2020 (IPS) During January the onslaught in the Western media, notably the US and the UK, against the Chinese government’s handling of the Covid-19 epidemic, was merciless. The Chinese government stood accused of an inhumane attitude towards its people, secrecy, a cover-up, and an overwhelming concern for its own survival above all other considerations. The actual evidence was thin bordering at times on the threadbare but this made little difference to the venom and bile of th...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - March 26, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Martin Jacques Tags: Democracy Global Headlines Health Coronavirus Source Type: news

Publishing in March: Cambridge World History of Violence
(Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History) The Cambridge World History of Violence will be published by Cambridge University Press in the UK as a four-volume set on March 26, 2020. Publication in North America will follow in May. Volume I: The Prehistoric and Ancient Worlds is co-edited by Mark Hudson, a researcher with the Eurasia3angle Group at the Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History (MPI-SHH). (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - March 25, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

The Coronavirus Outbreak Is a Critical Test for the European Union. So Far, It ’s Failing
When the clapping started, it was impossible not to feel moved. At 8 p.m. on March 17, people across the Netherlands leaned out of windows and congregated on doorstops to make a show of support for medical workers battling the coronavirus. First it was just a few claps, before the sound spread down my street in the Hague, working up to a crescendo of whistles and whoops. Fireworks sounded in the distance. A neighbor I had never spoken to waved from across the street. The warmth and goodwill was the epitome of what it means to be part of a community—a scene also playing out in Italy, Spain and France as stricken neigh...
Source: TIME: Health - March 18, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Charlotte McDonald-Gibson/The Hague Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 feature Londontime Source Type: news

What big data can tell us about plants
(Cambridge University Press) A new open-access journal from Cambridge University Press will provide an interdisciplinary forum for high quality research on groundbreaking discoveries and predictions in plant science. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 26, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Antibiotics in animals: More research urgently needed
(Cambridge University Press) Resistance to antibiotics has been declared a global health emergency -- and it's not just humans who are impacted by this public health crisis. Antibiotics used in food-producing animals contribute to the development of bacteria that are resistant to treatment, impacting animal health and potentially human health. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 21, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New journal to publish discoveries in biophysics
(Cambridge University Press) A new open access journal from Cambridge University Press -- QRB Discovery -- will provide an outlet for exciting new discoveries in the burgeoning field of biophysics. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 18, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Children with ADHD more likely to receive medication if they live in poorer areas
(Cambridge University Press) Children with ADHD from the poorest areas are significantly more likely to receive medication as children with ADHD from the most affluent areas, according to the first UK study of its kind. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - February 7, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

The International Association of Scientific, Technical and Medical Publishers launches ‘STM 2020 Research Data Year’
To accelerate the implementation of research data solutions, The International Association of Scientific, Technical and Medical Publishers (STM) has launched the ‘STM 2020 Research Data Year’ – a dedicated action plan to increase the number of journals with data policies, expand the number of journals depositing data links and grow the volume of citations to datasets. In any field of study, the sharing of data is one of the most fundamental aspects of maintaining the integrity of research. The availability of research data plays a vital role in ensuring reproducibility and the ongoing develop...
Source: News from STM - January 22, 2020 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: STM Publishing News Tags: Latest Source Type: news

Hope for OCD sufferers as study finds smearing faeces on a FAKE hand can help them overcome fears 
OCD sufferers may be terrified of germs, causing them to excessively wash. Researchers led by Cambridge University used the 'rubber hand illusion' to reduce the anxiety around exposure therapy. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - January 9, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Breast cancer breakthrough as Cambridge University scientists identify 350 DNA 'errors'
A study of 200,000 patients by the prestigious university in England identified 352 genetic mutations which influence whether a person develops the killer disease. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - January 7, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Microscopic devices made of 'DNA origami' make antibiotics work better, Cambridge University find
The microscopic devices are crafted from intricately folded strands of DNA that force drugs into contact with bacteria. University of Cambridge researchers found they slowed growth of E.coli. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - December 17, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Smits wins Batchelor Prize
(Cambridge University Press) 2020 Batchelor Prize awarded to Alexander J Smits of Princeton University (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - December 10, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Former Miss World finalist, 30, graduates from Cambridge University with a Master's degree 
Carina Tyrrell, 30, who achieved fourth place in Miss World pageant in 2014, has received an MPhil in public health from Cambridge University, and will return to Miss World as a judge next year. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - November 29, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Students accuse Cambridge university of 'greenwashing' ties with oil firms
Activists call Cambridge Zero initiative a ‘PR stunt to divert attention from links to fossil fuel industry’Student activists at Cambridge have accused the university of attempting to greenwash its relationship with oil and gas firms by stealing their group ’s name for a project led by an academic linked to the fossil fuel industry.Cambridge University is to launch its Cambridge Zero initiative at an event in London next week.The project ’s website, which is already live, touts it as a “bold response to the world’s greatest challenge”.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - November 23, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Damien Gayle and Anugraha Sundaravelu Tags: University of Cambridge Fossil fuels Fossil fuel divestment Environment Education Higher education Energy Greenhouse gas emissions Climate change Science Activism UK news Geoengineering Source Type: news

Switching to 'green' inhalers could reduce carbon footprint by 37-fold
The NHS is being urged to replace metered-dose inhalers after Cambridge University researchers found they had a carbon footprint 37 times that of dry powdered ones. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - October 30, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Here Are All the 2019 Nobel Prize Winners
The 2019 Nobel Prize announcements are underway this week, with the first prize, in the category of physiology or medicine, going to a trio of scientists for their work on cells’ ability to sense and react to oxygen availability. The Nobel Prize in physics, chemistry and literature have been announced and the prizes in peace and economic sciences will follow over the next few days. The awards are a recognition of work that advances each of the respective fields. Nobel winners are given a medal, a certificate and a cash award of about $900,000 (when multiple people win a single Nobel, they typically split the cash awa...
Source: TIME: Science - October 7, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Alex Fitzpatrick Tags: Uncategorized nobels onetime Research Success19 Source Type: news

Type 2 diabetes drug could offer hope for multiple sclerosis after a study on rats
Scientists from Cambridge University gave rats the blood-sugar lowering medication metformin for three months. They then stripped myelin from some of the nerves in the animals' brain. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - October 4, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Scientists Find the Skull of Humanity ’s Ancestor, on a Computer
By comparing fossils and CT scans, researchers say they have reconstructed the skull of the last common forebear of modern humans. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - September 11, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Carl Zimmer Tags: Paleontology Skull (Body Part) Fossils Neanderthal Man Evolution (Biology) Cambridge University Harvati, Katerina Africa Lahr, Marta Mirazon (1965- ) Mounier, Aurelien Nature (Journal) your-feed-science Source Type: news

Scientists Find the Skull of Humanity ’s Ancestor — on a Computer
By comparing fossils and CT scans, researchers say they have reconstructed the skull of the last common forebear of modern humans. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - September 10, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Carl Zimmer Tags: your-feed-science Paleontology Skull (Body Part) Fossils Neanderthal Man Evolution (Biology) Cambridge University Harvati, Katerina Africa Aurelien Mounier Marta Mirazon Lahr Nature (Journal) Source Type: news

Blood test is '100 times more sensitive at picking up on tumours in early-stage breast cancer'
Scientists from Cambridge University developed a tool that detects 'tumour DNA' in individual patients. It identified genetic mutations that were specific to 33 breast-cancer sufferers. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - August 8, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Exposure to oestrogen in the womb may increase a child's risk of autism
Scientists from Cambridge University tested the amniotic fluid of more than 200 pregnancies. They discovered four types of oestrogen hormones were higher in the babies who went on to develop autism. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - July 29, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

3D-Printed Flexible Mesh Eyed for Knee, Ankle Braces
While 3D-printing has allowed for the fabrication of materials that can customize certain types of prosthetics and other devices for medical use, typically they are made out of rigid materials, which limits the mobility of a patient using them. Now researchers at MIT have 3D-printed mesh materials that can offer more customization and flexibility for medical devices and braces that support parts of the body that need to flex, such as muscles and tendons. MIT engineers have 3D-printed stretchy mesh, with customized patterns designed to be flexible yet strong, for use in ankle and knee braces. (Image source: Felice Frankel...
Source: MDDI - July 24, 2019 Category: Medical Devices Tags: Design News Source Type: news