Energy storage in the Midwest and beyond: A timely analysis
(Cambridge University Press) As the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) released an update to last year's order on energy storage, MRS Energy& Sustainability today publishes a timely collection of papers that unpack the issue of energy storage in the Midwest and beyond. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 23, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Can anything ease my arthritic hands after years of pain? Dr Martin Scurr answers your questions
Sufferers can experience swelling and tenderness and a grating sound when they move. Also, I welcome the calls from Cambridge University researchers for more scans in pregnancy. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - April 23, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

This Genetic Mutation Makes People Feel Full — All the Time
Two new studies confirm that weight control is often the result of genetics, not willpower. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - April 18, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: GINA KOLATA Tags: Genetics and Heredity Obesity Weight DNA (Deoxyribonucleic Acid) Cambridge University Kaplan, Lee M Kathiresan, Sekar Great Britain Cell (Journal) Farooqi, Sadaf Wareham, Nick your-feed-science Source Type: news

Giving all pregnant women an extra ultrasound at 36 weeks could prevent C-sections
Around one in 25 woman have breech babies, and less than a tenth of these turn themselves around naturally. The new study was conducted by experts at Cambridge University. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - April 16, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Understanding how people respond to symptoms of a brain tumor
(King's College London) A recent study from King's College London and Cambridge University highlighted that people may experience multiple subtle changes before being diagnosed with a brain tumor. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - March 22, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Adulthood begins at 30: Scientists say that our brains are not fully grown-up in our twenties
The brain does not reach its full maturity until the age of 30 according to neuroscientists. Professor Peter Jones from Cambridge University says there is no strict definition for when adulthood starts. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - March 19, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

'Historical Google Earth' project captures a changing Britain
Cambridge University launches free digital archive of aerial photos going back to 1945A “historical Google Earth” featuring aerial photographs of Britain going back to 1945 has been made freely available by Cambridge University.The vast archive captures 70 years of change across urban and rural landscapes, from thebomb-scarred postwar period to the emergence of motorways and skyscrapers.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - February 22, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Aamna Mohdin Tags: Heritage Archaeology Photography Science Art and design UK news Culture University of Cambridge Source Type: news

It’s possible to be depressed while appearing happy – here’s why it’s particularly dangerous
While smiling depression is not a technical term, it is certainly possible to be depressed and manage to successfully mask the symptoms, writes Cambridge University researcher Olivia Remes. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - February 19, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Beer before wine WON'T make you feel fine: Order of drink makes no difference to hangover
The order of beverages has no bearing on severity of hangover, study showed. Instead, the more you drink, the worse the hangover, Cambridge University experts said. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - February 8, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Noisy gene atlas to help reveal how plants 'hedge their bets' in race for survival
(University of Cambridge) Plant scientists at the Sainsbury Laboratory Cambridge University have built a gene expression atlas that maps the 'noisy genes' of genetically identical plants. This is helping to explain why 'twin' plants, with identical genes, grown in identical environments continue to display unique characteristics all of their own. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - January 24, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Heart disease may begin in the WOMB
A study by Cambridge University found that adults who suffered low oxygen in the womb are more likely to show red flags for heart disease, like high blood pressure or stiff arteries. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - January 22, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Cambridge University scientists develop new test for breast cancer
The breakthrough enables GPs to use an online tool to predict a woman's risk, potentially decades in advance of symptoms. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - January 15, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Study finds recalling positive memories protects youngsters from depression
Researchers led by Cambridge University said training teenagers to control their emotions by recalling specific positive memories could make them more resilient to depression. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - January 14, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

The 'inspirational' mother behind a cancer breathalyser
Cambridge University engineering graduate Billy Boyle poured his entire heart into saving thousands from the disease following the death of his wife Kate Gross in December 2014. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - January 3, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Parents' brain activity 'echoes' their infant's brain activity when they play together
(PLOS) Research shows for the first time that when adults are engaged in joint play together with their infant, the parents' brains show bursts of high-frequency activity, which are linked to their baby's attention patterns and not their own. The study publishes December 13 in the open-access journal PLOS Biology and was conducted by Dr Sam Wass of the University of East London in collaboration with Dr Victoria Leong (Cambridge University and Nanyang Technological University, Singapore) and colleagues. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - December 13, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Matter: Yes, the Octopus Is Smart as Heck. But Why?
It has eight arms, three hearts — and a plan. Scientists aren ’ t sure how the cephalopods got to be so intelligent. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - November 30, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: CARL ZIMMER Tags: Animal Cognition Animal Behavior Octopus Brain Cambridge University Trends in Ecology and Evolution (Journal) Source Type: news

Scientists grow 'mini-placentas' for future trials
The 'organoids' were developed at Cambridge University as a tool for unravelling some of the mysteries of early pregnancy. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - November 28, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Britons are swallowing conspiracy theories. Here ’s how to stop the rot | Hugo Drochon
Aliens exist and global warming is a hoax – these unbelievable beliefs are symptoms of people feeling threatenedWho believes in conspiracy theories, and why? That is the question asked ina five-year study at Cambridge University, which commissioned three surveys from YouGov (2015, 2016 and 2018) to get a sense of the phenomenon.It turns that out 60% of British people believe in at least one of the 10 conspiracy theories we put to them. So, for instance, 8% think humans have made contact with aliens at Roswell but the US government is hiding it from us; 7% believe that global warming is a hoax invented to deceive peop...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - November 28, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Hugo Drochon Tags: Society Psychology Social media Digital media Brexit Politics Immigration and asylum Source Type: news

Recent study documents damage to rice crops by three fall-applied residual herbicides
(Cambridge University Press) Fall-applied residual herbicides are a commonly used control for glyphosate-resistant Italian ryegrass -- one of the most troublesome weeds in Mid-South row crops. But research published in the journal Weed Technology shows rice growers need to be cautious. Some residual herbicides can have a negative impact on rice crop performance. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - November 15, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Safety is Third, Not First, and We All Know It Should Be
Conclusion In educational opportunities, train like you plan to fight. Since there may not be an actual patient, the “benefit” in the risk-benefit analysis may be lesser. However, taking no risks in training ensures you’ll be less prepared to take risks—even R+ risks—in actual operations. For example, you don’t stop patient care because it’s raining, so don’t stop your training simply because it’s raining. Also, during your education, fight the idea that we can ever say “the scene is safe.” Accept that our work is done in an imperfect environment where safet...
Source: JEMS Special Topics - November 13, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Christopher Davis, MD, NRP, FAWM Tags: Exclusive Articles Operations Source Type: news

Autism is an 'extreme version' of the male brain
Cambridge University researchers, who analysed personality tests for more than half a million men and women, found both men and autistic people were more 'systematic' than 'empathetic'. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - November 12, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

App-delivered videos of patients washing hands or touching dirty objects reduces OCD symptoms
Researchers from Cambridge University found that an app that lets OCD patients watch themselves wash their hands or touch a dirty object helps reduce symptoms and cognitive flexibility.   (Source: mobihealthnews)
Source: mobihealthnews - October 23, 2018 Category: Information Technology Source Type: news

Evolution is everywhere
(Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona) Human Evolution Beyond Biology and Culture: Evolutionary Social, Environmental and Policy Sciences (Cambridge University Press, October 2018) is a new book written by ICREA Research Professor Jeroen van den Bergh of at ICTA-UAB. It offers a complete account of evolutionary thinking in the social, environmental and policy sciences, while creating bridges with biology. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - October 17, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Just SEVEN calories too many a day 'is all it takes to get fat'
Dr Giles Yeo, a Cambridge University geneticist who has worked on BBC programmes including Trust Me, I’m A Doctor and Horizon, says the problem worsens in middle age when bodies slow down. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - October 14, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Alzheimer's 'world first' as scientists discover how to destroy toxic particles
Cambridge University scientists along with a team in Sweden identified abnormal deposits called protein oligomers as the most likely cause of dementia. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - September 24, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Give millions of patients already on statins a new type of drug
Cambridge University researchers tested the effects of LPL enhancers using genetic data of around 400,000 people. The results were published in JAMA Cardiology. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - September 19, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Report: UK startup hopes to communicate directly with the nervous system
Cambridge University spin-out Cambridge Bio-Augmentation Systems and tech company Nvidia are partnering to work on a system that they hope will allow devices to directly communicate with the human central nervous system, according to a new Forbes report. CBAS is developing neural interfaces they say will allow external devices to communicate directly with the central nervous system, hoping that if they are able to talk to the system, they could manage chronic diseases “at the root,” according to the report. “We’re building what is essentially a USB port to allow communication with the nervous system...
Source: Mass Device - August 22, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Fink Densford Tags: Research & Development cambridgebioaugmentationsystems Source Type: news

Eating a Christmas dinner might diagnose diabetes earlier than the standard glucose drink
Researchers from  Cambridge University found that giving mice a high-fat, high-calorie meal detects insulin resistance more accurately than sugary drink given to suspected diabetics. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - August 22, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Nvidia Team Up With Cambridge Spin-Out To Create'Broadband' For The Body
Cambridge University spin-out Cambridge Bio-Augmentation Systems (CBAS), has partnered with Nvidia to bring AI-powered edge-computing to the most powerful communication network: the nervous system. (Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News)
Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News - August 20, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Gemma Milne, Contributor Tags: NASDAQ:NVDA Source Type: news

Scientists examine the relative impact of proximity to seed sources
(Cambridge University Press) A new research study published in the journal Invasive Plant Science and Management tackles an important, unresolved question in the biology of invasive plants. Which is most important to the establishment of new invasive communities -- proximity to seed sources, canopy disturbance, or soil disturbance? (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - August 17, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Being a winner makes men more likely to cheat on their spouse
A study from Cambridge University found that winning causes hormonal fluctuations in men that can influence their sexual behaviour and make them more likely to approach attractive women. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - August 9, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Women with polycystic ovary syndrome are more likely to have a child with autism
Women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) are more likely than other women to have an autistic child, according to an analysis of NHS data carried out by a team at Cambridge University ’ s Autism Research Centre. The research is published today in the journal Translational Psychiatry. The team stressed that the likelihood of having an autistic child is still very low, even among women with PCOS – but finding this link provides an important clue in understanding one of the multiple causal factors in autism. (Source: University of Bristol news)
Source: University of Bristol news - August 2, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Tags: Health, Research; Faculty of Health Sciences, Faculty of Health Sciences, Bristol Medical School; Press Release Source Type: news

Women with PCOS found to be ‘more likely to have autistic child’
Women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) are more likely than other women to have an autistic child, according to an analysis of NHS data carried out by Cambridge University. (Source: Nursing Times)
Source: Nursing Times - August 1, 2018 Category: Nursing Source Type: news

Former refugee among winners of Fields medal – the 'Nobel prize for maths'
Caucher Birkar grew up on a farm near the Kurdish city of Marivan in Iran and spoke little English when he began his PhDAn Kurdish man who came to Britain as a refugee after fleeing conflict two decades ago is one of four men who have been awarded the Fields medal, considered the equivalent of a Nobel prize for mathematics.The winners of the prize, presented at the International Congress of the International Mathematical Union in Rio de Janeiro, have been announced as Prof Caucher Birkar, 40, from Cambridge University, Prof Akshay Venkatesh, 36, an Australian based at Princeton and Stanford in the US, Prof Alessio Figalli,...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - August 1, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Nicola Davis and Naaman Zhou Tags: Mathematics Science University of Cambridge Education Higher education Refugees University of Nottingham Source Type: news

Women with PCOS are 35% more likely to have a child with autism
Experts today described the new Cambridge University study as an 'important piece of new evidence' as the medical community remains flummoxed by the cause of ASD. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - August 1, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Women with polycystic ovary syndrome more likely to have a child with autism
(University of Cambridge) Women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) are more likely than other women to have an autistic child, according to an analysis of NHS data carried out by a team at Cambridge University's Autism Research Centre. The research is published today in the journal Translational Psychiatry. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - August 1, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Mothers in some areas of England are more likely to have a C-section
Official figures revealed nearly a third of all births at Cambridge University Hospitals FT are elective Caesareans. In contrast, the rate is just 3.6 per cent at the Dorset County Hospital FT. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - July 26, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

How the sex of your baby may predict pregnancy complications!
Cambridge University researchers discovered the sex of a baby controls levels of a metabolite that plays an important role in all bodily cells in the pregnant mother's blood. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - July 12, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

How my wife’s death inspired invention of cancer breathalyser
AN inventor whose breathalyser cancer detector scooped Britain ’s top engineering award has told how his own wife’s fatal illness inspired him. Billy Boyle, a Cambridge University graduate, lost his wife Kate at 36 to colon cancer on Christmas Day 2014. (Source: Daily Express - Health)
Source: Daily Express - Health - June 29, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

'Breathalyser' that could save thousands of lives by scoops Britain's top engineering award
Inventor Billy Boyle, a Cambridge University graduate, says the miracle device was inspired by his wife's late diagnosis and death from colon cancer. Mr Boyle says his goal is to save 100,000 lives. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - June 28, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Mountain-dwellers near Everest have forearms 1cm shorter than lowland people, study finds
Researchers led by Cambridge University PhD student Stephanie Payne compared the length of people arms in Nepal and found those living at altitude have significantly shorter forearms. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - June 20, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Shelford Group trust signs £107m IT deal
Cambridge University Hospitals Foundation Trust has signed a £107m contract with Northern Ireland company to provide IT support services. (Source: HSJ)
Source: HSJ - June 14, 2018 Category: UK Health Source Type: news

For Women With Early Breast Cancer, Herceptin Treatment Can Be Much Shorter
A large, new study shows that the treatment regimen, typically recommended for a year, can be just as effective at 6 months, reducing serious side effects and costs. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - May 16, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: DENISE GRADY Tags: Breast Cancer Herceptin (Drug) American Society of Clinical Oncology Cambridge University side effects Genentech Inc Source Type: news

Impact of weather and well-timed cultural management techniques on organic weed control
(Cambridge University Press) Weed management can be a tough challenge in organic cropping systems since growers don't have herbicides in their weed control arsenal. New research published in the journal Weed Science, though, shows that weather conditions and well-timed cultural management techniques can help fill the void by making crops more competitive. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 15, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Matter: In Ancient Skeletons, Scientists Discover a Modern Foe: Hepatitis B
From 15 sets of skeletal remains, researchers have recovered DNA from the oldest viruses known to have infected humans — and have resurrected some strains in the laboratory. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - May 9, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: CARL ZIMMER Tags: Hepatitis Genetics and Heredity Skeletons Viruses Bones Bronze Age Liver Cancer Epidemics Cambridge University Nature (Journal) University of Copenhagen eLife (Journal) Source Type: news

High cholesterol increases Alzheimer's proteins in the brain
Researchers from Cambridge University found that cholesterol in the brain triggers the formation of protein plaques that have previously been associated with Alzheimer's. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - May 7, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

High cholesterol increases the build up of Alzheimer's proteins in the brain by 20 times
Researchers from Cambridge University found that cholesterol in the brain triggers the formation of protein plaques that have previously been associated with Alzheimer's. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - May 7, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news