Breakthrough on heart attack care: Kidney cancer drug 'heals heart and prevents second attack'
An injection of kidney and skin cancer medicine aldesleukin increases levels of a rare white blood cell that protects the heart, researchers at Cambridge University found. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - September 6, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Risk of hospitalisations higher with Delta variant: UK study
The study, carried out by Public Health England (PHE) and Cambridge University and published in ‘The Lancet' journal on Friday, is the first of its kind to compare the hospitalisation risk of the two variants and highlights the need for people to be fully vaccinated. (Source: The Economic Times)
Source: The Economic Times - August 28, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Sue Perkins health: The diagnosis that 'destroyed' her life - and symptoms for you to spot
SUE PERKINS, 51, is best known for being one half of the comedy duo Mel and Sue with long term friend Mel Giedroyc, 53. Their friendship which began over 32 years ago at Cambridge university was suddenly put under strain when Sue got some news that "destroyed her life from the inside out". (Source: Daily Express - Health)
Source: Daily Express - Health - August 7, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Early adulthood education and employment experiences play independent role in later life cardiovascular health
New research has found that education and employment experiences in early adulthood contribute to cardiovascular health inequalities in later life, independent of occupation and family income in mid-adulthood. The findings, published today in the Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health, involve researchers from the University of Cambridge, University of Bristol and UCL Social Research Institute. (Source: University of Bristol news)
Source: University of Bristol news - August 6, 2021 Category: Universities & Medical Training Tags: Health, Research; Faculty of Health Sciences, Faculty of Health Sciences, Bristol Medical School; Press Release Source Type: news

DR MICHAEL MOSLEY: Could statins help beat long-Covid? It's just one of many treatments being tested
DR MICHAEL MOSLEY: Researchers at Cambridge University are looking at whether giving statins or a blood-thinning drug to patients when discharged from hospital helps long-term outcomes. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - July 30, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

FFP3 masks: study shows they significantly reduce the risk of COVID-19 infection, RCN
A study by Cambridge University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust has found wearing FFP3 face masks can considerably reduce the risk of health care workers becoming infected with COVID-19. (Source: Current Awareness Service for Health (CASH))
Source: Current Awareness Service for Health (CASH) - July 13, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Human body size shaped by climate, evolutionary study shows
Research combines data from fossils with climate models, revealing the effect of climate on body and brain sizeA well-known pattern in human evolution is an increase in body and brain size. Our species,Homo sapiens,is part of theHomogenus and emerged about 300,000 years ago. We are much bigger than earlierHomo species and have brains three times larger than humans who lived a million years ago.There has been debate over the factors causing humans to evolve in this way, prompting a research team led by Cambridge University and T übingen University in Germany to combine data on more than 300 human fossils from theHomo g...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - July 8, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Charlotte Burton Tags: Evolution Human biology Science Source Type: news

Upgrading the type of masks worn by NHS staff could cut their risk of catching Covid to ZERO
Cambridge University scientists found when doctors and nurses on Covid wards were given the FFP3 face mask their risk of catching the virus plummeted to zero. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - June 29, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Fewer than one in 1,000 patients are dying from Covid now compared to one in 90 during second wave
Cambridge University scientists also found one in 55 over-75s are now dying from Covid after catching the disease, compared to one in five during the darkest days of January. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - June 28, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Lucida joins GE Healthcare's Edison Accelerator
Lucida Medical, a startup company spun out of Cambridge University that focuse...Read more on AuntMinnie.comRelated Reading: GE Healthcare names new CEO GE Healthcare signs cardiac AI deal with ACC GE debuts Edison HealthLink edge computing platform MaxQ AI to integrate Accipio with GE's Edison GE to integrate Edison platform with ACR AI-LAB (Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines)
Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines - June 25, 2021 Category: Radiology Source Type: news

Giles Yeo: ‘Let’s consider the type of food we eat, and not fixate on calories’
The scientist and broadcaster discusses the drawbacks of calorie-counting and BMI in measuring obesity, and how our growing understanding of genetics is leading to new treatmentsSince the dawn of the 20th century, almost all weight loss guidelines have used calories as a simple measure of how much energy we ’re consuming from our food. But according to Giles Yeo, a Cambridge University research scientist who studies the genetics of obesity, there’s one problem: not all calories are created equal. In his new book,Why Calories Don ’t Count, Yeo explains that what really matters is not how many calories a pa...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - June 20, 2021 Category: Science Authors: David Cox Tags: Genetics Nutrition Obesity Diets and dieting Biology Life and style Science Society Source Type: news

Early encounter of microbes and fetal immune system during second trimester of gestation
(Agency for Science, Technology and Research (A*STAR), Singapore) The human fetal immune system begins to develop early during gestation, however, factors responsible for fetal immune-priming remain elusive. Dr Florent Ginhoux from A*STAR's Singapore Immunology Network, Professor Jerry Chan from KK Women's and Children's Hospital, Professor Salvatore Albani from SingHealth Duke-NUS Translational Immunology Institute, and Cambridge University explored potential exposure to microbial agents in-utero. They identified live microbes across fetal organs that stimulate activation of fetal T-cells during the second trimester of ge...
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - June 15, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Autumn Cambridge University Covid cases linked to one nightclub
Students who attended events during freshers ’ week and over Halloween were source of biggest infection clusterCoronavirus – latest updatesSee all our coronavirus coverageNearly three-quarters of coronavirus cases among University of Cambridge students last autumn have been traced back to a single nightclub, highlighting the risks of reopening venues in the next phase of the UK government ’s roadmap.Students who attended socially distanced events during freshers ’ week and over Halloween were the source of the biggest infection cluster at the university, according to researchers who analysed the eff...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - June 1, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Rachel Hall Tags: Coronavirus University of Cambridge Higher education UK news Students Science Source Type: news

Stephen Hawking ’s office and archive gifted to UK to settle tax bill
Scientist ’s treasure trove and personal objects to go to Science Museum and Cambridge University LibraryA vast treasure trove of papers and personal objects belonging to Stephen Hawking, from dizzying black hole theories to scripts for the Simpsons, have been acquired for the nation.It was announced on Thursday that Hawking ’s archive and the contents of his university office have been acquired through theAcceptance in Lieu scheme, which allows families to offset tax.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - May 26, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Mark Brown Arts corespondent Tags: Stephen Hawking Astronomy Physics Black holes UK news Space Source Type: news

Research spotlights Minnesota's successes in eradicating Palmer amaranth
(Cambridge University Press) Palmer amaranth is a hard-to-control noxious weed that can significantly reduce crop yields. It was first introduced in Minnesota in 2016 through contaminated seed mixes used for conservation plantings. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - April 30, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

What are the risks of blood clots from AstraZeneca's Covid vaccine REALLY?
Slides shown at a press conference announcing the change in vaccine guidance yesterday were made by Cambridge University experts, led by Professor Sir David Spiegelhalter. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - April 8, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Sanfilippo co-edits book on the relationships between privacy, governance, and information
(University of Illinois School of Information Sciences) A new book published by Cambridge University Press explores the complex and dynamic relationships between privacy, governance, and the production, cultivation, and sharing of knowledge. It features several case studies across academia, social media, mental health, and the Internet of Things (IoT). (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - March 25, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Cambridge University issues 'stark warning' over toll of pandemic on young people's mental health
Psychiatrists at the University of Cambridge are calling for call for urgent action 'to ensure that this generation is not disproportionately disadvantaged by Covid-19'. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - March 10, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Bitcoin activity now uses more energy than all of Argentina
(Natural News) As Bitcoin’s popularity continues to rise, driven in part by recent moves by electric automaker Tesla, the true energy cost of the cryptocurrency is also coming to light. A new study shows that Bitcoin uses more energy than the entire country of Argentina. The report comes from Cambridge University, which says that the cryptocurrency has... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - February 24, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

People with extremist views less able to do complex mental tasks, research suggests
Cambridge University team say their findings could be used to spot people at risk from radicalisation (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - February 23, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

People with extremist views less able to do complex mental tasks, research suggests
Cambridge University team say their findings could be used to spot people at risk from radicalisationOur brains hold clues for the ideologies we choose to live by, according to research, which has suggested that people who espouse extremist attitudes tend to perform poorly on complex mental tasks.Researchers from the University of Cambridge sought to evaluate whether cognitive disposition – differences in how information is perceived and processed – sculpt ideological world-views such as political, nationalistic and dogmatic beliefs, beyond the impact of traditional demographic factors like age, race and gender...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - February 22, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Natalie Grover Tags: Psychology Neuroscience University of Cambridge Counter-terrorism policy UK news World news US news The far right Source Type: news

Lab-grown ‘mini-bile ducts’ by scientists at Cambridge university used to repair human livers in regenerative medicine first
Scientists have used a technique to grow bile duct organoids – often referred to as ‘mini-organs’ – in the lab and shown that these can... (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - February 20, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Don Hunter obituary
My brother-in-law Don Hunter, who has died aged 93, was a physicist who worked on some of the first electronic computers in the Rutherford Laboratory at Cambridge University and later helped set up one of the first major computer software companies in the UK. Don worked as a research assistant in the maths department of the Rutherford Laboratory from 1949 until 1952. There he was involved in pioneering work on the electronic delay storage automatic calculator (Edsac 1) computer. In 1955 he took up a research post at the Standard Telecommunication Laboratories (STL) in Harlow, Essex, where he was part of the design team for...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - February 14, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Moira Jones Tags: Computing Physics University of Cambridge Software Source Type: news

Major streaming companies join pioneering initiative to monitor media industry ’ s digital carbon footprint
Netflix, BT and Cambridge University Press are the latest to sign up to Bristol's fully operational DIMPACT tool. (Source: University of Bristol news)
Source: University of Bristol news - February 9, 2021 Category: Universities & Medical Training Tags: Business and Enterprise, Announcements, International, Public engagement; Faculty of Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, School of Computer Science, Electrical and Electronic Engineering, and Engineering Maths, Faculty of Engineering, School of Computer Source Type: news

New research to enhance air filtering in ambulances
(CranfieldUniversity) Cranfield University is working with Q-Flo, Cambridge University and NHS England to record experimental airflow data from a modern NHS ambulance under different driving conditions. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - February 4, 2021 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Maternal mental health needs attention during COVID-19 lockdowns
(Cambridge University Press) Mothers are at increased risk of mental health problems as they struggle to balance the demands of childcare and remote working in COVID-19 lockdowns, according to new research from an international team of researchers. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - February 3, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Covid vaccine update: Single Pfizer shot may leave you vulnerable to South African strain
FEARS the coronavirus vaccines will not eliminate the threat posed by new variants have been heightened in the wake of a new study. Laboratory tests by Cambridge University found that a single shot of then two shot Pfizer jab may leave the elderly vulnerable to the new South African strain. (Source: Daily Express - Health)
Source: Daily Express - Health - February 2, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

'Find of the century': medieval hoard of treasures unearthed in Cambridge
Graves found under demolished student halls are providing valuable insight into life in a post-Roman settlementAn early medieval graveyard unearthed beneath student accommodation at Cambridge University has been described as “one of the most exciting finds of Anglo-Saxon archaeology since the 19th century”.King ’s College discovered the “extensive” cemetery, containing more than 60 graves, after demolishing a group of 1930s buildings which had recently housed graduates and staff in the west of the city, to make way for more modern halls.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - January 30, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Donna Ferguson Tags: Archaeology University of Cambridge Education Higher education Science UK news Source Type: news

COVID-19 vaccine hesitancy in the UK: the Oxford coronavirus explanations, attitudes, and narratives survey (Oceans) II, Cambridge University Press
COVID-19 vaccine hesitancy is relatively evenly spread across the population. Willingness to take a vaccine is closely bound to recognition of the collective importance. Vaccine public information that highlights prosocial benefits may be especially effective. Factors such as conspiracy beliefs that foster mistrust and erode social cohesion will lower vaccine up-take. This briefing on the study links to the journal article. (Source: Current Awareness Service for Health (CASH))
Source: Current Awareness Service for Health (CASH) - January 26, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Radioactive pig tranquilliser could be used in humans to transform diagnosis of high blood pressure 
Scientists at Cambridge University hope the drug will enable doctors to improve the diagnosis of primary hyperaldosteronism (PHA), a form of high blood pressure. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - January 25, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Study reveals a diverse cephalopod fauna in the canary current large marine ecosystem
(Cambridge University Press) An extensive review of cephalopod fauna from the Northwest African Atlantic coast was performed by researchers from the University of Vigo (Spain) and the Spanish Institute of Oceanography (IEO). (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - January 25, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Coronavirus UK: Scientists 'should start developing new Covid vaccines now' to cope with variants
Professor Ravi Gupta, a microbiologist at Cambridge University, told MailOnline 'the time has come' for vaccines to be updated so they are fully effective against new variants of coronavirus. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - January 19, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

The Child in Status Epilepticus Dilemma
The following case is based on a real-life situation, highlighting the difficulties in applying ethical decisions in the prehospital critical care setting. While the case is based from the United Kingdom, it ought to be applicable to similar EMS systems and settings. Kassirer et al. highlight that discussing real-world scenarios helps exemplify reasoning (both good and bad) that the reader ought to relate to within similar and future contexts.1 During the start of a night shift, an ambulance crew consisting of a paramedic and an assistant (EMT-B) are dispatched to a 10-year-old child in status epilepticus (SE). The pati...
Source: JEMS Patient Care - January 12, 2021 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: JEMS Staff Tags: Best Practices Exclusives Patient Care Pediatric Care Seizure Source Type: news

The Child in Status Epilepticus Dilemma
The following case is based on a real-life situation, highlighting the difficulties in applying ethical decisions in the prehospital critical care setting. While the case is based from the United Kingdom, it ought to be applicable to similar EMS systems and settings. Kassirer et al. highlight that discussing real-world scenarios helps exemplify reasoning (both good and bad) that the reader ought to relate to within similar and future contexts.1 During the start of a night shift, an ambulance crew consisting of a paramedic and an assistant (EMT-B) are dispatched to a 10-year-old child in status epilepticus (SE). The pati...
Source: JEMS Administration and Leadership - January 12, 2021 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: JEMS Staff Tags: Best Practices Exclusives Patient Care Pediatric Care Seizure Source Type: news

The Child in Status Epilepticus Dilemma
The following case is based on a real-life situation, highlighting the difficulties in applying ethical decisions in the prehospital critical care setting. While the case is based from the United Kingdom, it ought to be applicable to similar EMS systems and settings. Kassirer et al. highlight that discussing real-world scenarios helps exemplify reasoning (both good and bad) that the reader ought to relate to within similar and future contexts.1 During the start of a night shift, an ambulance crew consisting of a paramedic and an assistant (EMT-B) are dispatched to a 10-year-old child in status epilepticus (SE). The pati...
Source: JEMS Latest News - January 12, 2021 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: JEMS Staff Tags: Best Practices Exclusives Patient Care Pediatric Care Seizure Source Type: news

The Child in Status Epilepticus Dilemma
The following case is based on a real-life situation, highlighting the difficulties in applying ethical decisions in the prehospital critical care setting. While the case is based from the United Kingdom, it ought to be applicable to similar EMS systems and settings. Kassirer et al. highlight that discussing real-world scenarios helps exemplify reasoning (both good and bad) that the reader ought to relate to within similar and future contexts.1 During the start of a night shift, an ambulance crew consisting of a paramedic and an assistant (EMT-B) are dispatched to a 10-year-old child in status epilepticus (SE). The pati...
Source: JEMS: Journal of Emergency Medical Services News - January 12, 2021 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: JEMS Staff Tags: Best Practices Exclusives Patient Care Pediatric Care Seizure Source Type: news

The Child in Status Epilepticus Dilemma
The following case is based on a real-life situation, highlighting the difficulties in applying ethical decisions in the prehospital critical care setting. While the case is based from the United Kingdom, it ought to be applicable to similar EMS systems and settings. Kassirer et al. highlight that discussing real-world scenarios helps exemplify reasoning (both good and bad) that the reader ought to relate to within similar and future contexts.1 During the start of a night shift, an ambulance crew consisting of a paramedic and an assistant (EMT-B) are dispatched to a 10-year-old child in status epilepticus (SE). The pati...
Source: JEMS Operations - January 12, 2021 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: JEMS Staff Tags: Best Practices Exclusives Patient Care Pediatric Care Seizure Source Type: news

The Child in Status Epilepticus Dilemma
The following case is based on a real-life situation, highlighting the difficulties in applying ethical decisions in the prehospital critical care setting. While the case is based from the United Kingdom, it ought to be applicable to similar EMS systems and settings. Kassirer et al. highlight that discussing real-world scenarios helps exemplify reasoning (both good and bad) that the reader ought to relate to within similar and future contexts.1 During the start of a night shift, an ambulance crew consisting of a paramedic and an assistant (EMT-B) are dispatched to a 10-year-old child in status epilepticus (SE). The pati...
Source: JEMS Special Topics - January 12, 2021 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: JEMS Staff Tags: Best Practices Exclusives Patient Care Pediatric Care Seizure Source Type: news

Green recovery must end the reign of GDP, argue Cambridge and UN economists
(University of Cambridge) * University helps United Nations launch new " Ecosystem Accounting " : allowing governments to better include and reflect nature in their post-pandemic economic recovery. * " The extreme human and economic cost of the pandemic arise from a failure to manage natural capital. " (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - December 14, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

US Presidential Election Part 3: President Trump ’s Legacy of Mismanagement of the Pandemic
Credit: Whitehouse.GovBy Farhang JahanpourOXFORD, Dec 1 2020 (IPS) Covid-19 is on track to be the deadliest and one of the most catastrophic epidemics since the 1918-1919 flu pandemic, which infected about 500 million people or one-third of the world’s population at the time. The number of deaths was estimated somewhere between 17 and 50 million, and possibly as high as 100 million worldwide. The first observations of illness and mortality were documented in December 1917 at Camp Greene, North Carolina. To maintain morale, World War I censors minimized reports of casualties, but as newspapers in neutral Spain were f...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - December 1, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Farhang Jahanpour Tags: Democracy Global Geopolitics Headlines Health North America TerraViva United Nations Source Type: news

Charles Darwin ’s notebooks reported stolen from Cambridge University
Library staff believed manuscripts were ‘mis-shelved’ in 2000 but now think theft likely (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - November 25, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Charles Darwin: Notebooks worth millions lost for 20 years
Cambridge University Library launches an appeal to find the scientist's missing notes and sketches. (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - November 24, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Fireball: Visitors from Darker Worlds review – Werner Herzog dodges meteorites | Peter Bradshaw's film of the week
In his latest science doc, the existential film-maker considers the cataclysmic threat from space – as real now as it ever wasIn 2007,Werner Herzog made a movie about Antarctica calledEncounters at the End of the World, where he met the Cambridge University geographer and seismologist Clive Oppenheimer. The resulting partnership has opened up whole new adventures for Herzog in pop anthropology and the history of ideas. Together, Herzog and Oppenheimer madeInto the Inferno in 2016, with Oppenheimer largely in front of the camera and Herzog behind, supplying the unmistakable rasping voiceover with its occasional flouri...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - November 12, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Peter Bradshaw Tags: Documentary films Werner Herzog Culture Meteors Space Science Source Type: news

Cambridge University DROPS its estimate of daily coronavirus cases in England to 64,000
The MRC Biostatistics Unit, which works with Public Health England, has shrunk its estimate of new daily coronavirus infections by 17 per cent since the start of November. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - November 11, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Game 'pre-bunks' political misinformation by letting players undermine democracy
(University of Cambridge) An online game helps " inoculate " players against fake news by showing them how political misinformation is created and circulated. Launched today, Harmony Square has been created by Cambridge University psychologists with support from US Department of Homeland Security. Accompanying study shows that a single play reduces the perceived reliability of misinformation in users. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - November 6, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

The Future of LTC: The Continuing Evolution of the SNF
The American nursing facility has been in continuous evolution since its inception in the early 19th century. The early “old age homes” were places to save “formerly respectable people from the indignities of the almshouse” (Elon et al., “Post-Acute and Institutional LTC for the elderly,” in Reichel’s Care of the Elderly, 7th ed., Cambridge University Press, 2016:659–670). In the late 19th century thr ough the 20th century, nursing facilities were also places to convalesce from acute hospitalization. (Source: Caring for the Ages)
Source: Caring for the Ages - October 31, 2020 Category: Health Management Authors: Rebecca D. Elon Source Type: news

Artificial 'mini-lungs' grown in a lab let scientists watch how the coronavirus infects human cells
Researchers from Duke University and Cambridge University produced artificial lungs in two independent and separate studies to examine the spread of Covid-19. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - October 23, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Covid risk factors for ethnic minorities 'can't be changed overnight'
Dr Raghib Ali, a clinical epidemiologist at Cambridge University, was one of the main researchers behind a major Government race report into Covid-19 published today. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - October 22, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Fear of COVID-19 raises risk of depression among Soweto's deprived communities
(Cambridge University Press) A STUDY into the impact of the COVID-19 lockdown on the mental health of people in Soweto has found a significant link between symptoms of depression and how likely people felt they were to be infected. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - October 19, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Hesitancy about a COVID-19 vaccine is linked to beliefs about origin of the virus
(Cambridge University Press) More than a third of people (34%) in Turkey and one sixth of people (17%) in the UK are 'hesitant' about a COVID-19 vaccine, according to a study by UCL and Dokuz Eylul University in Turkey. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - October 19, 2020 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news