Brain training seen as promising non-pharmacological method to enhance attention in healthy young adults
This brain training app may help you stay focused, says new study (CNN): “Our digital lives make concentration difficult…A group of Cambridge university researchers believes to have developed a “fun” solution to this modern problem. By playing a “brain training” game, called Decoder, players can increase their concentration. In order to test the game’s effect, the research team conducted a study published Monday in the journal Frontiers in Behavioural Neuroscience. For the study, 75 healthy participants were split into three groups: one that played Decoder, one th...
Source: SharpBrains - February 1, 2019 Category: Neuroscience Authors: SharpBrains Tags: Cognitive Neuroscience Education & Lifelong Learning Health & Wellness adhd Brain-Training brain-training-app Decoder improve-concentration Neuropsychology non-pharmacological Ritalin Source Type: blogs

Medical students "taught how to practice empathy by following clever mnemonics" - NEJM
C. Nicholas Cuneo, M.D. in the NEJM: "With every faux interaction I felt myself being forced to shed another layer of authenticity, and I quickly grew to dread the whole tedious charade.PEARLS, it spelled out: Partnership, Empathy, Apology, Respect, Legitimization, and Support.With a smirk, I tossed it in the trash."Better understanding and educational approach are needed.--Just as a side note, here is an overview of some empathy/communication mnemonics with the corresponding references:"PEARLS– which stands for partnership, empathy, apology/acknowledgment, respect, legitimation, and support"https...
Source: Clinical Cases and Images - Blog - October 27, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Tags: Communication Empathy NEJM Source Type: blogs

Aug 9, Jean Piaget: Today in the History of Psychology (9th August 1896)
Jean Piaget was born. Renowned throughout the world for his pioneering theories of child development and learning, Piaget is widely considered one of the twentieth century's most influential psychologists. Drawing on genetic epistemology to explore the growth of knowledge within the cognitive world of the child, Piaget introduced a number of groundbreaking concepts within the field of developmental psychology, including mental structures, assimilation, accommodation and equilibration. Acclaimed throughout his career, Piaget collected honorary doctorates from Harvard, The Sorbonne and Cambridge University and received the A...
Source: Forensic Psychology Blog - August 9, 2018 Category: Forensic Medicine Source Type: blogs

New Research May Support the Existence of Empaths
Do empaths exist? Many people who claim to be highly sensitive or intuitive to the emotions of others and even to feel what others feel would respond with an enthusiastic “yes.” The scientific studies that are often used to demonstrate that empaths exist, however, provide indirect evidence. This includes research showing the existence of mirror neurons in the brain, which are said to enable us to read and understand each other’s emotions by filtering them through our own (Iacobani, 2008). Other studies used to explain empaths include the concept of emotional contagion, which is the idea that when pe...
Source: World of Psychology - July 30, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Kristen Milstead Tags: Ethics & Morality Family Friends Psychology Relationships Research Empath Highly Sensitive Person Source Type: blogs

A Brief Look at FOCI: The Wearable That Helps You Stay Calm and Focused
At the ITF Conference in Belgium in May, imec director Chris Van Hoof shared with us how mental health is an area of medicine that is underserved and ripe for innovation with medical technology. While they might be more for general wellness, we’re slowly starting to see a new wave of technologies in the form of apps and smartwatch features that offer breathing exercises to help reduce stress. But how can one quantify stress? UK-based Tinylogics thinks that their upcoming platform called FOCI, a wireless, wearable sensor combined with machine learning, is the answer. The FOCI wearable is a lightweight, tiny device ab...
Source: Medgadget - June 29, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Scott Jung Tags: Medicine Psychiatry Rehab Sports Medicine Source Type: blogs

Childhood Amnesia: Why Can ’ t We Remember the Early Years?
Although early experiences are important for personal development and future life, as adults we recall nothing or very little of those early formative events, such as making first steps or learning first words. In fact, when adults are asked about their first memories they usually don’t recall events before the age of 2-3, with only fragmented recollection of events that happened between the age of 3 and 7. This phenomenon is often called childhood or infantile amnesia. It represents an inability of both children and adults to recall episodic memories (i.e., memories for particular events or stimuli that occur in a p...
Source: World of Psychology - June 11, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Psych Central Staff Tags: Brain Blogger Children and Teens Memory and Perception Publishers Research childhood amnesia cognitive development episodic memories infantile amnesia neurological development social development theory of neurogenesis Source Type: blogs

Start Well - Stay Well: a new model to support new starters
NHS Employers - This case study explores how the Cambridge University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust (CUH) designed the Start Well: Stay Well model to ensure new starters feel part of the team from the start of their employment journey, and that they continue to be engaged throughout their time with CUH.Case studyMore detail (Source: Health Management Specialist Library)
Source: Health Management Specialist Library - June 11, 2018 Category: UK Health Authors: The King ' s Fund Information & Knowledge Service Tags: Workforce and employment Source Type: blogs

Clinical reasoning in pain – emotions
The current definition of pain includes the words “unpleasant sensory and emotional experience” so we would be surprised if we encountered a person with pain who wasn’t feeling some sort of negative emotion, am I right? Yet… when we look at common pain assessments used for low back pain, items about emotions or worries are almost always included as indicators of negative outcomes (for example, STarTBack – Worrying thoughts have been going through my mind a lot of the time, I feel that my back pain is terrible and it’s never going to get any better, In general I have not enjoyed all the ...
Source: HealthSkills Weblog - April 29, 2018 Category: Anesthesiology Authors: BronnieLennoxThompson Tags: Assessment Clinical reasoning Coping strategies Health Humour Pain biopsychosocial Occupational therapy pain management rehabilitation Research Therapeutic approaches treatment Source Type: blogs

Photographing the Cambridge Peregrines – Part 2
Having recently photographed the Peregrines (Falco peregrinus) that share their time between Cambridge University Library, King’s College Chapel, and the United Reform Church (see Cambridge Peregrines Part 1), Mrs Sciencebase and myself ventured a little further afield (having had a tipoff from a birder friend about another local pair). So, this morning we found ourselves in the wastelands of Cherry Hinton the southeastern suburb of the city of Cambridge. We ventured into a local wildlife reserve there that was originally a chalk quarry that back in the day mainly supplied materials for college construction and loca...
Source: David Bradley Sciencebase - Songs, Snaps, Science - March 9, 2018 Category: Science Authors: David Bradley Tags: Science Source Type: blogs

Reply to Erich Jarvis by William Matchin
More from William Matchin -- Reply to Erich Jarvis:At the most recent SfN, Erich Jarvis gave the opening presidential address on the functional neuroanatomy of language, which I commented on and critiqued in my recent blog post for Talking Brains (http://www.talkingbrains.org/2017/11/abstractness-innateness-and-modality.html). Erich has briefly responded to my writing on Twitter and suggested a debate. Few things could give me more pleasure than a productive debate on central issues concerning the nature of human language. The following is a response to his comments in the context of a more in-depth exploration of the issu...
Source: Talking Brains - January 10, 2018 Category: Neuroscience Authors: Greg Hickok Source Type: blogs

Continuous Sedation at the End of Life: Ethical, Clinical and Legal Perspectives
New from Cambridge University Press: Continuous Sedation at the End of Life: Ethical, Clinical and Legal Perspectives Continuous sedation until death (sometimes referred to as terminal sedation or palliative sedation) is an increasingly common practice in end-of-life care. However, it raises numerous medical, ethical, emotional and legal concerns. These include: the reducing or removing of consciousness (and thus potentially causing 'subjective death'), the withholding of artificial nutrition and hydration, the proportionality of the sedation to the symptoms, its adequacy in actually relieving symptoms rather than simply g...
Source: blog.bioethics.net - November 28, 2017 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Abstractness, innateness, and modality-independence of language: reflections on SNL & SfN 2017
Guest post by former student, William Matchin: +++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++  It ’s been almost 10 years since the Society for the Neurobiology of Language conference (SNL) began, and it is always one of my favorite events of the year, where I catch up with old friends and see and discuss much of the research that interests me in a compact form. This year’s meeting was no ex ception. The opening night talk about dolphin communication by Diana Reiss was fun and interesting, and the reception at the Baltimore aquarium was spectacular and well organized. I was impressed with the high quality...
Source: Talking Brains - November 20, 2017 Category: Neuroscience Authors: Greg Hickok Source Type: blogs

Monetary Freedom: Lessons from the Western Han Dynasty
During the Western Han Dynasty (206 B.C. – A.D. 9), the question of monetary freedom was vigorously debated. There were as yet no banks or paper money in China — money consisted solely of coin.  Private mints competed with government mints, either in the shadow market or legally. In 81 B.C., the issue of whether the state or the marke t would be the best guardian of sound money came to a head in the famous “Discourses on Salt and Iron,” which were compiled by Huan Kuan in his bookYantie lun. The relevant chapter for our study ischapter 4, “Cuobi” ( “Discordant Currencies&rdquo...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - October 17, 2017 Category: American Health Authors: James A. Dorn Source Type: blogs

Biomolecule Imaging Pioneers Share Nobel Prize
Today, the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences has decided to award the Nobel Prize in Chemistry 2017 to Jacques Dubochet(University of Lausanne, Switzerland) andJoachim Frank (Columbia University, New York, USA), andRichard Henderson (MRC Laboratory of Molecular Biology, Cambridge, UK). The award is given "for developingcryo-electron microscopy for the high-resolution structure determination of biomolecules in solution"Cool microscope technology revolutionises biochemistryWe may soon have detailed images of life ’s complex machineries in atomic resolution. The Nobel Prize in Chemistry 2017 is awarded to Jacq...
Source: The A and P Professor - October 4, 2017 Category: Physiology Authors: Kevin Patton Source Type: blogs

Recursos en espa ñol: Huracán Maria; Terremoto en la Ciudad de México
Huracán Maria La guía de información para la salud en desastres, Huracanes 2017, de la Biblioteca Nacional de Medicina se ha actualizado para incluir recursos específicos para los huracanes María, Irma y Harvey. Recursos en español para el huracán Maria Huracán Maria (Centro para el Control y la Prevención de Enfermedades) Huracán Maria (FEMA) Búsquedas de literatura de desastres en Disaster Lit (disponible solamente en inglés) Recursos sobre huracanes en español Recursos sobre cortes de energía  eléctrica e...
Source: BHIC - September 26, 2017 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Annette Parde-Maass Tags: Emergency Preparedness Multilingual National Library of Medicine News Websites disaster response español spanish language resources Source Type: blogs

Emergency Access Initiative activated for libraries affected by recent disasters
NLM and Publishers Launch Emergency Access Initiative, Granting Free Access to Books and Journals for Libraries Impacted by Hurricanes Harvey and Irma. Expanded to Include Hurricane Maria and the Earthquakes in Mexico The National Library of Medicine (NLM) activated the Emergency Access Initiative (EAI) on September 15th in response to Hurricanes Irma and Harvey which devastated Florida and several Caribbean islands, as well as parts of South Carolina, Texas, and Louisiana. On September 20th, NLM extended the area of coverage to include areas impacted by Hurricane Maria, and those in Mexico impacted by the r...
Source: BHIC - September 22, 2017 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Annette Parde-Maass Tags: Emergency Preparedness National Library of Medicine News disaster response EAI Source Type: blogs

Conspirators in their own memory loss – findings from 53 patients with “psychogenic amnesia”
By Christian Jarrett A person diagnosed with psychogenic amnesia complains of serious memory problems, sometimes even forgetting who they are, without there being any apparent physical reason for their symptoms – in other words, their condition seems to be purely psychological. It’s a fascinating, controversial diagnosis with roots dating back to Freud’s, Breuer’s and Charcot’s ideas about hysteria and how emotional problems sometimes manifest in dramatic physical ways. Today, some experts doubt that psychogenic amnesia is a real phenomenon, reasoning that there is either an undetected physica...
Source: BPS RESEARCH DIGEST - September 21, 2017 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: BPS Research Digest Tags: Brain Memory Mental health Source Type: blogs

Law, Religion, and Health in the United States
I am delighted to be a small part of this valuable new volume coming out this month from Cambridge University Press:  Law, Religion, and Health in the United States. (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - June 26, 2017 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, June 26th 2017
Fight Aging! provides a weekly digest of news and commentary for thousands of subscribers interested in the latest longevity science: progress towards the medical control of aging in order to prevent age-related frailty, suffering, and disease, as well as improvements in the present understanding of what works and what doesn't work when it comes to extending healthy life. Expect to see summaries of recent advances in medical research, news from the scientific community, advocacy and fundraising initiatives to help speed work on the repair and reversal of aging, links to online resources, and much more. This content is...
Source: Fight Aging! - June 25, 2017 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

SENS Research Foundation Publishes the 2016 Annual Rejuvenation Research Report
The SENS Research Foundation annual reports tend to arrive in the middle of the following year, and today the 2016 report was published. You can find it in PDF format at the foundation website. The story of SENS rejuvenation research, approaches that aim to repair the cell and tissue damage that causes aging, is one of growth and success over the years. It has been a bootstrapping from idea to reality, powered by the philanthropy and determined support of our community. We have come a long way and achieved a great deal these past fifteen years. Yet there remains the upward curve ahead, and the completion of the vision of a...
Source: Fight Aging! - June 22, 2017 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Healthy Life Extension Community Source Type: blogs

Silent wings of the barn owl
Walking the dog at dusk out on the Cambridgeshire fens mid-May, lots of swallows around, meadow pipits, yellowhammers, the inevitable wood pigeons, collared doves, starlings and blackbirds, a few LBJs (little brown jobs), chaffinch, house martins, robins, (barely glimpsed, but certain) goldcrests and more. Heading along the lode thought I saw a little egret out of the corner of my eye, but turned to see a beautiful barn owl (Tyto alba) in the lowering sun circle the fields, hunting small mammals, worrying the skylarks on their nests. The shot above was the first I captured, it’s often the way, first shot on the reel...
Source: David Bradley Sciencebase - Songs, Snaps, Science - May 30, 2017 Category: Science Authors: David Bradley Tags: Science Source Type: blogs

Allan H. Meltzer: A Life Well Lived (1928-2017)
The objective of policy rules is to reduce the uncertainty that the community must bear, not to prevent voluntary risk taking.Allan was open-minded and was willing to change his policy advice based on logic and evidence.He continued to participate in Cato ’s Annual Monetary Conference for many years and contributed 15 articles to theCato Journal (see Table 1). Although he was often critical of Fed policy, he thought Paul Volcker was correct in ending double-digit inflation by slowing the growth of money and credit, and that Alan Greenspan was correct in following an implicit monetary rule to prevent wide fluctuations...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - May 12, 2017 Category: American Health Authors: James A. Dorn Source Type: blogs

Global Science Report: Sea Ice Expansion in the Southern Hemisphere Is Real and Driven by Falling Temperatures
While there ’s been thousands of legacy media stories about the very real decline in summer sea-ice extent in the Arctic Ocean, we can’t findoneabout the statistically significantincrease in Antarctic sea ice that has been observed at the same time.Also, comparisons between forecast temperature trends down there and what ’s been observed are also very few and far between. Here’s one published in 2015:Observed (blue) and model-forecast (red) Antarctic sea-ice extent published by Shu et al. (2015) shows a large and growing discrepancy, but for unknown reasons, their illustration ends in 2005.For those...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - May 11, 2017 Category: American Health Authors: Craig D. Idso, Patrick J. Michaels Source Type: blogs

An open letter to Psychological Medicine, again!
In conclusion, noted Wilshire et al., “the claim that patients can recover as a result of CBT and GET is not justified by the data, and is highly misleading to clinicians and patients considering these treatments.” In short, the PACE trial had null results for recovery, according to the protocol definition selected by the authors themselves. Besides the inflated recovery results reported in Psychological Medicine, the study suffered from a host of other problems, including the following: *In a paradox, the revised recovery thresholds for physical function and fatigue–two of the four recovery mea...
Source: virology blog - March 23, 2017 Category: Virology Authors: Vincent Racaniello Tags: Commentary Information adaptive pacing therapy CFS chronic fatigue syndrome clinical trial cognitive behavior therapy Dave Tuller exercise graded exercise therapy mecfs myalgic encephalomyelitis outcome PACE trial recovery Source Type: blogs

It Is Very Important To Make Sure Data Mining Patient Records Is Properly Managed.
Here is a saga that has just started to unwind and be revealed.http://uk.businessinsider.com/deepmind-royal-free-london-nhs-deal-inexcusable-mistakes-2017-3?r=US&IR=TDeepMind's first deal with the NHS has been torn apart in a new academic studySam SheadMar. 16, 2017, 8:07 AM A data-sharing deal between Google DeepMind and the Royal Free London NHS Foundation Trust was riddled with "inexcusable" mistakes, according to an academic paper published on Thursday.The "Google DeepMind and healthcare in an age of algorithms" paper — coauthored by Cambridge University's Julia Powles and The Economist's ...
Source: Australian Health Information Technology - March 21, 2017 Category: Information Technology Authors: Dr David More MB PhD FACHI Source Type: blogs

An open letter to Psychological Medicine about “ recovery ” and the PACE trial
In conclusion, noted Wilshire et al., “the claim that patients can recover as a result of CBT and GET is not justified by the data, and is highly misleading to clinicians and patients considering these treatments.” In short, the PACE trial had null results for recovery, according to the protocol definition selected by the authors themselves. Besides the inflated recovery results reported in Psychological Medicine, the study suffered from a host of other problems, including the following: *In a paradox, the revised recovery thresholds for physical function and fatigue–two of the four recovery mea...
Source: virology blog - March 13, 2017 Category: Virology Authors: Vincent Racaniello Tags: Commentary Information adaptive pacing therapy CFS chronic fatigue syndrome clinical trial cognitive behavior therapy Dave Tuller exercise graded exercise therapy mecfs myalgic encephalomyelitis outcome PACE trial recovery Source Type: blogs

The use of online journaling as a qualitative methods datasource
Conclusion       The Internet will continue to have a significant impact on the occupation of writing in the future. Hypertext allows people to write in a non-sequential post-structuralist format, such as was advocated for by Derrida; hypertext also meets the demands of multivocality, intertextuality and de-centeredness (Landow, 1992). Individual self-determinism in narrative construction is important to consider in context of the ethical reading and interacting of such online datasets (Buitelaar, 2014).        The occupation of writing ha...
Source: ABC Therapeutics Occupational Therapy Weblog - February 14, 2017 Category: Occupational Health Tags: OT Education OT practice OT stories Source Type: blogs

In Memoriam: John A. Balint, MD
After over three decades of dedicated service to Albany Medical College as a researcher, practicing physician, administrator, and mentor, when some people might consider retirement, John Balint in the early 1990’s was just beginning to redefine his career. It was during this time that I first met John at the University of Chicago, Center for Clinical Medical Ethics, when we were both members of the 1993-1994 Fellowship class. I was privileged to learn about his amazing life up to that point, but what seemed more important at that time, were his high hopes for the future. John sought out this fellowship opportunity to...
Source: blog.bioethics.net - December 21, 2016 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Bioethics Today Tags: Health Care Doctor-Patient Relationships education Loss professionalism syndicated Source Type: blogs

Americans Worry About Police Safety, But Republicans Most Concerned About Police Being Disrespected
Although public opinion datashows stark partisan divides in evaluations of police performance, aCato Institute/YouGov survey shows that Americans —regardless of partisanship—are worried for police safety.Two-thirds (65%) of respondents say that police officers have “very dangerous” jobs,30% say police jobs are “somewhat dangerous,” and only5% say their jobs are not very dangerous. Concerns about police safetyextend across partisan groups. Six in 10 Democrats and independents as well as 7 in 10 Republicans think police jobs are “very dangerous.”  Although concern for...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - December 19, 2016 Category: American Health Authors: Emily Ekins Source Type: blogs

Aging, Just Another Disease
Aging is nothing more than a medical condition, and one that should be treated. There is a considerable amount of residual inertia on this topic, however, many people yet to be convinced that aging is anything other than set in stone, or that it is desirable to prevent the suffering and death caused by aging. At the large scale and over the long term, funding for medical research and pace of progress is determined by public support for the goals of that research. This is why we need advocacy, fundraising, and continued public discussion on the plausibility and desirability of building therapies capable of treating the caus...
Source: Fight Aging! - November 2, 2016 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

Study: Fewer Citizen Complaints After Police Body Camera Deployment
Arecent randomized controlled trial found that the number of complaints against police fell dramatically  after officers were outfitted with body cameras. It is the latest piece of research suggesting that police body cameras have a positive effect on police-citizen interactions. The study, headed by the University of Cambridge ’s Institute of Criminology, studied complaints against police in seven sites in two countries. The departments involved in the study were in areas such as the English Midlands, Cambridgeshire, California, and Northern Ireland. Researchers examined 4,264 officer shifts over roughly 1...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - September 29, 2016 Category: American Health Authors: Matthew Feeney Source Type: blogs

It Looks Like Labor and The News Limited Papers Have Noticed The ADHA. They Are Not Convinced Yet!
This article appeared on Sunday.A New Debate DebacleSamantha MaidenNational Political EditorSunday August 21, 2016A controversial former Journalist who created an “error strewn” database of British patients’ personal medical information has now been put in charge of Australia’s health records.Labor has warned the appointment of Tim Kelsey as the new CEO of Australia’s Digital Health Agency has raised the spectre of another census night style debacle .Mr Kelsey had a trailblazing career in the UK as the first national director of Patients and Information for the National Health Service and chai...
Source: Australian Health Information Technology - August 25, 2016 Category: Information Technology Authors: Dr David More MB PhD FACHI Source Type: blogs

Aug 9, Jean Piaget: Today in the History of Psychology (9th August 1896)
Jean Piaget was born. Renowned throughout the world for his pioneering theories of child development and learning, Piaget is widely considered one of the twentieth century's most influential psychologists. Drawing on genetic epistemology to explore the growth of knowledge within the cognitive world of the child, Piaget introduced a number of seminal concepts within the field of developmental psychology, including mental structures, assimilation, accommodation and equilibration. Acclaimed throughout his career, Piaget collected honorary doctorates from Harvard, The Sorbonne and Cambridge University and received the American...
Source: Forensic Psychology Blog - August 9, 2016 Category: Forensic Medicine Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, July 25th 2016
This study builds on preliminary findings from the first phase of the INTERSTROKE study, which identified ten modifiable risk factors for stroke in 6,000 participants from 22 countries. The full-scale INTERSTROKE study included an additional 20,000 individuals from 32 countries in Europe, Asia, America, Africa and Australia, and sought to identify the main causes of stroke in diverse populations, young and old, men and women, and within subtypes of stroke. To estimate the proportion of strokes caused by specific risk factors, the investigators calculated the population attributable risk for each factor (PAR; an esti...
Source: Fight Aging! - July 24, 2016 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

A Popular Science Article on Slowing Aging, Parabiosis, and Other Topics
This popular science article examines a few of the current efforts to build the foundation for therapies to treat aging and its consequences, with a particular focus on parabiosis research in which the circulatory systems of old and young individuals are linked. This approach is being used to investigate differences in levels of gene expression that occur with age, most likely in reaction to rising levels of cell and tissue damage, and especially those changes connected to decline in stem cell function. A promising sign for the near future of advocacy for longevity science is that journalists, such as the author of this pi...
Source: Fight Aging! - July 20, 2016 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

Want to Improve Patient Health? Stop Promoting Health!
This article quoted the late Noreen Clark, internationally renowned chronic disease management researcher, as saying that improving daily feeling and functioning is the real hook for motivating patients to manage their illnesses. To Motivate the Consistent Decisions that Favor Health, Let’s Rebrand Health as Well-Being I propose a simple strategy: Let’s rebrand “health” as “well-being.” In addition to the interdisciplinary science that supports this suggestion, I’ve been using this tactic in my private health coaching practice for twenty years and have seen how this simple change i...
Source: Disruptive Women in Health Care - July 13, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: dw at disruptivewomen.net Tags: Health Uncategorized Source Type: blogs

Do Negative Climate Impacts on Food Production Lead to Violence?
Introducing their important work, Buhaug et al. (2015) note that earlier research suggests there is “a correlational pattern between climate anomalies and violent conflict” due to “drought-induced agricultural shocks and adverse economic spillover effects as a key causal mechanism linking the two phenomena.” But is this really so? Seeking an answer to this question, the four Norwegian researchers compared half a century of statistics on climate variability, food production and political violence across Sub-Saharan Africa, which effort, in their words, “offers the most precise and theoretically...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - May 26, 2016 Category: American Health Authors: Craig D. Idso Source Type: blogs

Supporting NHS staff who are volunteers
NHS Employers -This guidance for NHS employers looks at the business case and benefits of volunteering, the impact it has on an employee’s terms and conditions and gives examples from Northumbria Healthcare NHS Foundation Trust and Cambridge University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust who have both supported their staff to take part in volunteering activities. Report NHS Employers - publications (Source: Health Management Specialist Library)
Source: Health Management Specialist Library - April 19, 2016 Category: UK Health Authors: The King's Fund Information & Knowledge Service Tags: Workforce and employment Source Type: blogs

Brain Death Rejected: Expanding Legal Duties to Accommodate Religious Objections
I posted a revision of "Brain Death Rejected: Expanding Legal Duties to Accommodate Religious Objections."   This is chapter 22 in a forthcoming volume from Cambridge University Press: Law, Religion, and American Healthcare. This volume is a prod... (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - April 18, 2016 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care medical futility blog syndicated Source Type: blogs

The Patient Body: When are Religious Exemptions Religious?
Several months ago, I posted a draft chapter of a forthcoming book from Cambridge University Press, titled LAW, RELIGION, AND AMERICAN HEALTHCARE.  My chapter is titled “Brain Death Rejected: Expanding Legal Duties to Accommodate Religious Exemptions.” Ann Neumann, has just published some constructive criticism at The Revealer: A Review of Religion and Media.  Neumann is a contributing editor at The Revealer and Guernica magazine and a visiting scholar at NYU's Center for Religion and Media.  She is also author of The Good Death: An Exploration of Dying in America (Beacon Pres...
Source: blog.bioethics.net - March 25, 2016 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care medical futility blog syndicated Source Type: blogs

The Fundamental Fallacy of Redistribution
The idea that government could redistribute income willy-nilly with impunity did not originate with Senator Bernie Sanders. On the contrary, it may have begun with two of the most famous 19th Century economists, David Ricardo and John Stuart Mill.   Karl Marx, on the other side, found the idea preposterous, calling it “vulgar socialism.” Mill wrote, “The laws and conditions of the production of wealth partake of the character of physical truths.  There is nothing optional or arbitrary about them… . It is not so with the Distribution of Wealth.  That is a matter of human institut...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - February 11, 2016 Category: American Health Authors: Alan Reynolds Source Type: blogs

UK Courts Remind Clinicians – No Unilateral DNAR without Consultation
Carl WinspearIn 2014, the UK Court of Appeals handed down its judgment in Tracey v. Cambridge University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, clarifying that clinicians must consult with the patient before writing a DNAR order.   A study earlier this year showed that most UK clinicians had never  heard of the case.  And practice regarding DNAR orders had not changed. This month, a new case confirmed the holding in Tracey and extended it to require consultation with the family when the patient lacks capacity. At 3:00 am on January 3, 2011, clinicians wrote a DNAR order for incapacitated Carl Winspea...
Source: blog.bioethics.net - November 19, 2015 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope Tags: Health Care medical futility blog syndicated Source Type: blogs

Cambridge University Hospitals Trust IT Failures: An Open Letter to Queen Elizabeth II on Repeated EHR Failures, Even After £12.7bn Wasted in Failed NHS National IT Programme
In conclusion, Your Highness, it might benefit your citizens (and those of the U.S.) if a national re-education programme were instituted to de-condition your leaders from unfettered belief in cybernetic miracles in medicine, a mental state they attain in large part due to mass EHR vendor and pundit propaganda.A more sober mindset is recommended by your subject Shaun Goldfinch in "Pessimism, Computer Failure, and Information Systems Development in the Public Sector" (Public Administration Review 67;5:917-929, Sept/Oct. 2007, then at the University of Otago, New Zealand):  The majority of information systems ...
Source: Health Care Renewal - September 24, 2015 Category: Health Management Tags: Addenbrooke Hospital Cambridge University Hospitals healthcare IT dangers healthcare IT risks Mismanagement NPfIT Patient care has not been compromised Rosie hospital Source Type: blogs

Inertia of Clinical Practice: Impact of Tracey on DNACPR Discussions
It has been nearly ten months since the UK Court of Appeals handed down its judgment in Tracey v. Cambridge University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust.   Some predicted that the decision would have "far-reaching im... (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - March 29, 2015 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope Tags: Health Care medical futility blog syndicated Source Type: blogs

Gillian Murphy
is professor emeritus of cancer cell biology at Cambridge University. She visited F1000 Publisher Kathleen Wets at the F1000 offices last week. In this video, she tells us about her new role as joint Section Head of Cartilage … Continue reading → (Source: Naturally Selected)
Source: Naturally Selected - March 18, 2015 Category: Biomedical Science Authors: Adie Chan Tags: Faculty Rheumatology & Clinical Immunology Video Source Type: blogs

A health agenda comes to the 2015 Oscars
The following post originally ran on Health Populi. The 87th annual 2015 Oscars show (#Oscars15) feted more than the movie industry: the event celebrated health in both explicit and subtle ways. Julianne Moore took the golden statuette for Best Actress, playing the title role in Still Alice, the story a woman diagnosed with early-onset Alzheimer’s Disease. In accepting her award, Moore spoke of the need to recognize and “see” people with Alzheimer’s – so many people feel isolated and marginalized, Moore explained. Movies help us feel seen and not alone – and people with Alzheim...
Source: Disruptive Women in Health Care - February 24, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: dw at disruptivewomen.net Tags: Advocacy Source Type: blogs

Cytotoxic T Cell Horror Flick
Liven up your A&P class with a great video showing a gruesome attack by a killer T cell on a cancer cell. It's a fantastic bit of video microscopy produced by Cambridge University.Okay, with the oddly soothing music score instead of a more appropriate score for the graphic violence shown in this video, it's not much of a horror flick.  Especially when you consider that it's the "bad guy" cell getting whacked.  But it is graphic and dramatic and impressive.Just the thing to liven up a discussion of adaptive immunity, which (let's face it) can often cause a catatonic state in many students. It's a fre...
Source: The A and P Professor - February 9, 2015 Category: Physiology Authors: Kevin Patton Source Type: blogs

Tracey v. Cambridge University Hospital – Duty to Consult
The December 2014 issue of Clinical Medicine (Royal College of Physicians) includes a nice summary of the impact and implications of the UK Court of Appeal's judgment in Tracey v. Cambridge University Hospital.  Under prior UK cases like Aintree a... (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - December 15, 2014 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope Tags: Health Care medical futility blog syndicated Source Type: blogs

What in God's Name is Going on With Healthcare IT at Cambridge University Hospitals?
This story about a  UK hospital that recently "went live"with an American electronic health record/enterprise command-and-control system (EPIC) was not only predictable, but expected considering the sorry state of the health IT industry in terms of clinical leadership and regulation.(It appears this was a "big bang" rollout, see http://www.ehi.co.uk/news/EHI/8845/cambridge-goes-for-epic-big-bang, an implementation method better suited for warehouses and widget suppliers than major hospitals.)Addenbrooke’s staff blame blood shortage on new eHospitalBy CambridgeNews  |  Posted: Novemb...
Source: Health Care Renewal - November 12, 2014 Category: Health Management Tags: Addenbrooke Hospital Cambridge University Hospitals healthcare IT crash healthcare IT dangers healthcare IT risk Patient care has not been compromised Source Type: blogs

Today's YAMMM (Yet Another Mostly Male Meeting) Brought to You by CIFAR & NAS
Well, just got an invite to this meeting: Symbioses becoming permanent: The origins and evolutionary trajectories of organelles.  The topic seems of direct interest to what I work on.  And, it is relatively close (Irvine is a short hop away).  So this could be a way to go to a meeting without having to travel too far.  And maybe I could see my younger brother Matt who lives in LA and just graduated from UC Irvine's Masters program in Sound Engineering. Then I looked at the schedule of speakers and organizers.  Many are friends.  Many others are colleagues.  Could be fun to see some p...
Source: The Tree of Life - August 15, 2014 Category: Medical Scientists Authors: Jonathan Eisen Source Type: blogs