For type 2 diabetes patients who require an injectable drug, GLP-1-based drugs are preferred over insulin
That's a pretty big change:Diabetes Guidelines Updated: For patients with type 2 diabetes who require an injectable drug, a glucagon-like peptide 1 receptor agonist is preferred over insulin.https://buff.ly/2T0KowcGlucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1)-based therapies (eg, GLP-1 receptor agonists, dipeptidyl peptidase-4 [DPP-4] inhibitors) affect glucose control throughseveral mechanisms, including:- enhancement of glucose-dependent insulin secretion- slowed gastric emptying- reduction of postprandial glucagon and food intakeThese agents do not usually cause hypoglycemia.Short-acting GLP-1 receptor agonists have an effect on post...
Source: Clinical Cases and Images - Blog - December 20, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Tags: Diabetes Source Type: blogs

A (Belated) Tribute to David Mendosa
I still have some trouble coming to grips with the fact that on May 8, 2017, the Diabetes Community (D-OC) lost one of the Diabetes Online Community's true pioneers and I'd say founders: David Mendosa (http://www.mendosa.com/ -- for the time being, anyway). David passed away following a diagnosis of angiosarcoma in the liver -- which is evidently a type of cancer. I think the fact that he passed away from something other than diabetes or its complications is a true testament to David's belief of living life to the fullest in spite of diabetes, which need not impede anyone, in spite of being dealt a pretty lousy h...
Source: Scott's Web Log - August 17, 2017 Category: Endocrinology Tags: 2017 D-OC David Mendosa diabetes blogger diabetes industry Rick Mendosa Source Type: blogs

New Study Reports Diabetes Medication Could Treat Addiction
A relatively new class of drugs, glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor agonists, have had much success in the treatment of type 2 diabetes. Now, these drugs may offer support in the treatment of addiction and drug abuse. A new study, published in Translational Psychiatry, reports that GLP-1 receptors may be a target for treating drug abuse. The study was conducted in mice, but it calls attention to previous reports with similar findings. Dopamine is essential to reward pathways that influence drug abuse and addiction. Endocannabinoids and arachidonic acid, which are also naturally present in the brain, affect the functi...
Source: World of Psychology - November 5, 2016 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Psych Central Staff Tags: Addiction Brain Blogger Medications Publishers Recovery Research diabetes medication Dopamine Drug Abuse Drugs GLP-1 glucagon-like peptide-1 Jennifer Gibson PharmD study Translational Psychiatry Source Type: blogs

MKSAP: 66-year-old man with polyuria and polydipsia
Test your medicine knowledge with the MKSAP challenge, in partnership with the American College of Physicians. A 66-year-old man is evaluated in the office after being treated in the emergency department for an exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. While in the emergency department, he was noted to have a random blood glucose level of 211 mg/dL (11.7 mmol/L). His HbA1c was 7.8% at the time. A repeat random fingerstick blood glucose level in office is 204 mg/dL (11.3 mmol/L). The patient reports recent polyuria and polydipsia. He has lost 6 kg (13.2 lb) over the last 3 months. He has chronic epiga...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - July 23, 2016 Category: Journals (General) Authors: < a href="http://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/mksap" rel="tag" > mksap < /a > Tags: Conditions Diabetes Endocrinology Source Type: blogs

ZERO TOLERANCE for hypoglycemia
Wheat elimination starts you powerfully on the path to reversing diabetes. We’ve seen it many times and it continues to develop in people who kiss their bagels, pretzels, and processed foods booby-trapped with wheat and grains goodbye. But, as diabetics become less diabetic–a process that can occur VERY quickly, often within days of removing all wheat and grain products from their diet–but they are taking insulin or certain diabetes drugs, there is potential for hypoglycemia or low blood sugar. Low blood sugar from diabetes drugs can be dangerous and should be avoided at all costs. (Imagine if a non-diabe...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - April 2, 2016 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr. Davis Tags: Wheat Belly Lifestyle diabetes glucose gluten grains hypoglycemia insulin Source Type: blogs

Nature’s Medicine Cabinet
More than 70 percent of new drugs approved within the past 30 years originated from trees, sea creatures and other organisms that produce substances they need to survive. Since ancient times, people have been searching the Earth for natural products to use—from poison dart frog venom for hunting to herbs for healing wounds. Today, scientists are modifying them in the laboratory for our medicinal use. Here’s a peek at some of the products in nature’s medicine cabinet. A protein called draculin found in the saliva of vampire bats is in the last phases of clinical testing as a clot-buster for stroke patient...
Source: Biomedical Beat Blog - National Institute of General Medical Sciences - August 14, 2015 Category: Research Authors: Srivalli Subbaramaiah Tags: Chemistry and Biochemistry Pharmacology Cool Creatures Diseases Medicines Natural Products Source Type: blogs

Funtabulously Frivolous Friday Five 106
Just when you thought your brain could unwind on a Friday, you realise that it would rather be challenged with some good old fashioned medical trivia…introducing Funtabulously Frivolous Friday Five 106Question 1Which drug is derived from the saliva of the Gila Monster+ Reveal the Funtabulous Answerexpand(document.getElementById('ddet699757968'));expand(document.getElementById('ddetlink699757968'))ExenatideThe hormone exendin-4 occurs naturally in the saliva of the Gila monster, a large venomous lizard native to the southwestern United States and northwestern Mexico.Exenatide is a glucagon-like peptide-1 agonist (GLP...
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - April 30, 2015 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Niall Hamilton Tags: Frivolous Friday Five LITFL FFFF Source Type: blogs

Mary figured out how to reverse diabetes . . . on her own
Mary shared her story of how she learned–on her own, at first–that foods that raise blood sugar, such as grains, cause you to “need” diabetes drugs. Not eating foods that raise blood sugar causes you to not need diabetes drugs. “I started going grain-free in December, 2014 as a last-ditch effort to get a handle on my diabetes. “My extreme reaction to metformin–stomach problems from diarrhea to esophageal spasms–made me give it up for good early last year. My blood sugars were out of control, but my doctor did not want to start me on insulin. My blood sugar numbers were regu...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - April 16, 2015 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr. Davis Tags: Wheat Belly Success Stories blood sugar diabetes gluten grains Weight Loss Source Type: blogs

If you have diabetes: NO low blood sugars!
Wheat elimination starts you powerfully on the path to reversing diabetes. We’ve seen it many times and it continues to develop in people who kiss their bagels, pretzels, and processed foods booby-trapped with wheat goodbye. But, as diabetics become less diabetic–a process that can occur VERY quickly, often within days of removing all wheat products from their diet–but they are taking insulin or certain diabetes drugs, there is potential for hypoglycemia or low blood sugar. Low blood sugar from diabetes drugs can be dangerous and should be avoided at all costs. (Imagine if a non-diabetic started administ...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - March 28, 2015 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr. Davis Tags: Wheat Belly Lifestyle blood sugar diabetes gluten grains hypoglycemia Source Type: blogs

Doing Your Own Research
By David Spero Doctors used to be the only source of medical information. Not anymore. You can get much of the same information on the Internet. Problem is, not all of the information you'll come across online is good. Here are some ways to empower yourself with good Internet research: • It's good to have some general "search engine" sites as a starting point on your quest for information. I usually start with Google. Yahoo and Bing are also good. Search engine sites will give you a list of more specific sites where you can get the information you seek. For example, a Google search for "diabetes" ...
Source: Diabetes Self-Management - August 6, 2014 Category: Diabetes Authors: David Spero Source Type: blogs

The Safety of Diabetes Drugs
A possible connection between one of our newest and most important classes of diabetes drugs and pancreatic cancer has frightened many of us. But people with diabetes can now breathe easier.   The United States Food and Drug Administration and its European counterpart just released their joint findings concluding that these drugs, which include Byetta, Victoza, Bydureon, and Januvia, have “no compelling evidence of an increased... (Source: David Mendosa's SharePosts)
Source: David Mendosa's SharePosts - March 5, 2014 Category: Diabetes Authors: David Mendosa Source Type: blogs

Little-Noticed Diabetes Care Developments of 2013
As we approach the new year (2014!), although I haven't blogged as much as I did a number of years ago, there were a few things which, in my opinion, deserve acknowledgement as they relate to diabetes care.  One of the biggest (perhaps), yet less acknowledged, developments was mergers and acquisitions in the diabetes care space.  Although I follow this stuff, sometimes even I lose track of who acquired who and what their new names are (when they change the name of the company).Bristol Myers Squibb: In Again, Out Again (... Of Diabetes Care, That Is).  Novo's Danish Delusions.My readers may recall that last y...
Source: Scott's Web Log - January 1, 2014 Category: Diabetes Tags: 2013 2014 Annual Review AstraZeneca Bristol Myers Squibb CanAm FDA JDRF Lilly Medtronic NIDDK NIH Nipro Novo Nordisk Teva Wal-Mart Source Type: blogs

Bristol-Myers Sells Diabetes JV To AstraZeneca: What The Wags Say
Just 18 months ago, Bristol-Myers Squibb expanded its diabetes franchise by paying $7 billion for Amylin Pharmaceuticals and, simultaneously, broadened a joint venture with AstraZeneca. Now, though, Bristol-Myers is selling its stake in the partnership back to AstraZeneca for as much as $4.5 billion in order to focus on becoming a ‘specialty’ drugmaker. At the time, the deal was seen as a way for Bristol-Myers to develop diabetes products into a growth engine, since Amylin sold the Byetta and Bydureon treatments, while also spreading the risk by expanding its existing deal with AstraZeneca (back story). However...
Source: Pharmalot - December 19, 2013 Category: Pharma Commentators Authors: esilverman Source Type: blogs

Bristol close to selling diabetes stake to Astra for $3 bln -WSJ
Dec 18 (Reuters) - Bristol-Myers Squibb Co is close to selling its stake in a diabetes partnership with AstraZeneca Plc to the British drugmaker in a deal valued at more than $3 billion, the Wall Street Journal reported on Wednesday.Bristol had announced last month that it would no longer conduct research to discover new drugs for diabetes, hepatitis C and neurological conditions, but would increase spending on medicines that harness the immune system to fight cancer.That refocus led to speculation that Bristol would seek to sell its share in the non-U.S. part of the diabetes joint venture to AstraZeneca.Bristol spokeswoma...
Source: PharmaGossip - December 19, 2013 Category: Pharma Commentators Authors: insider Source Type: blogs

Whatever Happened To The ADA Request For Data From Pharma?
Last spring, the American Diabetes Association attempted to resolve a burning debate about the safety of various diabetes drugs called GLP-1 inhibitors by asking several drugmakers to release patient-level data that could be used for an independent review. At issue was whether a definitive link exists to developing acute pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer. The questions were raised after a pair of studies caused a stir. One study indicated that two widely used drugs – Merck’s (MRK) Januvia and Bristol-Myers Squibb’s Byetta – can double the risk of developing pancreatitis, which is an inflammation of...
Source: Pharmalot - December 18, 2013 Category: Pharma Commentators Authors: esilverman Source Type: blogs

Pharmalot... Pharmalittle... Good Morning
Rise and shine, everyone, yet another busy day is on the way. And unfortunately, this appears to be a rather rainy one. Nonetheless, our spirits remain sunny. As you may recall, in times like these, we repeat a favorite saying courtesy of the Morning Mayor: 'Every brand new day should be unwrapped like a precious gift.' So while you tug on the ribbon, please join us for a welcome cup of stimulation and a few tidbits to get things going. Hope you accomplish much today and do stay in touch if you hear anything fascinating... FDA Places Partial Hold On Ariad Cancer Drug Trial Over Side Effects (Reuters) NIH Enrolls A Dozen Cr...
Source: Pharmalot - October 10, 2013 Category: Pharma Commentators Authors: esilverman Source Type: blogs

Safety of Diabetes Drugs
Two studies published in professional journals this year have cast renewed doubt about the safety of one of our most important class of diabetes drugs. But the leading regulatory agencies both in Europe and the U.S. seem to think that those studies are flawed. We call this class of drugs incretin-based or GLP-1 agonists. They include Byetta, Victoza, and Bydureon. The most recent investigation of this class of drugs came out last month... (Source: David Mendosa's SharePosts)
Source: David Mendosa's SharePosts - August 12, 2013 Category: Diabetes Authors: David Mendosa Source Type: blogs

Diabetes Drugs Pancreatic Cancer Risk Not Backed By Existing Evidence: FDA
In yet another boost to several large drugmakers, the FDA has decided that there is no evidence that to confirm recent concerns that a widely used group of diabetes drugs called GLP-1 inhibitors is linked to pancreatic cancer, an FDA spokeswoman says. The decision comes several days after the European Medicines Agency reached the same conclusion (here is the EMA statement). “The FDA concurs with the EMA’s conclusions regarding the potential pancreatic effects of GLP-1 based therapies,” the FDA spokeswoman writes us. “The agency believes that the current labeling for approved GLP-1 based therapies re...
Source: Pharmalot - July 31, 2013 Category: Pharma Commentators Authors: esilverman Source Type: blogs

EMA Decides No Risk Of Pancreatic Cancer With Diabetes Drugs
In a decision that is a big boost to several drugmakers, the European Medicines Agency has concluded that there is no evidence to confirm recent concerns that a widely used group of diabetes drugs called GLP-1 inhibitors is linked to pancreatic cancer. The review took place in response to a ruckus caused by a study published in Diabetes four months ago that found, in humans, the drugs caused “marked” cell proliferation and damage, and displayed a potential for eventually transforming into cancer. The researchers examined the pancreas of 20 deceased human organ donors with type 2 diabetes (here is the abstract)....
Source: Pharmalot - July 26, 2013 Category: Pharma Commentators Authors: esilverman Source Type: blogs

Zero tolerance for hypoglycemia
Wheat elimination starts you powerfully on the path to reversing diabetes. We’ve seen it many times and it continues to develop in people who kiss their bagels, pretzels, and processed foods booby-trapped with wheat goodbye. But, as diabetics become less diabetic–a process that can occur VERY quickly, often within days of removing all wheat products from their diet–but they are taking insulin or certain diabetes drugs, there is potential for hypoglycemia or low blood sugar. Low blood sugar from diabetes drugs can be dangerous and should be avoided at all costs. (Imagine if a non-diabetic started administ...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - July 20, 2013 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr. Davis Tags: Diabetes Source Type: blogs

Start With Three Drugs?
By David Spero A new study says that people newly diagnosed with Type 2 can do better if they are immediately started on a three-drug combo. Does this make sense to you? Is it good science or bad medicine? Muhammad A. Abdul-Ghani, MD, from the University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, presented the findings at the ADA Scientific Sessions in Chicago. The study enrolled 155 people with Type 2 diabetes. The average time after diabetes diagnosis was five months. None of them were taking diabetes medications at the beginning of the trial. Their average HbA1c was 8.6%. Half the subjects got "conventional t...
Source: Diabetes Self-Management - July 10, 2013 Category: Diabetes Authors: David Spero Source Type: blogs

Going Nuts for Peanuts
This study, "Acute and second-meal effects of peanuts on glycemic response and appetite in obese women with high type 2 diabetes risk: a randomized cross-over clinical trial," was conducted jointly by Purdue University and the Federal University of Vicosa in Brazil. Such a long-distance collaboration couldn't have happened just a few years ago. It was published in the June 2013 edition of the British Journal of Nutrition. The study not only showed reduced blood glucose levels, but also reduced appetite and food consumption for most of the day in people who ate peanuts or peanut butter. This was based on levels of...
Source: Diabetes Self-Management - July 3, 2013 Category: Diabetes Authors: David Spero Source Type: blogs

READER POLL: Should Diabetes Drugmakers Provide Patient-Level Data?
Last week, the NIH ran a workshop to examine the safety of several widely used diabetes drugs and whether a definitive link can be established to acute pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer, which were the subject of recent studies that generated considerable controversy. The outcome was inconclusive, but the FDA may want further studies. The drugs, which mimic a hormone called GLP-1 to stimulate natural insulin production, include Merck’s Januvia (MRK); Onglyza, which is sold by Bristol-Myers Squibb (BMY) and AstraZeneca (AZN); Byetta, which is also sold by Bristol-Myers; the Tradjenta med sold by Eli Lilly (LLY) and B...
Source: Pharmalot - June 17, 2013 Category: Pharma Commentators Authors: esilverman Source Type: blogs

The ADA's "Investigation" of Incretin Drugs is a Gift to the Drug Companies
You may have heard that the American Diabetes Association (ADA) had called for a review of the incretin drugs--Januvia, Onglyza, Byetta, Victoza, etc.--in response to the recent discovery, which I described HERE, that they cause abnormal patterns of growth within the pancreas of a kind that lead to both pancreatitis and cancer. The call for review can be read HERE.Sadly, this call for review has nothing to do with protecting people with diabetes, a group for whom the ADA has never had much concern, save as a source of contributions to pay the inflated salaries of its top executives.The ADA is heavily funded by drug manufac...
Source: Diabetes Update - June 14, 2013 Category: Diabetes Authors: Jenny Source Type: blogs

Diabetes Drugs Under Scrutiny As FDA Considers Another Study
As a two-day NIH workshop gets underway to examine the safety of several widely used diabetes drugs, the FDA is considering whether to run a study to determine whether a definitive link can be established to acute pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer, which were the subject of recent studies that have generated considerable controversy. “A review of FDA-required epidemiological studies submitted to (the FDA) have provided conflicting results and do not provide reliable evidence to refute or support a causal link between GLP-1 based therapies and risk of acute pancreatitis,” wrote Solomon Iyasu, who heads one of t...
Source: Pharmalot - June 12, 2013 Category: Pharma Commentators Authors: esilverman Source Type: blogs

Has pancreatic damage from glucagon suppressing diabetes drugs been underplayed? - BMJ
BMJ 2013; 346 doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bmj.f3680 (Published 10 June 2013) Cite this as: BMJ 2013;346:f3680Article Related content Article metrics Deborah Cohen, investigations editor Author Affiliations dcohen@bmj.com Incretin mimetics have been called “the darlings of diabetes treatment” and they may soon also be licensed for treating obesity. But a BMJ investigation has found growing safety concerns linked to the drugs’ mechanism of action. Deborah Cohenasks why patients and doctors have not been told. They’ve b...
Source: PharmaGossip - June 11, 2013 Category: Pharma Commentators Authors: insider Source Type: blogs

A Lone Voice Raises Alarms on Lucrative Diabetes Drugs - NYT
LOS ANGELES — Dr. Peter C. Butler initially declined a request by the drug maker Merck to test whether its new diabetes drug, Januvia, could help stave off the disease in rats.“I said, I’m not interested in your money, go away,” Dr. Butler recalled.Merck no doubt now wishes it had. When Dr. Butler finally agreed to do the study, he found worrisome changes in the pancreases of the rats that could lead to pancreatic cancer. The discovery, in early 2008, turned Dr. Butler into a crusader whose follow-up studies now threaten the future of not only Januvia but all the drugs in its class, which have sales...
Source: PharmaGossip - May 31, 2013 Category: Pharma Commentators Authors: insider Source Type: blogs

Januvia and the pancreas
Merck's juggernaut diabetes drug Januvia now faces renewed scrutiny five years after an endocrinologist found that lab rats given the medicine were more susceptible to pancreatic cancer, according to a report in The New York Times. After followup studies by the same doctor, Peter Butler, the Food and Drug Administration and the European Medicines Agency have begun investigations that could lead to new warnings on Whitehouse Station-based Merck's Januvia and other drugs in its class, according to The Times report. In March, the FDA also said it was reviewing unpublished findings by a group of academic researchers tha...
Source: PharmaGossip - May 30, 2013 Category: Pharma Commentators Authors: insider Source Type: blogs

Alzheimer's and Dementia News 251
This study is currently recruiting new participants. _________________________________________________ Related Content Test Your Memory for Alzheimer's (5 Best Tests) What is the Difference Between Alzheimer’s and Dementia Alzheimer's Communication Tip, No More Blah Blah Blah How to Listen to an Alzheimer's Patient Learning How to Communicate with Someone Suffering From Alzheimer's Disease Alzheimer's World Bang Your Head Against the Wall The Combination of Aricept and Namenda Helps Slow the Rate of Decline in Alzheimer's Patients _________________________________________________ Dominantly Inherited Alzheimer Netw...
Source: Alzheimer's Reading Room, The - April 20, 2013 Category: Dementia Authors: Bob DeMarco Source Type: blogs

Disturbing Study: Both Families of Incretin Drugs Appear to Cause Potentially Cancerous Changes in the Pancreas
Researchers just published a study in the journal Diabetes in which they autopsied the pancreases of 20 people with diabetes, 12 of whom were taking incretin drugs as well as those of 14 people without diabetes. Most had died of stroke or head injuries, leaving their pancreases in excellent condition. The researchers wanted to see if, in fact, as claimed, the incretin drugs--the drugs that raise the concentration of GLP-1 or mimic GLP-1--cause an increase in the beta cell mass. These drugs have been promoted with the promise that they do, that they regenerate the pancreas. This is one major reason doctors prescribe them ev...
Source: Diabetes Update - March 25, 2013 Category: Diabetes Authors: Jenny Source Type: blogs

March Diabetes News Snippet Post
Here are all the news items posted in March: Jennysaid... People taking Byetta, Victoza, Januvia, and Onglyza had less heart failure than those not on these drugs. http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/03/130310164109.htmHowever, it is likely this is because Avandia and Actos CAUSE heart failure, rather than that these other drugs prevent it. People are rarely put on both families of drugs at once. It may also be because these GLP-1 related drugs are mostly prescribed to affluent, younger people with diabetes and good health insurance, while poorer people are put on the cheap sulfonylurea drugs which are now known to r...
Source: Diabetes Update - March 11, 2013 Category: Diabetes Authors: Jenny Source Type: blogs

Pancreatitis Risks And A Pair Of Diabetes Drug
Yet another potentially worrisome sign for a pair of widely used diabetes drugs. A new study indicates that Merck’ Januvia and Bristol-Myers Squibb’s as Byetta can double the risk of developing pancreatitis, which is an inflammation of the pancreas that is linked to cancer and kidney failure. This is the same issue that has plagued both drugs over the past few years. The study, which examined insurance records for more than 2,500 diabetics between February 2005 and December 2008, found that patients hospitalized with pancreatitis were twice as likely to be taking either of the drugs than a control group of Type...
Source: Pharmalot - February 26, 2013 Category: Pharma Commentators Authors: Ed Silverman Tags: Uncategorized Bristol Myers Squibb Byetta Diabetes Eli Lilly Januvia Merck Novo Nordisk Victoza Source Type: blogs

Keeping the Pounds On: Causes of Unexplained Weight Loss
By Amy Campbell Our society is obsessed with weight, if you haven't noticed. More than two thirds of US adults are overweight or obese, there are more diet books published than we can count, and, of course, we have the privilege of watching shows like The Biggest Loser to help keep us in line. And according to government statistics, more than 85% of people with Type 2 diabetes are overweight. So it stands to reason that much of the focus of managing Type 2 diabetes is based on reaching and staying at a healthy weight. It's important to note that thin people can get diabetes too, and not just Type 1 diabetes. In a 2008 stud...
Source: Diabetes Self-Management - February 25, 2013 Category: Diabetes Authors: Amy Campbell Source Type: blogs

Another Dangerously Misinterpreted Study: Insulin Doesn't Raise Cancer & Heart Disese Risk--High Blood Sugars Do
A huge, long-term UK study appears to show that for people with Type 2 Diabetes injecting insulin raises the risk of both cancer and heart disease.The study is:Mortality and Other Important Diabetes-Related Outcomes With Insulin vs Other Antihyperglycemic Therapies in Type 2 DiabetesCraig J. Currie et al.  The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism February 1, 2013 vol. 98 no. 2 668-677The study examined the records of 84,622 people with Type 2 Diabetes treated with 5 different drug combinations. It concludes: " In people with T2DM, exogenous insulin therapy was associated with an increased risk of di...
Source: Diabetes Update - February 21, 2013 Category: Diabetes Authors: Jenny Source Type: blogs

Sunday Funnies: Diabetes Med Wars
In with the new, out with the old... Byetta vs. Victoza... Sometimes changing up diabetes meds can kind of feel like dealing with temperamental pets. Thanks to the talented Mike Durbin, who blogs at My Diabetic Heart and shared recently that h... (Source: Diabetes Mine)
Source: Diabetes Mine - February 10, 2013 Category: Endocrinology Authors: Amy Tenderich Source Type: blogs

New to Diabetes: What's Next? (Part 1)
By Amy Campbell Back in October, I posted a piece called "Getting Started With Type 2 Diabetes." My intent with that was to provide you with an overview of what to do when you're told you have diabetes (or what to do if you've had diabetes for a while but perhaps hadn't been ready to manage it). Now that we're in a new year, I thought it might be helpful to expand upon that piece a bit. As you and I well know, taking care of your diabetes can seem like a full-time job, and if this is all new to you, it can be a bit bewildering trying to sort it all out. So in the spirit of new beginnings, this week I'll share a ...
Source: Diabetes Self-Management - January 7, 2013 Category: Diabetes Authors: Amy Campbell Source Type: blogs

And Along Came Tradjenta... Or, The Wacky World of Type 2 Drugs
The world of type 2 diabetes drugs is wacky indeed. While Amylin's long-acting version of Byetta - called Bydureon and predicted by many experts to become a blockbuster - is still held up at FDA, the agency approved a new oral drug earlier this mo... (Source: Diabetes Mine)
Source: Diabetes Mine - May 27, 2011 Category: Endocrinology Authors: Amy Tenderich Source Type: blogs

New drugs: Exenatide – an injectable diabetic agent and Denosumab – a monoclonal antibody for postmenopausal osteoporosis
Exanatide (Byetta): the first injectable synthetic analogue of the incretin hormone glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) note that the glyptins inhibit incretin breakdown and are thus incretin “enhancers” not “mimics” PBS approved for type 2 diabetics as an addition to the combination of metformin and  sulphonylurea to help lower HbA1c below 7% or as dual Rx for those who cannot tolerate metformin or a sulphonylurea. dose: is given bd s/c within 1 hour BEFORE meals starting at 5 mcg per dose which should be at least 6 hours apart after 1 month, dose can be increased to 10mcg bd main adverse ef...
Source: Oz E Medicine - emergency medicine in Australia - December 11, 2010 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Gary Tags: new drugs Source Type: blogs

Byetta Fallout Hits Novo Nordisk (That Pancreatitis Scare)
This morning Novo Nordisk announced that the FDA has scheduled an advisory committee meeting for its new Liraglutide once-daily GLP-1 drug, currently awaiting FDA approval. Believe it or not, this is huge news - with the potential to make or bre... (Source: Diabetes Mine)
Source: Diabetes Mine - September 5, 2008 Category: Endocrinology Authors: Amy Tenderich Source Type: blogs

Byetta Fallout Hits Novo Nordisk (That Pancreatitis Scare)
This morning Novo Nordisk announced that the FDA has scheduled an advisory committee meeting for its new Liraglutide once-daily GLP-1 drug, currently awaiting FDA approval. Believe it or not, this is huge news  - with the potential to make or bre... (Source: Diabetes Mine)
Source: Diabetes Mine - September 5, 2008 Category: Endocrinology Authors: Amy Tenderich Source Type: blogs

Januvia: Is It "Oral Byetta" or Just a Lucky Break?
I noticed a lot of comment action recently on a previous post about Januvia. I guess more and more people have now tried Merck's new type 2 "Wonder Drug" and want to share their experiences, good and bad. Some are delighted with the glucose cont... (Source: Diabetes Mine)
Source: Diabetes Mine - May 9, 2007 Category: Endocrinology Authors: Amy Tenderich Source Type: blogs

Byetta Exceeding Expectations
Lots of buzz this week about Amylin, makers of Symlin and Byetta injectable blood-glucose stabilizers for Type 1 and Type 2 diabetics respectively.Actually, the CNN Money correspondent covering Amylin spent a good deal of time sitting right next t... (Source: Diabetes Mine)
Source: Diabetes Mine - June 13, 2006 Category: Endocrinology Authors: Amy Tenderich Source Type: blogs

Amylin's Colorful CEO, and AOL's Stake in Diabetes Blogging
From the "Did You Know?" file, two fascinating news items to ponder:1) Ginger Graham, the fiery readheaded CEO of Amylin Pharmaceuticals, Inc. (makers of Symlin and Byetta), is a former rodeo star! OK, maybe not a star, but the new January '06 is... (Source: Diabetes Mine)
Source: Diabetes Mine - January 2, 2006 Category: Endocrinology Authors: Amy Tenderich Source Type: blogs

Janis Roszler, Symlin and Byetta
Oooh. I just found a very cool brand new article from Janis Roszler (RD, CDE, LD/N, etc., etc.) over at eDiets.com, of all places. First off, I just keep running into that woman's name! Turns out she's a diabetes author with her own "Dear Janis "... (Source: Diabetes Mine)
Source: Diabetes Mine - September 12, 2005 Category: Endocrinology Authors: Amy Tenderich Source Type: blogs