DWI-MRI may be best for indeterminate lung nodules
Diffusion-weighted MRI (DWI-MRI) offers comparable or even superior diagnostic...Read more on AuntMinnie.comRelated Reading: MRI shows promise for lung cancer screening FDG-PET/CT fails for peripheral T-cell lymphoma outcomes FDG-PET/CT helps stage men with breast cancer, too PET/CT makes case for directing cervical cancer treatment (Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines)
Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines - December 3, 2018 Category: Radiology Source Type: news

Women reveal the reasons they reject a preventive drug for breast cancer
(Cancer Research UK) Only around a fifth of women at higher risk of developing breast cancer think they need to take a drug proven to help prevent the disease, according to new research funded by Cancer Research UK and published today in Clinical Breast Cancer. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - December 2, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New therapies unveiled at San Antonio breast cancer conference
More than 7,000 physicians and researchers from around the world will converge on the Henry B. Gonzalez Convention Center Dec. 4-8 to attend the San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium (SABCS).   Founded, owned and operated by UT Health San Antonio, SABCS began in 1977 as a one-day regional conference. Over the past 41 years, the meeting has grown into a five-day international conference with representatives from more than 80 countries. Fifty percent of attendees are from countries outsi de the U.S.… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines - December 1, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Rosanne Fohn Source Type: news

New therapies unveiled at San Antonio breast cancer conference
More than 7,000 physicians and researchers from around the world will converge on the Henry B. Gonzalez Convention Center Dec. 4-8 to attend the San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium (SABCS).   Founded, owned and operated by UT Health San Antonio, SABCS began in 1977 as a one-day regional conference. Over the past 41 years, the meeting has grown into a five-day international conference with representatives from more than 80 countries. Fifty percent of attendees are from countries outsi de the U.S.… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - December 1, 2018 Category: Biotechnology Authors: Rosanne Fohn Source Type: news

Ribociclib cost effective for HR+/HER2 − advanced breast cancer
(Source: PharmacoEconomics and Outcomes News)
Source: PharmacoEconomics and Outcomes News - December 1, 2018 Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Source Type: news

Older Women Benefit From Mammograms Past Age 75 Older Women Benefit From Mammograms Past Age 75
Mammography is accurate in older women, who can be successfully treated after an early diagnosis of breast cancer, new research shows. Guidelines need to be updated, according to one expert.Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - November 30, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Radiology News Source Type: news

Meet the Post-Op Bra That & #039;s Long Overdue
Efrat Roman was diagnosed with breast cancer a little more than a decade ago and underwent a total of five different surgeries due to complications. As if going through multiple breast operations weren't challenging enough, Roman was surprised to find out that the post-op breast dressing options were severely lacking. "I realized there wasn't anything designated for the dressing of breasts post-op," Roman told MD+DI. "There are reusable bras that are post-op bras, but the fact that they are reusable is not enough because many breast cancer patients will suffer from some kind of asymmetry and with the reusabl...
Source: MDDI - November 30, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Amanda Pedersen Tags: Business Source Type: news

EZbra: Why Didn & #039;t Anyone Think of This Before?
Efrat Roman was diagnosed with breast cancer a little more than a decade ago and underwent a total of five different surgeries due to complications. As if going through multiple breast operations weren't challenging enough, Roman was surprised to find out that the post-op breast dressing options were severely lacking. "I realized there wasn't anything designated for the dressing of breasts post-op," Roman told MD+DI. "There are reusable bras that are post-op bras, but the fact that they are reusable is not enough because many breast cancer patients will suffer from some kind of asymmetry and with the reusabl...
Source: MDDI - November 30, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Amanda Pedersen Tags: Business Source Type: news

Breast cancer increases the risk of osteoporosis
Research, published inBreast Cancer Research, suggests that women under 50 with breast cancer have an increased risk of developing osteoporosis.MedicalXpress (Source: Society for Endocrinology)
Source: Society for Endocrinology - November 30, 2018 Category: Endocrinology Source Type: news

System can rapidly and accurately detect tumor margins during breast cancer surgery
(RIKEN) Scientists from the RIKEN Cluster for Pioneering Research (CPR), Osaka University, and collaborators have developed a new rapid and inexpensive way to accurately detect the margins between cancer and non-cancerous tissue during breast surgery. Their system is noteworthy in that it can detect the morphology of the cells, differentiating between cells that are more or less dangerous. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - November 30, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

App helps breast cancer survivors improve health after treatment
(Houston Methodist) Breast cancer survivors who used a smartphone app created at Houston Methodist consistently lost weight, largely due to daily, real-time interactions with their health care team via the mobile app. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - November 30, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Cryoablation a Promising Alternative to Surgery in Low-Risk Breast Cancer Cryoablation a Promising Alternative to Surgery in Low-Risk Breast Cancer
Image-guided cryoablation can be an effective primary treatment for small, low-risk breast tumors without lumpectomy, according to new data from the ongoing Ice 3 trial.Reuters Health Information (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - November 29, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Hematology-Oncology News Source Type: news

Image-Guided Cryoablation: an Option in Early Breast Cancer?
(MedPage Today) -- Researchers tout as potential alternative to lumpectomy in low-risk disease (Source: MedPage Today Hematology/Oncology)
Source: MedPage Today Hematology/Oncology - November 29, 2018 Category: Hematology Source Type: news

Research: Eating lentils twice a week can reduce your risk of breast cancer by 24%
(Natural News) Are you already doing everything you can to prevent breast cancer? Sure, you’re exercising regularly, eating a healthy diet with plenty of organic produce, and maintaining a healthy weight, but just how many lentils are you eating? The answer to that last question is more important than you might think, as a recent... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - November 29, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Nancy Cappello, Breast Cancer Activist, Is Dead at 66
A survivor of the disease, she fought for fuller disclosure of mammogram results — something she did not get. She died from complications of her treatment. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - November 28, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: DENISE GRADY Tags: Cappello, Nancy M Deaths (Obituaries) Breast Cancer Mammography Are You Dense? Source Type: news

UCLA research suggests widely used breast cancer therapy doesn ’t cause cognitive decline
UCLA researchers have found that commonly used hormone therapies for women diagnosed with breast cancer do not appear to cause significant cognitive dysfunction following the treatment.Endocrine therapy has become an essential part of treatment for the many women diagnosed with hormone-receptor positive breast cancer, in which hormones, such as estrogen, promote cancer growth. The endocrine treatment helps lower the recurrence and reduce the risk of death from breast cancer by interfering with how a woman ’s own hormones can continue to support the growth of dormant cancer cells. Yet, there has been limited evidence ...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - November 28, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

RSNA: Mammography May Benefit 30 - Year - Olds With Risk Factors
Early screening may benefit those with dense breasts, personal/family history of breast cancer (Source: The Doctors Lounge - Oncology)
Source: The Doctors Lounge - Oncology - November 28, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: Gynecology, Oncology, Radiology, Conference News, Source Type: news

Licorice contains powerful cancer-killing properties
(Natural News) When you ask people if they like licorice, you’re likely to get a spirited response. Some people can’t get enough of its unique flavor, while others can’t stand the sight of it. It turns out that it’s not just its taste that inspires a gamut of reactions; its use in fighting breast cancer... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - November 28, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Medical News Today: End-of-life symptoms of metastatic breast cancer
The end-of-life symptoms associated with metastatic breast cancer depend on where a person ’s cancer has spread to, and they can include both physical and mental issues. Treatment focuses on improving quality of life and caring for the individual’s physical, emotional, and spiritual needs. Learn more here. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - November 28, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Breast Cancer Source Type: news

RSNA: Mammography May Benefit 30-Year-Olds With Risk Factors
WEDNESDAY, Nov. 28, 2018 -- Women with one of three breast cancer risk factors may benefit from mammography screening beginning at age 30, according to a study presented at the annual meeting of the Radiological Society of North America, held from... (Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News)
Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News - November 28, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

For Some Women, Mammograms May Need to Begin at 30: Study
WEDNESDAY, Nov. 28, 2018 -- Women at increased risk for breast cancer should start receiving mammograms earlier than recommended, even as young as age 30, a new study contends. Young women who have dense breasts or a family history of breast cancer... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - November 28, 2018 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

How much do you trust Dr. Google?
(University of Surrey) Women experiencing signs of breast cancer vary in how they value, use, and trust 'Dr. Google' when making sense of their symptoms, a new study in the journal Health, Risk& Society reports. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 28, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New study supports mammography screening at 30 for some women
(Radiological Society of North America) A new, large-scale study of more than 5 million mammograms found that annual mammography screening beginning at age 30 may benefit women with at least one of three specific risk factors: dense breasts, a personal history of breast cancer or a family history of breast cancer. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - November 28, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

For Some Women, Mammograms May Need to Begin at 30: Study
(Source: Cancercompass News: Breast Cancer)
Source: Cancercompass News: Breast Cancer - November 28, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

What's Hot at SABCS 2018 What's Hot at SABCS 2018
At the world ’ s largest breast cancer meeting, studies on treatment duration, optimal sequencing, and novel neoadjuvant strategies are all on the agenda.Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - November 27, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Hematology-Oncology News Source Type: news

Cancer Pushes New York ’ s ‘ First Girlfriend, ’ Sandra Lee, Onto Political Stage
Ms. Lee, Gov. Andrew Cuomo ’ s longtime girlfriend, had shunned the political spotlight. Cancer has changed that. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - November 27, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: JESSE McKINLEY Tags: Lee, Sandra Cuomo, Andrew M Politics and Government Breast Cancer New York State Source Type: news

Medical News Today: Breast cancer: Tumor growth fueled by bone marrow cells
New research uncovers a mechanism of tumor growth that may explain why some breast cancer tumors are more aggressive than others. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - November 27, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Breast Cancer Source Type: news

Breast cancer tumors may recruit bone marrow cells for growth
Breast cancer tumors can grow by recruiting other cells from bone marrow, lowering the chances of a patient's survival, a new study says. (Source: Health News - UPI.com)
Source: Health News - UPI.com - November 26, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

New evidence shows chemotherapy, radiation cancer treatments may be linked to decline in cognitive performance
FINDINGSUCLA researchers conducted a study of breast cancer survivors to better understand if lower activity of telomerase (an enzyme that helps maintain the health of cells) along with DNA damage (a factor in cellular aging) were associated with worse cognitive performance, such as attention and motor skills. The study showed that lower telomerase activity and more DNA damage were associated with worse cognitive performance.BACKGROUNDCancer treatments may accelerate biological aging in cells.A previous UCLA study published in npj Breast Cancer in December 2017 linked lower telomerase activity and more DNA damage with expo...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - November 26, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Chemotherapy, radiation cancer treatments may be linked to decline in cognitive performance
FINDINGSUCLA researchers conducted a study of breast cancer survivors to better understand if lower activity of telomerase (an enzyme that helps maintain the health of cells) along with DNA damage (a factor in cellular aging) were associated with worse cognitive performance, such as attention and motor skills. The study showed that lower telomerase activity and more DNA damage were associated with worse cognitive performance.BACKGROUNDCancer treatments may accelerate biological aging in cells.A previous UCLA study published in npj Breast Cancer in December 2017 linked lower telomerase activity and more DNA damage with expo...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - November 26, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Medical News Today: What you need to know about breast cancer
Breast cancer survival rates are rising as screening and treatment improve. But breast cancer is still the most invasive cancer in women. Find out who might have a greater risk, what symptoms to look out for, and the treatment options a person might face. Plus, learn about the types of breast cancer and the stages. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - November 26, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Breast Cancer Source Type: news

Medical News Today: Do cancer treatments accelerate brain aging?
A new study finds connections between key markers of biological aging and signs of cognitive decline years after the completion of breast cancer treatment. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - November 26, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Breast Cancer Source Type: news

Cancer treatments may affect cognitive function by accelerating biological aging
(Wiley) Cancer treatments are suspected to accelerate certain aging processes in the body. A new study has found that indicators of such biological aging correlate with declines in cognitive function in women who had undergone breast cancer treatment several years earlier. Published early online in CANCER, a peer-reviewed journal of the American Cancer Society, the findings point to an aging-like effect of cancer treatments and further connect this to cognitive decline. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 26, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Study: Women who eat lots of fruits and vegetables have a lower risk of breast cancer
(Natural News) Statistics indicate that breast cancer is the second most common cancer in American women. While death rates from this deadly disease have been steadily decreasing in most Western countries, a breast cancer diagnosis remains both terrifying and dangerous. Medical experts advise regular screening, lifestyle changes and a healthy diet as the best ways to... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - November 24, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Six women working at the busiest border port in the US developed cancer within 30 months
Researchers from the University of Stirling found women working at the Ambassador Bridge between Detroit and Ontario are 16 times more likely than average to get breast cancer. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - November 23, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

New research validates using cat's claw to remedy breast cancer
(Natural News) It’s hard to believe that with all the scientific advancements that we have right now, chemotherapy – with its poor efficacy record and very dangerous side effects – is somehow the best treatment option for breast cancer. It’s a convenient belief for drug companies, but if you’ve ever suspected there must be a... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - November 23, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

CoQ10 demonstrates tremendous health benefits for fighting illnesses like breast cancer and heart disease
(Natural News) It’s widely appreciated for its powerful antioxidant and cell-energizing properties. But the nutrient Coenzyme Q10, also known as CoQ10, does a whole lot more than just clean up free radicals and improve cardiovascular function in humans. Studies indicate that CoQ10 is an amazing anti-cancer nutrient that can help to not only prevent but... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - November 23, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Mobile mammography boosts underserved women's access
Mobile mammography clinics appear to be effective at boosting underserved women's...Read more on AuntMinnie.comRelated Reading: Media coverage of mammo screening emphasizes controversy How effective are mobile mammography programs? Home visits boost breast cancer screening in Latinas ASCO BCS research highlights benefits of mobile mammo, PET/MR Breast cancer rate in Georgia affected by mammo availability (Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines)
Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines - November 23, 2018 Category: Radiology Source Type: news

Breast cancers enhance their growth by recruiting cells from bone marrow
(Rockefeller University Press) Researchers in Israel have discovered that breast tumors can boost their growth by recruiting stromal cells originally formed in the bone marrow. The study, which will be published Nov. 23 in the Journal of Experimental Medicine, reveals that the recruitment of bone marrow-derived fibroblasts lowers the odds of surviving breast cancer, but suggests that targeting these cells could be an effective way of treating the disease. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - November 23, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

One in four women say taking the contraceptive has damaged their mental health
Dr Zoe Williams (pictured) presented an episode of Horizon revealing the pill can cause small increases in the risk of breast cancer and blood clots, and may be linked to higher rates of suicide attempts. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - November 22, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Improving Breast Cancer Surgery (Video)
Geisel professor and surgeon Richard Barth, MD, teamed up with two Thayer engineers to dramatically improve the accuracy of breast cancer surgery. (Source: News at Dartmouth Medical School)
Source: News at Dartmouth Medical School - November 22, 2018 Category: Hospital Management Authors: Jennifer Durgin Tags: Multimedia News Research Video campaign cancer Home-feature innovation Interaction Norris Cotton Cancer Center Richard Barth Steven Leach surgery Source Type: news

PSBJ Interview: Dr. Patricia Dawson traded retirement for equity
The medical doctor returned to school midway through her career to obtain a PhD that would allow her to take on new leadership roles after laying down the scalpel as a breast cancer surgeon. (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - November 22, 2018 Category: Biotechnology Authors: Casey Coombs Source Type: news

PSBJ Interview: Dr. Patricia Dawson traded retirement for equity
The medical doctor returned to school midway through her career to obtain a PhD that would allow her to take on new leadership roles after laying down the scalpel as a breast cancer surgeon. (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care News Headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care News Headlines - November 22, 2018 Category: Health Management Authors: Casey Coombs Source Type: news

Beaverton lab identifies drug that turns off key gene in deadly childhood muscle cancer
The Children's Cancer Therapy Development Institute is studying how a breast cancer drug candidate could impact children with an aggressive tumor in the soft muscle. (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - November 21, 2018 Category: Biotechnology Authors: Elizabeth Hayes Source Type: news

Beaverton lab identifies drug that turns off key gene in deadly childhood muscle cancer
The Children's Cancer Therapy Development Institute is studying how a breast cancer drug candidate could impact children with an aggressive tumor in the soft muscle. (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines - November 21, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Elizabeth Hayes Source Type: news

Hospital systems roll out pricey cancer-screening units
The St. Elizabeth Foundation has received $1.5 million to pay for another mobile mammography unit, which will help screen for breast cancer among rural populations in Northern Kentucky, Southwest Ohio and Southeast Indiana.   The grant from the Cincinnati-based Maxon Foundation includes $1 million for the van and the screening technology housed within, plus $500,000 for maintenance in the years to come. U.S. Bank is trustee for the foundation, which was founded by the late Glenway Maxon Jr. to focus… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines - November 21, 2018 Category: American Health Authors: Barrett J. Brunsman Source Type: news

Diagnostic Value of Circulating Cell-Free DNA in Breast Cancer Diagnostic Value of Circulating Cell-Free DNA in Breast Cancer
Using qPCR, this study examined the utility of circulating cell-free DNA in auxiliary diagnosis, grading of malignant neoplasms, and prognostic prediction of breast cancer.Laboratory Medicine (Source: Medscape Today Headlines)
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - November 21, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Hematology-Oncology Journal Article Source Type: news

Does soy affect breast cancer risk?
(Source: MayoClinic.com - Ask a Specialist)
Source: MayoClinic.com - Ask a Specialist - November 21, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Women in their 70s should be offered breast screening, scientists say
Researchers at the Elizabeth Wende Breast Center in New York say women over the age of 75 should continue to receive routine breast cancer screening because their risk keeps rising with age. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - November 20, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news