Breast Cancer Risk After Recent Childbirth: A Pooled Analysis of 15 Prospective Studies
This analysis concludes that compared with nulliparous women, parous women have an increased risk for breast cancer for more than 20 years after childbirth. Health care providers should consider recent childbirth a risk factor for breast cancer in young women. (Source: Current Awareness Service for Health (CASH))
Source: Current Awareness Service for Health (CASH) - January 9, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Cancer death rates decline, but economic gap remains
The overall cancer death rate in the U.S. dropped by 27% over the past 25 years,...Read more on AuntMinnie.comRelated Reading: Report predicts plunge in U.S. lung cancer mortality Cancer death disparities linked to poverty, lifestyle Global lung cancer death rates for women to increase Both screening, treatment cut breast cancer deaths Cancer deaths continue to fall, but CT lung screening lags (Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines)
Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines - January 9, 2019 Category: Radiology Source Type: news

Can a Prostate Cancer Drug Improve OFS in Premenopausal Breast Cancer Patients?
Researchers tested whether the GnRH antagonist degarelix was better at achieving and maintaining ovarian function suppression than the commonly used GnRH agonist triptorelin in premenopausal women with breast cancer. (Source: CancerNetwork)
Source: CancerNetwork - January 9, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Dave Levitan Source Type: news

CNIO researchers confirm links between aggressive prostate cancer and hereditary breast cancer
(Centro Nacional de Investigaciones Oncol ó gicas (CNIO)) The study has potential implications for families with members suffering from these types of tumours who are at an increased risk of developing cancer. The finding is based on PROREPAIR-B, a prospective multi-centre observational cohort study that followed up more than 400 patients with metastatic prostate cancer, aimed to identify genetic markers associated with its progression and treatment response. Further studies will evaluate whether patients with BRCA2 mutations can undergo treatments used in patients with ovarian and breast cancer. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - January 9, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Eating a lot of processed meat can increase your risk of cancer
(Natural News) Bacon is a greasy guilty pleasure for most people. However, according to a study, it could also increase your risk of developing breast cancer. The results of a 2018 meta-analysis have revealed that bacon and other types of meat are associated with an increased risk of breast cancer. Data from the meta-analysis was published in September... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - January 8, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Cancer Deaths Have Fallen Drastically Over the Last 25 Years. But These Types Are On the Rise
Cancer is the second-leading cause of death among Americans, behind only heart disease. But there’s good news: the cancer death rate has drastically declined over the past 25 years, according to a new report from the American Cancer Society (ACS). Overall, the cancer death rate dropped by 27% between 1991 and 2016, according to the report’s data, which came from the National Center for Health Statistics. Steadily declining cancer mortality rates saved about 2.6 million lives between 1991 and 2016. Significant reductions in lung cancer mortality explain a large part of the overall trend. Smoking rates have falle...
Source: TIME: Health - January 8, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized Cancer healthytime Source Type: news

Persistent Hot Flashes Increase Breast Cancer Risk in Women Persistent Hot Flashes Increase Breast Cancer Risk in Women
Persistent hot flashes increase breast cancer risk in postmenopausal women compared with those who never experience vasomotor symptoms.Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Today Headlines)
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - January 8, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Diabetes & Endocrinology News Source Type: news

Could Gail Model Allow Personalized Breast Screening? Could Gail Model Allow Personalized Breast Screening?
The Gail model could allow breast cancer screening intervals to be adjusted individually on the basis of the patient's risk for invasive breast cancer, although many hurdles remain, say Australian scientists.Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Hematology-Oncology Headlines)
Source: Medscape Hematology-Oncology Headlines - January 8, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: Hematology-Oncology News Source Type: news

Clear rub-on gel could cut the risk of breast cancer by starving cells of oestrogen
The clear and odourless gel contains a form of the anti-cancer drug tamoxifen, which has been used for years to treat women with the disease by reducing levels of the hormone oestrogen. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - January 8, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

U.S. Cancer Deaths Continue to Decline
(Source: Cancercompass News: Breast Cancer)
Source: Cancercompass News: Breast Cancer - January 8, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Medical News Today: Triple-negative breast cancer responds to new dual-target therapy
An experimental therapy that targets two growth pathways reduced cancer cell proliferation and spread in mice with triple-negative breast cancer. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - January 7, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Breast Cancer Source Type: news

Medical News Today: Childbirth may increase risk of breast cancer
A new study reveals that contrary to popular belief, having recently given birth may result in a slightly higher risk of breast cancer. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - January 5, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Breast Cancer Source Type: news

Psychoeducational Intervention of Little Benefit in Breast Cancer
However, patients said that psychoeducational group study was important intervention for their life (Source: The Doctors Lounge - Psychiatry)
Source: The Doctors Lounge - Psychiatry - January 4, 2019 Category: Psychiatry Tags: Gynecology, Oncology, Psychiatry, Journal, Source Type: news

Women who suffer hot flushes during the menopause are more likely to develop breast cancer  
A study by the University of California LA of more than 25,000 post-menopausal women found those who experienced symptoms lasting over a decade were more at risk of the disease in later life. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - January 4, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Psychoeducational Intervention of Little Benefit in Breast Cancer
FRIDAY, Jan. 4, 2019 -- A psychoeducational intervention does not improve anxiety or body image but is still considered important among women with breast cancer, according to a study recently published in Reviews on Recent Clinical Trials. Federica... (Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News)
Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News - January 4, 2019 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Protein may offer hope for the thousands of women with one of the deadliest forms of breast cancer
A study by Princeton University found that the protein Tinagl1 - found in the kidneys - suppressed the growth of triple-negative breast cancer in the lab. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - January 4, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Genetic testing does not cause undue worry for breast cancer patients
(Michigan Medicine - University of Michigan) As genetic testing for breast cancer has become more complex, evaluating a panel of multiple genes, it introduces more uncertainty about the results. But a new study finds that newer, more extensive tests are not causing patients to worry more about their cancer risk. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - January 4, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Do Fat Levels Alter Breast Cancer Risk Even Among Women With Normal BMI?
Data from the Women ’s Health Initiative showed that higher levels of body fat were associated with an increased risk of invasive breast cancer, calling into question BMI as an adequate marker for increased risk. (Source: CancerNetwork)
Source: CancerNetwork - January 4, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Dave Levitan Source Type: news

Epidemiologist White moves into tenure-track role
A rising star and two-time NIEHS fellow plans to dig deep in the hunt for environmental risk factors in breast cancer. (read more) (Source: Environmental Factor - NIEHS Newsletter)
Source: Environmental Factor - NIEHS Newsletter - January 3, 2019 Category: Environmental Health Source Type: news

Breast cancer risk remains elevated 20-30 years after childbirth
New research shows pregnancy first elevates breast cancer risk, but becomes protective over time. (read more) (Source: Environmental Factor - NIEHS Newsletter)
Source: Environmental Factor - NIEHS Newsletter - January 3, 2019 Category: Environmental Health Source Type: news

Breast Cancer Disparities Mostly Explained by Facility Factors
THURSDAY, Jan. 3, 2019 -- Delays in diagnosis and use of under-resourced health centers account for most racial and ethnic disparities in breast cancer diagnosis, according to a study published online Jan. 2 in Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers&... (Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News)
Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News - January 3, 2019 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Experimental treatment shows promise against triple-negative breast cancer
(Princeton University) A naturally occurring protein called Tinagl1 reduced the spread of triple-negative breast cancer in a study conducted in mice. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - January 3, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Persistent hot flashes may lead to increased risk of breast cancer
(The North American Menopause Society (NAMS)) Studies examining the association between vasomotor symptoms (VMS) and breast cancer are not new, but results have been inconsistent. A new larger-scale study concludes that women participating in the Women's Health Initiative (WHI) trials who had persistent VMS are more likely to be diagnosed with breast cancer than women who never experienced VMS. Study results are published online today in Menopause, the journal of The North American Menopause Society (NAMS). (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - January 3, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Lillie Shockney, RN: 2018 WebMD Health Hero, Caregiver
As a breast cancer survivor, she knows what it’s like to face the disease head-on. Now she helps others make plans for the future. (Source: WebMD Health)
Source: WebMD Health - January 2, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Kathy Bates: 2018 WebMD Health Hero, Game Changer
This Oscar winner is lending her name -- and personal experience -- to an all-out effort to change the way doctors and hospitals approach lymphedema. In her spare time, she’s directing a new breast cancer documentary. (Source: WebMD Health)
Source: WebMD Health - January 2, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Mediterranean Diet Named Best Overall For 2019
By Sandee LaMotte, CNN (CNN) — If you’re a fan of the Mediterranean diet, get ready to do a victory dance. For the first time, the Mediterranean diet has won the gold as 2019’s best overall diet in rankings announced Wednesday by US News and World Report. The analysis of 41 eating plans also gave the Mediterranean diet the top spot in several subcategories: best diet for healthy eating, best plant-based diet, best diet for diabetes and easiest diet to follow. The high accolades are not surprising, as numerous studies found the diet can reduce the risk for diabetes, high cholesterol, de...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - January 2, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Health News best diets CNN Source Type: news

Tumors backfire on chemotherapy
Some patients with breast cancer receive chemotherapy before the tumor is removed with surgery. This approach, called 'neoadjuvant' therapy, helps to reduce the size of the tumor to facilitate breast-conserving surgery, and can even eradicate the tumor, leaving few or no cancerous cells for the surgeon to remove. In those cases, the patients are very likely to remain cancer-free for life after surgery. (Source: World Pharma News)
Source: World Pharma News - January 2, 2019 Category: Pharmaceuticals Tags: Featured Research Research and Development Source Type: news

Use mammography to leverage CT lung cancer screening
Breast cancer screening offers radiology practices the opportunity to encourage...Read more on AuntMinnie.comRelated Reading: Mammography can lead to other preventive services Mammography compliance leads to other screening tests More women get breast screening after ACA bans copays Mammo recalls don't keep women from other tests Do women really care about the 'harms' of mammography? (Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines)
Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines - January 2, 2019 Category: Radiology Source Type: news

Oophorectomy to Reduce Ovarian-cancer Risk Not Tied to Breast-cancer Risk Oophorectomy to Reduce Ovarian-cancer Risk Not Tied to Breast-cancer Risk
Oophorectomy performed to reduce ovarian-cancer risk has no significant impact on breast-cancer risk, regardless of family history or BRCA1/2 status, researchers report.Reuters Health Information (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - December 31, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Medscape Today News Source Type: news

Chemotherapy may cause breast cancer to SPREAD
The commonly prescribed chemo drugs paclitaxel and doxorubicin cause breast tumours to release proteins that then circulate in the blood until they reach the lungs, Swiss researchers found. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - December 31, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Tumors backfire on chemotherapy
(Ecole Polytechnique F é d é rale de Lausanne) Chemotherapy is an effective treatment for breast cancer, yet some patients develop metastasis in spite of it. Researchers at EPFL have discovered that chemotherapy-treated mammary tumors produce small vesicles that may help them spread to other organs. The study is published in Nature Cell Biology. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - December 31, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Boston Breast Cancer Program Identifies & Helps Women At Increased Risk
BOSTON (CBS) – Many women are at increased risk for breast cancer, but don’t know what to do about it. Now a local program is helping identify women at risk, then give ongoing support and counseling to help reduce it. Mil Pierce of Belmont is one of those women at risk; she has a strong family history of breast cancer. “My mom, my grandmother, my great aunt, generation after generation has had breast cancer,” she said. Mil Pierce (WBZ-TV) The 55-year old had genetic testing, but it was negative. So Mil went searching for answers to protect herself and her two teenage daughters. “I thought it w...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - December 28, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Boston News Health Syndicated Local Breast Cancer Brigham and Women's Hospital Dr. Mallika Marshall Source Type: news

Risk for Breast Cancer Increased With False - Positive Screening Result
Increased risk for screen - detected and interval breast cancer persists for 12 years after false - positive result (Source: The Doctors Lounge - Oncology)
Source: The Doctors Lounge - Oncology - December 28, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: Gynecology, Oncology, Pathology, Radiology, Journal, Source Type: news

Complexity'Biggest Challenge' of Metastatic Breast Cancer Complexity'Biggest Challenge' of Metastatic Breast Cancer
The complexity and heterogeneity of metastatic breast cancer may be the biggest challenge in tackling this disease and underlies the lack of gains since the turn of the century.Medscape Oncology (Source: Medscape Today Headlines)
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - December 28, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Hematology-Oncology Commentary Source Type: news

Risk for Breast Cancer Increased With False-Positive Screening Result
FRIDAY, Dec. 28, 2018 -- Women with prior false-positive screening results have an increased risk for screen-detected and interval breast cancer for more than 10 years, according to a study published online Dec. 18 in the British Journal of... (Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News)
Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News - December 28, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Is Your State a Hotspot for Obesity-Linked Cancers?
(Source: Cancercompass News: Breast Cancer)
Source: Cancercompass News: Breast Cancer - December 28, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Korean JLK Inspection launches AI-powered imaging diag system
Korean JLK Inspection said yesterday that it launched its AIHub artificial intelligence-powered medical image diagnostics platform. The newly launched AIHub system is designed to analyze images from a number of different imaging modalities, including magnetic resonance imaging, computed tomography, X-ray and mammography, the Seoul-based company said. JLK Inspection claims the system can detect and monitor for more than 30 medical conditions in 14 regions of the body. The company added that the system is focused on brain diseases and conditions including ischemic stroke, hemorrhagic stroke, brain aneurysm and Alzheimer&rsqu...
Source: Mass Device - December 27, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Fink Densford Tags: Diagnostics Imaging Software / IT jlkinspection Source Type: news

Common breast cancer treatment may cause hot flashes, memory loss
A therapy currently used to treat people with breast cancer has some dangerous side effects, new research says. (Source: Health News - UPI.com)
Source: Health News - UPI.com - December 27, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Researchers Refine Radiotherapy For Women With Breast Cancer, Reducing Side-Effects
Some women with early-stage breast cancer can have less radiotherapy and achieve the same outcome, experiencing fewer and less-severe side-effects. (Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News)
Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News - December 27, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Victoria Forster, Contributor Source Type: news

Protein which speeds up breast cancer 'could be a key to treating aggressive tumours'
Researchers from Cardiff University have, in lab experiments, discovered a protein called LYN which if not controlled can help breast cancer cells to survive, multiply and spread faster. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - December 27, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Breaking down AGEs: Insight into how lifestyle drives ER-positive breast cancer
(Medical University of South Carolina) Consumption of processed foods high in sugar and fat increase levels of advanced glycation end products (AGEs). Medical University of South Carolina researchers report that AGE levels are higher in patients with estrogen receptor (ER)-positive than ER-negative breast cancer. Addition of AGEs caused breast cancer cells, whose growth had previously been controlled by tamoxifen, to begin to grow again. This suggests that patients with high AGEs may be less likely to respond to tamoxifen treatment. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - December 27, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Impact of a psycho-educational team in early breast cancer patients' coping strategies
(Bentham Science Publishers) The main purpose of the psycho-educational groups was to help women with breast cancer, learn how to cope with the physical, emotional, and lifestyle changes associated with cancer as well as with medical treatments that can be painful and traumatic. With this study, the researchers wanted to detect the effects that group action had on the women who participated in it. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - December 27, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Chemo Disturbs Sleep in Breast Cancer Patients Chemo Disturbs Sleep in Breast Cancer Patients
Patients treated with chemotherapy have disturbed sleep-wake activity, a prospective study from Hong Kong and Australia confirms.Reuters Health Information (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - December 26, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Medscape Today News Source Type: news

Chicago nonprofit ’s digital quiz helps women better understand their cancer risk
Cancer strikes so many Americans that you undoubtedly know a fried or family member who has been affected by the disease. In fact, about 20,000 women in the United States get ovarian cancer every year,  and about 237,000 cases of breast cancer are diagnosed in women annually. To help women better understand their risk for certain cancers, a Chicago-based non-profit has created an online risk assessment tool, and it was just awarded some funding and the ability to expand via a pilot program.  B right… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - December 26, 2018 Category: Biotechnology Authors: Tatiana Walk-Morris Source Type: news

Chicago nonprofit ’s digital quiz helps women better understand their cancer risk
Cancer strikes so many Americans that you undoubtedly know a fried or family member who has been affected by the disease. In fact, about 20,000 women in the United States get ovarian cancer every year,  and about 237,000 cases of breast cancer are diagnosed in women annually. To help women better understand their risk for certain cancers, a Chicago-based non-profit has created an online risk assessment tool, and it was just awarded some funding and the ability to expand via a pilot program.  B right… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines - December 26, 2018 Category: American Health Authors: Tatiana Walk-Morris Source Type: news

Breast cancer drugs could help treat resistant lung cancers
(The Francis Crick Institute) A class of drugs used to treat certain breast cancers could help to tackle lung cancers that have become resistant to targeted therapies, a new study suggests.The research, published in Cell Reports, found that lung tumors in mice caused by mutations in a gene called EGFR shrunk significantly when a protein called p110α was blocked. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - December 26, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Confronting the side effects of a common anti-cancer treatment
(University of Massachusetts at Amherst) Results of a new study by neuroscientists at the University of Massachusetts Amherst suggest that a new treatment approach is needed -- and how this may be possible -- to address adverse effects of aromatase inhibitors, drugs commonly prescribed to both men and women to prevent recurrence of estrogen-positive breast cancer. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - December 26, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

New Technique Helps Women Protect Heart During Breast Cancer Treatment
CLEVELAND (CBS) — For women battling breast cancer, treatment can sometimes harm their hearts. Now a Cleveland hospital is using a technique to protect patients. Joyce McCain’s breast cancer was picked up in a routine mammogram earlier this year. The 65-year-old considered her active lifestyle and decided a lumpectomy with radiation was the right treatment for her. Then doctors explained there could be side effects for the heart. Joyce McCain (WBZ-TV) “That gave me something else to start worrying about,” McCain said. Joyce’s cancer was in her left breast, so radiation to treat the cancer coul...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - December 25, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Health News Breast Cancer Dr. Mallika Marshall Local TV Source Type: news

Breast cancer drug given to thousands of women on the NHS affects brain function and memory
When given to monkeys in a study by the University of Toronto, the drug letrozole - also known by its brand name Femara - damaged brain cell function in the hippocampus. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - December 24, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Breast cancer drug impairs brain function
(Society for Neuroscience) A comprehensive study of monkeys given the breast cancer drug letrozole reveals side effects that impact the brain. Published in JNeurosci, the research establishes the common marmoset as an important nonhuman primate model for studying the effects of estrogen-reducing treatments on the nervous system. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - December 24, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news