Dr. Geraldine McGinty Receives Thorwarth Award
This week, distinguished radiology community leader and breast cancer detection expert  Geraldine McGinty, MD, MBA, FACR, was  presentedwith the William T. Thorwarth, Jr., MD, Award. The American College of Radiology (ACR)-sponsored award is not distributed on an annual basis but given out incidentally to individuals who have made vast leadership contributions to economics and health policy in radiology.Dr. McGinty has made significant strides in the imaging industry in the last decade. In May 2016, she became the first woman appointed the vice chair of the ACR ’s Board of Chancellors. She has established h...
Source: radRounds - May 25, 2018 Category: Radiology Authors: Julie Morse Source Type: blogs

What to do if you want to be a cruise ship doctor
In 2013 I began searching for ways I could change my career to reduce my workload, but not give up medicine altogether. During that time I took a cruise and looked at various jobs I could do on a cruise ship. One of the jobs I was qualified for, I thought, was to be a Cruise Ship Doctor. After talking with the ship’s doctor to find out what it was like to be the doctor on a ship, I realized that I would enjoy that life. When I arrived back home I sent in an application to a cruise line. I was promptly informed that general surgeons were not qualified to be a ship’s doctor. They only accept physicians who practi...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - May 25, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/cory-fawcett" rel="tag" > Cory Fawcett, MD < /a > Tags: Physician Practice Management Primary Care Source Type: blogs

5 Reasons Why Artificial Intelligence Won ’t Replace Physicians
Hype and fears surround artificial intelligence taking jobs in healthcare. Will it render physicians obsolete? Will it replace the majority of medical professionals? The Medical Futurist decided to set things straight. Here are five fundamental reasons why A.I. won’t replace doctors and never will. The medical community should not fall for the fearmongering around A.I. At the dawn of the Fourth Industrial Revolution, automation and digitization are turning the job market upside down. Many fear that robots, A.I., and automation, in general, will take their jobs without alternatives. The same anxieties emerged in healt...
Source: The Medical Futurist - May 24, 2018 Category: Information Technology Authors: nora Tags: Artificial Intelligence in Medicine Future of Medicine AI digital health insurance doctor Healthcare job job market physician technology Source Type: blogs

Podcast: Diverse Diseases, Allied Advocates
Listen to part two of the episode recorded live on location at HealtheVoices 2018. (Part one was posted last week, so check it out if you haven’t, already.) In this continuation of the multi-advocate panel discussion, our panelists talk about the most difficult aspect of their advocacy and how they deal with it. They also address misconceptions and ignorance about their diseases, such as the difference between AIDS and HIV or IBD and IBS, the fact that lupus is not contagious, and that men can have breast cancer. To close out the episode, each panelist shares his/her thoughts on what advocates for different condition...
Source: World of Psychology - May 24, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: The Psych Central Show Tags: General Interview Mental Health and Wellness The Psych Central Show Advocacy Source Type: blogs

California AG Emergency Request to Reverse Court Ruling to Invalidate Medical Aid-in-Dying Law
The California attorney general has filed an emergency request with the state court of appeals to reverse a lower court ruling to invalidate the End of Life Option Act. The End of Life Option Act remains in effect until further notice. Similar to laws in Washington, D.C. and six other states, the California law gives mentally capable, terminally ill adults with six months or less to live to the option to request prescription medication they can decide to take to end unbearable suffering and die peacefully in their sleep. Last Tuesday, Riverside County Superior Court Judge Daniel Ottolia invalidated the law ...
Source: blog.bioethics.net - May 22, 2018 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

An aging physician muses on end-of-life care
As a retired physician who has written a book about end-of-life issues for elderly patients, I have placed myself in an awkward position. According to most guidelines, at age 67, I am elderly. How will I approach the end of my life? Not only do my personal medical concerns career around in the echo chamber of my own mind, but I have the added challenge of trying to follow my own advice regarding end-of-life decision making. And, there are multiple examples of physicians who did not do that. Witness the example of Francis Warren, Harvard’s most famous surgeon of the 20th century, renowned for heroic cancer surgeries a...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - May 21, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/samuel-harrington" rel="tag" > Samuel Harrington, MD < /a > Tags: Physician Palliative Care Source Type: blogs

Premarin, whole grains, and why you can ’ t believe headlines
Imagine you have a friend named Justin. He is a schoolteacher. Honest, hardworking, doesn’t smoke, rarely drinks alcohol, sleeps well, doesn’t take drugs, shows up at work every day. He has also chosen to be vegetarian. Another friend of yours, an auto mechanic named Tommy, eats fast food, loves fried chicken, drinks too much beer on the weekends, likes to drive fast cars, and sometimes gets into legal tangles. He smokes cigarettes, though has limited it to only half-a-pack per day. Late weekends, some weekday nights, sleep cut short to just two or three hours. Tommy is not a vegetarian, but likes his burgers r...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - May 17, 2018 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr. Davis Tags: Undoctored Wheat Belly Lifestyle Source Type: blogs

Podcast: Finding Strength & Unity in Our Differences
Listen to part one of the first ever LIVE Psych Central Show, recorded on location at HealtheVoices 2018, an annual event that brings together online advocates from across various health conditions for an opportunity to learn, share and connect. In this show, you will meet four advocates who join our hosts on stage for a panel discussion on a variety of advocacy issues, including lupus, inflammatory bowel disease, HIV, and breast cancer. You’ll hear about how being diagnosed affected their lives in ways they didn’t expect, and what made them become advocates. The second half of this show will be posted next wee...
Source: World of Psychology - May 17, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: The Psych Central Show Tags: General Interview Mental Health and Wellness The Psych Central Show Advocacy Source Type: blogs

“Superman Vision” Gets a Boost from Vayyar’s Next Generation Chip: Interview with CEO Raviv Melamed
Earlier this month, Vayyar Imaging, a firm based in Yehud, Israel,  announced the launch of its next generation CMOS System on a Chip (SOC), strengthening the company’s position as a global leader in 3D imaging technology. The new chip covers imaging and radar bands from 3 GHz to 81 GHz and, compared to many similar chips with three transmitters and three receivers, integrates more antennas than ever before with 72 transmitters and 72 receivers. The upgrade allows for longer range and higher quality imaging in real-time without compromising size. Commenting on the announcement, Co-Founder and CEO Raviv...
Source: Medgadget - May 16, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Michael Batista Tags: Diagnostics Exclusive Informatics Radiology Source Type: blogs

California Judge Overturns California Medical Aid-in-Dying Law
A California judge granted a motion by opponents of the California End of Life Option Act to overturn the law because he said the legislature violated the state constitution by passing it during a special session limited to health care issues. (HT: C&C) Riverside County Superior Court Judge Daniel A. Ottolia gave the state attorney general five days to file an emergency appeal of the ruling in the case, Ahn vs. Hestrin — Case RIC1607135, before it will take effect. Unless the appeals court suspends the ruling, it will prevent mentally capable, terminally ill adults with six months or...
Source: blog.bioethics.net - May 15, 2018 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Real World Evidence (RWE) vs Randomized Control Trials (RCT): The Battle For the Future of Medicine
By DAVID SHAYWITZ, MD Randomized control trials – RCTs – rose to prominence in the twentieth century as physicians and regulators sought to evaluate rigorously the performance of new medical therapies; by century’s end, RCTs had become, as medical historian Laura Bothwell has noted, “the gold standard of medical knowledge,” occupying the top position of the “methodologic heirarch[y].” The value of RCTs lies in the random, generally blinded, allocation of patients to treatment or control group, an approach that when properly executed minimizes confounders (based on the presumption t...
Source: The Health Care Blog - May 15, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: John Irvine Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: blogs

The Case For Real World Evidence (RWE)
By DAVID SHAYWITZ, MD Randomized control trials – RCTs – rose to prominence in the twentieth century as physicians and regulators sought to evaluate rigorously the performance of new medical therapies; by century’s end, RCTs had become, as medical historian Laura Bothwell has noted, “the gold standard of medical knowledge,” occupying the top position of the “methodologic heirarch[y].” The value of RCTs lies in the random, generally blinded, allocation of patients to treatment or control group, an approach that when properly executed minimizes confounders (based on the presumption t...
Source: The Health Care Blog - May 15, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: John Irvine Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: blogs

15-year study: stress did not increase risk of breast cancer among women with a genetic susceptibility to the disease
By Emma Young The idea that stress increases the risk of breast cancer is a persistent one, despite a number of major large-scale findings to the contrary. “Over the past 40 years, women have been exposed to strong messages about the importance of ‘thinking positively’ and reducing stress in their lives, which can add to the burden of guilt in those who develop cancer, who feel they have somehow failed”, note the authors of a new prospective study of women in Australia, published in Psycho-Oncology. Their findings suggest that neither acute nor chronic stressors recorded over a three-year period inf...
Source: BPS RESEARCH DIGEST - May 11, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: BPS Research Digest Tags: Cancer Health Mental health Source Type: blogs

Exclusive: BeCare Link ’s Innovative App for Multiple Sclerosis Patients
BeCare Link  has created a mobile application (“BeCare MS Link” in the Google Play app store) that connects patients to physicians and researchers to provide unprecedented levels of insight into multiple sclerosis (MS) and other neurodegenerative diseases. As paraphrased from a MS patient: “Much of MS is what is happening in your head, and you need the objective evidence that maybe things are not going as badly as you think.” A typical physician’s visit can only provide a snapshot in time of a patient’s overall well-being and functional status, with a patient’s self-recorded l...
Source: Medgadget - May 10, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Alice Ferng Tags: Exclusive Medicine Neurology Rehab Source Type: blogs

The Digital Future of Pathology
Pathology is the motor that drives healthcare to understand diseases. While it does the job via the same methods as it did for the last 150 years, it’s time to change. Digital technologies could push the field into becoming more efficient and more scalable. They could transform the job of pathologists into a more creative and data-driven profession while allowing patients to receive diagnoses faster and more accurately. Let’s see how the digital future of pathology looks! The foundation of medicine, pathology, has not changed for over 150 years Although the whole edifice of medicine rests on the pathologis...
Source: The Medical Futurist - May 10, 2018 Category: Information Technology Authors: nora Tags: Future of Medicine AI artificial intelligence biotechnology deep learning digital digital health medical imaging pathology precision medicine Radiology Source Type: blogs

Living With Limitations in the Family
This is the misunderstood side of my life - how I live with limitations. The other day, I visited my mother who also has RA. We went for a walk. I don't usually go for walks because I get plenty of exercise at the gym and going for walks isn't a great exercise for me. My back hurts and I get tired.Other family members insist my mother go for walks too. They give her directions like if she would walk further she can get in better shape. She also should do her exercises, which she does. And she rides her little stationary bike while watching the news for 30 minutes every night. She gets plenty of exercise and really can't do...
Source: Caroline's Breast Cancer Blog - May 9, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: limitations vacation walking Source Type: blogs

After Cancer Coping With The Instant Cancer Bond
So after you get diagnosed with cancer, it seems like everyone you know has cancer because:You have met a lot of other people going through cancer treatment while hanging out at chemo, in support groups, your oncologist's waiting room, etc. That part is kind of nice. You find out you aren't alone in this cancer business. You have an instant bond with new friends.Then you start hearing about all these other people who are diagnosed with cancer. You feel like you are supposed to be their friend too - because of that cancer bond thing again. Your cancer friends tell you about everyone they know when they are diagnosed with ca...
Source: Caroline's Breast Cancer Blog - May 8, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: cancer bonds cancer diagnosis coping friends guilt Source Type: blogs

Notice of Funding Opportunity: Bioethics and Disability
This report would examine developments at the state and federal-level, court cases, and current views from stakeholders. Policy Questions Which states have PAS laws and what do those laws provide? What protections against abuse of PAS?What have the Supreme Court and lower courts held regarding individuals’ rights under PAS laws? The laws themselves?Is there evidence that persons with disabilities are being denied treatment by insurance companies but offered PAS instead, as NCD predicted?How is PAS viewed by disability organizations? Has this evolved in the past 13 years? If so why? If not, why?Are persons with disabi...
Source: blog.bioethics.net - May 8, 2018 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Blogging Peeves
I love blogging and I love reading other people's blogs. But I have a few peeves (of which I cannot claim I have never committed) that just irritate me.Select the correct word. There is a huge difference between they're, their, and there; and reign and rein; and its and it's. And I can go on. If you aren't sure, look it up ondictionary.com orthesaurus.com for help. It will really help people decipher what you are writing about.Spelling, spelling, spelling. If your blog app indicates a word is wrong or autocorrects to something you don't understand, correct it. How many people's resumes include the term that they were ...
Source: Caroline's Breast Cancer Blog - May 6, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: blogging Source Type: blogs

What A Stupid Policy
I guess I am back to blogging. I woke up this morning and read the paper. I could not believe this policy." Breast cancer screening is offered to all women aged 50 to 70 in England every three years; they are sent invitation letters to make an appointment for the test. "Apparently in the UK, patients are'sent invitations'every THREE years for a mammogram. The parts that piss me off are that patients are only invited for a mammogram (shouldn't it be automatically scheduled by their primary care's - or another doctor's - office?) everythree years. What's wrong with annually? Or is it too expensive for the NHS?And t...
Source: Caroline's Breast Cancer Blog - May 3, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: breast cancer cancer diagnosis mammogram stupidity Source Type: blogs

Shannon Doherty Banking Blood
It was reported today that Shannon Doherty has been banking her own blood for an upcoming surgery. The 90210 actor was diagnosed with breast cancer in 2015. https://pagesix.com/2018/05/02/shannen-doherty-banking-blood-for-upcoming-surgery/ The post Shannon Doherty Banking Blood appeared first on InsideSurgery Medical Information Blog. (Source: Inside Surgery)
Source: Inside Surgery - May 3, 2018 Category: Surgery Authors: Lisa Marcucci Tags: Breast Surgery Oncology breast cancer Shannon Doherty Source Type: blogs

Fluorescent Particles Bind to Cancer Cells to Spot and Diagnose Tumors
Mammograms have become extremely useful in identifying suspect lesions that may be cancer, but biopsies are still required to actually find out whether the tissue is cancerous. Researchers at University of Michigan have developed a molecule, which can be delivered in pill form, that connects to cell surface receptors on certain types of cancer cells. The molecule has a fluorescent component on it, so when it’s illuminated with infrared light, it itself glows in response. This may allow the technique to be particularly useful in breast cancer, and potentially overcoming mammograms altogether by providing both ima...
Source: Medgadget - May 2, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: Materials Nanomedicine Oncology Pathology Radiology Source Type: blogs

Blogosphere, Here I Am
I'm finally back in the blogosphere. (I'm not sure I like that term but I'll use it). Blogging really helps me cope with life. Its where I share my emotions and thoughts and I've missed it. But I did need the hibernation.Since the middle of February, when my father stopped his chemo and was gone in two weeks, until now, I have been on a roller coaster of emotions. I have been lucky enough not to have lost a family member since my grandmother passed away in 1983 so this was very difficult. In addition, my health made it more difficult for me to do much to help the rest of my family pull together the memorial service, help c...
Source: Caroline's Breast Cancer Blog - May 2, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: blogging emotional toll stress Source Type: blogs

Would You Want To Know Whether You ’re At Risk For Alzheimer’s?
Do genetic tests help in preparing for potential future health issues or open Pandora’s box full of concerns, worries and hypochondriac thoughts? Would you want to know your genetic fate? Whether you are at risk for Alzheimer’s or a chronic disease 30 years in advance? Would you want to live with this kind of information? Would you take the BRCA test to find out that you are at risk for breast cancer? What would you do if you were? The Medical Futurist team contemplated situations requiring hard, life-altering decisions. What would you do? Our genetic heritage carries secrets that are difficult to process In Se...
Source: The Medical Futurist - April 28, 2018 Category: Information Technology Authors: nora Tags: Bioethics Genomics alzheimer disease DNA dna testing doctor-patient doctor-patient relationship DTC future genetics Huntington's patient empowerment personal genomics Source Type: blogs

Two Faces of Macrophages in Cancer Tissue
This popular science article looks at opposing views of the role of macrophages in the development of tumors. Some groups see macrophages as aiding the cancer, and want to suppress them, while others are engaged in turning macrophages into an effective weapon to destroy cancer cells. This two-faced nature echos a range of unrelated work on macrophage behavior. These cells can be classed by their activities into what are known as polarizations. The M1 polarization is aggressive and inflammatory, willing to attack cells and pathogens, while the M2 polarization aids tissue growth and regeneration. The balance between the two ...
Source: Fight Aging! - April 25, 2018 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

Debunking breast cancer myths: the truth about genes, gender, and destiny
An excerpt from Breasts: The Owner’s Manual: Every Woman’s Guide to Reducing Cancer Risk, Making Treatment Choices, and Optimizing Outcomes. Genetics play a less important role than you probably think. Consider this fact: the identical twin sister of a woman with breast cancer has only a 20 percent chance of getting breast cancer one day—which, by the way, is the same risk as anyone with an affected sister.1 Since these twins share the exact same DNA, if genetics called all the cancer shots, risk should approach 100 percent—but it doesn’t, because genes aren’t the be-all end-all man...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - April 24, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/kristi-funk" rel="tag" > Kristi Funk, MD < /a > Tags: Conditions Oncology/Hematology Source Type: blogs

Coming Back to Life
We are slowly coming back to life. We are all still very sad about my father's death. But his service is finally this weekend. At the last minute he decided to donate his body to benefit others. However due to his age, 89, and his cause of death, cancer (love those circulating cancer cells), options were limited. He donated his body to Harvard Medical School for research. They will keep his body for up to two years, but more like 12-18 months and then return his ashes to us. In the meantime we are having a celebration of life type service at a local Unitarian church this weekend. The service should provide some s...
Source: Caroline's Breast Cancer Blog - April 19, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: death family grief recovery Source Type: blogs

Screening mammograms: One recommendation may not fit all
To date, official recommendations on when and how often a woman should have a screening mammogram, have been based on risk factors (such as age, a family history of breast cancer, a personal history of radiation to the chest), genetic testing (the BRCA test, for example), or troubling results from a previous biopsy. Race and ethnicity have not officially factored into the equation — yet. Does race matter when it comes to screening mammograms? A recent study by Harvard doctors at Massachusetts General Hospital reinforces prior data suggesting that race and ethnicity can be a separate risk factor for breast cancer, and...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - April 16, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Monique Tello, MD, MPH Tags: Breast Cancer Health Prevention Screening Women's Health Source Type: blogs

For those on the margins, access to cancer care is a struggle
Sarah* is a new patient, referred to me because she is having difficulty deciding on treatment for breast cancer. I don’t know much else about her, and a quick review of her electronic medical record tells me that she is 48 years old and has hormone-positive disease in her left breast. There are numerous missed appointments, and it appears that her biopsy was well over six months ago. I suspect that I’m in for an interesting appointment. Most newly diagnosed patients want treatment immediately, as fast as we can organize it. Treatment decision delays and missed appointments suggest that there is a backstory tha...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - April 11, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/anne-katz" rel="tag" > Anne Katz, RN, PhD < /a > Tags: Conditions Oncology/Hematology Source Type: blogs

New Highly Effective Camera for Spotting Dye Tagged Tumors
A collaboration between researchers at University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and Washington University in St. Louis has led to the development of a highly sensitive new camera for detecting fluorescent markers tagged on cancer tumors. It is smaller, more accurate, and relies on cheaper parts than existing devices used to detect the same near-infrared fluorescent dyes. The camera owes some of its capabilities to the eye of the morpho butterly, which was studied to understand how butterflies see so well in certain light frequencies. The camera’s sensing abilities have been combined with an augmented-reality headse...
Source: Medgadget - April 5, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: Oncology Pathology Surgery Source Type: blogs

Seize the Day — Your Own Way
“Live life to the fullest.” “Celebrate life.” “Carpe diem.” I’ve heard them all. But what if I don’t feel like it? What if I’m having a lousy brain day, restricted to a darkened room with a blinding headache, and seizing the day is not an option? I have clusters of malformed blood vessels called cavernous angiomas in my brain. Two of them bled, turning my life upside down with seizures and other symptoms. A few months later, I underwent resection surgeries to prevent future bleeds. The surgeries wreaked additional havoc — headaches, seizures, fatigue, short attent...
Source: World of Psychology - April 5, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Psych Central Staff Tags: Brain Blogger Health-related Personal Publishers carpe diem celebrate life Fear Personality Seize the Day Source Type: blogs

AeroForm Tissue Expander for Breast Reconstruction: Interview with Scott Dodson, CEO
Breast reconstruction is a frequent consequence resulting from a fight with breast cancer. Women trying to become whole again have to undergo an implantation of a saline bag followed by regular, sometimes painful injections that gradually expand the size of the bag. There is another option, cleared by the FDA last year and in Europe back in 2012, that avoids injections altogether and allows women to choose when, where, and how much to expand the implant. We spoke with Scott Dodson, President & CEO of AirXpanders, the makers of the innovative AeroForm system, to learn more about the technology from patients’ and p...
Source: Medgadget - April 2, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: Exclusive Plastic Surgery Source Type: blogs

Hibernating, or Looking My Wounds
Often when I am extremely stressed, I find I need to hibernate a bit, and'lick my wounds'as they say. For the past month, since my father died, I have been craving time by myself, lots of time alone. (Cats optional.)The only day I usually have nothing on my calendar is a Tuesday. I have had something on my calendar every day since. Yesterday I was supposed to have a doctor appointment but it was cancelled because the practitioner was sick (instead of the patient being sick). That meant my calendar was empty. I got to stay home.I enjoyed my solitude and got lots of things done - like laundry. But also I focused on my weavin...
Source: Caroline's Breast Cancer Blog - March 28, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: isolation Source Type: blogs

The problem of misunderstanding 23andMe genetic test results
Home delivery for everything from fresh produce to custom-selected clothing has become a way of life for many Americans. While most home-delivery conveniences are generally changing our lives for the better — giving us more time and choices — at-home genetics kits that reveal information about the risk of developing certain cancers represent a risky step in our on-demand culture. The FDA recently gave 23andMe the green light to sell the first direct-to-consumer tests for mutations in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes, which are linked to serious risks of developing cancer. All a buyer has to do is s...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - March 28, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/susan-domchek" rel="tag" > Susan Domchek, MD < /a > Tags: Conditions Genetics Oncology/Hematology Source Type: blogs

Coping with Other's Cancer
When you are diagnosed with cancer, you are faced with the World of Oncology. Inside that world lies the answers to your questions and how to keep you alive. As you go through diagnosis and treatment, you get to educate yourself on your illness and what's involved in getting through it.Oncologists have to go to medical school to learn all this crap. Us patients get the express pass and learn it much faster and more intimately. Doctor's say'may cause nausea and hair loss'. We know it means we will watch our hair fall out as we shop for a wig and try to keep something in our stomachs. We learn what the truth really is and ho...
Source: Caroline's Breast Cancer Blog - March 24, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: cancer diagnosis cancer information cancer treatment coping Source Type: blogs

That Drama Queen Friend
And this can apply to males as well. But we all have the drama queen friend who spends hours/days/weeks/months agonizing over their latest ailment - a bunion, or a boil, or a blister, or whatever they have.Maybe they got new shoes that caused their feet to develop problems or they tripped and slightly skinned their knee (and ruined a pair of brand new tights). They are in agony with every step. There was so much blood. And it still hurts three days later. I am not trying to minimize real injuries or ailments but just the ones who act like they are on an episode of the " Kardashians " or " Jersey Shore "...
Source: Caroline's Breast Cancer Blog - March 22, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: being healthy emotions friends Source Type: blogs

New findings contradict headline-grabbing paper that suggested excessive small talk makes us miserable
By Emma Young If you want to feel happier, avoid small talk and aim instead for profound conversations. That was the message the mainstream media took from a well-publicised paper published in Psychological Science in 2010 (e.g. Talk Deeply, Be Happy? asked the New York Times). But now an extension of that study, in press at the same journal (available as a pre-print), and involving two of the psychologists behind the original work, has found no evidence that how much – or little – time  you spend chatting about the weather or what you’re having for dinner will affect your life satisfaction...
Source: BPS RESEARCH DIGEST - March 22, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: BPS Research Digest Tags: Emotion Replications Social Source Type: blogs

Can excessive small talk really make us miserable?
By Emma Young If you want to feel happier, avoid small talk and aim instead for profound conversations. That was the message the mainstream media took from a well-publicised paper published in Psychological Science in 2010 (e.g. Talk Deeply, Be Happy? asked the New York Times). But now an extension of that study, in press at the same journal (available as a pre-print), and involving two of the psychologists behind the original work, has found no evidence that how much – or little – time  you spend chatting about the weather or what you’re having for dinner will affect your life satisfaction...
Source: BPS RESEARCH DIGEST - March 22, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: BPS Research Digest Tags: Emotion Replications Social Source Type: blogs

I Bless The Rains Down In Africa...Again
Some of you might have noticed that I haven't posted for a while. Did you call? Did you write? Did you check to see if i was still alive?Sorry...just the Jewish mother in me coming out. I'm sure you all knew that the hiatus was justified, and you simply decided that my next missive would be well worth the wait. And I certainly hope to rise to your expectations.Many things have indeed been happening. Doctor Dolly is getting married in a few months, and you can imagine theturmoiljoy that has brought to the Dalai household. In the midst of plans for that amazing(ly expensive) event (JUST KIDDING, DOLLY!!) I received a promoti...
Source: Dalai's PACS Blog - March 21, 2018 Category: Radiology Source Type: blogs

Which Direct-To-Consumer Genetic Test to Choose?
Due to the collapse of the price of genetic testing and the FDA’s gradual ease of the regulatory environment, direct-to-consumer (DTC) genetic testing companies are booming. You can inquire your deoxyribonucleic acid about your ancestry, health risks, metabolism, and some start-ups even promise you to find true love or your kids’ talents. As the jungle of DTC companies is getting denser, more and more people ask me which genetic tests are worth the try. They love the possibility of getting access to their DNA but don’t know where to start. Here’s the DTC genetic testing kick-starter package! Naviga...
Source: The Medical Futurist - March 20, 2018 Category: Information Technology Authors: nora Tags: Genomics 23andme ancestry DNA DTC future genetic test Genetic testing genetics Genome genome sequencing Health 2.0 Source Type: blogs

Health Care ’s Pigs and Pokes
By ROBERT MCNUTT, MD & NORTIN HADLER, MD Take the example of a middle-aged woman undergoing chemotherapy for breast cancer. Month after month she receives a bill for $16,000. This purchases a monthly infusion of one chemotherapeutic agent.  Much of the bill is paid by her insurance, but her personal checking account will cough up about $1000 per month until she pays down her deductible. The invoice, however, is an illusion. The amount is not the actual number of dollars required to pay for services and materials rendered. Most of the money is diverted in accordance with contractual agreements between the hospital ...
Source: The Health Care Blog - March 18, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: John Irvine Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: blogs

On the Non-Effectiveness of Cost Effectiveness Analyses
By ROBERT MCNUTT, MD & NORTIN HADLER, MD Take the example of a middle-aged woman undergoing chemotherapy for breast cancer. Month after month she receives a bill for $16,000. This purchases a monthly infusion of one chemotherapeutic agent.  Much of the bill is paid by her insurance, but her personal checking account will cough up about $1000 per month until she pays down her deductible. The invoice, however, is an illusion. The amount is not the actual number of dollars required to pay for services and materials rendered. Most of the money is diverted in accordance with contractual agreements between the hospital ...
Source: The Health Care Blog - March 18, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: John Irvine Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: blogs

Pancreatic Cancer Sucks
I haven't been blogging recently because I have been emotionally stressed. It may take me a while longer to get back to it. Myfather, who was diagnosed with pancreatic cancer last May, had metastases by August 1, and was in chemo until Feb 13, died on Tuesday February 27.Since his diagnosis with Waldenstrom's lymphoma back in 2013, I had become his oncology interpreter/assistant. I went to the important appointments and answered his questions that the doctor's don't want to answer.Due to vein damage from chemo for his lymphoma he needed a port. When he did finally get a port, his first question was'when do I get it out?'Th...
Source: Caroline's Breast Cancer Blog - March 18, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: death depression family sadness Source Type: blogs

Mr. and Mrs. Wheat Belly
Men and women follow the Wheat Belly lifestyle and can undergo important and sometime startling hormonal changes. Though results vary with stage of life—young adults, middle-aged, older—there are a variety of hormonal changes that women and men typically experience, some in concert, others independently. Such hormonal shifts can be powerful and part of the health-restoring menu of changes that develop with this lifestyle. They can even improve a relationship in a number of ways, both physically and emotionally, especially if we weave in some of the newer Wheat Belly/Undoctored concepts and practices such as oxy...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - March 13, 2018 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr. Davis Tags: Wheat Belly Lifestyle estradiol estrogen hormonal hormones Inflammation low-carb oxytocin testosterone Thyroid Weight Loss Source Type: blogs

The Color of Bioethics
I would like to take you through a thought exercise. More often than not, we are reflecting on more sober, serious topics but I would like to invite you think about a different question today: what is the color of bioethics? To some this may seem like a silly question and maybe it is. However, as we move towards an increased professional presence we need to reflect on our image, including color. We reflect on how we present ourselves in body language, communication, and writing but why not color as well? In the professional marketing world, a lot of thought is given to color.  As professionals, we are sometimes traine...
Source: blog.bioethics.net - March 12, 2018 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Bioethics Today Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Reprioritized
You may know I live outside Boston, MA. We had two'little'snow storms in a row. The news is that we lost power from 10pm Wednesday until 7pm Saturday. Nearly 70 hours of now power makes one rethink everything.Yes we have nearly 12 hours of daylight each day. But it seemed to get dark very early each day. The indoor temperature reached 46 degrees yesterday. On the plus side we were relatively well equipped to lose power. We have a gas stove (hot food), gas hot water heater (hot showers), and a fireplace (some warmth). We also have lots of flashlights and a few lanterns and one tiny solar phone charger. The two cats were ver...
Source: Caroline's Breast Cancer Blog - March 11, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: taking care of me Source Type: blogs

The Magseed Injectable Marker: Interview with Eric Mayes, CEO of Endomag
Endomag, a medical technology company based in Cambridge, UK and Austin, Texas, has developed the Magseed, a magnetic injectable marker that can be implanted by a radiologist during an imaging procedure, such as during ultrasound or X-ray mammographic procedures. The marker can then assist surgeons to find features of interest in soft tissues. Originally intended and used as a marker for breast tumors (the CE mark approval was covered by Medgadget in September 2017), Endomag recently received FDA clearance for the use of the Magseed as a marker of other soft tissues and for long-term implantation. The marker is a tiny magn...
Source: Medgadget - March 9, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Conn Hastings Tags: Exclusive Ob/Gyn Pathology Radiology Surgery Source Type: blogs

Funtabulously Frivolous Friday Five 229
LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog - Emergency medicine and critical care medical education blog Just when you thought your brain could unwind on a Friday, you realise that it would rather be challenged with some good old fashioned medical trivia FFFF…introducing Funtabulously Frivolous Friday Five 229 – musical medial conditions from http://www.songfacts.com. Question 1 “I stare into Some great abyss And calculate The things I’d miss If I could only Make some sense of this.” Sheryl Crow is singing about her experience undergoi...
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - March 9, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Neil Long Tags: Frivolous Friday Five ACDC breast cancer cardiac arrest gonorrhoea heart attack heroin Leonard Cohen Madness radiation song Sheryl Crow Spiderbite The Flaming Lips The Jack Source Type: blogs

Apps Aren't Helpful
I found an article inCure Magazine (if you have cancer and aren't a subscriber, you are missing out) on this'cool'newapp for people living with cancer, called LivingWith. Its supposed to help those of us with cancer in dealing with their disease and its treatment.' With the number of moving parts associated with a cancer diagnosis and its treatments, patients now have a “one stop shop” to help them navigate their journey. 'An app? Seriously? How can an app do that? I am skeptical to start. First, are you sick and dealing with your cancer and you need to find an app and start using it to communicate with your fr...
Source: Caroline's Breast Cancer Blog - March 7, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: cancer diagnosis cancer resources coping online Source Type: blogs

Hidden Scars from Breast Cancer
Yes there are lots of hidden scars in breast cancer. I have discussed the emotional side a lot - which boils down to PTSD for some. But there is also the physical side. Every time you look at your body and see your cancer scars, you are reminded of  your cancer misadventure. Its only a scar that will fade over time but its still there.Back in 1984, I found my first breast lump. Due to the limitations of surgery at the time, I had to have an excisional biopsy. And because of my medical history (three years after thyroid cancer) they had to be sure. (And if you are trying to calculate my age, I am still only 37). So I h...
Source: Caroline's Breast Cancer Blog - March 6, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: breast cancer treatment lumpectomy progress scars surgery Source Type: blogs