Obama, Prince Harry, Angelina: Celebrities As Health Influencers
Beloved Hollywood celebrities, famous politicians or members of the British royal family: no better advertisement for fitness tracker producers and health tech companies. As models, actors and actresses are highly influential people, their early adoption of digital solutions could also push the masses towards living more healthily with technologies. On the other hand, celebrities are inclined to follow questionable health trends, too, which go against decades of medical evidence. Those examples, everyone should rather reject. Wearables conquered Hollywood, the White House, and the British royal family Celebrities are all a...
Source: The Medical Futurist - November 15, 2018 Category: Information Technology Authors: nora Tags: Social media in Healthcare celebrities digital health digital technologies digital technology famous fitness future health influencer health influencers Hollywood trackers trends wearables wellness Source Type: blogs

A Patient Complained about the Cost of Her Medical Care. Here ’s How Her Doctor Responded.
The oncologist had prescribed Xgeva hoping it would strengthen her bones while also delaying the progression of Angela Kahn’s breast cancer. But Kahn (a pseudonym) couldn’t get over the price of the drug. Before the oncologist had a chance to … Continue reading → The post A Patient Complained about the Cost of Her Medical Care. Here’s How Her Doctor Responded. appeared first on PeterUbel.com. (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - November 15, 2018 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: PeterUbel.com Tags: Health Care cancer healthcare costs Peter Ubel pharmaceutical industry syndicated Uncategorized Source Type: blogs

Point-of-Care BRCA1 Mutation Testing in 20 Minutes
BReast CAncer gene one (BRCA1) is one of the best-known genes linked to breast cancer risk. Unfortunately, the technology to spot the gene requires a lab and expertise at interpretation. Researchers at Louisiana State University have now developed a smartphone-based system called FLuoroZen that can test for the cancer-related BRCA1 mutation at the point-of-care within twenty minutes. The FLuoroZen analyzes DNA within saliva or blood when the sample is placed on nitrocellulose paper, itself placed on a glass slide. The device then detects the fluorescent oligonucleotide spots on the nitrocellulose paper thanks to two f...
Source: Medgadget - November 13, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: Genetics Ob/Gyn Pathology Surgery Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, November 12th 2018
This study's researchers approached all people turning 85 in 2006 in two cities in the UK for participation. At the beginning of the study in 2006-2007, there were 722 participants, 60 percent of whom were women. The participants provided researchers with information about what they ate every day, their body weight and height measurements, their overall health assessment (including any level of disability), and their medical records. The researchers learned that more than one-quarter (28 percent) of very old adults had protein intakes below the recommended dietary allowance. The researchers noted that older adults w...
Source: Fight Aging! - November 11, 2018 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

BMC ‘Research in progress’ photo competition – one week to go!
Source: Cultura Creative (RF) / Alamy Stock Photo We’ve received some fantastic entries so far but it’s not too late if you’re yet to enter your photos. Anyone interested in research and photography can enter from anywhere in the world. Your image should be related to research and can be focused on any area of your work and from any discipline including physical sciences, mathematics and engineering. The overall winner will receive a cash prize of €550 (~£490/$645), while the runner-up will receive €350 (~£310/$410). Inspiration Sarah Boyle’s winning photograph from last year&r...
Source: BioMed Central Blog - November 9, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: Davy Falkner Tags: Uncategorized Research in progress photo competition Source Type: blogs

Last Month in Oncology with Dr. Bishal Gyawali
By BISHAL GYAWALI MD Me-too deja vu I read the report of a phase 3 RCT of a “new” breast cancer drug but I had the feeling that I had already read this before. Later I realized that this was indeed a new trial of a new drug, but that I had read a very similar report of a very similar drug with very similar results and conclusions. This new drug is a PARP inhibitor called talazoparib and the deja vu was related to another PARP inhibitor drug called olaparib tested in the same patient population of advanced breast cancer patients with a BRCA mutation. The control arms were the same: physician ...
Source: The Health Care Blog - November 8, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: matthew holt Tags: Drug Discovery Pharmaceuticals Bishal Gyawali Cancer immunotherapy Oncology Source Type: blogs

I Heart Research: We speak to the winner of last year ’s ‘Research in progress’ photo competition
“I Heart Research”Sarah Boyle, Centre for Cancer Biology, Adelaide, South Australia. Tell us about your winning image from last year’s BMC ‘Research in progress’ photo competition Sarah Boyle, winner of the ‘Research in progress’ photo competition 2017. Breast cancer is the most widely diagnosed cancer in women world-wide, and despite advances in treatment, still remains a major cause of cancer-related death. My winning image, “I Heart Research”, was of a fluorescent mouse mammary tumor, captured during my studies into breast cancer progression. This mouse was genetical...
Source: BioMed Central Blog - November 7, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: Davy Falkner Tags: Uncategorized Research in progress photo competition Source Type: blogs

Another Recent Study Assesses the Financial Burden of Excess Fat Tissue
The personal cost of being overweight or obese is sizable, even when considering only financial matters, the greater expenditure on medical needs and the opportunity costs that accompany sickness and loss of capacity. Additional weight in the form of visceral fat tissue both shortens life expectancy and increases lifetime medical expense, this much is well established in the scientific literature. Summing those costs over the entire population produces some staggeringly large numbers. Those numbers can vary widely depending on the assumptions and what is included; those here are on the high end. Yet the cost of excess weig...
Source: Fight Aging! - November 6, 2018 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, November 5th 2018
In conclusion, weight cycling significantly increased life-span relative to remaining with obesity and had a similar benefit to sustained modest weight loss. Support for Oxidized Cholesterol as a Primary Cause of Atherosclerosis https://www.fightaging.org/archives/2018/11/support-for-oxidized-cholesterol-as-a-primary-cause-of-atherosclerosis/ In the paper I'll point out today, the authors provide evidence in support of the concept that it is specifically oxidized cholesterol that is the primary cause of atherosclerosis rather than the condition resulting from too much cholesterol in general. In atheroscl...
Source: Fight Aging! - November 4, 2018 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

Where Does Blood Testing Stand Today?
The dream about a drop of blood signaling a wide range of diagnostic results was shattered with Elizabeth Holmes and the Theranos scam. The machination of the company has set back the innovation of blood testing and investment into the field for years. However, there’s always hope. The Medical Futurist looked around where blood testing stands today and what’s the future it is heading towards. Dreaming about a home laboratory Stephen just came home from walking his dog, Barney, an always smiling labrador. The 40-something got off his smart shoes, sat back on the yellow couch that he and her partner, Sara, were f...
Source: The Medical Futurist - November 3, 2018 Category: Information Technology Authors: nora Tags: Biotechnology Business Future of Medicine Medical Professionals Patients Portable Diagnostics Researchers blood blood draw blood test blood testing digital health health market home Innovation laboratory theranos Source Type: blogs

Recent Research into the Interaction of Exercise and Aging
Today's open access papers touch on aspects of the interaction between exercise and the pace of aging. People age at somewhat different rates, and for the vast majority of us lifestyle is a far greater determinant of that rate than our genes. Until such time as the clinical deployment of rejuvenation therapies is well underway, and in regions of the world sufficiently wealthy to have tamed the majority of infectious disease, it remains the case that our choices regarding our health, such as calorie restriction and exercise, are the most reliable means of improving life expectancy. The size of the effect is not enormous in ...
Source: Fight Aging! - November 2, 2018 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Medicine, Biotech, Research Source Type: blogs

Nonsense-Based Health Care - in the Service of Political Ideology and Sectarian Beliefs
ConclusionSince 2016, we have seen increasing attempts to distort or ignore medical science, clinical and epidemiological research findings to support the political ideology of the ruling party and the religious beliefs of their extreme fundamentalist supporters.  As we have discussed, most recentlyhere, the Trump regime has seen fit to put ill-informed people in positions of power in health care and public health agencies.  Some of these people have put their political and/or religious agendas ahead of the public's health.  Our examples above show a continuing inclination by the administration, its sympathi...
Source: Health Care Renewal - November 2, 2018 Category: Health Management Tags: DHHS disinformation Donald Trump ill-informed management mission-hostile management propaganda Source Type: blogs

To help restore healthy bowel flora, eat no GMOs
One of the most potentially harmful aspects of genetically-modified crops, or GMOs, are that such crops are often engineered to be resistant to specific herbicides or pesticides. A farmer therefore can spray an herbicide to kill weeds, while the GM crop plant survives. But it means that the plant now has herbicide residues in it. Or it may contain its own built-in pesticide such as Bt toxin, expressed by the plant because the gene for this pest-resistant compound has been spliced into the plant’s genetic code. So GMO crops pose a double-whammy: the crop itself with new genetically-programmed components, especially pr...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - October 29, 2018 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr. Davis Tags: News & Updates dysbiosis Inflammation prebiotic probiotic sibo small intestinal bacterial overgrowth wheat belly Source Type: blogs

Should You Get a Mammogram?
Leda Derderich wishes she’d started having mammograms sooner. Dederich had stage IV breast cancer diagnosed at age 45, two years after she and her doctor discussed and dismissed the need for a routine screening mammogram while breastfeeding at age 43. That decision to delay screening mammograms may have meant that she lost the chance to find and treat her breast cancer before it had spread beyond the breast. It’s a decision she regrets now, and blames on the confusion around mammogram guidelines. I have had a much harder time accepting that I was not screened for breast cancer before it was too late. No...
Source: The Blog That Ate Manhattan - October 28, 2018 Category: Primary Care Authors: Margaret Polaneczky, MD Tags: Breast Cancer Mammography ACOG ACR ACS Guidelines mammogram Stage IV USPSTF Source Type: blogs

Optoacoustic Guidewire System for Breast Cancer Localization
Breast lumpectomy for breast CA is an imprecise procedure that too often results in cancerous tissue being left behind. About a quarter of patients have to come back and go through the surgery yet again. This is in large part due to the fact that guidewires are the standard way to point to the location of a tumor. While guidewires are better than nothing, they are crude and not very precise. Radioactive seeds are another option, but they have safety concerns and radio-based technologies are limited in their targeting and they can interfere with other equipment. Engineers at Boston University have now developed an optoacous...
Source: Medgadget - October 25, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: Oncology Radiology Surgery Source Type: blogs

When breast cancer screening guidelines conflict: Some patients face real consequences
Are my breast cancer and I on the wrong side of statistics, or just caught in the confusing and potentially devastating conflict between medical societies about when women should start breast-cancer screening? One morning more than a year ago, it didn’t seem like either. As both of my kids cuddled in bed with my husband and me, I started the conversation I’d been dreading. “Remember when I went to the doctor a few weeks ago?” I reminded my children. “Well, it turns out they found a bump in my boob. If it stays, it won’t be good for me. So we have to take it out.” “What is it?...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - October 25, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/leda-dederich" rel="tag" > Leda Dederich < /a > Tags: Patient Oncology/Hematology Source Type: blogs

Is IVF safe ?
A lot of people are very worried whether IVF is safe or not, and many infertile couples are not allowed to do IVF by their family members, because they are concerned about the side effects of IVF - both on the mother , and the baby. After all, they believe that in an IVF cycle we're pumping the mother full of powerful hormonal injections – surely these are going to have some adverse effects on the body.Thus, many people believe that these hormones increase the risk of breast cancer and ovarian cancer ; or that an IVF patient will run out of eggs faster and become menopausal sooner, because the IVF cycle “ uses ...
Source: Dr.Malpani's Blog - October 24, 2018 Category: Reproduction Medicine Source Type: blogs

One-View Digital Breast Tomosynthesis : Encouraging Results
According to results of Swedish Trial by Sophia Zackrisson et al published inLancet Oncology  recently, Breast cancer screening by use of one-view digital breast tomosynthesis with a reduced compression force has higher sensitivity at a slightly lower specificity for breast cancer detection compared with two-view digital mammography andhas the potential to reduce the radiation dose and screen-reading burden required by two-view digital breast tomosynthesis with two-view digital mammography.Reference : One-view breast tomosynthesis versus two-view mammography in the Malm ö Breast Tomosynthesis Screening Trial...
Source: Sumer's Radiology Site - October 20, 2018 Category: Radiology Authors: Sumer Sethi Source Type: blogs

Automated System Rates Breast Density on Mammograms
Nearly half of women have dense breasts, a risk factor for breast cancer. For proper screening, spotting dense breast tissue is important, as it can hide the presence of tumors. Currently, dense tissue is identified by radiologists viewing mammography images, but their evaluations are subjective and therefore can vary from physician to physician. A team of scientists from MIT and Massachusetts General Hospital have now created a piece of software that can automatically assess whether a given woman’s breast tissue is dense or not, with an accuracy matching that of a team of human radiologists. “Breast density i...
Source: Medgadget - October 18, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: Informatics Radiology Source Type: blogs

New PICO 7Y Negative Pressure Wound Therapy System to Treat Two Sites at Once
Smith & Nephew is launching its brand new PICO 7Y negative pressure therapy system designed to be able to treat two wounds at the same time. The system uses a single pump that can support two dressings via a special Y extension, helping with cost savings while reducing the amount of gear worn by the patient. This can be particularly beneficial for women choosing to undergo a double mastectomy. The PICO 7Y relies on the company’s AIRLOCK technology that makes sure to evenly distribute the negative pressure, while evaporation and absorption is used to pull moisture from the wound. The device comes with a number of ...
Source: Medgadget - October 16, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: Plastic Surgery Source Type: blogs

GE Healthcare Unveils New Automated Breast Ultrasound for Dense Breasts
GE Healthcare is unveiling its brand new Invenia Automated Breast Ultrasound (ABUS) 2.0 in the U.S. It is the only FDA approved “ultrasound supplemental breast screening technology,” which allows for spotting of cancerous lesions within dense breast tissue, according to GE. Since dense breast tissue is similar in density to tumors, the two can be hard to differentiate using a mammogram. At the same time, dense breast tissue is a risk factor for the development of breast cancer, so the two facts together compound the problem for about 40% of women with dense breasts. According to GE, its ABUS technology, when u...
Source: Medgadget - October 16, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: Ob/Gyn Radiology Surgery Source Type: blogs

Nanoparticles Encapsulating Chemotherapy Drugs to Kill Triple Negative Breast Cancer
The cells of triple negative breast cancer tumors don’t have receptors for estrogen, progesterone, and HER2, the main targets used to attack breast cancers. This is why they’re so difficult to treat, but researchers at George Washington University have shown that a technique of delivering a chemotherapy agent within specially designed nanoparticles can be very powerful against these triple negative breast cancers. The team, after much trial and error, concocted a formulation of the nanoparticles so as to have the greatest effects on the human cancer lines they worked with. Turns out the smallest nanopartic...
Source: Medgadget - October 3, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: Nanomedicine Oncology Source Type: blogs

Quite Simply: UNACCEPTABLE
Last week, my mom stunned me with bad news: A young woman named Tiffany Costa died. She was diagnosed with breast cancer in 2002 and died two weeks ago from stage II breast cancer at just 29 years old. She was metastatic for many years. Tiffany’s extended family members are dear friends of my mom. I came to “meet” Tiffany because of an email my mom forwarded to me. She was being treated with Doxil. There was (and it would appear there still IS) a shortage of Doxil and she was trying to raise money to have the drugs brought into this country from Europe. The cost was exorbitant. I remember reading the emai...
Source: Disruptive Women in Health Care - September 25, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: dw at disruptivewomen.net Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: blogs

When Size Affects Your Odds
Oncologists are on board in the fight against obesity. And they’ve made it official by issuing their first-ever Position Statement on Obesity and Cancer through the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO). That’s especially great news for women—who are twice as likely as men to be affected by the nearly half a million new cases of obesity-related cancers worldwide each year. Not surprisingly, the greatest proportion of them are in North America. (http://ow.ly/FacZg http://ow.ly/Fadcm) Despite the fact that more American men than women are overweight or obese, U.S. women are disproportionately affecte...
Source: Disruptive Women in Health Care - September 25, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: dw at disruptivewomen.net Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: blogs

“News (Hot) Flash: Sex, Drugs and Menopause” Recap – 2010 Breakfast Series
Our panel this morning discussed the issues surrounding how the WHI results were interpreted and communicated to women and their health care providers. We recognize that hormones are not appropriate for all women, and look forward to hosting a future panel that highlights alternatives. The speakers have a variety of backgrounds and experiences (and genders), and we aim to promote diversity of voices. This was not normal breakfast conversation. Today was a jolting – and disruptive – talk about what happens to women’s bodies when they age. (Who knew that if you’re menopausal and you don’t take y...
Source: Disruptive Women in Health Care - September 25, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: dw at disruptivewomen.net Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: blogs

Bi-annual MRI More Effective than Annual Mammogram for Breast Cancer Detection
This study could significantly change the way we approach breast cancer screening." MRI is much more sensitive than mammography, "  saidGreg Karczmar, PhD, professor of radiology at the University of Chicago. " It can find invasive breast cancers sooner than mammograms and it can rule out abnormalities that appear suspicious on a mammogram. Unfortunately, MRI is much too expensive for routine screening. " (Source: radRounds)
Source: radRounds - September 20, 2018 Category: Radiology Authors: Julie Morse Source Type: blogs

Upload Your DNA to a Web Site to Generate Risk Scores for Five Diseases
I have posted a few notes about predictive diagnostic algorithms (see:An Algorithm Using Medical Record Data Predicts Risk for Parkinson's Disease;Should the Work Product of"Non-Explainable" Medical Algorithms Be Ignored) and disease risk scores (see:Genetic Risk Scores: Ready for Inclusion in the Medical Record?). Using AI techniques, researchers at Massachusetts General are developing a web site that will display a risk score for five common diseases after consumers upload their DNA to the site (see:Clues to Your Health Are Hidden at 6.6 Million Spots in Your DNA). The algorithm takes into account mill...
Source: Lab Soft News - August 28, 2018 Category: Laboratory Medicine Authors: Bruce Friedman Tags: Clinical Lab Industry News Clinical Lab Testing Genomic Testing Healthcare Information Technology Healthcare Innovations Lab Industry Trends Lab Processes and Procedures Medical Consumerism Medical Research Source Type: blogs

Low-carb fairy tales
Conclusion: Premarin INCREASED breast cancer, INCREASED endometrial cancer, INCREASED cardiovascular death, even accelerated dementia. And this has been the story over and over again: Conclusions drawn in observational studies have proven to be flat wrong about 4 times out of 5. This hasn’t stopped people like Frank Sacks and Walter Willett, through the observational Physicians’ Health Study and Nurses’ Health Study to, time and again, declare observational findings as fact. Unfortunately, even the USDA buys this observational fiction, incorporating the findings of observational studies in their dietary g...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - August 24, 2018 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr. Davis Tags: News & Updates Fat grain-free low-carb saturated wheat belly Source Type: blogs

Coconut oil: Good or bad?
Conclusion: Premarin INCREASED breast cancer, INCREASED endometrial cancer, INCREASED cardiovascular death, even accelerated dementia. And this has been the story over and over again: Conclusions drawn in observational studies have proven to be flat wrong about 4 times out of 5. This hasn’t stopped people like Frank Sacks, through his observational Physicians’ Health Study and Nurses’ Health Study to, time and again, declare observational findings as fact. Unfortunately, even the USDA buys this observational fiction, incorporating the findings of observational studies in their dietary guidelines. Conventi...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - August 24, 2018 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr. Davis Tags: News & Updates coconut Fat grain-free Inflammation low-carb saturated fat wheat belly Source Type: blogs

Complications and risks of IVF treatment
Most woman are worried about the possible risks and complications of doing IVF treatment, but part of the problem is the many myths and misconceptions which plague IVF . Thus, it is clear that IVF doesn't increase the risk of birth defects and it won't cause breast cancer or ovarian cancer, but lots of websites continue to disseminate this misinformation.However, as with any other treatment, there are potential complications and this is why selecting a good IVF doctor is so important. One of the possible medical risks is that of ovarian hyper-stimulation syndrome ( OHSS), but in a well-managed clinic, this risk should...
Source: Dr.Malpani's Blog - August 17, 2018 Category: Reproduction Medicine Source Type: blogs

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(Source: Breast Cancer? But Doctor....I hate pink!)
Source: Breast Cancer? But Doctor....I hate pink! - August 15, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: blogs

The Top Bioprinting Companies
In the next 5-7 years, the bioprinting market is estimated to expand by 15.7 percent, and it is anticipated to grow over $4.70 billion by 2025, according to the latest study of BIS Research. While the growth statistics indicate a turbulent landscape, it is worth familiarizing with the main players. Here, we collected the best bioprinting companies currently on the market. The future of bioprinting: tissues not organs The idea of lab-grown organs might mean the end of testing drugs on animals or humans, the solution for organ shortages and an ending of the desperate state of organ donations worldwide. If the creators of the...
Source: The Medical Futurist - August 14, 2018 Category: Information Technology Authors: nora Tags: 3D Printing in Medicine Biotechnology Business Future of Medicine 3d printed bioprinting company Healthcare Innovation market regenerative skin Source Type: blogs

The Top Bioprinting Companies
In the next 5-7 years, the bioprinting market is estimated to expand by 15.7 percent, and it is anticipated to grow over $4.70 billion by 2025, according to the latest study of BIS Research. While the growth statistics indicate a turbulent landscape, it is worth familiarizing with the main players. Here, we collected the best bioprinting companies currently on the market. The future of bioprinting: tissues not organs The idea of lab-grown organs might mean the end of testing drugs on animals or humans, the solution for organ shortages and an ending of the desperate state of organ donations worldwide. If the creators of the...
Source: The Medical Futurist - August 14, 2018 Category: Information Technology Authors: nora Tags: 3D Printing in Medicine Biotechnology Business Future of Medicine 3d printed bioprinting company Healthcare Innovation market regenerative skin Source Type: blogs

What's in a name?
From time to time I have commented on the controversies over cancer screening. Most people assume that screening is an unqualified good, that early detection of cancer saves lives. Whenever some panel proposes recommending less screening, we hear screaming and yelling from advocates who claim they are trying to " ration " health care to save money at the expense of people's lives.In fact,as a bunch of Australians and a Minnesotan explain in BMJ, there are a few conditions called " cancer " that you are better off not treating, or perhaps treating very conservatively. These include what is called ductal ...
Source: Stayin' Alive - August 13, 2018 Category: American Health Source Type: blogs

National Breastfeeding Month
August is National Breastfeeding Month. According to the Office on Women’s Health, breastfed babies have lower risks during their childhood of obesity, ear infections, asthma and other conditions. Breast milk is rich in nutrients and easier for babies to digest than formula. Breastfeeding can help a mother’s health and healing following childbirth and leads to a lower risk of type 2 diabetes, certain types of breast cancer and ovarian cancer. Unfortunately, African American mothers have the lowest rates of starting and continuing to breastfeed their infant. See the Guide to Breastfeeding from the Office of...
Source: BHIC - August 8, 2018 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Patricia Devine Tags: Children and Teens Minority Health Concerns Source Type: blogs

SCOUT Wire-Free Tissue Localizer Cleared in U.S. for Soft Tissues
Cianna Medical, based in Aliso Viejo, CA, won FDA clearance for its SAVI SCOUT wire-free technology to be used for localizing of soft tissues. Previously, in the U.S. the SCOUT has only been indicated for use in localizing breast tumors (see flashbacks below). “SCOUT resolves one of the most difficult aspects of breast cancer treatment by allowing us to accurately localize soft tissue such as axillary lymph nodes,” said Ari Brooks, surgical breast oncologist and Director of the Integrated Breast Center at Penn Medicine, in a published statement. “The SCOUT reflector is very well suited for use in the...
Source: Medgadget - August 6, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: Oncology Radiology Surgery Source Type: blogs

Magtrace Nanoparticles for Sentimag System is FDA Approved for Breast Lymph Node Biopsy
The Food and Drug Administration approved Endomagnetics Inc.’s magnetic tracer injection and detection system for guiding lymph node biopsies in patients with breast cancer undergoing mastectomy. In the procedure, the clinician injects a solution of dextran-coated iron oxide magnetic nanoparticles (Magtrace) in the viscinity of the tumour or the areola, as is done typically with dye or radioactive tracers. The Magtrace then clears along lymphatic vessels and labels the sentinel and draining lymph nodes by accumulating in specific cell types. The surgeon can then detect these labelled lymph nodes using the Sentimag Ma...
Source: Medgadget - July 30, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Ben Ouyang Tags: Oncology Surgery Source Type: blogs

The most valuable lessons in life can be learned in oncology
I am a medical oncologist specializing in breast cancer. I often try to conceal what I do for a living when I meet people for the first time as it always leads down a particular road. “Is that so depressing? I don’t know how to deal with that all day, every day.” But in truth, it is not depressing. My work is very rewarding. I feel that the most valuable lessons I have learned in life, I have learned in the practice of oncology. 1. Labels hurt. In a world of ever-growing diversity, labels extend to the oncology clinic. While perhaps less publicly discussed than other forms of bias and discrimina...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - July 29, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/stephanie-graff" rel="tag" > Stephanie Graff, MD < /a > Tags: Physician Oncology/Hematology Source Type: blogs

Giving Consumers the Tools and Support They Need to Navigate Our Complex Healthcare System
By CINDI SLATER, MD, FACR As physicians and healthcare leaders, we are already well aware that the majority of patients do not have the information they need to make a medical decision or access to appropriate resources, so we didn’t need to hear more bad news. But that is precisely what new research once again told us this spring when a new study showed that almost half of the time, patients have no idea why they are referred to a GI specialist. While the study probably speaks to many of the communications shortcomings we providers have, across the board our patients often don’t know what care they need, or ho...
Source: The Health Care Blog - July 27, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: matthew holt Tags: Patients Physicians Health care leaders Health care technology patient-provider relationship Physician's Responsibilities Source Type: blogs

Chipping Away at the Anechoic Effect: Now the New York Times Protests the Demise of the AHRQ National Guidelines Clearinghouse
DiscussionMany people bemoan the current political situation, but some feel there is nothing they could possibly do the improve things.  We have been publishing this blog since 2004 with the hopes that chipping away at the anechoic effect which has hid the severity and nature of health care dysfunction might actually help to improve things.  However, at times we wondered if we were having any effect.  What good are individual actions like blog posts? It seems that most of us have little individual power.   Collectively, though we may have more than we realize.  Small individual actions ca...
Source: Health Care Renewal - July 20, 2018 Category: Health Management Tags: AHRQ anechoic effect Donald Trump evidence-based medicine guidelines news media Source Type: blogs

New App for Cancer Patients
(Source: Breast Cancer? But Doctor....I hate pink!)
Source: Breast Cancer? But Doctor....I hate pink! - July 16, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, July 16th 2018
We presently forget 98% of everything we experience. That will go away in favor of perfect, controllable, configurable memory. Skills and knowledge will become commodities that can be purchased and installed. We will be able to feel exactly as we wish to feel at any given time. How we perceive the world will be mutable and subject to choice. How we think, the very fundamental basis of the mind, will also be mutable and subject to choice. We will merge with our machines, as Kurzweil puts it. The boundary between mind and computing device, between the individual and his or her tools, will blur. Over the course of the ...
Source: Fight Aging! - July 15, 2018 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

Development of a Web-Based Educational Program for the Training of BRCA Carriers
We are in an era regarding genetic and molecular testing when it is often insufficient to simply report certain test results to clinicians and their patients. Sophisticated patient education may then be necessary in order for the patient to understand the implications of certain positive lab results. A perfect example of this is the identification of BRCA carriers. Such patients need to be informed about the implications of their genetic status and their possible responsibility to untested blood relatives. A recent paper discussed the development of aFamily Gene Toolkit to achieve such an educational goal (see:De...
Source: Lab Soft News - July 14, 2018 Category: Laboratory Medicine Authors: Bruce Friedman Tags: Clinical Lab Industry News Clinical Lab Testing Genomic Testing Healthcare Delivery Healthcare Information Technology Lab Information Lab Processes and Procedures Medical Consumerism Medical Education Public Health Source Type: blogs

Adverse Interactions Between Natural Selection and the Modern Environment
Our species evolved to perpetuate itself in a very different environment from the one we find ourselves in now. We are clearly far better off as individuals: lives are a good deal less nasty, brutish, and short than was the case for our distant ancestors. Technological progress has conquered a sizable slice of the death and disease of childhood and early adult life, to a degree varying by the wealth of any given region of the world. The worst half of infectious disease is controlled, but chronic age-related diseases remain poorly managed, and the incidence of these diseases rises inexorably as people live longer due to con...
Source: Fight Aging! - July 11, 2018 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Medicine, Biotech, Research Source Type: blogs

Gifts, they keep on coming....
(Source: Breast Cancer? But Doctor....I hate pink!)
Source: Breast Cancer? But Doctor....I hate pink! - July 9, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: blogs

T2 Bacterial Panel Obtain FDA Approval; Provides Rapid Diagnosis of Sepsis
There is exciting news in the area of clinical bacteriology. The FDA has approved the T2 Biosystems bacterial panel for the rapid detection of septicemia (see: T2 Biosystems Receives FDA Clearance to Market T2Bacteria Panel for Detection of Sepsis-Causing Pathogens), Below is an excerpt from the article:T2 Biosystems...announced that it has received market clearance from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for the T2 Bacteria Panel for the direct detection of bacterial species in human whole blood specimens from patients with suspected bloodstream infections. The T2Bacteria Panel... provides sensitive det...
Source: Lab Soft News - July 3, 2018 Category: Laboratory Medicine Authors: Bruce Friedman Tags: Clinical Lab Industry News Clinical Lab Testing Cost of Healthcare Food and Drug Administration Lab Industry Trends Medical Research Quality of Care Source Type: blogs