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What If The Pathologist Is Wrong?
And they won't review all the tests. This is a two part misadventure.First I was horrified by thisfirst story where two women were found to have been misdiagnosed by a pathologist at a hospital in Ireland. Their original breast cancer diagnoses were incorrect. One woman was diagnosed with DCIS in 2010 and had a mastectomy. Based on the original pathology she was not required to have any additional treatment. In 2012, to the surprise of her and her doctor, her cancer came back." Her original 2010 biopsy had shown invasive cancer but this had been missed.The hospital said this was a mistake that any pathologist could ha...
Source: Caroline's Breast Cancer Blog - February 22, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: breast cancer treatment cancer diagnosis medical errors pathology report Source Type: blogs

Andrographolide and bone destruction
This study shows that andrographolide inhibits the development of osteoclasts ( = the cells that chew away at our bones, which is fine in a healthy situation, not fine in cancer where everything goes nutso), while increasing the presence of osteoblasts (bone builders). The researchers say that the current therapies used to treat osteolytic diseases have many unwanted side effects. And they’re not just referring to bisphosphonates (which can cause osteonecrosis of the jaw) but also to new treatments such as the monoclonal antibody denosumab, Denosumab can cause low calcium levels, weakness, constipation, bac...
Source: Margaret's Corner - February 21, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Margaret Tags: Blogroll Source Type: blogs

Where has the time gone?
(Source: Breast Cancer? But Doctor....I hate pink!)
Source: Breast Cancer? But Doctor....I hate pink! - February 21, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: blogs

New Treatment for Breast Cancer Could Help Some Women Avoid Surgery
Most women diagnosed with early stage breast cancer typically have surgery to remove the tumor, followed by three to six weeks of radiation. But there’s an exciting new development in breast cancer treatment – a first-of-its kind radiation therapy system for early stage cancers that may cut the number of treatments to only a few days. And, one day, the inventors say, it might even eliminate the need for surgery altogether for some patients. It’s called the GammaPod, invented by scientists at the University of Maryland School of Medicine. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) recently cleared the way...
Source: Life in a Medical Center - February 20, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Authors: UMMC Admin Tags: Cancer breast cancer cancer treatment Cedric X. Yu Elizabeth Nichols GammaPod UMMC Source Type: blogs

A Health Tech ’s Secret Weapon: The People Under The Hood
By DAVID SHAYWITZ, MD The recently-announced acquisition of the oncology data company Flatiron Health by Roche for $2.1B represents a robust validation of the much-discussed but infrequently-realized hypothesis that technology entrepreneurs who can turn health data into actionable insights can capture significant value for this accomplishment. Four questions underlying this deal (a transaction first reported, as usual, by Chrissy Farr) are: (1) What is the Flatiron business model? (2) What makes Flatiron different from other health data companies? (3) Why did Roche pay so much for this asset? (4) What are the le...
Source: The Health Care Blog - February 20, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: John Irvine Tags: Uncategorized David Shaywitz Flatiron Health Human Oncology Source Type: blogs

How The Post Cancer Brain Works
I have lots of aches and pain. This is a proven fact. You can ask any of my doctors. And I am also a klutz. And I have the battle scars to prove it.Last week, I tripped over my father's wheelchair in the waiting room of the chemotherapy department. How embarrassing. In front of maybe 40 people waiting for their appointments. They all noticed.This is what happened. We arrived at the hospital and my father grabbed a wheelchair. He has a bad leg so he pushes a wheelchair around instead of using a cane or walker. It's easier for him. He checked in for his appointment and we sat down to wait for him to be called. He parked the ...
Source: Caroline's Breast Cancer Blog - February 20, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: brainless cancer bonds falls klutziness more pain Source Type: blogs

A Good Book Ruined By A Bit of Reality
I am a bookworm. As a child I always wanted to go to the library and didn't mind that if I read my newly selected books on the way home I might start to be a bit woozy from the wiggly New England roads. (Highways are much better for car reading.)In times of stress (read'medical disasters'among other things) I often turn to books as my personal form of avoidance. This was fine until my medical maladies kept interfering with my reading enjoyment. That would really suck.During college, after thyroid cancer, with my small paperback book collection, I would avoid studying or read in bed something less enlightening than any requ...
Source: Caroline's Breast Cancer Blog - February 18, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: books cancer stigma coping reading Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, February 19th 2018
Fight Aging! provides a weekly digest of news and commentary for thousands of subscribers interested in the latest longevity science: progress towards the medical control of aging in order to prevent age-related frailty, suffering, and disease, as well as improvements in the present understanding of what works and what doesn't work when it comes to extending healthy life. Expect to see summaries of recent advances in medical research, news from the scientific community, advocacy and fundraising initiatives to help speed work on the repair and reversal of aging, links to online resources, and much more. This content is...
Source: Fight Aging! - February 18, 2018 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

Nanomachines Create Clots Inside Vessels Feeding Cancer Tumors
Researchers from Arizona State University and National Center for Nanoscience and Technology of the Chinese Academy of Sciences have developed a remarkable new way of killing tumors. They’ve developed robot-like nanoscale devices that cling to the walls of tumor vessels, release a clotting agent, and block the tumor from receiving nutrients. These nanorobots, which consist of sheets made of strings of DNA, have DNA aptamers that target a protein produced only by certain tumor types. The sheets are rolled up into cylinders and thrombin, the clotting enzyme, is attached to the interior of the newly formed tubes. W...
Source: Medgadget - February 16, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: Nanomedicine Oncology Source Type: blogs

Comparing Prognostic Breast Cancer Tests
Back in the late 2000's, I heard about the new Oncotype Dx test that was just coming available for women who had early stage breast cancer and could help in the decision making process - whether to chemotherapy or not. The test was supposed to tell your risk of recurrence. That was great news (of course I was not eligible because of my medical history...) and many women found their risk and made the big chemotherapy decision.New research has looked at the results of these tests and compared them. They looked at these four tests: Oncotype Dx Recurrence Score, PAM50-based Prosigna Risk of Recurrence Score (ROR), Breast Cance...
Source: Caroline's Breast Cancer Blog - February 16, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: breast cancer treatment cancer recurrence test results Source Type: blogs

Treatment Resistance Breast Cancer
Most breast cancers are hormone receptor positive or (ER+) and are treated with multiple therapies including chemotherapy and hormone therapies including tamoxifen and aromatase inhibitors. But the problem is then that after they metastasize,  a third of them become resistance to treatment and will cause your demise." Such endocrine therapies, including tamoxifen and aromatase inhibitor drugs, can prevent recurrence of early breast cancer, and can slow the progression of metastatic disease. However, in about one-third of patients with metastatic ER-positive breast cancer, treatment with endocrine therapies l...
Source: Caroline's Breast Cancer Blog - February 15, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: breast cancer treatment cancer research clinical trials metastatic cancer Source Type: blogs

Doctors As Patients
I think doctor's make the worst patients. A friend's father, she told me, was a doctor but ignored his own cancer symptoms and said he was fine until he wasn't. I have never met a doctor who rushed to be a patient....But I think the best training for a doctor is to be a patient - particularly a patient of the disease or ailment they treat. This would provide so much more understanding for them.Here is the story ofa British breast cancer surgeon who was diagnosed with breast cancer in 2015 and finally returned to work in 2017. She never expected to face this diagnosis. I don't anyone ever does." Doctors face particular...
Source: Caroline's Breast Cancer Blog - February 14, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: being a patient breast cancer treatment doctors surgery Source Type: blogs

DNA Machinery that can Sabotage the Blood Supply of Tumors
Researchers have been building simple molecular machines out of DNA for some years now. This approach to molecular machinery is well suited to applications that involve conditional activation based on the proteins present in the surrounding environment; a lot of the necessary functional parts already exist in DNA and just have to be assembled in the right way. The Oisin Biotechnologies cell-killing technology is a smaller example of the type than the approach here, in which sizable DNA containers are constructed. They carry a cargo that will disrupt local blood flow, and are triggered into opening by cancerous cell surface...
Source: Fight Aging! - February 14, 2018 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

Intermountain Precision Genomics to Develop Hereditary Cancer Gene Panels
The emerging healthcare model which is dominated by a small number of very large health systems will be characterized, in part, by in-house, sophisticated genomic and molecular lab testing by these systems. This is because these large health systems will have the capital to invest in their own"laboratories of excellence" within their system. Such is the case withIntermountain Healthcare which has its own in-house genomics laboratory called Intermountain Precision Genomics. Intermountain Health is one of the giant health systems with 37,000 employees, 22 hospitals, and more than 185 clinics. Here is the missi...
Source: Lab Soft News - February 13, 2018 Category: Laboratory Medicine Authors: Bruce Friedman Tags: Clinical Lab Industry News Clinical Lab Testing Genomic Testing Healthcare Business Healthcare Innovations Lab Industry Trends Lab Processes and Procedures Medical Consumerism Pathology Informatics Reference Laboratories Test Kits and Source Type: blogs

Doctor Questions
We are always told to write down your list of questions for your doctors and even bring someone to write down the answers. This can be appropriate for when you are first diagnosed with something nasty. But it doesn't hold true for regular follow ups with  your other doctors.Over the years, I have learned not only to bring a list of doctor questions to appointments. But I have also learn to break it down into as few as possible, into two categories.Category one is for the list of issues you have noted since last seeing them. For example you had the flu in November for ten days. Or have been under a lot of stress from w...
Source: Caroline's Breast Cancer Blog - February 13, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: coping doctor appointments doctor questions Source Type: blogs

Brachytherapy for Breast Cancer Follow Up
Back in 2007, when I was diagnosed and treated for my breast cancer, I heard about this new technique for the radiation portion of treatment,brachytherapy. I was jealous. It was not offered at my hospital. The big thing I liked was that it took so much less time for treatment.Breast cancer treatment takes a LONG time. I was diagnosed at the end of May, after two surgeries that went into July, I finished chemo in December, and needed one more surgery (don't ask). I was then facing 7 weeks of radiation. I just wanted to be done. Since brachytherapy wasn't available I had the standard radiation treatment. I couldn't even have...
Source: Caroline's Breast Cancer Blog - February 11, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: breast cancer treatment cancer research radiation Source Type: blogs

Genetic Testing and Non-High Risk
A person can be considered medically high risk due to their or a family member's medical history. If you are considered medically as high risk, you get popped into the category of give them lots more medical attention and'lovely'tests.Now withthe progress of genomic testing, its no longer a big expensive, rare proposition. However, why do we only test the high risk people? These are the people who already know they are high risk. But that leaves a lot of people who don't know they are high risk and could be. This doesn't make sense. Some new research asks if it wouldn't it make more sense to test more people who aren'...
Source: Caroline's Breast Cancer Blog - February 10, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: breast cancer cancer prevention genetic testing ovarian cancer Source Type: blogs

Up and Down, Again
Everyone has ups and downs in their life, especially with their health. Or maybe I have more ups and downs than the average person.  Okay, maybe my health has been on a downward slide for awhile few years now.However, I realized the other day that I was actually feeling pretty well for the first time in quite a while. I mean my back has been sore but the rest of me has actually been doing okay. Its kind of nice actually. And it makes me think how long its been since I felt that well.I had been feeling as if I was over-medicated in some ways for the past few years. I changed my pain management doctor and had reduced so...
Source: Caroline's Breast Cancer Blog - February 9, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: being healthy healthiness tired unhealthiness Source Type: blogs

Overloaded with Instructions
I get it. I have a lot of ailments so I am in a lot of groups and follow a lot of organizations for their health tips. So I get lots of email. Tons of email to be precise. Some of it gets the delete button right away - especially if the subject line doesn't tell me anything.But then Iread glance at a lot of them before deleting. But often they provide suggestions or instructions how to be healthier for whichever ailment. But now I am overloaded with instructions/suggestions this week:No more asparagus for me because itcan lead to breast cancer spread. I like asparagus. Damn.Exercise can reducebreast cancer recurrence. I'm ...
Source: Caroline's Breast Cancer Blog - February 8, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: breast cancer confusion fibromyalgia instructions rheumatoid arthritis Source Type: blogs

The Skeptical Oncologist
By BISHAL GYAWALI, MD Why conduct post approval studies at all? Atezolizumab previously received accelerated approval in second-line metastatic or advanced urothelial cancer based on response rates from a single arm trial. The results of post approval confirmatory phase 3 are now published and demonstrate that atezolizumab did not improve survival versus chemotherapy (11.1 v 10.6 months, HR 0.87, p = 0.41). The concept of accelerated approval is to grant early and conditional approval and access to drugs in diseases of unmet need, and that the decision to fully approve or revoke be made based ...
Source: The Health Care Blog - February 7, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: John Irvine Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: blogs

My Back Pain Break Is Over
Just over a year ago, I switched to a new back pain doctor because my old one was an idiot. I like my new doctor. I saw him a whole bunch of times through 2017. At my last appointment, he said to me " instead of scheduling your next appointment, why don't we wait and see how you do and you call me when you need to see me? " I thought that was fine. I have not seen him since November and have nothing scheduled.Unfortunately, my back is very unhappy with me in many ways. The pain level breaks through my pain patch. This has been going on for a week or so. I might wait another week or so before calling but I don't k...
Source: Caroline's Breast Cancer Blog - February 6, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: back pain doctor appointments doctor questions Source Type: blogs

Precision Medicine and Public Health (from Precision Medicine and the Reinvention of Human Disease)
Excerpted fromPrecision Medicine and the Reinvention of Human DiseaseDespite having the most advanced healthcare technology on the planet, life expectancy in the United States is not particularly high. Citizens from most of the European countries and the highly industrialized Asian countries enjoy longer life expectancies than the United States. According to the World Health Organization, the United States ranks 31st among nations, trailing behind Greece, Chile, and Costa Rica, and barely edging out Cuba [42]. Similar rankings are reported by the US Central Intelligence Agency [43]. These findings lead us to infer that acc...
Source: Specified Life - February 6, 2018 Category: Information Technology Tags: cancer cancer vaccines precision medicine prevention public health Source Type: blogs

Because Of Your Medical History....
Once you get cancer or any other'nasty'medical ailment, this little phrase follows you for the rest of your life'because of your medical history...'. If you have this phrase following you around, you are lucky when you are not sent for more tests or additional follow appointments start filling your calendar.As a child I was not the one (sister) who had ear infections non-stop or the one (brother) that went running around into and over and under things resulting into many minor injuries requiring stitches, etc. I was the reasonably healthy one, except for a few colds here and there.Boom, at age 19, I was diagnosed with thyr...
Source: Caroline's Breast Cancer Blog - February 5, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: aggravation being a patient medical history Source Type: blogs

More'Uplifting' News on Breast Cancer Recurrences
Sometimes I wish they would stop researching breast cancer so we stop getting such'good'news. New research was meant to look at whether some hormone receptor positive breast cancer patientscould stop taking tamoxifen or aromatase inhibitors such as Femara, Aromasin, or Arimidex. However they found instead that ER/PR+ breast cancers can'smolder'(their word, not mine) for twenty years or more, before recurring.Aromatase inhibitors and tamoxifen inhibit the production of estrogen which feeds these ER/PR+ breast cancers. The longer you are on the medication, the longer you are protected from a recurrence. However, some women e...
Source: Caroline's Breast Cancer Blog - February 3, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: breast cancer treatment cancer research frustration Source Type: blogs

If Breast Cancer Doesn't Kill You, Heart Failure Might
File this in the category of the stuff we should have been told but weren't. Many women diagnosed with breast cancer, are given chemotherapy as part of their treatment. One of the drugs commonly used is calledDoxorubicin, also known Adriamycin or Rubex, or as us patients have been known to call it'red devil', which carries a significant cardiac risk.When you are given it in chemo the nurses put on masks and special gowns to protect them. No thought of the patients. I was told it could cause some cardiac issues but now I am learning that the danger is very real and very concerning." “Both breast cancer and cardio...
Source: Caroline's Breast Cancer Blog - February 2, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: breast cancer treatment cardiac chemotherapy Source Type: blogs

Growing research aims at helping cancer patients in distress access most-likely-to-help self-care options, from Mindfulness training to Web-based cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT)
Conclusions: This online CBT intervention was associated with greater decreases in distress for those patients who more closely adhered to the program. Given the low costs and high accessibility of this intervention approach, even if only effective for subgroups of patients, the potential impact may be substantial. The Conversation in Context The State of Mindfulness Science: 10 Key Research Findings to Encourage and Guide your Meditation Practice in 2018 Under what conditions can mindfulness courses help health care workers manage stress and burnout? FDA clears first CBT-based digital therapeutic to treat substance abus...
Source: SharpBrains - February 1, 2018 Category: Neuroscience Authors: SharpBrains Tags: Cognitive Neuroscience Education & Lifelong Learning Health & Wellness Professional Development Technology anxiety breast cancer cancer patients cancer-treatment CancerCope CBT cognitive-behavioral-therapy cognitive-therapy distr Source Type: blogs

A Useless'Perk' from My Health Insurance
I have found them most useless perk from any health insurance plan ever. When I was diagnosed with RA, my health insurance informed me that I was eligible for this perk called the Accordant Care in.What this plan includes is a quarterly conversation with a nurse on current medications and any recent heath issues I might have had as well as a monthly newsletter with health tips. The nurse is also available at other times if I have questions on any health issues.That all sounds good, right? Wrong.Every conversation with the nurse consisted of them reading me scripted questions that I had to answer: have I fallen in the last ...
Source: Caroline's Breast Cancer Blog - February 1, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: caregiving idiots rheumatoid arthritis Source Type: blogs

A Carcinogen in My Coffee
I feel like this is another step in the plan for Big Brother to take over our lives and regulate us to death. Seriously. Or maybe its just another way for the lawyers to get rich over stupid lawsuits.There is a lawsuit making its way through the Los Angeles court system that wants companies who make or sell coffee to warn consumers that there is a potential carcinogen created in coffee brewing that could cause cancer. As part of Proposition 65 in 1986, California businesses need to warn customers that there could be a risk involved in consumption or use of a product. So the lawsuit claims that customers need to be warned a...
Source: Caroline's Breast Cancer Blog - January 31, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: cancer cause cancer risk coffee consumers idiots laws Source Type: blogs

Giving Back
Or helping yourself while you help others. After going through cancer, or other nasty medical misadventure, you are traumatized, and, as in the words of Arlo Guthrie:" ...you get injected, inspected, detected, infected, ... "You do not have fun for many months as you watch your hair fall out, your blood counts go up and down. You also follow your tumor markers more than the stock market, try to figure out how to get rid of your'chemo pallor', and lighten up any surgical scars. At the end you feel like you have been dragged through a swamp, up a mountain, and under the proverbial bus. You spend a lot of time ...
Source: Caroline's Breast Cancer Blog - January 30, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: cancer bonds cancer support coping giving back Source Type: blogs

End Of Life Stuff
No I am not dying. But in the middle of the night I couldn't sleep and my mind wandered off to thebest and funniest obituaries that you see shared around the internet. (I have no idea why my mind wandered that direction.) But I was snickering about some of the funniest ones I remember parts of.But it made me think. I want to write my own obituary. And it will have to be a funny one. Because I want people to laugh about me or at me after I'm gone. And not mourn me sadly. But that should be in a couple of decades (I hope).So here are some thoughts on what I will include:She was so uncoordinated she could walk into a wall if ...
Source: Caroline's Breast Cancer Blog - January 29, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: death organization planning Source Type: blogs

How to tell seniors they ’re too old for cancer screening
Cancer screening can save lives. Mammographies reduce the chance women will die of breast cancer; and colonoscopies reduce the chance people will die of colon cancer. But should my 93-year-old father receive a screening colonoscopy? The test is uncomfortable, carries risks, and costs money. Even more importantly, my dad probably won’t live long enough to benefit from the test. That’s why most medical experts think people like my dad—people unlikely to live another decade—should not receive cancer screening tests like colonoscopies. But how in the heck is my dad’s doctor supposed to deliver thi...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - January 27, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/peter-ubel" rel="tag" > Peter Ubel, MD < /a > Tags: Conditions Geriatrics Primary Care Source Type: blogs

When a breast cancer surgeon gets breast cancer: being on the other side of the scalpel
Six weeks ago, I was diagnosed with invasive breast cancer. As a breast cancer and breast plastic surgeon, I see women all the time who are in the exact same place I’ve been since receiving the phone call from the pathologist.  Shocked and terrified by the news, overwhelmed by what this is going to mean for their life in both the short- and the long-term, waiting for results from what seems like endless tests that could significantly change their treatment options. When talking about my practice, I would tell people that my goal was to provide the kind of personalized, high-touch care that I would want...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - January 26, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/anne-peled" rel="tag" > Anne Peled, MD < /a > Tags: Physician Oncology/Hematology Surgery Source Type: blogs

I Need A Nap - Or Reasons I Don't Blog
I haven't been blogging (as I promised) because I have been too exhausted. I meant to blog today, yesterday, the day before, and probably the day before that. But when I finally have a chance to sit down and gather my thoughts to blog, I am exhausted and just can't formulate words.I do need to blog as it helps me destress. But I haven't been able. Maybe I just need a tropical vacation.... (Source: Caroline's Breast Cancer Blog)
Source: Caroline's Breast Cancer Blog - January 25, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: blogging fatigue Source Type: blogs

Obstruction of medical justice: How health care fails patients with cancer
Isn’t getting cancer bad enough? That’s the frustrated thought that goes through my mind when I see patients with cancer suffering — not from their cancer, but from the failure of the health care system. Take Nancy,* a 60-year-old woman with hormone-positive breast cancer. When she came to the emergency room with a fungating breast mass, we knew immediately she had ignored it for a long time; she said she hadn’t been able to see a doctor because she didn’t have insurance. But after confirming the diagnosis of incurable metastatic breast cancer, she was discharged home to continue with hormone ...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - January 22, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/miriam-a-knoll" rel="tag" > Miriam A. Knoll, MD < /a > Tags: Policy Oncology/Hematology Public Health & Source Type: blogs

New Breast Cancer Research Found A Factor that Doubles Death Risk
Isn't that a warm fuzzy feeling? Now I want toask my oncologist if I have this factor. But first let me see if I can explain it. This is the precis:" Researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden have discovered that the risk of death from breast cancer is twice as high for patients with high heterogeneity of the estrogen receptor within the same tumour as compared to patients with low heterogeneity. The study, which is published in The Journal of the National Cancer Institute, also shows that the higher risk of death over a span of 25 years is independent of other known tumour markers and also holds true for Luminal...
Source: Caroline's Breast Cancer Blog - January 21, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: breast cancer treatment cancer research cancer risk hormone receptor status Source Type: blogs

Early Detection
We do regularly try to detect some cancers early through mammograms, colonoscopies, and PSA tests. I think most of us (meaning the general public) are comfortable with these tests as we age. But what if there was a genetic test available which you could have done regularly, every few years or whatever time frame, to test you for several different cancers before they had a chance to spread.A new test,CancerSEEK, has been tested on more than 1000 patients and seems very hopeful." The CancerSEEK test looks for mutations in 16 genes that regularly arise in cancer and eight proteins that are often released.It was trialled ...
Source: Caroline's Breast Cancer Blog - January 20, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: cancer detection cancer diagnosis medical tests Source Type: blogs

Revisiting options for improving results of breast reconstruction
This study is the first of its kind to provide patient-reported outcomes about fat grafting, and reflects a growing trend of incorporating patient-reported outcomes into clinical trials. Gaining a better understanding of outcomes from the patients’ perspective helps researchers and clinicians to design and deliver care that truly meets the personal preferences and treatment priorities of women diagnosed with breast cancer. I’d like to thank my colleague Dr. Dhruv Singhal, a plastic surgeon at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, for his contributions to this post.  The post Revisiting options for imp...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - January 19, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Ted A. James, MD Tags: Breast Cancer Health Women's Health Source Type: blogs

I Am Very Confused
I realize this must be part of the vast conspiracy to keep breast cancer patients confused. Nancy, over atNancy's Point, blogged about theAJCC ’s Updates to the Breast Cancer Staging System, asking if we are confused about it. Well, since I didn't know about the updates (or even who the AJCC is) I was and still am very confused.Let's start with theAJCC or the American Joint Committee on Cancer. Apparently they are the people who set up cancer staging criteria. They set the original TNM staging system in 1959. TNM means Tumor size, Nodes positive, and Metastases. " The panel recognized the need to incorporat...
Source: Caroline's Breast Cancer Blog - January 18, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: breast cancer breast cancer treatment confusion staging Source Type: blogs

NIH MedlinePlus Salud Magazine Now Available
The annual issue of NIH MedlinePlus Salud magazine is now available online and in print. Salud, which means health in Spanish, is a free magazine of NIH and the Friends of the National Library of Medicine. Salud brings accurate and timely information in Spanish and English on health topics to patients and helps explain how NIH turns “discovery into health.” This issue covers— Black Eyed Peas’ Taboo on music, research, and his fight against cancer Journalist Liz Hernandez on how Alzheimer’s has affected her family Breast cancer and Latinas Latest asthma research Tips for yo...
Source: BHIC - January 17, 2018 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Annette Parde-Maass Tags: Articles Minority Health Concerns Multilingual National Library of Medicine News Source Type: blogs

Some Days Are Better Than Others
Yesterday was not one of the good days. No, I did not have a health catastrophe. But I had a couple of emotional/stress related catastrophes. To recover I went to the gym and destress by abusing my body on the stationary bike for a while. (Until my phone started ringing and I had to take the call because of other stress issues.)And other stress happened. But I took a deep breath, had a glass of wine with dinner (a very yummy meal as we got some acorn fed pork from a friend). With dinner I made an apple chutney with cloves and a sweet potato hash. Cooking helps destress me. The fancier the meal the more stressed I am.I hope...
Source: Caroline's Breast Cancer Blog - January 17, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: stress Source Type: blogs

How to Tell Grandpa He Is Too Old for Another Colonoscopy
Shutterstock Cancer screening can save lives: Mammographies reduce the chance women will die of breast cancer; and colonoscopies reduce the chance people will die of colon cancer. But should my 93-year-old father receive a screening colonoscopy? The test is uncomfortable, … Continue reading → The post How to Tell Grandpa He Is Too Old for Another Colonoscopy appeared first on PeterUbel.com. (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - January 16, 2018 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Peter Ubel Tags: Health Care cancer screening Doctor patient communication Peter Ubel syndicated Uncategorized Source Type: blogs

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Laurie Kingston, 1967-2018Laurie passed away peacefully at Élisabeth Bruyère Hospital in Ottawa, Ontario on Monday January 8th, 2018 at the age of 50 years. Loving partner of Tim Wayne. Beloved mother of Sacha Kingston-Wayne and Daniel Kingston-Wayne. Daughter of Diane Kingston and the late Bob Kingston of Hawkesbury, Ontario. Daughter-in-law of Susan Way ne, Jack Wayne and Susan Silva of Toronto, Ontario. Will be dearly missed by her sister Linda Kingston and her partner Ian (Ottawa); brother-in-law Andrew Wayne, his partner Brenda MacDonald, nieces Claire, Esme and nephew Noah (Guelph); brother-in-law Ian W...
Source: Not just about cancer - January 16, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: blogs

Okay I lied
I did say I would blog more often and get back on regular blogging as part of destressing. But it looks like I lied. But I have a good reason.My husband and I went away for a few days to take a real break. Luckily (if you want to look at it that way) the cell phone coverage was awful so we couldn't get any calls or texts from home.We needed a break. I got to walk on the beach (okay it was in Maine and was a bit chilly) three times. We did some shopping. We explored. We ate out. We were lazy. We were on the ocean.It was very nice. Now I can get back to blogging regularly. (Source: Caroline's Breast Cancer Blog)
Source: Caroline's Breast Cancer Blog - January 15, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: blogs

An Approach to Starving Cancer Cells that is Applicable to Many Cancers
This study is very exciting because it sheds light on a new uncharacterized way to treat cancer with very limited toxicity." Although cancer cells contain REV-ERB proteins, somehow they remain inactive. The researchers used two REV-ERB activators that had already been developed - SR9009 and SR9011 - in studies on a variety of cancer cells, including those from T cell leukemia, breast cancer, colorectal cancer, melanoma, and glioblastoma. In each cell line, treatment with the REV-ERB activators was enough to kill the cells. The same treatment on healthy cells had no effect. "When we block access to these re...
Source: Fight Aging! - January 12, 2018 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

Your Brain On Cancer
Once you enter cancerland, your brain takes detours all the time. Where do these detours go? BAD PLACES!" Is that a zit? No, of course not. Its a tumor. Must be skin cancer. "" A headache? No, a brain tumor. Dead in 3 months. "" Is that a swollen lymph node? Quick, leukemia or lymphoma, which one? "As you can easily see you brain with cancer goes down the wrong roads. Usually in the middle of the night. Or when your are stuck in traffic by yourself.You start making little deals with yourself. " I'll wait a month and see if its still a problem. No, a month? No three weeks. Wait, two weeks....
Source: Caroline's Breast Cancer Blog - January 11, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: cancer detection fear of cancer living with cancer stress Source Type: blogs

What ’s the latest on estrogen use in post-menopausal women?
Estrogen is a miracle drug for many women who experience the drenching sweats, sexual dysfunction and frustrating brain betrayals associated with entering menopause. It comes in expensive patches, less expensive pills or injections, as well as vaginal creams or rings. It has gone in and out of favor with the medical community for decades. Estrogen is the main ingredient in most birth control pills and has been studied extensively in that context as well as in the setting of women whose ovaries have ceased to produce it as they age. It can increase the risk of migraines, blood clots in the legs or lungs; it can cause benign...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - January 11, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/janice-boughton" rel="tag" > Janice Boughton, MD < /a > Tags: Conditions OB/GYN Source Type: blogs

Running On Empty
Today I am running on empty. If I had any energy, I would be on my way to the gym. I am not moving yet. Well I had some breakfast but am back in bed. I will meet a friend for lunch later today and then possibly drag myself off to the gym after.I am exhausted.Maybe I should go to the doctor or something. No wait, I had three appointments on Monday. And I see my rheumatologist next week. I can nap every day between now and then.These days I am good for about 10 hours a day total. If I lie down each afternoon for a couple of hours, I can then stay up for dinner and go to bed early.Talk about lack of quality of life.----------...
Source: Caroline's Breast Cancer Blog - January 10, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: fatigue rest sleep Source Type: blogs

FDA Approves Planmed ’s Budget Friendly, but Attractive Clarity 2D Mammography System
Planmed, a Finnish company specializing in breast cancer radiography systems, won FDA approval for its Clarity 2D digital mammography device. The Clarity 2D is a budget mammography system that has a lot of the features that exist in more expensive systems. Planmed touts its TriFilter technology that produces high quality images at a low radiation dose. The company’s MaxView technology uses swappable radiolucent sheets that put pressure around the breast to optimize the imaging results. Interestingly, the Clarity 2D is designed to work within mobile clinics and high humidity environments, allowing for it to be used to...
Source: Medgadget - January 9, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: Ob/Gyn Radiology Surgery Source Type: blogs

Until I Drop
Every day that I go out the door (which is not everyday), I go until I drop or that is what it feels like.Yesterday is an example: three doctor appointments at two different places 45 minutes apart, two stops at stores, one stop at my parents for 15 minutes, and then home. I was so tired by the time I got home, I was barely standing. I took the easy way out and got in bed for the next two hours.At my last stop, at the podiatrist that I have been going to since last summer, I ran into a friend who worked there. I knew she worked in a medical office but I didn't know she worked in that one. She only works two days a week whi...
Source: Caroline's Breast Cancer Blog - January 9, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: fatigue fibromyalgia naps rheumatoid arthritis tired Source Type: blogs

Back On The Fitness Bandwagon
Finally, I am back on the fitness bandwagon. This week is my first full week of three days at the gym. Finally. I am excited, but exhausted.According to my card at the gym, I had an extended absence from October 4 to December 20. I was so excited to go back. But have forced myself to take it easy. With the help of the physical therapist at the gym, I cut back my exercise plan significantly. I cut down on the weight I use, the time I do cardio, and added a number of specific'knee strengthening'exercises. I also have spent three weeks only going twice a week.Its killing me.Every time I leave the gym, I am exhausted. and I co...
Source: Caroline's Breast Cancer Blog - January 8, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: being active exhaustion fitness gym Source Type: blogs