Complications and risks of IVF treatment
Most woman are worried about the possible risks and complications of doing IVF treatment, but part of the problem is the many myths and misconceptions which plague IVF . Thus, it is clear that IVF doesn't increase the risk of birth defects and it won't cause breast cancer or ovarian cancer, but lots of websites continue to disseminate this misinformation.However, as with any other treatment, there are potential complications and this is why selecting a good IVF doctor is so important. One of the possible medical risks is that of ovarian hyper-stimulation syndrome ( OHSS), but in a well-managed clinic, this risk should...
Source: Dr.Malpani's Blog - August 17, 2018 Category: Reproduction Medicine Source Type: blogs

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(Source: Breast Cancer? But Doctor....I hate pink!)
Source: Breast Cancer? But Doctor....I hate pink! - August 15, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: blogs

The Top Bioprinting Companies
In the next 5-7 years, the bioprinting market is estimated to expand by 15.7 percent, and it is anticipated to grow over $4.70 billion by 2025, according to the latest study of BIS Research. While the growth statistics indicate a turbulent landscape, it is worth familiarizing with the main players. Here, we collected the best bioprinting companies currently on the market. The future of bioprinting: tissues not organs The idea of lab-grown organs might mean the end of testing drugs on animals or humans, the solution for organ shortages and an ending of the desperate state of organ donations worldwide. If the creators of the...
Source: The Medical Futurist - August 14, 2018 Category: Information Technology Authors: nora Tags: 3D Printing in Medicine Biotechnology Business Future of Medicine 3d printed bioprinting company Healthcare Innovation market regenerative skin Source Type: blogs

What's in a name?
From time to time I have commented on the controversies over cancer screening. Most people assume that screening is an unqualified good, that early detection of cancer saves lives. Whenever some panel proposes recommending less screening, we hear screaming and yelling from advocates who claim they are trying to " ration " health care to save money at the expense of people's lives.In fact,as a bunch of Australians and a Minnesotan explain in BMJ, there are a few conditions called " cancer " that you are better off not treating, or perhaps treating very conservatively. These include what is called ductal ...
Source: Stayin' Alive - August 13, 2018 Category: American Health Source Type: blogs

National Breastfeeding Month
August is National Breastfeeding Month. According to the Office on Women’s Health, breastfed babies have lower risks during their childhood of obesity, ear infections, asthma and other conditions. Breast milk is rich in nutrients and easier for babies to digest than formula. Breastfeeding can help a mother’s health and healing following childbirth and leads to a lower risk of type 2 diabetes, certain types of breast cancer and ovarian cancer. Unfortunately, African American mothers have the lowest rates of starting and continuing to breastfeed their infant. See the Guide to Breastfeeding from the Office of...
Source: BHIC - August 8, 2018 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Patricia Devine Tags: Children and Teens Minority Health Concerns Source Type: blogs

SCOUT Wire-Free Tissue Localizer Cleared in U.S. for Soft Tissues
Cianna Medical, based in Aliso Viejo, CA, won FDA clearance for its SAVI SCOUT wire-free technology to be used for localizing of soft tissues. Previously, in the U.S. the SCOUT has only been indicated for use in localizing breast tumors (see flashbacks below). “SCOUT resolves one of the most difficult aspects of breast cancer treatment by allowing us to accurately localize soft tissue such as axillary lymph nodes,” said Ari Brooks, surgical breast oncologist and Director of the Integrated Breast Center at Penn Medicine, in a published statement. “The SCOUT reflector is very well suited for use in the...
Source: Medgadget - August 6, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: Oncology Radiology Surgery Source Type: blogs

Magtrace Nanoparticles for Sentimag System is FDA Approved for Breast Lymph Node Biopsy
The Food and Drug Administration approved Endomagnetics Inc.’s magnetic tracer injection and detection system for guiding lymph node biopsies in patients with breast cancer undergoing mastectomy. In the procedure, the clinician injects a solution of dextran-coated iron oxide magnetic nanoparticles (Magtrace) in the viscinity of the tumour or the areola, as is done typically with dye or radioactive tracers. The Magtrace then clears along lymphatic vessels and labels the sentinel and draining lymph nodes by accumulating in specific cell types. The surgeon can then detect these labelled lymph nodes using the Sentimag Ma...
Source: Medgadget - July 30, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Ben Ouyang Tags: Oncology Surgery Source Type: blogs

The most valuable lessons in life can be learned in oncology
I am a medical oncologist specializing in breast cancer. I often try to conceal what I do for a living when I meet people for the first time as it always leads down a particular road. “Is that so depressing? I don’t know how to deal with that all day, every day.” But in truth, it is not depressing. My work is very rewarding. I feel that the most valuable lessons I have learned in life, I have learned in the practice of oncology. 1. Labels hurt. In a world of ever-growing diversity, labels extend to the oncology clinic. While perhaps less publicly discussed than other forms of bias and discrimina...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - July 29, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/stephanie-graff" rel="tag" > Stephanie Graff, MD < /a > Tags: Physician Oncology/Hematology Source Type: blogs

Giving Consumers the Tools and Support They Need to Navigate Our Complex Healthcare System
By CINDI SLATER, MD, FACR As physicians and healthcare leaders, we are already well aware that the majority of patients do not have the information they need to make a medical decision or access to appropriate resources, so we didn’t need to hear more bad news. But that is precisely what new research once again told us this spring when a new study showed that almost half of the time, patients have no idea why they are referred to a GI specialist. While the study probably speaks to many of the communications shortcomings we providers have, across the board our patients often don’t know what care they need, or ho...
Source: The Health Care Blog - July 27, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: matthew holt Tags: Patients Physicians Health care leaders Health care technology patient-provider relationship Physician's Responsibilities Source Type: blogs

Chipping Away at the Anechoic Effect: Now the New York Times Protests the Demise of the AHRQ National Guidelines Clearinghouse
DiscussionMany people bemoan the current political situation, but some feel there is nothing they could possibly do the improve things.  We have been publishing this blog since 2004 with the hopes that chipping away at the anechoic effect which has hid the severity and nature of health care dysfunction might actually help to improve things.  However, at times we wondered if we were having any effect.  What good are individual actions like blog posts? It seems that most of us have little individual power.   Collectively, though we may have more than we realize.  Small individual actions ca...
Source: Health Care Renewal - July 20, 2018 Category: Health Management Tags: AHRQ anechoic effect Donald Trump evidence-based medicine guidelines news media Source Type: blogs

New App for Cancer Patients
(Source: Breast Cancer? But Doctor....I hate pink!)
Source: Breast Cancer? But Doctor....I hate pink! - July 16, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, July 16th 2018
We presently forget 98% of everything we experience. That will go away in favor of perfect, controllable, configurable memory. Skills and knowledge will become commodities that can be purchased and installed. We will be able to feel exactly as we wish to feel at any given time. How we perceive the world will be mutable and subject to choice. How we think, the very fundamental basis of the mind, will also be mutable and subject to choice. We will merge with our machines, as Kurzweil puts it. The boundary between mind and computing device, between the individual and his or her tools, will blur. Over the course of the ...
Source: Fight Aging! - July 15, 2018 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

Development of a Web-Based Educational Program for the Training of BRCA Carriers
We are in an era regarding genetic and molecular testing when it is often insufficient to simply report certain test results to clinicians and their patients. Sophisticated patient education may then be necessary in order for the patient to understand the implications of certain positive lab results. A perfect example of this is the identification of BRCA carriers. Such patients need to be informed about the implications of their genetic status and their possible responsibility to untested blood relatives. A recent paper discussed the development of aFamily Gene Toolkit to achieve such an educational goal (see:De...
Source: Lab Soft News - July 14, 2018 Category: Laboratory Medicine Authors: Bruce Friedman Tags: Clinical Lab Industry News Clinical Lab Testing Genomic Testing Healthcare Delivery Healthcare Information Technology Lab Information Lab Processes and Procedures Medical Consumerism Medical Education Public Health Source Type: blogs

Adverse Interactions Between Natural Selection and the Modern Environment
Our species evolved to perpetuate itself in a very different environment from the one we find ourselves in now. We are clearly far better off as individuals: lives are a good deal less nasty, brutish, and short than was the case for our distant ancestors. Technological progress has conquered a sizable slice of the death and disease of childhood and early adult life, to a degree varying by the wealth of any given region of the world. The worst half of infectious disease is controlled, but chronic age-related diseases remain poorly managed, and the incidence of these diseases rises inexorably as people live longer due to con...
Source: Fight Aging! - July 11, 2018 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Medicine, Biotech, Research Source Type: blogs

Gifts, they keep on coming....
(Source: Breast Cancer? But Doctor....I hate pink!)
Source: Breast Cancer? But Doctor....I hate pink! - July 9, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: blogs

T2 Bacterial Panel Obtain FDA Approval; Provides Rapid Diagnosis of Sepsis
There is exciting news in the area of clinical bacteriology. The FDA has approved the T2 Biosystems bacterial panel for the rapid detection of septicemia (see: T2 Biosystems Receives FDA Clearance to Market T2Bacteria Panel for Detection of Sepsis-Causing Pathogens), Below is an excerpt from the article:T2 Biosystems...announced that it has received market clearance from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for the T2 Bacteria Panel for the direct detection of bacterial species in human whole blood specimens from patients with suspected bloodstream infections. The T2Bacteria Panel... provides sensitive det...
Source: Lab Soft News - July 3, 2018 Category: Laboratory Medicine Authors: Bruce Friedman Tags: Clinical Lab Industry News Clinical Lab Testing Cost of Healthcare Food and Drug Administration Lab Industry Trends Medical Research Quality of Care Source Type: blogs

More MRI Machines = More Happy Patients
The University of Minnesota ’s Clinics and Surgery center will be installing a new MRI as a response to the increasing wait times and high number of patients seeking imaging services.According toThe Minnesota Daily, the Center has experienced a 10 percent increase in MRI appointments each year. Patients typically wait between two to three weeks for their imaging appointments. To prevent long wait lists, the Center has had to extend their hours and book more procedures on Saturdays and Sundays. Around 20,000 MRI procedures are performed each year across the university ’s health centers. They are purchasing a new...
Source: radRounds - June 29, 2018 Category: Radiology Authors: Julie Morse Source Type: blogs

Rethinking the screening mammogram
This study analyzed data from women over 40 and compared the size of breast cancers at the time of diagnosis detected in the 1970s (before mammography became common) with the size of tumors detected between 2000 and 2002, when screening mammography was routine. Treatments and rates of death due to breast cancer 10 years after the diagnosis were also analyzed. The study found that: As more women underwent routine screening mammograms, more small breast cancers were detected. Many of these tumors were restricted to the ducts within the breast (called ductal carcinoma in situ), and even without treatment would never threaten...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - June 28, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Robert H. Shmerling, MD Tags: Health Source Type: blogs

I Started a New Blog
I started this blog when I was diagnosed with breast cancer in 2007. Blogging really helped me cope with my cancer and its treatment.However my life has moved on. I have blogged about it in the past - that my life was changing - breast cancer is no longer the main focus in my life.My chronic ailments have replaced that focus. While breast cancer never really goes away it turns more to be chronic illness than a terminal one, unless metastases appear. So I have a total of four chronic illnesses - breast cancer, thyroid cancer, rheumatoid arthritis, and fibromyalgia. I also have chronic physical ailments - bone spur, desiccat...
Source: Caroline's Breast Cancer Blog - June 25, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: ailments blogging breast cancer chronic conditions Source Type: blogs

Understanding the Repercussions of False Positive Breast Cancer Biopsies
A new  studyhas found that false positive breast cancer biopsies are costing healthcare facilities over $2.1 billion annually. This high false positive rate and the consequential expenses highlight the need for improved breast cancer diagnostic protocols and technology.Researchers from IBM Watson Health and Seno Medical looked at health care claims filed between 2011 and 2015 from 875,000 women to understand the rate of follow-up procedures after mammography and breast exams. They found that between 2012 and 2015, 8,732,909 patients received diagnostic mammograms, 6,987,399 underwent breast ultrasounds, and 1,585,856 ...
Source: radRounds - June 21, 2018 Category: Radiology Authors: Julie Morse Source Type: blogs

Photoacoustic Computed Tomography May Replace Mammographies for Breast Cancer Screening
Though mammography helps to provide early detection of breast cancer, it is a modality that suffers from limitations, particularly in dense breasts. A new technology, developed at Caltech, may have the potential to eclipse mammographies for spotting cancerous lesions. The photoacoustic system sends near-infrared laser light into breast tissue and detectors are used to spot ultrasonic waves that return. Because the light is absorbed disproportionately by hemoglobin molecules, their signal is stronger, and they end up more visible to the detector. Since most of the hemoglobin is present within blood vessels, the scan effecti...
Source: Medgadget - June 20, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: Diagnostics Ob/Gyn Radiology Surgery Source Type: blogs

Who should NOT do the L. reuteri yogurt?
Because consumption of the L. reuteri yogurt made with the ATCC PTA 6475 and DSM 17938 strains work by raising levels of oxytocin (in addition to local probiotic benefits on reducing H. pylori and acid reflux, for example, unusual for its upper, not just lower, gastrointestinal benefits), there are people who probably should not consume the yogurt.. Oxytocin is a multi-faceted hormone whose levels decline as we age, much as does growth hormone and other hormones. But, among its many varied effects is the potential for causing uterine contraction. That is why oxytocin is administered to provoke delivery of a term infan...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - June 19, 2018 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr. Davis Tags: Undoctored Wheat Belly Lifestyle anti-aging healing oxytocin probiotic reuteri skin wrinkles Source Type: blogs

Who should NOT do the L. reuteri yogurt?
Because consumption of the L. reuteri yogurt made with the ATCC PTA 6475 and DSM 17938 strains work by raising levels of oxytocin (in addition to local probiotic benefits on reducing H. pylori and acid reflux, for example, unusual for its upper, not just lower, gastrointestinal benefits), there are people who probably should not consume the yogurt.. Oxytocin is a multi-faceted hormone whose levels decline as we age, much as does growth hormone and other hormones. But, among its many varied effects is the potential for causing uterine contraction. That is why oxytocin is administered to provoke delivery of a term infan...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - June 19, 2018 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr. Davis Tags: Undoctored Wheat Belly Lifestyle anti-aging healing oxytocin probiotic reuteri skin wrinkles Source Type: blogs

Rebuilding my body: breast reconstruction in England
This report compiles evidence from Freedom of Information (FOI) requests conducted by the Breast Cancer Now in 2017. It shows that 47 out of 208 clinical commissioning groups (CCGs) in England (22.6 per cent) have established policies to restrict reconstruction services for non-clinical reasons. With a further nine CCGs (4.3 per cent) having draft policies or informal restrictions in place. The emerging policies – which have been described by the charity as'totally unacceptable' and'not in the best interest of patients' – include limiting the number of surgeries women are allowed, enforcing a ti...
Source: Health Management Specialist Library - June 18, 2018 Category: UK Health Authors: The King ' s Fund Information & Knowledge Service Tags: Patient involvement, experience and feedback Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, June 18th 2018
Fight Aging! provides a weekly digest of news and commentary for thousands of subscribers interested in the latest longevity science: progress towards the medical control of aging in order to prevent age-related frailty, suffering, and disease, as well as improvements in the present understanding of what works and what doesn't work when it comes to extending healthy life. Expect to see summaries of recent advances in medical research, news from the scientific community, advocacy and fundraising initiatives to help speed work on the repair and reversal of aging, links to online resources, and much more. This content is...
Source: Fight Aging! - June 17, 2018 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

Exercise as part of cancer treatment
In a first, a national cancer organization has issued formal guidelines recommending exercise as part of cancer treatment, for all cancer patients. The Clinical Oncology Society of Australia (COSA) is very clear on the directive. Its recommendations are: Exercise should be embedded as part of standard practice in cancer care and viewed as an adjunct therapy that helps counteract the adverse effects of cancer and its treatment. All members of the multi-disciplinary cancer team should promote physical activity and help their patients adhere to exercise guidelines. Best practice cancer care should include referral to an accr...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - June 13, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Monique Tello, MD, MPH Tags: Cancer Exercise and Fitness Health Source Type: blogs

A Reminder that Excess Visceral Fat is Harmful
This popular science article takes a high level look at the vast array of research data showing that excess visceral fat causes great harm to long term health. One of the more important mediating mechanisms is an increase in chronic inflammation, a state of dysfunction in the operation of the immune system that disrupts organ function and tissue maintenance, and accelerates the development of all of the common age-related diseases. There are numerous other connections between the pace of aging and the activities of visceral fat tissue, however. Becoming overweight is the path to a shorter life expectancy, greater incidence...
Source: Fight Aging! - June 13, 2018 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

Alcohol Clinical Trial Continues to Crumble: Anheuser-Busch Pulls Its Funding
In another setback for the NIAAA's and alcohol industry's study of the " health benefits " of encouraging people to drink, Anheuser-Busch has pulled its funding from the clinical trial because recent controversy over how the research funding was solicited has undermined the study's credibility.According to anarticle by Roni Caryn Rabin in theNew York Times:" Brewing giant Anheuser-Busch InBev, one of five alcohol companies underwriting a $100 million federal trial on the health benefits of a daily drink, is pulling its funding from the project, saying controversy about the sponsorship threatens to undermine ...
Source: The Rest of the Story: Tobacco News Analysis and Commentary - June 10, 2018 Category: Addiction Source Type: blogs

The Unknown Part of Anthony Bourdain
“Last time I saw all this, I think it’s fair to say, I was at a turning point in my life,” Anthony Bourdain says before embarking into the Borneo jungle. He was not afraid to discuss his long battle with substance use, an issue that millions of Americans struggle with. In fact, recent data shows that annual deaths from opioid misuse have surpassed deaths by car accidents, guns, or breast cancer, highlighting an astoundingly dramatic increase in nationwide substance use disorders. 1, 2 “I have been hardened by the last 10 years. I don’t know what that says about me… but, there it is.&rdq...
Source: World of Psychology - June 9, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Amanda Marie Cardinale Tags: Celebrities Depression General Stigma Suicide anthony bourdain bourdain suicide suicide of anthony bourdain Source Type: blogs

Weekly Overseas Health IT Links – 9th June, 2018
Here are a few I came across last week.Note: Each link is followed by a title and few paragraphs. For the full article click on the link above title of the article. Note also that full access to some links may require site registration or subscription payment.-----https://www.digitalhealth.net/2018/05/breast-cancer-screening-error-thousands-more/Breast cancer screening error ‘may have affected thousands more’The breast cancer screening error may have affected thousands more women across England, one researcher at Kings College London has claimed.Hanna Crouch – 31 May 2018Jeremy Hunt told MPs in May that a...
Source: Australian Health Information Technology - June 9, 2018 Category: Information Technology Authors: Dr David G More MB PhD Source Type: blogs

‘ Eat Cake For Breakfast ’ : A Tribute to Kate Spade
“Are you sure she needs this surgery?” my brother asked my surgeon minutes before the doctor entered the operating room. My brother was suspicious of Western medicine’s harsh approaches to treating cancer. “If she doesn’t have this surgery, she’ll be dead in three months,” the surgeon said sternly, put out that my brother would even question his authority. I would learn of this conversation several days after my operation to remove an angiosarcoma on my right breast. The angiosarcoma had resulted from radiation treatment I’d had to eliminate another breast cancer four years b...
Source: World of Psychology - June 7, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Laura Yeager Tags: Agitation Bipolar Celebrities Depression Suicide Bipolar Disorder Depressive Episode kate spade Source Type: blogs

The Not-Quite Annual ASCO Round-Up - 2018 edition
by Drew RosielleTheAmerican Society of Clinical Oncology annual meeting, besides being a feast for the pharmaceutical business news pages (google'ASCO'and most of the hits will be about how announcement X affected drug company Y's stock), is also one of the premiere platforms for publishing original palliative-oncology research. So every year I try to at least scan the abstracts to see what's happening, and I figure I might as well blog about it. It's tough to analyze abstracts, so I'll mostly just be summarizing ones that I think will be of interest to hospice and palliative care folks. I imagine I've missed some good one...
Source: Pallimed: A Hospice and Palliative Medicine Blog - June 6, 2018 Category: Palliative Care Tags: artificial nutrition ASCO cannabanoid code status conference reviews fatigue hpmglobal marijuana mindfulness mucositis neuropathic oncology pain race rosielle scrambler Source Type: blogs

Dr. Geraldine McGinty Receives Thorwarth Award
This week, distinguished radiology community leader and breast cancer detection expert  Geraldine McGinty, MD, MBA, FACR, was  presentedwith the William T. Thorwarth, Jr., MD, Award. The American College of Radiology (ACR)-sponsored award is not distributed on an annual basis but given out incidentally to individuals who have made vast leadership contributions to economics and health policy in radiology.Dr. McGinty has made significant strides in the imaging industry in the last decade. In May 2016, she became the first woman appointed the vice chair of the ACR ’s Board of Chancellors. She has established h...
Source: radRounds - May 25, 2018 Category: Radiology Authors: Julie Morse Source Type: blogs

What to do if you want to be a cruise ship doctor
In 2013 I began searching for ways I could change my career to reduce my workload, but not give up medicine altogether. During that time I took a cruise and looked at various jobs I could do on a cruise ship. One of the jobs I was qualified for, I thought, was to be a Cruise Ship Doctor. After talking with the ship’s doctor to find out what it was like to be the doctor on a ship, I realized that I would enjoy that life. When I arrived back home I sent in an application to a cruise line. I was promptly informed that general surgeons were not qualified to be a ship’s doctor. They only accept physicians who practi...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - May 25, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/cory-fawcett" rel="tag" > Cory Fawcett, MD < /a > Tags: Physician Practice Management Primary Care Source Type: blogs

5 Reasons Why Artificial Intelligence Won ’t Replace Physicians
Hype and fears surround artificial intelligence taking jobs in healthcare. Will it render physicians obsolete? Will it replace the majority of medical professionals? The Medical Futurist decided to set things straight. Here are five fundamental reasons why A.I. won’t replace doctors and never will. The medical community should not fall for the fearmongering around A.I. At the dawn of the Fourth Industrial Revolution, automation and digitization are turning the job market upside down. Many fear that robots, A.I., and automation, in general, will take their jobs without alternatives. The same anxieties emerged in healt...
Source: The Medical Futurist - May 24, 2018 Category: Information Technology Authors: nora Tags: Artificial Intelligence in Medicine Future of Medicine AI digital health insurance doctor Healthcare job job market physician technology Source Type: blogs

Podcast: Diverse Diseases, Allied Advocates
Listen to part two of the episode recorded live on location at HealtheVoices 2018. (Part one was posted last week, so check it out if you haven’t, already.) In this continuation of the multi-advocate panel discussion, our panelists talk about the most difficult aspect of their advocacy and how they deal with it. They also address misconceptions and ignorance about their diseases, such as the difference between AIDS and HIV or IBD and IBS, the fact that lupus is not contagious, and that men can have breast cancer. To close out the episode, each panelist shares his/her thoughts on what advocates for different condition...
Source: World of Psychology - May 24, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: The Psych Central Show Tags: General Interview Mental Health and Wellness The Psych Central Show Advocacy Source Type: blogs

California AG Emergency Request to Reverse Court Ruling to Invalidate Medical Aid-in-Dying Law
The California attorney general has filed an emergency request with the state court of appeals to reverse a lower court ruling to invalidate the End of Life Option Act. The End of Life Option Act remains in effect until further notice. Similar to laws in Washington, D.C. and six other states, the California law gives mentally capable, terminally ill adults with six months or less to live to the option to request prescription medication they can decide to take to end unbearable suffering and die peacefully in their sleep. Last Tuesday, Riverside County Superior Court Judge Daniel Ottolia invalidated the law ...
Source: blog.bioethics.net - May 22, 2018 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

An aging physician muses on end-of-life care
As a retired physician who has written a book about end-of-life issues for elderly patients, I have placed myself in an awkward position. According to most guidelines, at age 67, I am elderly. How will I approach the end of my life? Not only do my personal medical concerns career around in the echo chamber of my own mind, but I have the added challenge of trying to follow my own advice regarding end-of-life decision making. And, there are multiple examples of physicians who did not do that. Witness the example of Francis Warren, Harvard’s most famous surgeon of the 20th century, renowned for heroic cancer surgeries a...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - May 21, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/samuel-harrington" rel="tag" > Samuel Harrington, MD < /a > Tags: Physician Palliative Care Source Type: blogs

Premarin, whole grains, and why you can ’ t believe headlines
Imagine you have a friend named Justin. He is a schoolteacher. Honest, hardworking, doesn’t smoke, rarely drinks alcohol, sleeps well, doesn’t take drugs, shows up at work every day. He has also chosen to be vegetarian. Another friend of yours, an auto mechanic named Tommy, eats fast food, loves fried chicken, drinks too much beer on the weekends, likes to drive fast cars, and sometimes gets into legal tangles. He smokes cigarettes, though has limited it to only half-a-pack per day. Late weekends, some weekday nights, sleep cut short to just two or three hours. Tommy is not a vegetarian, but likes his burgers r...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - May 17, 2018 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr. Davis Tags: Undoctored Wheat Belly Lifestyle Source Type: blogs

Premarin, whole grains, and why you can ’ t believe headlines
Imagine you have a friend named Justin. He is a schoolteacher. Honest, hardworking, doesn’t smoke, rarely drinks alcohol, sleeps well, doesn’t take drugs, shows up at work every day. He has also chosen to be vegetarian. Another friend of yours, an auto mechanic named Tommy, eats fast food, loves fried chicken, drinks too much beer on the weekends, likes to drive fast cars, and sometimes gets into legal tangles. He smokes cigarettes, though has limited it to only half-a-pack per day. Late weekends, some weekday nights, sleep cut short to just two or three hours. Tommy is not a vegetarian, but likes his burgers r...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - May 17, 2018 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr. Davis Tags: Undoctored Wheat Belly Lifestyle Source Type: blogs

Podcast: Finding Strength & Unity in Our Differences
Listen to part one of the first ever LIVE Psych Central Show, recorded on location at HealtheVoices 2018, an annual event that brings together online advocates from across various health conditions for an opportunity to learn, share and connect. In this show, you will meet four advocates who join our hosts on stage for a panel discussion on a variety of advocacy issues, including lupus, inflammatory bowel disease, HIV, and breast cancer. You’ll hear about how being diagnosed affected their lives in ways they didn’t expect, and what made them become advocates. The second half of this show will be posted next wee...
Source: World of Psychology - May 17, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: The Psych Central Show Tags: General Interview Mental Health and Wellness The Psych Central Show Advocacy Source Type: blogs

“Superman Vision” Gets a Boost from Vayyar’s Next Generation Chip: Interview with CEO Raviv Melamed
Earlier this month, Vayyar Imaging, a firm based in Yehud, Israel,  announced the launch of its next generation CMOS System on a Chip (SOC), strengthening the company’s position as a global leader in 3D imaging technology. The new chip covers imaging and radar bands from 3 GHz to 81 GHz and, compared to many similar chips with three transmitters and three receivers, integrates more antennas than ever before with 72 transmitters and 72 receivers. The upgrade allows for longer range and higher quality imaging in real-time without compromising size. Commenting on the announcement, Co-Founder and CEO Raviv...
Source: Medgadget - May 16, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Michael Batista Tags: Diagnostics Exclusive Informatics Radiology Source Type: blogs

California Judge Overturns California Medical Aid-in-Dying Law
A California judge granted a motion by opponents of the California End of Life Option Act to overturn the law because he said the legislature violated the state constitution by passing it during a special session limited to health care issues. (HT: C&C) Riverside County Superior Court Judge Daniel A. Ottolia gave the state attorney general five days to file an emergency appeal of the ruling in the case, Ahn vs. Hestrin — Case RIC1607135, before it will take effect. Unless the appeals court suspends the ruling, it will prevent mentally capable, terminally ill adults with six months or...
Source: blog.bioethics.net - May 15, 2018 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Real World Evidence (RWE) vs Randomized Control Trials (RCT): The Battle For the Future of Medicine
By DAVID SHAYWITZ, MD Randomized control trials – RCTs – rose to prominence in the twentieth century as physicians and regulators sought to evaluate rigorously the performance of new medical therapies; by century’s end, RCTs had become, as medical historian Laura Bothwell has noted, “the gold standard of medical knowledge,” occupying the top position of the “methodologic heirarch[y].” The value of RCTs lies in the random, generally blinded, allocation of patients to treatment or control group, an approach that when properly executed minimizes confounders (based on the presumption t...
Source: The Health Care Blog - May 15, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: John Irvine Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: blogs

The Case For Real World Evidence (RWE)
By DAVID SHAYWITZ, MD Randomized control trials – RCTs – rose to prominence in the twentieth century as physicians and regulators sought to evaluate rigorously the performance of new medical therapies; by century’s end, RCTs had become, as medical historian Laura Bothwell has noted, “the gold standard of medical knowledge,” occupying the top position of the “methodologic heirarch[y].” The value of RCTs lies in the random, generally blinded, allocation of patients to treatment or control group, an approach that when properly executed minimizes confounders (based on the presumption t...
Source: The Health Care Blog - May 15, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: John Irvine Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: blogs

15-year study: stress did not increase risk of breast cancer among women with a genetic susceptibility to the disease
By Emma Young The idea that stress increases the risk of breast cancer is a persistent one, despite a number of major large-scale findings to the contrary. “Over the past 40 years, women have been exposed to strong messages about the importance of ‘thinking positively’ and reducing stress in their lives, which can add to the burden of guilt in those who develop cancer, who feel they have somehow failed”, note the authors of a new prospective study of women in Australia, published in Psycho-Oncology. Their findings suggest that neither acute nor chronic stressors recorded over a three-year period inf...
Source: BPS RESEARCH DIGEST - May 11, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: BPS Research Digest Tags: Cancer Health Mental health Source Type: blogs