Boston experts release new international guidelines for thyroid disease in pregnancy
(Boston University Medical Center) Thyroid disease is a common and frequently dangerous clinical problem during pregnancy. Led by local experts at Boston University School of Medicine (BUSM) and Brigham and Women's Hospital, the American Thyroid Association (ATA) published new guidelines for the management of these disorders, seeking to improve the health of nearly 300,000 affected pregnant women in the United States each year. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 9, 2017 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Scientists discover blood test which 'predicts how long people will live'
It sounds like the premise of a sci-fi film. But, believe it or not, scientists at Boston University claim to have discovered a game-changing blood test that could help predict lifespans. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - January 6, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Biomarker patterns may predict how people age: Study
Amy WallaceBOSTON, Jan. 6 (UPI) -- A new study from Boston University has found that using patterns of biomarkers aids in predicting how a person is aging and their risk for age-related diseases. (Source: Health News - UPI.com)
Source: Health News - UPI.com - January 6, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

BU study finds patterns of biomarkers predict how well people age, risks of age-related disease
(Boston University Medical Center) Levels of specific biomarkers, or chemicals found in the blood, can be combined to produce patterns that signify how well a person is aging and his or risk for future aging-related diseases, according to a new study by researchers at the Boston University Schools of Public Health and Medicine and Boston Medical Center. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 6, 2017 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Researchers identify factors associated with stopping treatment for opioid dependence
(Boston University Medical Center) Individuals with opioid use disorder who are treated with buprenorphine, a commonly prescribed drug to treat addiction, are more likely to disengage from treatment programs if they are black or Hispanic, unemployed, or have hepatitis C according to a study published online in the Journal of Substance Abuse Treatment. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 5, 2017 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

People aren't the only beneficiaries of power plant carbon standards
(Drexel University) A research team from Drexel University, Syracuse University, Boston University and Harvard University has projected the potential affects of carbon emissions standards in the year 2020. Their work shows that key crops and tree species would benefit from policies that would limit the emission of pollutants from power plants. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - January 4, 2017 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

BUSM researcher awarded Ellison Foundation grant to study Parkinson's disease target
(Boston University Medical Center) Richard Myers, Ph.D., professor of neurology at Boston University School of Medicine (BUSM), was recently awarded $100,000 from the Ellison Foundation for research to further study a Parkinson's disease (PD) target.The Myers research team will investigate the Cyclin G-associated kinase (GAK) gene and protein and why a deficiency of this gene increases the risk for developing Parkinson's disease. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 3, 2017 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

MassDevice.com +5 | The top 5 medtech stories for December 21, 2016
Say hello to MassDevice +5, a bite-sized view of the top five medtech stories of the day. This feature of MassDevice.com’s coverage highlights our 5 biggest and most influential stories from the day’s news to make sure you’re up to date on the headlines that continue to shape the medical device industry. Get this in your inbox everyday by subscribing to our newsletters.   5. Micro Interventional Devices launches MIS annuloplasty trial Micro Interventional Devices said yesterday it completed the 1st clinical implantation of its MIA implant in the STTAR clinical trial of the device, which is designed ...
Source: Mass Device - December 21, 2016 Category: Medical Equipment Authors: MassDevice Tags: News Well Plus 5 Source Type: news

Researchers ’ bionic pancreas outperforms standard insulin pump therapy
Researchers from Boston University have developed a bionic pancreas system that outperformed conventional insulin pump therapy for patients with type 1 diabetes, according to a trial conducted at Massachusetts General Hospital. The team’s work was published in The Lancet.  This device is the latest development in the race to make an entirely closed loop insulin pump system, or “artificial pancreas” for patients with type 1 diabetes. In September, Medtronic‘s (NYSE:MDT) MiniMed 670G hybrid closed loop system became the 1st device of its kind to win FDA clearance. Boston University...
Source: Mass Device - December 21, 2016 Category: Medical Equipment Authors: Sarah Faulkner Tags: Clinical Trials Diabetes Drug-Device Combinations mHealth (Mobile Health) Pharmaceuticals Research & Development Beta Bionics Boston University Massachusetts General Hospital Medtronic Source Type: news

Police-led addiction program in Gloucester shows first-year success, BU study finds
(Boston University Medical Center) About 95 percent of individuals with substance-use disorders who came to the Gloucester Police Department for help accessing addiction treatment were placed in detoxification or substance-use treatment programs during the first year of a widely publicized initiative aimed at combating the opioid epidemic, according to a report by Boston University researchers. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - December 21, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Good news and bad news about forest fragmentation
(Boston University) New England forests may be more sensitive to climate change than previously suggested. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - December 20, 2016 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Freezing in record lows? You may doubt global warming
Researchers from Utah State University, Boston University, The George Washington University and the University of Oxford report findings from analysis of experiential basis for skepticism about climate change in the United States. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - December 19, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Bionic pancreas system successfully controls blood sugar without risk of hypoglycemia
(Massachusetts General Hospital) The bionic pancreas system developed by Boston University investigators proved better than either conventional or sensor-augmented insulin pump therapy at managing blood sugar levels in patients with type 1 diabetes living at home, with no restrictions, in a clinical trial led by a Massachusetts General Hospital physician. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - December 19, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

What Ohio's 20-Week Abortion Ban Law Will Really Mean For Women
Ohio just became the 18th state to pass an arbitrary ban on abortions after 20 weeks.  The new law, which Gov. John Kasich (R) signed Tuesday, outlaws an extremely rare procedure. Only about 1 percent of all abortions take place after 20 weeks, and most are the result of doctors finding birth defects that were undetectable in earlier screenings. The ban will push women to travel out of state if they discover a serious defect during a second trimester ultrasound, adding another layer of logistical and financial difficulty to an already complicated termination procedure, says Dr. Jennifer K. Hsia, a clini...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - December 15, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

What Ohio's 20-Week Abortion Ban Law Will Really Mean For Women
Ohio just became the 18th state to pass an arbitrary ban on abortions after 20 weeks.  The new law, which Gov. John Kasich (R) signed Tuesday, outlaws an extremely rare procedure. Only about 1 percent of all abortions take place after 20 weeks, and most are the result of doctors finding birth defects that were undetectable in earlier screenings. The ban will push women to travel out of state if they discover a serious defect during a second trimester ultrasound, adding another layer of logistical and financial difficulty to an already complicated termination procedure, says Dr. Jennifer K. Hsia, a clini...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - December 15, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Dietary fibre intake 'can help prevent development of knee pain'
People's dietary intake of fibre could have an effect on their chances of developing chronic knee pain, according to a new study. Research carried out by Boston University School of Medicine has offered evidence that an increase in dietary fibre may be an effective means of reducing knee pain, in part by lowering body weight and inflammation. The study Published in the medical journalArthritis Care& Research, the study examined a group of 4,796 men and women aged 45 to 79 years with or at risk of kneeosteoarthritis, whose dietary fibre levels were estimated using a validated food frequency questionnaire at the star...
Source: Arthritis Research UK - December 7, 2016 Category: Rheumatology Source Type: news

Meeting with Trump emboldens anti-vaccine activists, who see an ally in the Oval Office
By Rebecca Robins The discredited researcher who launched the anti-vaccine movement met with Donald Trump this summer -- and found him sympathetic to the cause. Now, with Trump preparing to move into the White House, leaders of the movement are newly energized, hopeful they can undermine decades of public policy promoting childhood vaccinations. At the most basic level, they're hoping Trump will use his bully pulpit to advance his oft-stated concern -- debunked by an extensive body of scientific evidence -- that there's a link between vaccines and autism. "For the first time in a long...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - December 1, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

A Man's Sleep Habits Actually Affect His Partner's Ability To Get Pregnant
Heterosexual couples who are trying to conceive should pay more attention to their sleep, new research suggests ― particularly how much sleep the man gets. Researchers found that men who get either too little or too much sleep decreased their chances of getting pregnant with their partner over a 12-month period by as much as 42 percent, according to data recently presented at the annual conference of the American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Men who got eight hours of sleep per night had the highest rates of pregnancy with their partners, study author Lauren Wise, a professor in the Department of Epidemiology at Bo...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - December 1, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

A Man's Sleep Habits Actually Affect His Partner's Ability To Get Pregnant
Heterosexual couples who are trying to conceive should pay more attention to their sleep, new research suggests ― particularly how much sleep the man gets. Researchers found that men who get either too little or too much sleep decreased their chances of getting pregnant with their partner over a 12-month period by as much as 42 percent, according to data recently presented at the annual conference of the American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Men who got eight hours of sleep per night had the highest rates of pregnancy with their partners, study author Lauren Wise, a professor in the Department of Epidemiology at Bo...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - December 1, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Standing up may unmask cognitive deficits in patients with Parkinson's
In a new study published online in the journal Neurology, a research team led by neurologists at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (BIDMC) and neuropsychologists at Boston University has shown... (Source: Parkinson's Disease News From Medical News Today)
Source: Parkinson's Disease News From Medical News Today - December 1, 2016 Category: Neurology Tags: Parkinson's Disease Source Type: news

Tai Chi proves feasible and beneficial for vets with PTSD
(Boston University Medical Center) Veterans with symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) who participated in in Tai Chi not only would recommend it to a friend, but also found the ancient Chinese tradition helped with their symptoms including managing intrusive thoughts, difficulties with concentration and physiological arousal. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 30, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

BGRF scientists publish seminal paper and announce project to develop biomarkers of aging
(Biogerontology Research Foundation) The Biogerontology Research Foundation announces the international collaboration on signaling pathway perturbation-based transcriptomic biomarkers of aging. On Nov. 16, scientists at the Biogerontology Research Foundation alongside collaborators from Insilico Medicine Inc., Johns Hopkins University, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Boston University, Novartis, Nestle and BioTime Inc. announced the publication of their proof of concept experiment demonstrating the utility of a novel approach for analyzing transcriptomic, metabolomic and signalomic data sets, titled iPANDA, in Nature ...
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - November 21, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Researchers identify pathway important for kidney function
(Boston University Medical Center) Boston University researchers, in collaboration with Centers for Therapeutic Innovation at Pfizer Inc., have discovered a novel molecular pathway needed to regulate kidney podocytes -- special octopus-like cells that are critical in maintaining normal kidney function. The findings, which appear in JCI Insight, may help identify a new drug target for chronic kidney diseases associated with podocyte loss. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 17, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Through grant & telemedicine, Boston Medical Center expanding access to epilepsy care
(Boston University Medical Center) Boston Medical Center (BMC) has been awarded a three-year, $1.2 million grant from the Health Resources and Services Administration to expand access to high quality care for underserved populations of children and youth with epilepsy and related disorders. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 17, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Here's Your Health To-Do List Before Trump Takes Office
The election of Donald Trump and Mike Pence has many Americans wondering how the new administration will affect their health care options. During his campaign, Trump promised to repeal Obamacare. Although it’s impossible to predict whether or not he’ll make good on that promise, dismantling the Affordable Care Act would have a wide-reaching impact: According to the Congressional Budget Office, it could increase the number of uninsured Americans by 22 million.  And that may be just one of many moves the future president could make that would change the current state of healthcare in the U.S. Worri...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - November 16, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Novel method to identify illegal drugs, faster and with greater accuracy
(Boston University Medical Center) For the identification of illicit drugs in forensic toxicological casework, analysis can be delayed and potentially compromised due to lengthy sample preparation. However a new technique has been developed that can provide high sensitivity and fast results. This new development, which is described in the Journal of Analytical Toxicology, will impact how resources are utilized and how quickly results are conveyed to law enforcement. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - November 16, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Researchers identify protein required for breast cancer metastasis
(Boston University Medical Center) Researchers have identified a new pathway and with it a protein, BRD4, necessary for breast cancer cells to spread. The findings, which appear in the journal Cancer Research, may provide a new target to suppress breast cancer metastasis. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - November 15, 2016 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Researchers propose noninvasive method to detect bone marrow cancer
(Boston University Medical Center) For the first time, researchers have shown that using magnetic resonance imaging can effectively identify bone marrow cancer (myelofibrosis) in an experimental model.The findings, published in the journal Blood Cancer, may change the way this disease is diagnosed which is now through invasive bone marrow biopsies. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 14, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Center for Regenerative Medicine receives 3 prestigious NIH awards
(Boston University Medical Center) The Center for Regenerative Medicine at Boston Medical Center and Boston University School of Medicine has received three prestigious awards from the National Institutes of Health to further its commitment to induced pluripotent stem cell research and education. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 14, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Trash that pop can, trash yourself
(University of Alberta) Think twice about tossing that pop can, since you might be trashing yourself, too. We are more prone to recycle our throwaway cups, cans and paper if we somehow link them to our sense of identity, says a study by the University of Alberta and Boston University. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - November 14, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Fatty liver disease contributes to cardiovascular disease and vice versa
(Boston University Medical Center) For the first time, researchers have shown that a bi-directional relationship exists between fatty liver disease and cardiovascular disease. Fatty liver disease can lead to increased cardiovascular disease risk and vice versa. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 10, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

How Little-Known Tax Laws Could Drive Down Our Suicide Rate
Suicide is a pressing public health issue that deserves a thoughtful policy response. But we don’t often talk about regulating one of the biggest suicide risk factors: alcohol. The use of alcohol and drugs is the most frequent risk factor for suicide after depression and mood disorders, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Alcohol was a factor in approximately one-third of suicides in 2007, 62 percent of which involved people with blood alcohol levels higher than the legal driving limit of 0.08. While mental health experts talk about the role of alcohol use in suicide rates...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - November 9, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Novel method to identify illicit designer drugs developed
(Boston University Medical Center) A new technique has been identified that quickly and cheaply recognizes illegal designer drugs that normally evade detection.The findings, described online in the journal Forensic Science International, will assist law enforcement officials investigating overdose and death investigations involving illicit substances. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 9, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

There's A 99 Percent Chance You'll Know A Firearm Victim In Your Lifetime
For many people hearing about gun violence, it can feel really far away ― a mass shooting on the other side of the country, a death in the home of a gun owner, the street violence described in Donald Trump’s offensive appeal to African-American voters: “You walk down the street, you get shot.” Indeed, racial segregation helps further the myth that many Americans won’t be affected by gun violence.  “Because everyday gun violence is concentrated in racially segregated neighborhoods, it’s easy for millions of Americans to think they won’t be affected,” the Guard...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - November 4, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

There's A 99 Percent Chance You'll Know A Firearm Victim In Your Lifetime
For many people hearing about gun violence, it can feel really far away ― a mass shooting on the other side of the country, a death in the home of a gun owner, the street violence described in Donald Trump’s offensive appeal to African-American voters: “You walk down the street, you get shot.” Indeed, racial segregation helps further the myth that many Americans won’t be affected by gun violence.  “Because everyday gun violence is concentrated in racially segregated neighborhoods, it’s easy for millions of Americans to think they won’t be affected,” the Guard...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - November 4, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Michael E. Charness honored for contributions to understanding alcohol's impact
(Boston University Medical Center) Michael E. Charness, M.D., professor of neurology and associate dean of veteran's affairs at Boston University School of Medicine, was recently awarded the 2016 Mark Keller Honorary Award from the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 4, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Autopsy Shows Former NFL Player Kevin Turner Had Advanced CTE
Former NFL player Kevin Turner had the most advanced stage of chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) when he died, Boston University brain researchers announced Thursday. Dr. Ann McKee said at a Thursday news conference that an autopsy showed Turner had died of the brain trauma-related condition, rather than amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), otherwise known as Lou Gehrig’s disease. Turner had been diagnosed with ALS, a motor neuron disease that presents itself similarly to CTE. “This is not ALS; this is CTE,’’ McKee said. “The severity of Mr. Turner’s CTE was extraordinary and unprece...
Source: TIME: Top Science and Health Stories - November 3, 2016 Category: Science Authors: Julia Zorthian Tags: Uncategorized Football health Sports Source Type: news

Boston University researcher receives Alzheimer's Association research award
(Boston University Medical Center) Claudia Satizabal, PhD, instructor of neurology at Boston University School of Medicine, was recently awarded a 2016 research grant to promote diversity from the Alzheimer's Association. The two-year, $118,673 award will be used to further study the impact of obesity on brain aging and Alzheimer's Disease. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 2, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Connection between brain inflammation and CTE identified
(Boston University Medical Center) For the first time, researchers have shown that inflammation in the brain may have direct involvement in the development of chronic traumatic encephalopathy. In addition, they found that the number of years one plays contact sports may predict the occurrence of CTE and that this association is partly due to increased inflammation in the brain. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 2, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Nearly every American will know a victim of gun violence, BU study finds
(Boston University Medical Center) Nearly all Americans are likely to know a victim of gun violence within their social networks during their lifetime, indicating that citizens are 'closer to gun violence than they perceive,' according to a new study by researchers from the Boston University Schools of Public Health and Medicine. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - November 1, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Study finds new approach to block binge eating
(Boston University Medical Center) A new therapeutic target for the treatment of compulsive binge eating has been identified by researchers at Boston University School of Medicine (BUSM). (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - October 6, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Transgender women who begin hormone therapy more likely to quit smoking
(Boston University Medical Center) While there has been much concern about the potential harm from transgender medical intervention (hormone therapy), a new study has found that transgender women who receive hormone therapy are more likely to quit or decrease smoking cigarettes as compared to the general population. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - October 5, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Study reveals the protein structure of the human apoptosome
(Boston University Medical Center) Programmed cell death, or apoptosis, plays a central role in the maintenance of human health by providing a line of defense against unrestricted cell growth that occurs in many cancers and AIDS as well as in neurodegenerative diseases and stroke.Researchers from Boston University School of Medicine have for the first time mapped an active human apoptosome. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - October 4, 2016 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Researchers investigate new strategy to block growth of colon cancer cells
(Boston University Medical Center) Researchers from Boston University School of Medicine (BUSM) have discovered a possible strategy to treat colon cancers that are caused by the mutant KRAS gene, which is responsible for approximately half of all colon cancer cases. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - October 3, 2016 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

New research indicates key protein may directly impact development of colon cancer
(Boston University Medical Center) Researchers have discovered a new role of a protein that, if manipulated, may help suppress colorectal cancer (CRC) growth. The discovery, published online by Oncotarget journal, may lead to new therapies in managing patients with CRC. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - October 3, 2016 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Will Smith Disappointed 'Concussion' Didn't Have More Impact On NFL
Actor Will Smith had expected the 2015 film “Concussion,” in which he plays a pathologist who exposes the truth about traumatic brain injuries in National Football League players, would lead to serious change in the sport.  Instead, alarming scientific research that the movie highlighted went largely overlooked, which Smith said came as a surprise, he told Vanity Fair.  “I thought ‘Concussion’ would have a bigger impact,” Smith told the magazine. “I knew it would be hard because people love the game, but the science is so overwhelming, and it’s someth...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - September 28, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Will Smith Disappointed 'Concussion' Didn't Have More Impact On NFL
Actor Will Smith had expected the 2015 film “Concussion,” in which he plays a pathologist who exposes the truth about traumatic brain injuries in National Football League players, would lead to serious change in the sport.  Instead, alarming scientific research that the movie highlighted went largely overlooked, which Smith said came as a surprise, he told Vanity Fair.  “I thought ‘Concussion’ would have a bigger impact,” Smith told the magazine. “I knew it would be hard because people love the game, but the science is so overwhelming, and it’s someth...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - September 28, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

From Deli To Doctor, Doctor To Deli
"For this we sent them to college!" their great grandmothers holler from their graves as their great grandchildren announce their intentions not to be doctors or lawyers or I-bankers but to open a food truck or a restaurant. "We worked hard to spare you back-breaking work." Why are millennials pursuing career opportunities like these when more traditional avenues closed to their parents, grandparents, and great grandparents are now open to them? Pin-striped suits and rep ties have gone out of style, while interest in nontraditional careers has grown exponentially among affluent, young college graduates....
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - September 27, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Alcohol policies contribute to suicide prevention, BU review shows
(Boston University Medical Center) Restrictive alcohol policies, such as those limiting liquor store density or imposing taxes on alcohol, have been shown to have a 'protective effect' in reducing suicides, according to a newly published review led by Boston University School of Public Health researchers. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 13, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

‘ Botox Police ’ : FDA crime unit draws fire over import crackdown
(Reuters) – On April 5, 2012, a criminal investigator from the Food and Drug Administration named Robert West charged into an oncology clinic in Greenville, Tennessee. West was chasing a lead that Dr. Anindya Sen and his wife, the clinic’s office manager Patricia Posey Sen, purchased an unapproved Turkish version of the cancer drug Avastin. But “Cowboy Bob,” as some defense attorneys call him, did not realize his interview was caught on the clinic’s surveillance cameras. West told Posey Sen she was guilty of buying counterfeit drugs and looked like a “deer in the headlights,” court...
Source: Mass Device - September 9, 2016 Category: Medical Equipment Authors: MassDevice Tags: Cosmetic/Aesthetic Food & Drug Administration (FDA) Source Type: news