Boston University gets $5.4M federal grant for Alzheimer's research
The funding from the National Institutes of Health will held the center develop diagnostic tests and potential treatments for one of the most deadly and prevalent diseases. (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care News Headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care News Headlines - August 29, 2017 Category: Health Management Authors: Jessica Bartlett Source Type: news

Boston University gets $5.4M federal grant for Alzheimer's research
The funding from the National Institutes of Health will held the center develop diagnostic tests and potential treatments for one of the most deadly and prevalent diseases. (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - August 29, 2017 Category: Biotechnology Authors: Jessica Bartlett Source Type: news

NIH awards BU more than $5 million to continue Alzheimer's research
(Boston University School of Medicine) The National Institutes of Health/National Institute on Aging has awarded the Boston University Alzheimer's Disease Center (BU ADC) a three-year, $5.4 million grant to continue research on ways to reduce the human and economic costs of Alzheimer's disease (AD) through the advancement of knowledge. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - August 25, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Study finds link between malnutrition, alcoholism and tuberculosis in India
(Boston University School of Medicine) A new study reveals a striking link between malnutrition, heavy alcohol use and tuberculosis in southern India. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - August 23, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Behavior theory may offer key to ensuring infants are put to sleep safely
(Yale University) It is still common for infants to be placed in unsafe sleeping positions by their caregivers, report researchers from Yale and Boston University (BU). Fewer than half of infants are always placed on their backs for sleep, the recommended safe sleep position. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - August 21, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

BU researcher receives AHA grant to improve cardiovascular treatments
(Boston University Medical Center) Vijaya B. Kolachalama, Ph.D., assistant professor of medicine at Boston University School of Medicine, has received a Scientist Development grant from the American Heart Association. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - August 16, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Unstable housing to cost health care system estimated $111 billion over 10 years, study finds
(Boston University Medical Center) Unstable housing among families with children will cost the United States an estimated $111 billion in health and education expenditures over the next ten years, according to new research published by Children's HealthWatch based at Boston Medical Center. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - August 10, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Will This Be The End Of College Football? It Should Be.
A new study from Boston University shows that over 90% of former college football players suffered serious brain damage later in life. The sample was likely biased and may exaggerate the risks, but how can universities justify exposing students to even a much smaller risk? (Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News)
Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News - August 9, 2017 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Steven Salzberg, Contributor Source Type: news

Will This Be The End Of College Football? It Should Be
A new study from Boston University shows that over 90% of former college football players suffered serious brain damage later in life. The sample was likely biased and may exaggerate the risks, but how can universities justify exposing students to even a much smaller risk? (Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News)
Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News - August 9, 2017 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Steven Salzberg, Contributor Source Type: news

Could This Spell The End For College Football? It Should.
A new study from Boston University shows that over 90% of former college football players suffered serious brain damage later in life. The sample was likely biased and may exaggerate the risks, but how can universities justify exposing students to even a much smaller risk? (Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News)
Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News - August 9, 2017 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Steven Salzberg, Contributor Source Type: news

1 in 12 doctors accepts payment from pharmaceutical companies related to opioids
(Boston University Medical Center) One in twelve physicians -- and nearly one in five family medicine physicians -- accepted payments from pharmaceutical companies related to opioids, according to a new study out of Boston Medical Center's Grayken Center for Addiction Medicine. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - August 9, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

One fall too many
(Boston University Medical Center) Adults age 65 and older who go to the emergency department (ED) for a fall-related injury are not likely to participate in a fall prevention program after being discharged, despite being given a flyer for a local program before leaving the hospital. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - August 8, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Texting while parenting: Mobile program improves safety of sleeping infants
(Yale University) Mother's latest little helper is already in her pocket: A new educational intervention delivered in the form of texts and emails has been found to increase adherence to safe sleep practices for infants, concluded researchers at the Yale, University of Virginia, and Boston University schools of medicine in a joint study published July 25 in the Journal of the American Medical Association. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - August 7, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Book Review: On Edge
“Fear ambushes me… I feel fine… And then, a second later, I’m not,” writes Andrea Peterson. Her new book, On Edge: A Journey Through Anxiety, is an exploration of her life with anxiety, from her first panic attack, to realizing that she had an anxiety disorder, to sorting out the dizzying array of treatments and ultimately discovering for herself what anxiety is and how to live with it. While it is estimated that one in three Americans will have at least one anxiety disorder in their lifetime, it took Peterson multiple trips to the emergency room, EKG tests...
Source: Psych Central - August 3, 2017 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Claire Nana Tags: Anti-anxiety Book Reviews Healthy Living Mindfulness Personal Stories Women's Issues Source Type: news

ReWalk Robotics touts Harvard-led Restore soft exosuit study
ReWalk Robotics (NSDQ:RWLK) today released results from a study of a soft suit exoskeleton system designed to aid ambulatory stroke patients, touting that the system was able to facilitate normal walking ability in patients. The study was authored by researchers at Harvard University’s Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering and Boston University, and utilized a prototype that Marlborough, Mass.-based ReWalk Robotics plans to commercialize as the Restore system. Results from the study were published in the Journal of Science Translational Medicine. The Restore system is designed to transmit pow...
Source: Mass Device - August 2, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Fink Densford Tags: Clinical Trials Prosthetics Robotics ReWalk Robotics Source Type: news

New Study Examines Brain Injury in Football Players
CHICAGO (AP) — Research on 202 former football players found evidence of a brain disease linked to repeated head blows in nearly all of them, from athletes in the National Football League, college and even high school. It's the largest update on chronic traumatic encephalopathy, or CTE, a debilitating brain disease that can cause a range of symptoms including memory loss. The report doesn't confirm that the condition is common in all football players; it reflects high occurrence in samples at a Boston brain bank that studies CTE. Many donors or their families contributed because of the players' repeated concussions a...
Source: JEMS Patient Care - July 26, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Lindsey Tanner, Associated Press Tags: Patient Care News Source Type: news

New Study Examines Brain Injury in Football Players
CHICAGO (AP) — Research on 202 former football players found evidence of a brain disease linked to repeated head blows in nearly all of them, from athletes in the National Football League, college and even high school. It's the largest update on chronic traumatic encephalopathy, or CTE, a debilitating brain disease that can cause a range of symptoms including memory loss. The report doesn't confirm that the condition is common in all football players; it reflects high occurrence in samples at a Boston brain bank that studies CTE. Many donors or their families contributed because of the players' repeated concussions a...
Source: JEMS: Journal of Emergency Medical Services News - July 26, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Lindsey Tanner, Associated Press Tags: Patient Care News Source Type: news

Dr. Agus on new football brain study: "This is a major issue"
The largest study of brain trauma in football players reveals the risks to players of all ages. Researchers at Boston University examined the brains of 111 deceased NFL players. They found signs of the disease CTE in 110 players. Families of the former players donated the brains after they suspected injuries. Dr. David Agus joins "CBS This Morning" from Los Angeles to talk about results of the study, athletes' potential to sustain head injuries and how to prevent CTE. (Source: Health News: CBSNews.com)
Source: Health News: CBSNews.com - July 26, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

WATCH: New report finds brain disease in most football players studied
Researchers at Boston University found that of the 111 former NFL pros included in their study, 110 met the criteria for a CTE diagnosis. (Source: ABC News: Health)
Source: ABC News: Health - July 26, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: GMA Source Type: news

ACA reduced disparities in health care access, report shows
(Boston University Medical Center) The Affordable Care Act (ACA) has helped to close the gap in health care access between residents of poor and higher-income households, a new report by Boston University School of Public Health (BUSPH) researchers shows. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 26, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New Study Shows Prevalence of Brain Disease in Former Football Players
CHICAGO (AP) — Research on 202 former football players found evidence of a brain disease linked to repeated head blows in nearly all of them, from athletes in the National Football League, college and even high school. It's the largest update on chronic traumatic encephalopathy, or CTE, a debilitating brain disease that can cause a range of symptoms including memory loss. The report doesn't confirm that the condition is common in all football players; it reflects high occurrence in samples at a Boston brain bank that studies CTE. Many donors or their families contributed because of the players' repeated concussions a...
Source: JEMS Patient Care - July 26, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Lindsey Tanner, Associated Press Tags: Trauma Patient Care News Source Type: news

New Study Shows Prevalence of Brain Disease in Former Football Players
CHICAGO (AP) — Research on 202 former football players found evidence of a brain disease linked to repeated head blows in nearly all of them, from athletes in the National Football League, college and even high school. It's the largest update on chronic traumatic encephalopathy, or CTE, a debilitating brain disease that can cause a range of symptoms including memory loss. The report doesn't confirm that the condition is common in all football players; it reflects high occurrence in samples at a Boston brain bank that studies CTE. Many donors or their families contributed because of the players' repeated concussions a...
Source: JEMS: Journal of Emergency Medical Services News - July 26, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Lindsey Tanner, Associated Press Tags: Trauma Patient Care News Source Type: news

CTE was nearly ubiquitous among former NFL players who donated their brains to science
In a group of more than 100 professional football players whose brains were examined after their death, new research has found that virtually all suffered from chronic traumatic encephalopathy, a condition likely brought on by repeated blows to the head.At a Boston University program that investigates... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - July 25, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Melissa Healy Source Type: news

NFL brain study diagnoses CTE in 99% of ex-players' brains
Boston University's famed CTE team, which is analyzing Aaron Hernandez's brain, has released major findings from post-mortems on 202 players' brains, which were donated to research. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - July 25, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

CTE found in 99% of studied brains from deceased NFL players
Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy (CTE) was found in 110 brains of 111 deceased former NFL players that were donated to Boston University's CTE Research Center, according to a study released Tuesday by JAMA. (Source: CNN.com - Health)
Source: CNN.com - Health - July 25, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Snoring link to Alzheimer ’s disease unproven
Conclusion This relatively large cross-sectional analysis has found a link between certain measures of breathing problems during sleep and poorer cognitive function in middle-aged to older adults. The strengths of this study include its size and use of a prospective sleep study to assess whether people had sleep apnoea or other problems with breathing during sleep. The use of standard cognitive tests is also a strength. However, the study does have its limitations: The study did have mixed findings – while certain measures of problems with breathing during sleep (e.g. oxygen levels) were associated with cognitive o...
Source: NHS News Feed - July 24, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Neurology Lifestyle/exercise Source Type: news

Substance Use Disorders Webinar Series
Register today for this 4-part webinar series, sponsored by NER! Participants may attend any or all sessions in the series. Each webinar has a specific focus within the substance use disorder field, and will provide a professional perspective that combines research and/or evidence-based information, along with personal experience to further understanding of the opioid health crisis. Presenters will share what they have learned by being involved on the front lines of addiction and treatment. Participants may be eligible for MLA CE, pending course approval. Registration is required. Misperceptions and the Misused Language of...
Source: NN/LM Middle Atlantic Region Blog - July 20, 2017 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Hannah Sinemus Tags: Consumer Health Education Health Professionals Public Health Source Type: news

Engineered liver tissue expands after transplant
(Massachusetts Institute of Technology) Researchers have developed a way to engineer liver tissue by organizing tiny subunits that contain cells embedded into a biodegradable tissue scaffold. In a study of mice with damaged livers, the researchers from MIT, Rockefeller University, and Boston University found that after implantation in the abdomen, the structures expanded 50-fold and performed normal liver tissue functions. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - July 19, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Team-based model reduces prescription opioid use among patients with chronic pain by 40 percent
(Boston University Medical Center) A new, team-based, primary care model is decreasing prescription opioid use among patients with chronic pain by 40 percent, according to a new study out of Boston Medical Center's Grayken Center for Addiction Medicine, which is published online ahead of print in JAMA Internal Medicine. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 17, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Frequent ejaculation may decrease prostate cancer risk
"Ejaculating at least 21 times a month significantly reduces a man's risk of prostate cancer," is the headline on the Mail Online. This is based on research from the US that asked men how often they ejaculated per month and subsequent reporting of prostate cancer. They found that men who ejaculated 21 times or more a month were less likely to report prostate cancer at follow-up than those ejaculating four to seven times per month. However, it does not prove that ejaculating more frequently prevents cancer, only that it is associated with a reduction in risk. It might be that a range of other factors such as ...
Source: NHS News Feed - July 6, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Cancer Source Type: news

Hospital discharge program improves patient experience leaving the hospital
(Boston University Medical Center) A standardized, in-hospital discharge planning program, known as Project ReEngineered Dishcharge (RED), improves patient experience as they leave the hospital, according to researchers at Boston Medical Center. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 6, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Study: No link seen between traumatic brain injury and cognitive decline
(Boston University Medical Center) Although much research has examined traumatic brain injury (TBI) as a possible risk factor for later life dementia from neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease (AD), little is known regarding how TBI influences the rate of age-related cognitive change. A new study now shows that history of TBI (with loss of consciousness) does not appear to affect the rate of cognitive change over time for participants with normal cognition or even those with AD dementia. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 5, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Study finds protective effect of obesity after a stroke
A new study by Boston University suggests that although obesity raises the risk of stroke, overweight or mildly obese people survive strokes at higher rates. (Source: Health News - UPI.com)
Source: Health News - UPI.com - June 29, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Does carrying extra weight offer better survival following a stroke?
(Boston University Medical Center) Despite the fact that obesity increases both the risk for stroke and death, a new study has found that people who are overweight or even mildly obese survive strokes at a higher rate as compared to those with a normal body weight. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 29, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

BUSM receives grant to create software prototype for sharing medical data
(Boston University Medical Center) In an effort to securely share medical data between the US and India, Boston University School of Medicine (BUSM) has received a BU Digital Health Initiative Research Award.The $40,000 award will fund the two-year project, 'Enabling Data Science for Medicine.' It allows for collaboration between BUSM and the Center for Reliable Information Systems and Cyber Security and Software& Application Innovation Lab. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 27, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Popular prostate drug linked to serious side effects
(Boston University Medical Center) Treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) with the commonly prescribed Avodart (Dutsteride) may put men at an increased risk for diabetes, elevated cholesterol levels, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and worsening erectile dysfunction. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 22, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

BUSM's Orly Leiva selected to Minority Medical Student Award Program
(Boston University Medical Center) Orly Leiva, a fourth-year medical student at Boston University School of Medicine (BUSM), has been named by the American Society of Hematology (ASH) as one of 22 medical students selected to take part in the 2017 Minority Medical Student Award Program (MMSAP). (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 19, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Medications underutilized when treating young people with opioid use disorder
(Boston University Medical Center) Only one in four young adults and teens with opioid use disorder (OUD) are receiving potentially life-saving medications for addiction treatment, according to a new Boston Medical Center (BMC) study published online in JAMA Pediatrics. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 19, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Emocha launches pilot to help recovering opioid addicts
Emocha will be piloting its platform in partnership with two opioid recovery clinics based at the University of Washington in Seattle and Boston University. (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines - June 15, 2017 Category: American Health Authors: Morgan Eichensehr Source Type: news

Boston University awarded Macy grant to improve refugee health
(Boston University Medical Center) Given the unprecedented refugee crisis and the current political and social climate today's immigrant's face, training the next generation of health professionals to be competent global healers and leaders is imperative. In an effort to prepare students at the earliest stages of their medical training, Boston University School of Medicine (BUSM) has received a three-year, $392,000 grant from the Josiah Macy Jr. Foundation to help train future physicians to better serve refugee and immigrant populations. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 15, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Boston Medical Center, Head Start partner to prevent maternal depression
(Boston University Medical Center) Boston Medical Center, in partnership with Action for Boston Community Development's Head Start program, has helped mothers experience a 40 percent reduction in the emergence of clinically significant depressive symptom episodes. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 14, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

3-D-printed patch helps guide growing blood vessels
(Boston University College of Engineering) A research team led by Boston University Biomedical Engineering Professor Christopher Chen is pioneering an infused 3-D-printed patch that guides the growth of new blood vessels, avoiding some of the problems with other approaches to treating ischemia. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 13, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Study provides further support for genetic factors underlying addictions
(Boston University Medical Center) Impairment of a particular gene raises increases susceptibility to opioid addiction liability as well as vulnerability to binge eating according to a new study.Dysfunction of the gene, casein kinase1-epsilon (CSNK1E), increases opioid's euphoric response and produces a marked increase in sensitivity to binge eating in a female experimental model but not in the male. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 13, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

BU medical student wins grant from the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism
(Boston University Medical Center) Emily Oot, a third-year graduate student at Boston University School of Medicine (BUSM), has received a national research service award to study risk factors for the initiation of alcohol and drug use during early adolescence. The $106,887 grant is from the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA). (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 12, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Lessons from Fire Prevention: Why We Can Head Off Disease Without Sacrificing Cure
This insightful and data-filled evidence-based article from the Boston University School of Public Health  illustrates the work EMS can, and should, do to prevent disease where we cannot control curing it: Public health is concerned with creating a healthier world, preferably one where we prevent disease before it starts. This inevitably occasions grappling with our overwhelming investment in medicine and curative care, and arguing for a recalibration of our investment towards the social, economic, and cultural factors that promote health. We can educate people how to reduce their chances of suffering heart attacks, ...
Source: JEMS: Journal of Emergency Medical Services News - June 11, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: A.J. Heightman, MPA, EMT P Tags: Training News Source Type: news

Nepal: 15 years after legalizing abortions, gaps in access, equity, quality continue to exist
(Boston University Medical Center) Nepal is often heralded as a model of successful implementation and rapid scale-up of safe abortion services. Yet despite the legalization of the procedure in 2002, challenges continue to exist for women who want to obtain a safe, legal abortion.In a new perspective piece in the Health and Human Rights Journal, researchers discuss where gaps in access, equity and quality of abortion services threaten the realization of reproductive rights. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 8, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

6 brain-controlled devices helping people regain movement
[Image from Amy Leonard on Flickr]People who have lost feeling in their limbs or have lost the ability to move them may soon have those sensations restored thanks to a slew of recent brain-controlled device innovations. While we are moving toward less invasive methods like electrode-filled caps on the head, there are still more invasive implants that are benefiting those who suffered from a stroke or a serious spinal cord injury. From mind-controlled exoskeletons to robots reading your mind, here are 6 brain-controlled devices that are moving robotic arms and helping people become mobile again. Next>> The post 6 brai...
Source: Mass Device - June 2, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Danielle Kirsh Tags: Neurological Neuromodulation/Neurostimulation Prosthetics Robotics Boston University EEG mit Neuolutions Ohio State University paralysis University of Melbourne University of Minnesota University of Pittsburgh Source Type: news

Deployment stress impacts well-being through different mental health issues for female and male vets
(Boston University Medical Center) Experiencing stress-related mental health issues following deployment exposures increases risk of reduced well-being in other life domains in the years following military service for veterans. Gender plays an important role in these associations. The findings, which appear in Clinical Psychological Science, have implications for better understanding the challenges female and male veterans face upon returning from service and may lead to ways care can be optimized with consideration of the role gender may play. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 1, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

In utero tobacco exposure can lead to executive function issues in adolescents
(Boston University Medical Center) Prenatal tobacco exposure is known to have negative short-term impacts including preterm birth, low birth weight and subsequent behavioral issues. However, a new study found that the negative impacts can last well into the child's future. The results showed that exposure to as few as 10 cigarettes was associated with negative impacts on the executive function of adolescents who were exposed prenatally. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 1, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Did a 1980 Letter Help Spark the U.S. Opioid Crisis?
WEDNESDAY, May 31, 2017 -- Today's U.S. opioid epidemic is rooted in a 1980 letter to a medical journal that played down the potential for painkiller addiction, a new report states. The 101-word letter, written by Boston University Medical Center... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - May 31, 2017 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news