E-cigarettes may damage blood vessels in the same way as HEART DISEASE, study finds
Researchers at the Boston University School of Medicine have discovered the chemicals used to produce flavours in e-cigarettes cause damage to heart cells in the same way heart disease does. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - June 14, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

BU receives grant to assist scientists in training for career transitions
(Boston University School of Medicine) In an effort to broaden opportunities for participation in professional development activities for graduate and postdoctoral trainees, Boston University School of Medicine (BUSM) will develop a software application (app) that will enable identification and sharing of these opportunities with local institutions. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 14, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Flavored electronic cigarettes linked to possible cardiovascular disease
(Boston University School of Medicine) Could flavored electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes) cause bodily harm?There has been a rapid rise in e-cigarette use, partially due to flavoring additives in tobacco products and perception of less harm than traditional combustible cigarettes. Numerous studies have been done on the risks of e-cigarettes to lungs, but the risk to blood vessels and how flavorings can affect the body are largely unknown. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 14, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Possible marker found to predict long-term learning
(Boston University School of Medicine) For the first time, researchers have discovered a possible biomarker for long term learning. Could this new discovery help reshape how students learn and how they are taught? (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 13, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Turning the tables on the cholera pathogen
(Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering at Harvard) Researchers at Harvard's Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering, the Massachusetts Institutes of Technology (MIT) and Boston University, led by James J. Collins are reporting a two-pronged probiotic strategy in Science Translational Medicine that is able to suppress V. cholerae's colonization of the intestinal tract in mice and to indicate their presence by simple stool sampling. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - June 13, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

BU: Medicaid expansion increases volume and quality of care in rural areas
(Boston University School of Medicine) New study from Boston University School of Public Health finds that the first two years of Medicaid expansion were associated with increased coverage, better quality care, and more service use at rural community health centers. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 4, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Weight changes associated with reduced bone strength
(Hebrew SeniorLife Institute for Aging Research) Researchers from Hebrew SeniorLife's Institute for Aging Research, Boston University, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, and University of Calgary have found evidence that weight loss can result in worsening bone density, bone architecture and bone strength. The results were published in the Journal of Bone and Mineral Research. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 1, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Tighter Alcohol Policies Cut Alcohol-Related Crash Deaths
WEDNESDAY, May 30, 2018 -- Strengthening state alcohol policies can reduce alcohol-related crash fatalities, according to a study published online May 29 in JAMA Internal Medicine. Timothy S. Naimi, M.D., M.P.H., from Boston University, and... (Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News)
Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News - May 30, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Member Highlights: Poughkeepsie Public Library District, Poughkeepsie, NY
Library Speaker Series with the MidHudson Regional Hospital The Poughkeepsie Public Library District has offered a Health & Wellness speaker series, beginning in January 2018, presented by staff from the MidHudson Regional Hospital. All of the programs within this series discussed easy ways to implement suggested life-style changes into participants’ daily lives. Nancy Case, MS, RDN, CDN Paul Hanna, MD Syed Naqvi, MD, FAAC Corey Scurlock, MD, MBA Zubair M. Khan, MD, and Lisa McKevitt, RRT, RPSGT, RST Nutrition for a New Year (January 2018) – Presented by Outpatient Dietitian Nancy Case, MS, RDN, CDN, thi...
Source: NN/LM Middle Atlantic Region Blog - May 29, 2018 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Hannah Sinemus Tags: Member Highlights Source Type: news

Whether or not you are susceptible to traveler’s diarrhea depends on the protein content of your saliva, according to new research
(Natural News) Traveler’s diarrhea can be either inconvenient or fatal, depending on its severity. However, thanks to research, experts are one step closer to discovering how we can protect ourselves from this infectious disease. According to a research team from the Boston University School of Medicine (BUSM), they have successfully identified histatin-5, a protein in saliva that can protect the body... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - May 25, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

BU: Religious refusal laws harm sexual minority mental health
(Boston University School of Medicine) A new study led by a Boston University School of Public Health (BUSPH) researcher has found that state laws permitting the denial of services to same-sex couples because of religious or moral beliefs harm the mental health of sexual minority adults in those states. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 23, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Boston nonprofit tackling 'superbugs' gets $52M from Gates foundation, U.K.
An accelerator program based at Boston University that funds the development of potential life-saving antibacterial drugs will receive up to $52 million from the U.K. government and the Bill& Melinda Gates Foundation. The public-private partnership, called Combating Antibiotic Resistant Bacteria Biopharmaceutical Accelerator — or CARB-X — announced the new funding on Tuesday. CARB-X said it has now raised more than $500 million since being launched in July 2016 by the U.S. Department of Health… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care News Headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care News Headlines - May 22, 2018 Category: Health Management Authors: Max Stendahl Source Type: news

Crises, Calamities, and Chaos: How Public Health Can Improve Response to Emerging Threats Wherever They Arise
Boston University. 04/30/2018 This 46-minute presentation discusses how, from Ebola to Zika, from hurricanes to opioids, threats to health make headlines and challenge the public health response. Lessons learned from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's engagements around the world, and in everyone's backyard, suggest a role for everyone in mitigating risk and building resilience. (Video or Multimedia) (Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Guide for Disaster Medicine and Public Health)
Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Guide for Disaster Medicine and Public Health - May 16, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: The U.S. National Library of Medicine Source Type: news

Changing the Climate: How Public Health, Cities, and the Media Can Advance Climate Solutions
Boston University. 04/20/2018 This day-long symposium brings together thought leaders from public health, cities, and journalism to develop strategies that bring greater attention to, and produce visionary actions that address, the global climate challenge. Panelists discuss how many cities are developing far-sighted policies to reduce carbon emissions while also adapting to ongoing changes. Public health researchers are documenting how urban climate solutions can directly benefit the health of local residents, but this research has not yet been communicated in a manner that has motivated effective action. (Video or Multim...
Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Guide for Disaster Medicine and Public Health - May 16, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: The U.S. National Library of Medicine Source Type: news

BU researcher receives competitive $100,000 NIH grant
(Boston University School of Medicine) Duo Zhang, Ph.D., a postdoctoral associate at Boston University School of Medicine, has received the highly competitive National Institutes of Health Pathway to Independence (K99) Award. The award helps facilitate the transition of postdoctoral researchers from mentored positions to independent tenure-track or faculty positions and helps launch research careers. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 15, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Dementia risk soars for middle aged people who are under weight
People who are widowed, struggle to sleep, and have low weight in their 50s and 60s have a much higher risk of developing the disease down the line, Boston University found. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - May 8, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Age, marital status, BMI and sleep associated with risk for dementia
(Boston University School of Medicine) Could your age, marital status, BMI (body mass index) and amount of sleep impact your risk for dementia? Researchers at Boston University School of Medicine (BUSM) analyzed data from the Framingham Heart Study (FHS) to identify new combinations of risk factors that are linked to increased risk of dementia in later life. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 8, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Nature or nurture: unravelling the roots of childhood behaviour disorders
Studies on young children have identified a genetic link for some such disorders, but environmental factors also have an effectHumans have succeeded as a species in large part because of our ability to cooperate and coordinate witheach other. These skills are driven by a range of “moral emotions” such as guilt and empathy, which help us to navigate the nuance of social interactions appropriately.Those who lack moral emotions are classed as having “callous-unemotional” traits: persistent personality characteristics that make negotiating social situations difficult. The combination of callous-unemotio...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - May 4, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Greg Chapman, research scientist, Boston University Twin Project Tags: Psychology Science Mental health Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder Genetics Biology Society Medical research Source Type: news

Study Raises New Questions About Safety Of Youth Football
BOSTON (CBS) – A new study from the Boston University School of Medicine raises more questions about the safety of youth tackle football. Researchers focused on 211 football players who were diagnosed with chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) after death and found that those who began tackle football before age 12 developed cognitive, behavioral and mood symptoms on average 13 years earlier than other players. CTE, believed to be caused by repetitive blows to the head, leads to profound degeneration of the brain. The researchers found for every one year younger that a player began tackle football, he developed symp...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - April 30, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Boston News Health Syndicated Local Watch Listen CTE Dr. Mallika Marshall Source Type: news

Youth football may inflict damage on players' mood and behavior
Every one year younger that they took up the sport was associated with earlier onset of cognitive problems by 2.4 years, and of mood problems by 2.5 years, Boston University found. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - April 30, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Youth football may inflict irreparable damage on players' mood, emotion and behavior
Every one year younger that they took up the sport was associated with earlier onset of cognitive problems by 2.4 years, and of mood problems by 2.5 years, Boston University found. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - April 30, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Playing Youth Tackle Football Is Linked to Earlier Symptoms of Brain Disease
This study has limitations. The brains used in this study may not represent those of the broader tackle football population, because most ex-football players, and their families, chose to donate their brains to shed light on their cognitive and behavioral struggles. Still, the results are alarming. “The data supports that you should not play tackle football until you’re more physically mature,” says McKee, whose future work will attempt to define a sort of tipping point for tackle football: how long can kids play before the risks rise exponentially? Last week, California lawmakers dropped legislation bann...
Source: TIME: Health - April 30, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Sean Gregory Tags: Uncategorized Brain healthytime onetime Source Type: news

First radiologist to receive clinical research award from osteoarthritis research
(Boston University School of Medicine) Ali Guermazi, M.D., Ph.D., assistant dean of diversity and professor of radiology at Boston University School of Medicine, and vice chairman of academic affairs in the department of radiology at Boston Medical Center, is the recipient of Osteoarthritis Research Society International Clinical Research Award for his outstanding work in the field of imaging. Guermazi is the first radiologist to receive this honor. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 30, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

BU: Smoking, alcohol consumption increase lifetime risk of atrial fibrillation
(Boston University School of Medicine) A new study co-authored by Boston University School of Public Health (BUSPH) researchers found that among individuals aged 55 years or older, the overall lifetime risk of atrial fibrillation (AF) was 37 percent and was influenced by the burden of risk factors. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 30, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Protein responsible for Leukemia's aggressiveness identified
(Boston University School of Medicine) Researchers have identified a protein critical for the aggressiveness of T-cell leukemia, a subtype of leukemia that afflicts children and adults. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - April 27, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Upgrading the immune system to fight cancer
(Boston University College of Engineering) New research has opened the door to reducing serious side effects of CAR-T therapy while enhancing its effectiveness. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - April 26, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

BU study: Egyptian fruit bat genome yields clues to protection
(Boston University) The study examined the genome of Rousettus aegyptiacus, the Egyptian fruit bat, and found larger-than-expected families of genes related to the mammalian immune system. Specifically, researchers found large families of interferon and natural killer genes that differed dramatically from their counterparts in other mammals. The finding, published online and featured in the May 2018 print edition of Cell, may eventually lead to a deeper understanding of virus transmission, and better treatments for humans who become infected. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - April 26, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

BU: Obese patients underrepresented in cancer clinical trials
(Boston University School of Medicine) A new review by Boston University School of Public Health researchers found that less than one-fifth of participants in cancer-related clinical trials are obese. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - April 25, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Doctors prescribe opioids at high rates to those at increased overdose risk, but trends improving, study finds
The number of first-time prescriptions for opioid drugs has not risen since about 2010, according to UCLA researchers. However, patients taking a class of drug known to increase the risk for overdoses were likelier to receive a first-time opioid prescription — a combination that could be linked to the current surge in opioid-related deaths.People with chronic pain are often prescribed a class of medications called “benzodiazepines” to treat anxiety, panic attacks and other mental conditions that can be brought on by the stress of coping with their pain. But these people also are likelier to receive new op...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - April 24, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

BU medical student receives student fellowship from Alpha Omega Alpha
(Boston University School of Medicine) Melissa Chua, a fourth-year medical student at Boston University School of Medicine (BUSM), has received the Alpha Omega Alpha (AOA) Carolyn L. Kuckein Student Research Fellowship. The purpose of the award is to foster the development of the next generation of medical researchers. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 23, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

BU: Guns used in cross-border crimes originate from states with more lax laws
(Boston University School of Medicine) Opponents of gun control have frequently pointed to high rates of gun violence in cities such as Chicago to argue that strong state gun control laws are not effective.But guns used in states with stricter gun laws typically flow from states with weaker laws, according to a new study from Boston University School of Public Health (BUSPH) researchers. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 23, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Upswings in older-age cognitive ability may not be universal
(Boston University School of Medicine) A study of a majority-black cohort, led by a Boston University School of Public Health (BUSPH) researcher, finds no clear upward trend in cognitive abilities among older adults. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 23, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Researchers optimize lung stem cell engineering process
(Boston Medical Center) The Center for Regenerative Medicine (CReM) at Boston University and Boston Medical Center has engineered two new categories of lung epithelial cells in vitro using pluripotent stem cells. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 12, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

BU medical student receives Fulbright Award to India
(Boston University School of Medicine) Nina Gummadi, a third-year medical student at Boston University School of Medicine, has received a Fulbright Scholar Award to India. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 11, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

UCLA scientists discover that cells contain mitochondria specialized to build fats
Mitochondria, known to most people as the “powerhouses of the cell,” have been recognized for decades as the cellular organelle where sugars and fats are oxidized to generate energy. Now, new research by UCLA scientists has found that not all mitochondria fit this definition. Within each cell a group of specialized mitochondria can be f ound attached to fat droplets. Rather than burn fat to create energy, these specialized mitochondria are responsible for providing the energy to build and store fat molecules.“This is really a whole new view of mitochondria and what they can do,” said lead author Dr....
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - April 6, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Scientists Worry Scott Pruitt ’s New EPA Change Will Harm Life-Saving Research
Michelle Bell’s 2004 study linking short-term exposure to air pollution to increased risk of death was a breakthrough. Previous research had shown how the pollutant ozone damages human health, but Bell’s was the first to show persuasively how damaging even a short exposure can be to the respiratory and cardiovascular systems. What made Bell’s study possible — and distinguished it from previous research — was the ability to analyze huge amounts of health data from people in 95 urban areas across the country. “We need this data to do the research and we need the research to make the most e...
Source: TIME: Science - March 30, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Justin Worland Tags: Uncategorized Environment EPA Scott Pruitt Source Type: news

NIH-funded study to use Trak, a home fertility test for men
Sandstone Diagnostics ’ Trak Male Fertility Testing System will be used in an NIH-funded study being conducted by Boston University and Stanford University, according to a statement. The Pregnancy Study Online (PRESTO) studies the effect of lifestyle factors on fertility, miscarriage, and birth outcomes. (Source: mobihealthnews)
Source: mobihealthnews - March 29, 2018 Category: Information Technology Source Type: news

Potential biomarkers in animals could signal Ebola virus infection before symptoms appear
(US Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases) Scientists have identified potential biomarkers in nonhuman primates exposed to Ebola virus (EBOV) that appeared up to four days before the onset of fever, according to research published today in the journal Science Translational Medicine. The work, a collaboration between the U.S. Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases (USAMRIID) and Boston University (BU), could pave the way for developing diagnostic tools to identify EBOV infection in humans even before symptoms appear. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - March 28, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

BU study: Diagnosing Ebola before symptoms arrive
(Boston University) Boston University researchers studied data from 12 monkeys exposed to Ebola virus, and discovered a common pattern of immune response among the ones that got sick. This response occurred four days before the onset of fever -- the first observable symptom of infection. The work, published in the journal Science Translational Medicine, suggests a possible biomarker for early diagnosis of the disease. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - March 28, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Aethlon Medical biz Exosome Science readies CTE biomarker trial of ex-NFL players
The objective of our Exosome Sciences subsidiary is to further reinforce the clinical observations that resulted from our first study in former NFL players and then translate these outcomes into functional products that help those at risk of suffering from CTE and potentially other neurological disorders that involve the abnormal aggregation of Tau protein in the brain,” Aethlon Medical CEO Jim Joyce said in a prepared statement. Sample collection in the study is being conducted in collaboration with Translational Genomics Research Institute’s Center for Noninvasive Diagnostics co-director Dr. Kendall Van ...
Source: Mass Device - March 22, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Fink Densford Tags: Clinical Trials Neurological Aethlon Medical Inc. Exosome Sciences Source Type: news

BU: Children of centenarians feel stronger purpose in life
(Boston University School of Medicine) A sense of meaning and direction in life is associated with living longer and experiencing less disease, disability, and cognitive impairment.Now, a new study co-authored by Boston University School of Public Health (BUSPH) researchers has found that the children of centenarians, who tend to have similar healthy aging patterns and long lives like their parents, are also much more likely than the general population to have a strong sense of purpose. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - March 20, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Record Numbers of College Students Are Seeking Treatment for Depression and Anxiety — But Schools Can’t Keep Up
Not long after Nelly Spigner arrived at the University of Richmond in 2014 as a Division I soccer player and aspiring surgeon, college began to feel like a pressure cooker. Overwhelmed by her busy soccer schedule and heavy course load, she found herself fixating on how each grade would bring her closer to medical school. “I was running myself so thin trying to be the best college student,” she says. “It almost seems like they’re setting you up to fail because of the sheer amount of work and amount of classes you have to take at the same time, and how you’re also expected to do so much.” ...
Source: TIME: Health - March 19, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Katie Reilly Tags: Uncategorized College Education onetime Source Type: news

Clinical medicine training prepares medical students to treat transgender patients
(The Endocrine Society) Medical students who are specifically trained in clinical transgender medicine are better prepared to treat transgender patients, a new study from Boston University School of Medicine suggests. The study results will be presented in a poster Saturday, March 17, at ENDO 2018, the 100th annual meeting of the Endocrine Society in Chicago, Ill. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - March 17, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

BU: Brazil yellow fever outbreak necessitates vaccines
(Boston University School of Medicine) Brazil is in the midst of a yellow fever outbreak, with the mosquito-borne virus reaching popular tourist destinations that do not normally see the disease. Since January 2018, 10 cases of yellow fever have been confirmed in international travelers visiting Brazil, including four deaths. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - March 16, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Researchers create 3-D structure of the nuclear pore complex
(Boston University School of Medicine) For the first time, researchers have produced a nearly complete three-dimensional structure for the yeast Nuclear Pore Complex (NPC). This discovery represents a major step toward identifying the atomic structure of the NPC, which soon may provide researchers with a better understanding of how the central transport channel functions. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - March 14, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Fertility Clinic Meltdowns Destroyed Frozen Eggs and Embryos. What Happens Now?
Simultaneous refrigeration failures at two fertility clinics in San Francisco and suburban Cleveland have damaged or destroyed potentially thousands of frozen eggs and embryos in the biggest such loss on record in the U.S. The malfunctions have left parents-to-be heartbroken and baffled experts. Here are some questions and answers about the two cases. ___ What happened? In Ohio, University Hospitals Cleveland Medical Center estimates 2,000 eggs and embryos may have been damaged or destroyed when an unexplained storage tank malfunction caused temperatures to rise on March 4. The medical center apologized. On the same day in...
Source: TIME: Health - March 13, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Carla K. Johnson / AP Tags: Uncategorized APH fertility healthytime onetime Source Type: news

Study: Doctors Who Prescribe More Opioids Make More Money
This study suggests that conflicts of interest with the pharmaceutical industry may influence oncologists in high-stakes treatment decisions for patients with cancer,” the authors concluded. Some studies have looked at whether the amount of money a doctor receives makes a difference. Studies by researchers at Yale University, the George Washington University Milken Institute of Public Health and Harvard Medical School have all found that the more money physicians are paid by pharmaceutical companies, the more likely they are to prescribe certain drugs. Dr. Patrice Harris, a spokeswoman for the American Medical Associ...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - March 12, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Health News Local TV opioid crisis opioids Source Type: news

T2 Biosystems lands $2m grant for ‘ superbug ’ test
T2 Biosystems won a $2 million grant to develop a test using its T2Dx MR-based technology to detect strains of drug-resistant bacteria or so-called “superbugs.” The grant is from Carb-X, a Boston University-based public-private partnership aimed at furthering anti-bacterial R&D that’s jointly funded by the U.S. Health & Human Services Dept.’s Biomedical Advanced Research & Development Authority and the Wellcome Trust. The group has a $455 million war chest to deploy until 2021 to back the development of new antibiotics, therapeutics, vaccines, rapid diagnostics and devices to treat ...
Source: Mass Device - March 8, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Brad Perriello Tags: Diagnostics Funding Roundup T2 Biosystems Inc. Source Type: news

Saliva plays a role in the body's defense against traveler's diarrhea
(Boston University School of Medicine) Researchers have identified a protein in saliva (histatin-5) that protects the body from traveler's diarrhea.The findings, available online in the Journal of Infectious Diseases, may lead to the development of new preventive therapies for the disease. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - March 8, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news