Anxiety Ruled This Lawyer's Life. Until He Tried Meditation.
A 500-square-foot Midtown studio in New York City is quietly becoming a temple for the anxious, the overworked and the curious. There are 26 seats. From inside the studio windows, you peer over taxi cabs crowding 5th Avenue below and if you put your nose right up to the glass, you can see the needle of the Empire State building looming large, piercing upwards into the sky. Ben Turshen opened the single door to his meditation studio less than six weeks ago and he has only been teaching the practice for two years. But his following is growing, perhaps because he’s the most unlikely of teachers. “I didn’t...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - May 18, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Anxiety Ruled This Lawyer's Life. Until He Tried Meditation.
A 500-square-foot Midtown studio in New York City is quietly becoming a temple for the anxious, the overworked and the curious. There are 26 seats. From inside the studio windows, you peer over taxi cabs crowding 5th Avenue below and if you put your nose right up to the glass, you can see the needle of the Empire State building looming large, piercing upward into the sky. Ben Turshen opened the single door to his meditation studio less than six weeks ago and he has only been teaching the practice for two years. But his following is growing, perhaps because he’s the most unlikely of teachers. “I didn’t ...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - May 18, 2015 Category: Science Source Type: news

Could A Bionic Pancreas Be Ready By 2017?
A bionic pancreas device that automatically controls blood sugar levels has been developed by researchers at Boston University and may be ready for market by late 2017. Artificial pancreas systems have the potential to help millions of diabetics avoid the risks associated with unpredictable fluctuations in blood sugar level. (Source: Medical Design Online News)
Source: Medical Design Online News - May 18, 2015 Category: Medical Equipment Source Type: news

Report recommends new approach to college drinking
(Boston University Medical Center) Social media messaging, screening and interventions offer new tools to help colleges prevent and reduce excessive drinking, according to a report authored by a Boston University School of Public Health researcher, working with a group of experts. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 18, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Study validates effectiveness of genomic test for lung cancer detection
(Boston University Medical Center) A new test co-developed by a Boston University School of Medicine researcher will allow patients suspected of having lung cancer to be subjected to fewer and less-invasive tests to determine if they have the disease. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - May 17, 2015 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

What the F Is Wrong With Parents Who Buy Booze for Their Kids?
For the past two years, I have gone into local high schools around prom time to speak to juniors and seniors about drugs and alcohol. I am really honest with them. I show them my mugshot from when I got a DUI with a blood alcohol level of .24. I show them the substance abuse treatment facility I went to. And I show them a picture of my brother who died at the age of 29 from a prescription drug overdose as well as a picture of where he is buried. I let them know that they if they are an alcoholic or addict and they don't choose recovery, then their other options are jails, institutions or death. Although my motives aren't t...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - May 15, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

New York State Is Pushing Back On Health Care Discrimination Against Transgender People
New York State is kicking off a health care initiative to improve services for transgender people, state officials announced Friday. “My office is committed to ensuring equal and respectful access to medical care for all New Yorkers, regardless of their gender identity,” Attorney General Eric Schneiderman said in a statement. His office is partnering on the initiative with the Greater New York Hospital Association, Mt. Sinai Health Systems and Lambda Legal, an LGBT civil rights organization. The push will provide increased protections for transgender people receiving health care services, and aims to help cl...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - May 15, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

BMC wins 2015 Greenhealth Emerald Award and Circles of Excellence Climate Award
(Boston University Medical Center) Boston Medical Center is the recipient of the 2015 Greenhealth Emerald Award and the Circles for Excellence Award by Practice Greenhealth in recognition of the hospital's sustainability efforts and innovation. BMC is the only Boston hospital to receive the Greenhealth Emerald Award and only hospital in the country selected to receive the Circles of Excellence Climate Award. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 15, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

No link found between PTSD and cancer risk
(Boston University Medical Center) In the largest study to date that examines post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) as a risk factor for cancer, researchers from Boston University School of Medicine, have shown no evidence of an association. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - May 13, 2015 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Boston University students awarded fellowships by the Howard Hughes Medical Institute
(Boston University Medical Center) Two medical students from Boston University have been selected by the Howard Hughes Medical Institute to conduct full-time biomedical research in its Medical Research Fellows Program. Joseph Park and Jacqueline Estevez are two of the selected 68 top medical and veterinary students from 37 different schools in the United States to receive this honor. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 13, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Recreational drug use on weekends often morphs into daily use, BU study finds
(Boston University Medical Center) More than half of patients who report 'weekend-only' drug use end up expanding their drug use to weekdays, too -- suggesting that primary care clinicians should monitor patients who acknowledge 'recreational' drug use, says a new study by Boston University public health and medicine researchers. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 13, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Study finds repetitive brain injuries may accelerate aging, dementia risk
(Boston University Medical Center) Repetitive head injuries that occur during contact sports and military service may accelerate the aging process by increasing the build-up of beta-amyloid in the brain, leading to worse disease and an increased likelihood of developing dementia. In particular, boxers fared the worst among athletes and military veterans with a history of head injuries. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 12, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Toxic Turf? Movement Grows Against Synthetic Turf
The following story was reported by the New England Center for Investigative Reporting, an independent, nonprofit news center based at Boston University and WGBH News, and published here in collaboration with The Huffington Post. NECIR trains the next generation of journalists in investigative reporting with summer high school workshops in Boston. Click here to learn more and apply today. Artificial turf fields, cushioned with recycled crushed tires and increasingly in demand for US athletic complexes, are getting some serious pushback. In Swampscott last week, town meeting members approved plans to install a new synthet...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - May 9, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

University Report Card 2.0: Global Equity and Biomedical Research
Co-authored with Merith Basey (Executive Director, Universities Allied for Essential Medicines), Warren Kaplan (Clinical Assistant Professor, Global Health Center for Global Health & Development,Boston University School of Public Health) This year at the Consortium of Universities for Global Health Conference, Atul Gawande, surgeon, writer and public health researcher, made the following statement during his opening remarks: "There are more than 60,000 known ways the bodies' 13 organ systems can go wrong with over 4000 medical procedures and 6000 medicines found in the last 100 years to treat and prevent those f...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - May 4, 2015 Category: Science Source Type: news

Laurie Letvak
Vice President and Head of Clinical Development Policy Dr. Laurie Letvak is Vice President and Head of Clinical Development Policy at Novartis, a position she has held since June 2014. Laurie has been with Novartis for 20 years in a variety of positions.  She played a key role in the development of Gleevec® since joining the International Project Team in 2001, responsible for Global Medical Affairs.   She led the development of the Medical Affairs program, which resulted in many key studies, some of which have provided the data for new indications for Gleevec ®, including Ph+ ALL and Adjuvant GIST.&n...
Source: PHRMA - May 4, 2015 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Ali Source Type: news

Pacquiao, Mayweather, and the Physics of Getting Punched in the Head
In a perfect world, a highly trained, heavily muscled man would not punch you in the head. Fortunately for most of us, the world is indeed perfect in that one small way. But most of us aren’t boxers. For those who are–say, Floyd Mayweather Jr. and Manny Pacquiao, who square off this weekend in a matchup dubbed “the fight of the century“—getting punched in the head by highly trained men is an occupational hazard. The payday can be huge, but the price—in terms of traumatic brain injury—can be very high. Plenty of sports are hard on the brain. Organized football, from Pop Warner up th...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - May 1, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jeffrey Kluger Tags: Uncategorized Boxing chronic traumatic encephalopathy CTE Floyd Mayweather Jr. Manny Pacquiao Science Sports TBI traumatic brain injury Source Type: news

Vergara Lawsuit Raises Ethical Questions About Frozen Embryos
http://media.boston.cbslocal.com/CBSBOS_3004201517503700000AA.mp4 BOSTON (CBS) – The former fiancé of Sofia Vergara is suing the high profile actress to protect two frozen embryos they made together. Vergara has moved on from her relationship to Nick Loeb, but he wrote an impassioned op-ed in the New York Times saying he wants to become a parent even if she doesn’t. The two had signed a consent form stating that any embryos they created could only be brought to term if both of them agreed. But Loeb claims it should be void because California law requires no mention of what would happen if they ...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - April 30, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: deanreddington Tags: Health Local News Seen On WBZ-TV Syndicated Local Watch Listen Beth Germano frozen embryos Nick Loeb Sofia Vergara Source Type: news

Study finds biomarkers linked to NFL players' brain injuries
Researchers at the Boston University School of Medicine & Exosome Sciences say they've spotted blood biomarkers linked to a neurodegenerative brain condition in patients who suffer repeated brain trauma. Aethlon Medical Inc., Boston University, Exosome SciencesNews Well, Clinical Trials, Neurologicalread more (Source: Mass Device)
Source: Mass Device - April 29, 2015 Category: Medical Equipment Authors: Mark Hollmer Source Type: news

Well: For Teenagers, Potassium May Matter More Than Salt
Keep your teenager healthy by serving foods high in potassium and stop worrying so much about salt, a new study shows. (Source: NYT)
Source: NYT - April 27, 2015 Category: American Health Authors: TARA PARKER-POPE Tags: Food JAMA Pediatrics (Journal) Boston University Teenagers and Adolescence Lynn L. Moore Featured Diet and Nutrition Source Type: news

Well: For Teenagers, Potassium May Matter More Than Salt
Keep your teenager healthy by serving foods high in potassium and stop worrying so much about salt, a new study shows. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - April 27, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: TARA PARKER-POPE Tags: Food JAMA Pediatrics (Journal) Boston University Teenagers and Adolescence Lynn L. Moore Featured Diet and Nutrition Source Type: news

Well: For Teenagers, Potassium May Matter More Than Salt
Keep your teenager healthy by serving foods high in potassium and stop worrying so much about salt, a new study shows. (Source: NYT)
Source: NYT - April 27, 2015 Category: Nutrition Authors: TARA PARKER-POPE Tags: Food JAMA Pediatrics (Journal) Boston University Teenagers and Adolescence Lynn L. Moore Featured Diet and Nutrition Source Type: news

Study finds cardiorespiratory fitness contributes to successful brain aging
(Boston University Medical Center) Cardiorespiratory fitness may positively impact the structure of white matter in the brains of older adults. These results suggest that exercise could be prescribed to lessen age-related declines in brain structure. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 27, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

BMC develops protocol for preserving forensic evidence after a terrorist attack
(Boston University Medical Center) Boston Medical Center pathologists have developed a set of protocols for processing and preserving forensic evidence, such as shrapnel, bullets and other projectiles, in surgical specimens (i.e. amputated limbs, injured organs, etc.) after a terrorist attack based on lessons learned from the Boston Marathon bombing. Their findings are published online in advance of print in the Archives of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 21, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

ICYMI: An Infuriating History Of Breast Cancer And The Psychological Depth Of ‘YOLO'
ICYMI Health features what we're reading this week. This week, we took a closer look at psychology across disciplines. We were fascinated that 18th-century doctors blamed women for their breast cancer diagnoses and disappointed that new research confirmed what many already suspected: teachers tend to punish black students more harshly than white students for the same infractions. In pop psychology, we learned that living life without regret is the common denominator uniting Miley Cyrus's and Friedrich Nietzsche's world views. Read on and tell us in the comments: What did you read and love this week? 1. The Psychology ...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - April 18, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Forsyth study details how gum disease treatment can prevent heart disease
(Forsyth Institute) A new study from the Forsyth Institute is helping to shed more light on the important connection between the mouth and heart. According to research recently published online by the American Heart Association, scientists at Forsyth and Boston University have demonstrated that using an oral topical remedy to reduce inflammation associated with periodontitis, more commonly known as gum disease, also results in the prevention of vascular inflammation and can lower the risk of heart attack. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - April 14, 2015 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Warning About New ‘Hormone Reset Diet’
http://media.boston.cbslocal.com/CBSBOS_1304201517184300000AA.mp4 BOSTON (CBS) – There’s a newcomer to the diet scene. It’s called the Hormone Reset Diet and it promises to help women lose weight, but Dr. Mallika Marshall says before you sign on, there are some things you should know. This new method was conceived by a doctor, a gynecologist in California. She claims women can lose 15 pounds in 21 days if they follow seven dietary guidelines, each designed to address a specific hormonal imbalance. For example, for estrogen, go meatless and eliminate alcohol. Get rid of fruit to reset the hunge...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - April 13, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: deanreddington Tags: Health Local Syndicated Local Diet Dr. Mallika Marshall hormone reset diet hormones Source Type: news

Study finds emergency departments may help address opioid overdose, education
(Boston University Medical Center) Emergency departments provide a promising venue to address opioid deaths with education on both overdose prevention and appropriate actions in a witnessed overdose. In addition, emergency departments have the potential to equip patients with nasal naloxone rescue kits as part of this effort. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 13, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

The Future of Trauma
Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) has been a mental health condition, classified in the Diagnostic Statistical Manual (DSM) of the American Psychiatric Association (APA), since 1980. The Diagnostic Statistical Manual (DSM-III) in 1980 classified PTSD as an anxiety disorder, DSM IV (1994) and DSM-IV Textual Revision (TR) also reaffirmed PTSD as an anxiety disorder. DSM-5 (2013) reclassified PTSD as a Trauma and Stress-Related Disorder. PTSD in terms of its longevity, 35 years as a recognized diagnosis, can be seen as a young adult. However, the phenomena of intrusive thoughts, nightmares, startle response, psychic nu...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - April 3, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

BMC study: New Hepatitis C treatments cost-effective, but only for selected patients
(Boston University Medical Center) A study led by Boston Medical Center researchers demonstrates that while new therapies to treat Hepatitis C Virus are highly effective, they are cost-effective and provide the greatest value in specific groups of HCV-infected patients. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - March 30, 2015 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Concussion Experts Pick Apart The Myth That Cycling Is More Dangerous Than Football
The idea that bicycling might be more dangerous than football crept back into the national consciousness this week after an NFL-affiliated doctor named Joseph Maroon suggested as much during an appearance on the NFL Network. “It’s much more dangerous riding a bike or a skateboard than playing youth football,” said Maroon, who is a consultant to the NFL’s Head, Neck and Spine Committee and the Pittsburgh Steelers’ team neurosurgeon. Listen to the full interview here. (Source: SoundCloud) It's a startling claim, especially considering the number of parents who fear the effect football could...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - March 20, 2015 Category: Science Source Type: news

Here's What We Know About Football And Brain Injuries
By: Rachael Rettner Published: 03/18/2015 10:51 AM EDT The up-and-coming professional football player Chris Borland, of the San Francisco 49ers, is now leaving the sport out of concern that a career in football would increase his risk of brain disease. But what types of neurological problems have been linked with football, and how might these arise? On Monday (March 16), Borland announced he was retiring from football after studying the link between football head injuries and degenerative brain disease, and discussing his decision with friends, family members, concussion researchers and teammates, according to ESPN. ...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - March 18, 2015 Category: Science Source Type: news

Why The World Should Know The Names Of These 5 Women In STEM
In 2011, women made up only one quarter of the American workforce in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM), and their presence in computer occupations has dropped in the past 20 years. The few trailblazing women who are in STEM today are finding ways to not only advance technology but change the world in the process. These women have embraced being outnumbered as a way to make their projects stand out among those of their male colleagues. Women in STEM industries earn 33 percent more than their non-STEM counterparts, and the gender wage gap in STEM jobs is narrower than in non-STEM jobs. With growing im...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - March 16, 2015 Category: Science Source Type: news

Study of veterans finds family support during deployment reduces suicidal thoughts
(Boston University Medical Center) Family support during deployment is an important protective factor against post-deployment suicidal ideation according to a new study in the journal Anxiety, Stress and Coping. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - March 16, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Syria's Historical Artifacts Aren't Just Being Destroyed By ISIS, They're Being Looted
Every week, we bring you one overlooked aspect of the stories that made news in recent days. You noticed the media forgot all about another story's basic facts? Tweet @TheWorldPost or let us know on our Facebook page. The first reports that Islamic State militants were destroying cultural heritage sites came soon after the group seized large swaths of Iraq and Syria last year. Such accounts have since become commonplace. The famed ancient Assyrian capital of Khorsabad, which had survived for 2,700 years, was reportedly ransacked and razed this month. Also in March, militants reportedly bulldozed the ancient city of Nimr...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - March 13, 2015 Category: Science Source Type: news

Some Boston institutions cut salaries to grapple with NIH declines
Working towards the Nobel Prize may not be as lucrative as it once was, as researchers at some Boston institutions have had to take pay cuts to accommodate dips in federal funding. Salary reductions are one way that institutions like Boston University School of Medicine and its sister research institution, Boston Medical Center, are working to grapple with funding dips from the National Institutes of Health, which has has decreased in recent years in inflation-adjusted dollars. "People have always… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines - March 12, 2015 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Jessica Bartlett Source Type: news

Some Boston institutions cut salaries to grapple with NIH declines
Working towards the Nobel Prize may not be as lucrative as it once was, as researchers at some Boston institutions have had to take pay cuts to accommodate dips in federal funding. Salary reductions are one way that institutions like Boston University School of Medicine and its sister research institution, Boston Medical Center, are working to grapple with funding dips from the National Institutes of Health, which has has decreased in recent years in inflation-adjusted dollars. "People have always… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - March 12, 2015 Category: Biotechnology Authors: Jessica Bartlett Source Type: news

Mobilizing research for global health theme of 6th annual CUGH conference
(University of Washington Health Sciences/UW Medicine) The sixth annual Consortium of Universities for Global Health conference is creating a stir by bringing together some of the world's leading researchers to tackle some of the biggest global health challenges we face.'This is shaping up to be our best conference ever,' said Dr. Gerald Keusch, conference chair and professor of medicine and public health at Boston University.More than 1,600 people will be gathering at the conference March 25-28 from 50 countries. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - March 10, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

​The BBJ's Five Things: Nat'l Napping Day; PAX lookback; Apple launch; Braude begins
Good morning, Boston! Today is National Napping Day, the day following the return of daylight savings time. Did you know it was created by a Boston University professor and his wife in 1999 to showcase the many health benefits of napping? The benefits of napping have been covered in recent years, not only for your preschooler, but for your employees as well. Scientific evidence has shown that a nap can boost mood and performance, and some workplaces have even created "nap rooms." According to Fast… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines - March 9, 2015 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Doug Banks Source Type: news

JAMA Viewpoint: Young African-American men deserve better from health care
(Boston University Medical Center) Healthcare spending is at an all-time high in the US, yet young African-American men see little benefit, according to Boston Medical Center researchers' Viewpoint commentary published in the current issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association. The researchers note that black men have a life expectancy nearly five years less than white men. While heart disease and cancer contribute to this decreased life expectancy, homicide also plays a large role. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - March 9, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

BMJ study: Hip, knee volumes rose after RomneyCare hit Massachusetts
Utilization rates for hip and knee replacement procedures rose after Massachusetts pioneering universal healthcare program went into effect under former Gov. Mitt Romney, according to a study in the British Medical Journal. The utilization rate for hip and knee replacements jumped in Massachusetts in the wake of its pioneering universal healthcare plan, enacted under former Gov. Mitt Romney in 2006, according to a recent study published in the British Medical Journal. Boston Medical Center, Boston University, British Medical Journal, MassachusettsNews Well, Healthcare Reform, Medical Device Tax, Orthopedicsread...
Source: Mass Device - March 6, 2015 Category: Medical Equipment Authors: Brad Perriello Source Type: news

Review article provides new insights on how tumors metastasize
(Boston University Medical Center) In a review article recently published in the journal Clinical and Translational Medicine, researchers from Boston University School of Medicine shed new light on the underlying processes of tumor metastasis and highlight the role of epigenetics in this process. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - March 6, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Boston Medical Center to play key role in back pain treatment study
(Boston University Medical Center) Boston Medical Center (BMC) researchers are part of a national clinical trial that will examine how best to treat acute low back pain and potentially prevent it from being chronic. BMC will receive $2.3 million for its role in the five-year study that was recently approved for a $14 million award by the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - March 6, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Race/ethnicity sometimes associated with overuse of medical care
(Boston University Medical Center) Racial and ethnic disparities in the receipt of health care -- typically referring to minorities not receiving needed care -- are well known. A recent review in the journal Milbank Memorial Quarterly has now found that while race/ethnicity is not consistently associated with the overuse of medical care, unnecessary care that does not improve patient outcomes. However, when overuse occurs, a substantial proportion occurs among white patients. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - March 6, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

People with gout have lower risk of Alzheimer’s disease
Conclusion This population-based study has found that people with gout had a 24% reduced risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease. It was a well-designed study, in that there were large numbers of people in each group and multiple potential confounding factors were taken into account. The validation of the study was also valuable in showing the expected lack of a link between osteoarthritis and Alzheimer’s disease. However, there are some limitations with this type of study, with a major one being that it cannot prove cause and effect. While some potential confounding factors were accounted for in the statistical...
Source: NHS News Feed - March 5, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Medical practice Neurology Older people Source Type: news

A couch potato lifestyle doesn't just make you fat - it also shrinks your BRAIN
Men and women who were unfit in their 40s had less grey matter by the time they hit 60 - and performed less well in mental agility tests, the Boston University study found. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - March 5, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

AHA: MRI links physical fitness, brain volume
Using MRI, researchers from Boston University School of Medicine found that (more) (Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines)
Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines - March 4, 2015 Category: Radiology Source Type: news

Study: 15% Of Boston Toddlers Drink Coffee
BOSTON (CBS) — Researchers have found something surprising in Boston baby bottles. According to a new study by Boston Medical Center, about 15 percent of 2-year-olds drink as much as four ounces of coffee a day. At the age of one year, between two and three percent of the infants studied were drinking coffee. At two years, that number grew to 15 percent — consuming on average a little more than an ounce of coffee a day. “Our results show that many infants and toddlers in Boston – and perhaps in the US – are being given coffee and that this could be associated with cultural practices,&rdqu...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - March 3, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: nealjriley Tags: Health Local News Syndicated Local Boston Boston Medical Center Coffee coffee babies Diane Stern WBZ NewsRadio 1030 Source Type: news

Researchers identify genes responsible for lung tumors
(Boston University Medical Center) The lung transcription factor Nkx2-1 is an important gene regulating lung formation and normal respiratory functions after birth. Alterations in the expression of this transcription factor can lead to diseases such as lung interstitial disease, post-natal respiratory distress and lung cancer. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - March 2, 2015 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Better insurance access leads to more hip, knee replacements among minorities
(Boston University Medical Center) Researchers at Boston Medical Center have found that the expansion of insurance coverage in Massachusetts increased the number of elective knee and hip replacement procedures by 4.7 percent, with greater increases among black and Hispanic patients. The findings are published online in advance of print in the British Medical Journal. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 26, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Study finds hormone therapy in transgender adults safe
(Boston University Medical Center) In the most comprehensive review to date addressing the relative safety of hormone therapy for transgender persons, researchers from Boston University School of Medicine have found that hormone therapy in transgender adults is safe. The findings, which appear in the Journal of Clinical and Translational Endocrinology, may help reduce the barriers for transgender individuals to receive medical care. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 24, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news