How student-led curriculum is driving changes in Boston
Student leaders at Boston University Schools of Medicine and Public Health have devised a new way to provide health care to homeless patients in Boston and advocate on their behalf. About 7,250 men, women and children are homeless in the city. Here’s how BU’s medical students are making a big difference. Students in the Homeless Health Care Curriculum at Boston University grasp difficult lessons in public health while advancing their knowledge of patient care, clinical skills and health disparities—all essential to the development of patient-centered physicians, said Theresa (Tess) Timmes, a third-year ...
Source: AMA Wire - October 12, 2015 Category: Journals (General) Authors: amamod Source Type: news

Boston University Sports Medicine Fellowship 2016 Position Available
Boston University Sports Medicine Fellowship program is seeking to fill an opening for August 2016. This is a 1-year ACGME accredited fellowship program. (Source: Orthogate - Latest News)
Source: Orthogate - Latest News - October 10, 2015 Category: Orthopaedics Tags: Featured Fellowship News Source Type: news

High dose chemo & stem cell transplantation results in long-term survival for amyloid patients
(Boston University Medical Center) Patients with Light-chain amyloidosis who are treated with high-dose chemotherapy and autologous (one's own) stem cell transplantation (HDM/SCT) have the greatest success for long-term survival. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - October 8, 2015 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

BMC receives award to study impact of diabetes self-management education
(Boston University Medical Center) The National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK) has awarded a $783,906 grant to Suzanne Mitchell, M.D., a family physician at Boston Medical Center (BMC), to study health outcomes of minority women with type 2 diabetes who participate in group medical visits to help them manage their diabetes. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - October 8, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Challenges in Implementation of the Primary Care Assessment Tool (PCAT) in Vietnam (Kristin Shaw MPH)
On completion of this presentation, participants should be able to: ? Describe the goals and objectives of the PCAT study ? Explain the challenges of the PCAT study implementation in low-resource settings ? Apply lessons learned to future research studies In an effort to assess and assure the quality of primary care delivery, a series of Primary Care Assessment Tools (PCAT) was developed by Barbara Starfield at John Hopkins University. The purpose of the PCAT study is to collect information that will be used to develop policies and programs to improve the current system of primary health care. The tools assess 7 principle...
Source: Family Medicine Digital Resources Library (FMDRL) Recently Uploaded - October 6, 2015 Category: Primary Care Source Type: news

Researchers discover role of microglia during early progression of Alzheimer's disease
(Boston University Medical Center) For the first time, researchers have determined how toxic tau fibrils spread by the help of brain immune cells called microglia during the early stages of Alzheimer's disease. The discovery of this new pathway may lead to a therapeutic target for AD, one that has not been previously identified. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - October 5, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Waking Up to Another (Preventable) Tragedy
The mass shooting Thursday at Umpqua Community College in Oregon is heartbreaking--especially for the students and families directly affected. But it is tragic in a different way for those of us in public health who have followed the trajectory of gun violence in the U.S. and tried to sound a call for change. Firearm deaths are a preventable epidemic. There is no other cause of death that we know how to prevent so readily--and that, time and time again, we do nothing about. And so we wake up today to the latest of more than 40 school shootings this year--the headlines so familiar to us, even as the geography and the face...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - October 2, 2015 Category: Science Source Type: news

Outrage of the Month: Editors of Prestigious Journal Sacrifice Standards to Defend an Unethical Clinical Trial
Read more in Public Citizen's October Health Letter Since its founding in 1812, the New England Journal of Medicine (NEJM) has established itself as one of the premier medical journals in the world. It earned that reputation through consistent adherence to the highest standards of accuracy, scientific integrity and editorial review. Recently, however, NEJM Editor-in-Chief Jeffrey Drazen and his senior editors have shown a disturbing disregard for the journal's traditionally high standards. This became most apparent when, in 2013, they published a series of pieces that provided a misleading and unbalanced assessment of an u...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - September 29, 2015 Category: Science Source Type: news

Primary care-based addiction treatment lowers substance dependence in people with HIV
(Boston University Medical Center) A program developed at Boston Medical Center, which integrates addiction treatment into primary care for patients with or at risk for HIV, has been shown to lower patients' substance dependence and encourage their engagement in treatment. The findings are published online in the Journal of Substance Abuse Treatment. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 29, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

BMC reduces emergency wait time, improves care for pediatric sickle cell disease patients
(Boston University Medical Center) Boston Medical Center has significantly reduced the amount of time that pediatric patients experiencing pain from sickle cell disease wait before receiving pain medication when they come to the emergency department. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 21, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

New classification system developed for gout
(Boston University Medical Center) A panel of experts and researchers have developed a new classification system for gout, the most common form of inflammatory arthritis. This new system standardizes the classification of this condition using a variety of evidence-based criteria. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 14, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Study: Physician-patient decision making may differ in care of racial/ethnic minorities
(Boston University Medical Center) Racial and ethnic inequalities in medical care are widely documented in literature. However, variations in Americans' experiences with healthcare, specifically regarding physician-patient communication and shared decision-making about treatment plans, are not well understood. A new study from Boston Medical Center, which suggests that a patient's race/ethnicity may influence the amount and type of information they receive from physicians regarding treatment recommendations, is published online in advance of print in the journal Patient Education and Counseling. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 9, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Researchers show effectiveness of non-surgical treatment of lumbar spinal stenosis
(Boston University Medical Center) Patients with spinal stenosis experienced good short term benefit, lasting from weeks to months, after receiving epidural steroid injections. These findings, which appear in a letter in the journal Pain Medicine, contradict a previously published New England Journal Medicine study that found epidural steroid injections were not helpful in spinal stenosis cases. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 4, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Bicycle injuries are mounting, especially in adults
For the past month, the Boston medical community has been mourning the death of Dr. Anita Kurmann, who was killed in a traffic accident while biking to work on a Friday morning. Dr. Kurmann, an endocrine surgeon, was completing a three-year fellowship at Boston University and Harvard-affiliated Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center. She had made great progress with coaxing stem cells to grow into thyroid tissue. Her bicycle has been painted white and chained to a post at the site where she died, one of several “ghost bikes” that commemorate other lives lost in a similar fashion. It’s ironic that Dr. Kurman...
Source: New Harvard Health Information - September 3, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Beverly Merz Tags: Exercise and Fitness Safety bicycle injuries bike injuries bike safety Source Type: news

Newly discovered protein may protect kidney cells from injury
(Boston University Medical Center) A new discovery by Boston University School of Medicine (BUSM) researchers may change how kidney disease is treated in the future.The previously unknown protein transmembrane and immunoglobulin containing 1 (TMIGD1) involved in protecting kidney epithelial cells (cells critical to normal kidney function) from injury, could be a novel target for restoring kidney function from various forms of kidney disease. The findings are published online in the American Journal of Pathology. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 2, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

New genetic mutation identified in melanoma cancer cells
(Boston University Medical Center) There is strong evidence that the protein complex APC/C may function as a tumor suppressor in multiple cancers including lymphoma, colorectal and breast cancer, and now melanoma. A new study has revealed that a genetic mutation leading to repression of a specific protein, Cdh1, which interacts with APC/C, is present in melanoma cancer cells. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 2, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Vicki Kennedy
AttorneyVictoria Reggie Kennedy is an attorney and consultant.  Through VR Kennedy Strategies LLC, she advises clients and assists them in devising strategies to resolve complex business problems, particularly those stemming from regulatory, communications or governance concerns.  Additionally, she assists clients in navigating federal administrative processes as well as in developing and executing strategies to expand their impact in the marketplace. She is the President of the Board and co-founder of the Edward M. Kennedy Institute for the United States Senate in Boston, a non-partisan organization created to e...
Source: PHRMA - September 1, 2015 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Ali Source Type: news

Vicki Kennedy
AttorneyVictoria Reggie Kennedy is an attorney and consultant.  Through VR Kennedy Strategies LLC, she advises clients and assists them in devising strategies to resolve complex business problems, particularly those stemming from regulatory, communications or governance concerns.  Additionally, she assists clients in navigating federal administrative processes as well as in developing and executing strategies to expand their impact in the marketplace. She is the President of the Board and co-founder of the Edward M. Kennedy Institute for the United States Senate in Boston, a non-partisan organization created to e...
Source: PHRMA - September 1, 2015 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Ali Source Type: news

Gene may predict severity of post-traumatic stress disorder
This study is believed to be the first to show that the spindle and kinetochore-associated complex subunit 2 gene may play a role in the development of PTSD. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - September 1, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Medication treatment for opioid use disorders in primary care increases patient access
(Boston University Medical Center) Clinicians at Boston Medical Center showed that expanding the number of sites offering office-based opioid treatment with buprenorphine utilizing addiction nurse care managers, trainings and technical support resulted in more physicians becoming waivered to prescribe buprenorphine and more patients accessing treatment at sites across Massachusetts. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - August 31, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Education positively impacts safe opioid prescribing among clinicians
(Boston University Medical Center) Educating clinicians on how to safely prescribe opioids can help decrease opioid misuse among chronic pain sufferers. These findings, which appear online in the journal Pain Medicine, confirm that education can empower clinicians to make more informed clinical decisions about initiating, continuing, changing or discontinuing opioids for patients suffering from chronic pain based on a careful benefit versus risk/harm assessment. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - August 26, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Opioid receptor gene variations associated with neonatal abstinence syndrome severity
(Boston University Medical Center) A new study led by researchers at Boston Medical Center indicates that variations in opioid receptor genes are associated with more severe neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS) in newborn babies. The findings, published online in Drug & Alcohol Dependence, could help lead to the development of individualized treatment plans tailored to each infants' risk of requiring medication to curb their NAS symptoms, which could help improve these patients' outcomes and reduce how long some stay in the hospital. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - August 25, 2015 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Adverse effects of common prostate enlargement and hair growth drugs: A review
(Boston University Medical Center) Twenty-five percent of men currently taking Finasteride or Dutasteride, popularly known as Proscar and Avodart, for the treatment of benign prostate enlargement, appear not to benefit from taking these medications. Those prescribed Propecia or Avodart for male pattern hair loss (known as alopecia) are also at risk for adverse events elicited by these drugs. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - August 25, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Giving pharmacists the power to combat opioid overdoses
(Boston University Medical Center) In response to the growing opioid crisis, several states, including Massachusetts and Rhode Island, have granted pharmacists the authority to provide naloxone rescue kits without a prescription to at-risk patients. This model of pharmacy-based naloxone education and distribution is one of the public health strategies currently being evaluated at hundreds of pharmacies in both states to determine the impact on opioid overdose death rates. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - August 24, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Impact of sleep disturbance on recovery in veterans with PTSD and TBI
(Boston University Medical Center) Poor sleep may impact treatment and recovery in veterans with Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) and Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI). A review of extensive research on sleep in TBI and PTSD has found that sleep-focused interventions can improve treatment outcomes in veterans. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - August 21, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

How To Drink In College Without Ruining Your Life Or Liver
College is a wonderful time of self-discovery and reading Emily Dickinson on the quad. Also, for some, guzzling Franzia straight from the bag and shotgunning Natty Light in a frat basement. It’s been happening on campuses across the country since way before "Animal House." While plenty of people choose not to drink in college, roughly 3 out of 5 students did as of 2013, according to the National Institute of Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, part of the National Institutes of Health. The NIAAA found at the time that 39 percent of students between the ages of 18 and 22 reported engaging in binge drinki...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - August 18, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

No link found between PTSD and cancer risk
(Boston University Medical Center) In the largest study to date that examines Post Traumatic Stress Disorder as a risk factor for cancer, researchers from Boston University School of Medicine, have shown no evidence of an association. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - August 14, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Education intervention with residents improves understanding of transgender issues
(Boston University Medical Center) The term 'transgender' has made its way into mainstream media, but for many physicians, or physicians-in-training, who do not typically treat transgender patients, transgender medicine is still a mystery. Joshua Safer, MD, FACP, endocrinologist at Boston Medical Center and his colleague conducted an intervention with physician resident trainees and found that by providing education about transgender identity, the residents' knowledge and willingness to assist with hormonal therapy increased significantly. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - August 10, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Study suggests altered brain development among former NFL players
(Boston University Medical Center) Former National Football League players who started playing tackle football before the age of 12 were found to have a higher risk of altered brain development compared to those who started playing at a later age. The study is the first to demonstrate a link between early exposure to repetitive head impacts and later life structural brain changes. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - August 10, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

BMC, RIH and CVS to address pharmacy-based naloxone to combat opioid addiction, overdose
(Boston University Medical Center) Boston Medical Center has received a $1.3 million grant from the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality to support a demonstration project of pharmacy-based naloxone rescue kits to help reduce opioid addiction and overdose death in two New England States: Massachusetts and Rhode Island. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - August 6, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Boston University's 3D map reveals tiny connections between cells
Harvard University researchers hope the map could be used to identify unusual connections between brain cells that could shed light on disorders such as bipolar and depression. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - August 5, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Researchers identify new cancer marker and possible therapeutic target for breast cancer
(Boston University Medical Center) A new way to detect - and perhaps treat -- one of the deadliest types of breast cancer has been found.Led by researchers at Boston University School of Medicine, the study appears online in Breast Cancer Research. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 31, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

There may be a complex market living in your gut
(Claremont Graduate University) Conventional theories used by economists for the past 150 years to explain how societies buy, sell, and trade goods and services may be able to unlock mysteries about the behavior of microbial life on earth, according to a study by researchers from Claremont Graduate University, Boston University, and Columbia University. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - July 31, 2015 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Liver plays role in pneumonia, sepsis susceptibility
(Boston University Medical Center) New evidence highlights the importance of the liver in immunity against bacterial pneumonia. The study is the first of its kind to directly show such a link between liver-produced molecules and pneumonia susceptibility during sepsis. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - July 30, 2015 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

BUSM researchers funded by Melanoma Research Alliance to bring new therapies to patients
(Boston University Medical Center) Boston University School of Medicine researchers Neil Joseph Ganem, PhD and Anurag Singh, PhD, each have received the Jackie King Young Investigator Awards from the Melanoma Research Alliance, the largest private funder of melanoma research. Both serve as assistant professors of pharmacology & experimental therapeutics and medicine. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - July 16, 2015 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Rates of drunk driving tied to state alcohol policies, BU study finds
(Boston University Medical Center) States with more restrictive alcohol policies and regulations have lower rates of self-reported drunk driving, according to a new study by researchers at the Boston University schools of public health and medicine and the University of Minnesota School of Public Health. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 15, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Student Diagnosed With Mumps At Boston University
BOSTON (CBS) – A case of the mumps has been reported at Boston University. A letter sent to students says someone in one of the summer classes on July 1 and 2 was infected with the contagious virus. Students are now being asked to confirm that they are up to date on their vaccinations or risk being banned from campus. The infection has become scarce in recent decades. We don’t see a lot of mumps these days because there’s an effective childhood vaccine that prevents it, the MMR or measles, mumps, rubella vaccine. Mumps is caused by a virus that can be passed from person to person like a cold vir...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - July 8, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: kcarroll94 Tags: Health Local News Seen On WBZ-TV Syndicated Local Watch Listen Boston University Dr. Mallika Marshall MMR mumps Vaccine Source Type: news

Remembering Herb Goodwin, Judge, Baseball Buddy and Angel, R.I.P.
Of his father, Hamlet says to Horatio, "'A was a man, take him for all in all, I shall not look upon his like again." Herb Goodwin was not my father, whom I love, but Herb was an angelic father figure to me, and I know I shall not look upon his like again. A retired chief district court judge, based in Brookline, Mass., Herb passed away at the age of 80 on June 26. For years, he suffered from multiple sclerosis. I first met Herb when I was a boy in 1976. My mother, who had roomed at Boston University with Rhoda, Herb's wife, took me to Herb's house in Brookline. I can still picture him scooping up his scrambled e...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - June 27, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Future physicians more inclined to embrace genomic medicine than practicing physicians
(Boston University Medical Center) Medical students showed a greater acceptance of using approaches in genomic medicine, a key element in the practice of precision medicine, to treat patients as compared to physicians currently in practice according to a Brief Communication in the journal Medical Science Educator. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 24, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Vietnam's Ministry of Health recognizes BUSM for building capacity in hospital nutrition
(Boston University Medical Center) Carine Lenders, M.D., M.S., ScD, associate professor of pediatrics at Boston University School of Medicine (BUSM) and physician nutrition specialist at Boston Medical Center (BMC), and Elizabeth Henry, DrPH, MHS, who will graduate from BU's School of Public Health (BUSPH) in September, have received the People's Health Medal from the Social Republic of Vietnam's Ministry of Health for their work on behalf of the Abbott Fund Institute of Nutrition Science (AFINS). (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 24, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Physician receives lifetime achievement award
(Boston University Medical Center) Michael Charness, M.D., professor of neurology and associate dean of veterans affairs at Boston University School of Medicine and Chief of Staff of the VA Boston Health Care System has been selected by the Rosett Committee of the Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders Study Group as the 2015 recipient of the Henry Rosett Award for Outstanding Contributions to the Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders field. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 22, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

BUSM researcher receives $1.6 million NIH grant for pneumonia research
(Boston University Medical Center) Joseph Mizgerd, Sc.D., professor of medicine, microbiology and biochemistry at Boston University School of Medicine, and director of the University's Pulmonary Center, recently was awarded $1.6 million from the National Institutes of Health's National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases. The four-year grant will be used to fund his project to better understand how immunity to pneumonia develops and how it protects certain individuals. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 19, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

ED worsened, testosterone levels decreased by some treatments of prostate enlargement
(Boston University Medical Center) Men with benign prostate enlargement who used finasteride to treat their condition, experienced worsening erectile dysfunction that did not resolve with continued treatment. In addition, they experienced a reduction in their testosterone levels leading to hypogonadism -- little to no production of sex hormones. However, men who used tamsulosin experienced none of these adverse side effects. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 12, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Responding to Stress With Attention, Care and Connection
This article originally appeared in Ornish Living. -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website. (Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post)
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - June 5, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Announcing the new MassDevice: A note to our readers, sponsors and supporters
A few years ago, MassDevice co-founder and executive editor Brad Perriello tacked up a printed email I sent him in the fall of 2007, with the subject line “The device wire.” I was gung ho about an idea I had for a website called MassDevice, a sort of new media outlet that would cover the medical device industry in Massachusetts. I was pretty enthusiastic, noting in the email that it would be a good opportunity for us. We met more than 10 years ago in graduate school at Boston University and made a pact to help each other advance our careers in journalism. As with most of our interactions over the years, my enth...
Source: Mass Device - June 4, 2015 Category: Medical Equipment Authors: MassDevice Tags: Business/Financial News Source Type: news

Biggest research threat at academic medical centers: Reduced funding and clinical revenue
(Boston University Medical Center) Reductions in federal support and clinical revenue not only jeopardize biomedical research at academic medical centers, but may ultimately impact clinical medicine according to an opinion piece in the journal Science Translational Medicine. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 27, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

We Need To Make A Distinction Between Smoking And Nicotine Addiction, According To Scientists
By Kate Kelland, Health and Science Correspondent LONDON, May 19 (Reuters) - Since he ditched Marlboro Lights five years ago, Daniel's fix is fruit-flavored nicotine gum that comes in neat, pop-out strips. He gets through 12 to 15 pieces a day and says he has "packets of the stuff" stashed all over. But he doesn't see himself as a nicotine addict. Like many people, Daniel believes nicotine gum is far less harmful for him than smoking. Doctors worldwide agree. By giving up cigarettes, they say, Daniel has removed at least 90 percent of the health risks of his habit. Even so, the possibility th...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - May 19, 2015 Category: Science Source Type: news

Anxiety Ruled This Lawyer's Life. Until He Tried Meditation.
A 500-square-foot Midtown studio in New York City is quietly becoming a temple for the anxious, the overworked and the curious. There are 26 seats. From inside the studio windows, you peer over taxi cabs crowding 5th Avenue below and if you put your nose right up to the glass, you can see the needle of the Empire State building looming large, piercing upwards into the sky. Ben Turshen opened the single door to his meditation studio less than six weeks ago and he has only been teaching the practice for two years. But his following is growing, perhaps because he’s the most unlikely of teachers. “I didn’t...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - May 18, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Anxiety Ruled This Lawyer's Life. Until He Tried Meditation.
A 500-square-foot Midtown studio in New York City is quietly becoming a temple for the anxious, the overworked and the curious. There are 26 seats. From inside the studio windows, you peer over taxi cabs crowding 5th Avenue below and if you put your nose right up to the glass, you can see the needle of the Empire State building looming large, piercing upward into the sky. Ben Turshen opened the single door to his meditation studio less than six weeks ago and he has only been teaching the practice for two years. But his following is growing, perhaps because he’s the most unlikely of teachers. “I didn’t ...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - May 18, 2015 Category: Science Source Type: news

Could A Bionic Pancreas Be Ready By 2017?
A bionic pancreas device that automatically controls blood sugar levels has been developed by researchers at Boston University and may be ready for market by late 2017. Artificial pancreas systems have the potential to help millions of diabetics avoid the risks associated with unpredictable fluctuations in blood sugar level. (Source: Medical Design Online News)
Source: Medical Design Online News - May 18, 2015 Category: Medical Equipment Source Type: news