Be vigilant about bug spray
Ticks and mosquitoes don’t care about COVID-19 safety protocols. They don’t care that people are trying to squeeze out the last moments of this restrictive summer by getting outdoors, hiking, or just sitting on their decks at night and feeling something that’s close to normal. COVID-19 has commanded our attention and caused people to adapt their behaviors to prevent one major health concern, but it doesn’t mean others have been eliminated. “Masks and social distancing will do nothing to protect you from what ticks and mosquitoes potentially carry,” says Dr. Todd Ellerin, director of infe...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - August 7, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Steve Calechman Tags: Autoimmune diseases Prevention Safety Source Type: blogs

Chronic Lyme arthritis: A mystery solved?
In 1975, researchers from Yale investigated an epidemic of 51 patients with arthritis who lived near the woodsy town of Lyme, Connecticut. The most common symptom was recurrent attacks of knee swelling. A few had pain in other joints, such as the wrist or ankle. Many had fever, fatigue, and headache. Some remembered a round skin rash before the onset of knee swelling. We now know that Lyme disease is an infection acquired from tick bites, caused by a spiral bacterium named Borrelia burgdorferi. After a tick bite, Borrelia bacteria wriggle through the skin away from the bite site. This leads to a circular red rash, known as...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - October 3, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: John Ross, MD, FIDSA Tags: Arthritis Bones and joints Infectious diseases Source Type: blogs

Answer to Case 502
Answer:Borreliaspp., relapsing fever group. Molecular studies are needed to definitively identify the causative agent. However, knowing the exposure history of the patient also helps narrow the differential. In this case, we later found out that the patient is from the northwestern part of North America, and therefore this is most likelyBorrelia hermsii,one of the tick-borne relapsing feverBorreliaspecies.The other tick-borneBorreliain North America areB. parkeriiandB. turicatae.These species are transmitted through the bite of a soft-bodied tick in the genusOrnithodoros,and are usually associated with exposure to'rustic's...
Source: Creepy Dreadful Wonderful Parasites - July 15, 2018 Category: Parasitology Source Type: blogs

Lyme disease: Resolving the “Lyme wars”
It’s finally getting warm here in New England, and most of us have plans to enjoy the beautiful weather. And that’s why the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recently released a report raising awareness about how to prevent the tickborne infections that typically occur during this time of the year. Lyme disease is probably the most well-known, and the one for which diagnosis and treatment are most controversial. What is Lyme disease? Several countries around the world, especially in the Northern Hemisphere, and all 50 states in the US have already reported cases of Lyme. The disease is caused by ...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - June 18, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Marcelo Campos, MD Tags: Health Infectious diseases Source Type: blogs

Cave Fever in the United States and Israel
In 2017, several cases of relapsing fever in Texas were reported among cave workers.  The Israeli equivalent of the disease is in fact known as “cave fever” with most cases reported among tourists in caves. [1,2]  Notably, an American tourist acquired “cave fever” in Israel in 1988.  The regional pathogen, Borrelia persica is found in approximately ten percent of caves, and is transmitted by Ornithodorus tholozani, an argassid (“soft”) tick.  The annual incidence has remained fairly stable at 5 to 15 cases for the past five decades. References: Berger S. Infectious ...
Source: GIDEON blog - April 21, 2018 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Dr. Stephen Berger Tags: Ebooks Epidemiology Graphs ProMED Source Type: blogs

Ticks and the changing landscape of tick-borne illnesses
Ticks and the diseases they carry have long been recognized as health concerns, especially in the warmer months when ticks (and humans) are more active. Ticks wait on grass tips or shrubs to latch onto new hosts when they brush by. Most of the hosts are animals, but a few tick species do bite and feed on humans. While doing so, they can transmit bacteria and viruses through their saliva. But here’s what’s changing: Tick species are being found in a wider geographic range. The number of case reports of tick-borne illnesses is increasing. Scientists continue to identify new pathogens (bacteria and viruses that c...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - August 11, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Wynne Armand, MD Tags: Health Infectious diseases Prevention Safety Travel health Source Type: blogs

Ticks and the changing landscape of tick borne illnesses
Ticks and the diseases they carry have long been recognized as health concerns, especially in the warmer months when ticks (and humans) are more active. Ticks wait on grass tips or shrubs to latch onto new hosts when they brush by. Most of the hosts are animals, but a few tick species do bite and feed on humans. While doing so, they can transmit bacteria and viruses through their saliva. But here’s what’s changing: Tick species are being found in a wider geographic range. The number of case reports of tick-borne illnesses is increasing. Scientists continue to identify new pathogens (bacteria and viruses that c...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - August 11, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Wynne Armand, MD Tags: Health Infectious diseases Prevention Safety Travel health Source Type: blogs

More Theorizing on the Role of Pathogens in Alzheimer's Disease
The dominant approach to Alzheimer's research and the development of potential therapies involves finding ways to clear out aggregates of amyloid and tau that build up in the brain. This has proven challenging, however. It is too early to say in certainty whether lack of tangible progress on this front is because it is a hard problem, or because this isn't the most effective direction. The weight of evidence strongly suggests the former is the case, but that hasn't stopped delayed progress from spurring the development of a great many alternative hypotheses as to the cause of Alzheimer's disease. One line of thinking sugge...
Source: Fight Aging! - July 27, 2017 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

Deaths and complications due to treating the fake disease known as “ chronic Lyme disease ”
Alternative practitioners invent and treat fake diseases like adrenal fatigue and chronic Lyme disease. Unfortunately, as a recent CDC report on complications due to treating chronic Lyme disease with long term antibiotics shows, treating fake diseases can cause harm and, in some cases, even kill. (Source: Respectful Insolence)
Source: Respectful Insolence - June 21, 2017 Category: Surgery Authors: Orac Tags: Clinical trials Complementary and alternative medicine Homeopathy Naturopathy Pseudoscience Quackery Skepticism/critical thinking antibiotics Borrelia burgdorferi catheter-associated sepsis CDC chronic lyme disease Clostridium diff Source Type: blogs

Finding the tick in time could save you from Lyme!
“Doesn’t it typically happen during the summer?” asked a worried lady that had walked into my clinic in November with a growing circular rash on her wrist. She was referring, of course, to Lyme disease, that scourge of outdoor enthusiasts. While the peak season for Lyme disease is indeed summer, the ticks that transmit it are active March through December. And, while this may be off-season for the ticks, it is a good time to catch up on how to stay safe in the not-so-distant spring. What is Lyme disease, and how do you treat it? Lyme disease is caused by a bacterium called Borrelia burgdorferi which is sp...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - February 24, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Meera Sunder, MBBS, MRCOG Tags: Health Infectious diseases Prevention Source Type: blogs

Two Novel Conditions with an Intriguing Link
​How could a Lyme disease lookalike rash and anaphylaxis to meat have anything in common? As I found out recently, they do. They both have a common vector, the Lone Star Tick, which is also known by its formal name, Amblyomma americanum, and is found predominately in the East, Southeast, and Southwest. It is an aggressive tick that loves humans.In fact, all three growth stages (adult, nymph, and larva) are known to feed on humans. Besides the common signs of irritation that often accompany a tick bite, a rash similar to the rash of Lyme disease has been commonly described. This "bull's-eye" rash is often accomp...
Source: M2E Too! Mellick's Multimedia EduBlog - September 1, 2016 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Blog Posts Source Type: blogs

Lyme Disease in the United Kingdom
The following background data on Lyme disease in the United Kingdom were abstracted from Gideon www.GideonOnline.com and the Gideon e-book series.  [1,2] Primary references are available on request. Time and Place: Lyme disease is reported from East Anglia, Scotland, Wales, Yorkshire and Northern Ireland.  Highest incidence is associated with popular holiday destinations such as Exmoor, the New Forest, the South Downs, parts of Wiltshire and Berkshire, Thetford Forest, the Lake District, the Yorkshire moors and the Highlands and Islands of Scotland.  “Hot spots” for the disease include the New Fo...
Source: GIDEON blog - April 12, 2016 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Dr. Stephen Berger Tags: Ebooks Epidemiology Graphs lyme disease United Kingdom Source Type: blogs

Did Andreas Lubitz Have Lyme Disease?
Although the editors of InsideSurgery.com did not participate in the care of Andreas Lubitz, we are following news reports closely. Multiple sources today are reporting that he was under continuing care of a physician who recommended that he stop flying as a commercial airline pilot for Lufthansa controlled Germanwings air service. Lubitz seems to be a well-liked, non-controversial young man from a stable upbringing who by all accounts loved being a pilot. What could have caused him to fly his airliner with another 149 people aboard to their certain annihilation into a French mountainside? One wonders what medical conditi...
Source: Inside Surgery - March 27, 2015 Category: Surgery Authors: Editor Tags: Infectious Disease andreas lubitz crash germanwings Lyme disease pilot Source Type: blogs

pedia notes
Acupuncture Andrographis Babesia bartonella betterhealthguy.com – Scott’s website, lots of detox info Biodentistry bioresourceinc.com – wholesaler for Pekana Biotensor Buhner herbal protocol Chlorella – thought to provide mercury detox, many think biopure.us is best. other brands are E-lyte and Sun Cholestapure – supposedly less difficult to handle than cholestyramine Comprehensive Medical Center – Kirkland, Washington clinic that acts as home office in the United States of Dietrich Klinghardt, MD, PhD (425) 823-8818. Dr. Klinghardt visits intermittently and charges $7/minute. He has two...
Source: Inside Surgery - March 22, 2015 Category: Surgery Authors: Editor Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: blogs

Can Gingko and Turmeric Help Stop Ebola?
Summary There is no known pharmaceutical currently available that specifically treats Ebola disease. One treatment modality that should be considered is the use of herbal medicines, which have both centuries old anecdotal success as well as recent modern biochemical and formal research rationales for their use. Five areas of action that could be addressed by the herbal medicines as it relates to Ebola would be: VP24/immune system evasion GP protein/replicatio; herbal strategies effective against similar hemorrhagic disease beneficial modulation of patient immune and inflammatory response systems prophylactic use for heal...
Source: Inside Surgery - August 2, 2014 Category: Surgery Authors: Editor Tags: Infectious Disease ayurvedic baicalen cathepsin b dengue Ebola gingko herb Quercetin resveratrol rosemary sage st johns work turmeric Source Type: blogs

Anaplasmosis in Germany
The following data on Anaplasmosis in Germany are abstracted from the Gideon e-book series. [1,2] (primary references available on request). Prevalence surveys: 5.3% of rodents and 1% of Ixodes ricinus in Stuttgart (2008 publication) 3.2% of Ixodes ricinus adults and 2.3% of nymphs. 0.9% of infected ticks were found to carry Borrelia spp. (Hanover, 2011 publication) 61.8% of blood samples from European hedgehogs (Erinaceus europaeus), 73.4% of associated Ixodes ricinus and 26.6% of Ixodes hexagonus (2007 to 2008) 3.2% of bird-feeding and 1.1% of rodent-feeding ticks in central Germany (2007) 1.4% of bird-fee...
Source: GIDEON blog - April 20, 2014 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Dr. Stephen Berger Tags: Ebooks Epidemiology ProMED anaplasmosis Germany Source Type: blogs

Climate Change and Disease: USA Today Gets It Wrong
This report describes statistically significant increases in the incidence rate of reported coccidioidomycosis in endemic states during 1998–2011 after adjusting for changes in population size and in age and sex distribution. Although the number of cases decreased in Arizona during 2007–2008 and in California during 2007–2009, incidence dramatically increased in 2010 and 2011. In 2011, coccidioidomycosis was the second most commonly reported nationally notifiable condition in Arizona and the fourth most commonly reported in California. The reasons for the increases described in this report are unclear. Co...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - December 16, 2013 Category: Health Medicine and Bioethics Commentators Authors: Patrick J. Michaels, Paul C. "Chip" Knappenberger Source Type: blogs

Borrelia miyamotoi
(Source: Notes from Dr. RW)
Source: Notes from Dr. RW - October 15, 2013 Category: Internists and Doctors of Medicine Tags: infectious disease Source Type: blogs

Lyme Disease
Pathophysiology of Lyme Disease Lyme disease is an 1) infection with Borrelia burgdorferi via tick bite 2) previous thinking held tick vector was Ixodes but transmission is now thought by some experts to be possible with additional tick species 3) occurs in stage I and stage II days to weeks after infection and in stage III months to years after infection (usually with preceding latency period Signs and Symptoms Stage I 1) characteristic expanding annular rash with central clearing (“bull’s eye or “target” rash) that occurs in only 40% of infections Stage II 2) multiple secondary annular skin lesio...
Source: Inside Surgery - March 19, 2013 Category: Surgeons Authors: Editor Tags: Infectious Disease babesia bulls eye rash coinfections deer tick erythema migrans hyperbaric ixodes target rash Source Type: blogs

Parkinson’s Disease
Pathophysiology of Parkinson’s Disease Parkinson’s disease is a neurodegenerative disease marked by: 1) progressive slowing of all voluntary movements 2) muscular “cogwheel” rigidity 3) tremors at rest 4) mask-like facies 5) emotional lability Signs and Symptoms 1) tremors disappear with voluntary movement 2) drooling 3) dementia (15%) 4) depression 5) micrographia 6) “pill rolling” 7) hesitancy when rising from chair 8) short shuffling gait 9) decreased blink rate 10) diminished arm swing 11) stooped posture 12) loss of postural righting reflexes 13) autonomic problems (constipation, i...
Source: Inside Surgery - March 16, 2013 Category: Surgeons Authors: Editor Tags: Neurology cogwheel rigidity dopaminergic neurons Lewy bodies mask like face pill rolling shuffling gate substantia nigra tremor tremors at rest Source Type: blogs

Healthcare Update — 01-28-2013
You can keep your doctor and your insurance … if you can afford it. Some insurance brokers expect health insurance premiums to triple in the fall prior to full implementation of Obamacare. Oh, and if you can’t afford that insurance, plan to pay a punitive tax. But don’t worry, Mississippi Gov. Phil Bryant thinks that everything is fine now. Everyone in America has health care. All they have to do is go to the emergency room. Once no one can afford private insurance due to premium hikes, then government funding cuts can affect essential hospital services – like what is happening in Australia. Should...
Source: WhiteCoat's Call Room - January 28, 2013 Category: Emergency Medicine Doctors Authors: WhiteCoat Tags: Healthcare Update Source Type: blogs

First Case of New Deer Tick Disease Reported in U.S.
CBS New York reports that Hazel Sanchez, a New Jersey woman, is the first known case of borrelia miyamotoi, a new disease spread by ticks. The disease is spread by the same ticks that spread Lyme disease. The woman's symptoms included confusion, weakness and weight loss. Fortunately, lab technicians at Hunterdon Medical Center found the bacteria in her spinal fluid and cured her with an antibiotic. Take a look: The bacteria was first discovered by Yale researchers in 2011. It is likely that other Americans have been made ill by the virus. The New Jersey case is the first known U.S. case. Permalink | Facebook | Twitter...
Source: HealthNewsBlog.com - January 26, 2013 Category: Health Medicine and Bioethics Commentators Tags: tick tick-disease ticks Source Type: blogs

USMLE Questions – Characteristic Disease Findings
The United States Medical Licensing Examination (USMLE) is designed to emphasize knowledge of clinical scenarios and clinical pearls, even on Step I. Listed below are some commonly encountered disease findings and characteristics. Feature Disease 45, X chromosome Turner’s syndrome 5-HIAA increased in urine Carcinoid syndrome Aganglionic rectum Hirschsrpung’s disease Apple-core sign on barium enema Colon cancer Arched back (opisthotonos) Tetanus Argyll-Robertson pupil Syphilis Ash leaf on forehead Tuberous sclerosis Auer rods  Acute myelogenous leukemia Austin Flint murmur Aortic r...
Source: Inside Surgery - January 18, 2013 Category: Surgeons Authors: Editor Tags: Surgpedia USMLE diseases findings VMA water hammer pulse Source Type: blogs

Borrelia review
Excerpt from a book review of Borrelia: Molecular Biology, Host Interaction and Pathogenesis:"an excellent resource for history, disease manifestations, basic biology ... a useful resource for information on general topics, such as symptoms of diseases, history, or basic bacterial physiology ... a helpful read" from Brian Stevenson (University of Kentucky, Lexington, USA) writing in Q. Rev. Biol. (2012) 87: 392-393. read more ...Borrelia: Molecular Biology, Host Interaction and PathogenesisEdited by: D. Scott Samuels and Justin D. RadolfISBN: 978-1-904455-58-5Publisher: Caister Academic PressPublication Date: Mar...
Source: Microbiology Blog: The weblog for microbiologists. - January 2, 2013 Category: Microbiology Tags: Bacteriology Book Reviews Microbiology Book Reviews Molecular Biology Book Reviews Genomics Book Reviews Source Type: blogs