The Perils of Overconfidence
In subtle and not-so-subtle ways, our society conveys the message that we should be a strong, confident person. We shouldn’t hesitate to grab what we want and express our views in a direct, forceful way. Being tentative, faltering, or uncertain earns us the reputation of being weak and indecisive. Assertiveness rules. Extraversion is prized. Humility is shameful. Do we pay a hidden price in our quest to be uncompromisingly assertive and project an image of strength and confidence?  Is it possible to become overconfident? No doubt you’ve met people who dazzle you with their apparent self-confidence and asse...
Source: World of Psychology - July 17, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: John Amodeo, PhD Tags: Habits Mindfulness Perfectionism Personality Assertiveness Borderline Personality Disorder Confidence emotional rigidity Insecurity Narcissism Resilience splitting Source Type: blogs

Psychology Around the Net: July 4, 2020
Happy 4th of July! Here in America, not only does July usher in the birthday celebrations of these United States, but since 2008 July has also been the Bebe Moore Campbell National Minority Mental Health Awareness Month, or Minority Mental Health Month, or even BIPOC Mental Health Month (Mental Health America has decided to phase out the word “minority” and instead refer to Blacks, Indigenous People, and People of Color). Regardless of how the name evolves, its original namesake — Bebe Moore Campbell — was a teacher, author, journalist, and mental health advocate who worked hard to bring awareness...
Source: World of Psychology - July 4, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Alicia Sparks Tags: Psychology Around the Net Adhd Bebe Moore Campbell infant sleep issues Law Enforcement Minority Mental Health Awareness Month pandemic police Procrastination productivity hack young adults moving home Source Type: blogs

Feeling Trapped or Abandoned: When Relationships Run Hot or Cold
By nature, humans are wired for connection. We seek out others to share our lives with, with the goal of forming lasting and intimate bonds. So feeling trapped or abandoned in an intimate relationship shouldn’t be a common thing, should it? Actually, these experiences are common for partners who wind up repeating cycles within intimate relationships that they may be unaware of. Feeling trapped or abandoned are commonly seen in the push-pull dynamic found in unhealthy relationships; both styles often represent two sides of the same coin. Engulfment and Abandonment Defined Fear of being engulfed, or trapped, is often i...
Source: World of Psychology - May 28, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Dr. Annie Tanasugarn Tags: Relationships Abandonment Attachment Style Borderline Personality Engulfment Intimacy Self-Esteem Source Type: blogs

On labels and boundaries
What we call a disease matters. It matters to the person because a diagnosis is a marker: this problem is known, it’s recognised, it’s real (Mengshoel, Sim, Ahlsen & Madden, 2017). It matters to the clinician, particularly medical practitioners, but also those clinicians working within a largely “disease-oriented” framework (for example, physiotherapists, osteopaths) (Haskins, Osmotherly, Rivett, 2015; Kennedy, 2017). It matters also to insurance companies, or funding providers – who is in, and who is out. The diagnostic label itself hides a great many assumptions. The ways in which dia...
Source: HealthSkills Weblog - April 6, 2020 Category: Anesthesiology Authors: BronnieLennoxThompson Tags: Assessment Chronic pain Clinical reasoning Coping strategies Pain conditions Professional topics Uncategorized Source Type: blogs

Podcast: Stealing Cinderella (A True Story)
 Would you risk everything for love? Even your life? In today’s podcast, Gabe interviews Mark Diehl, author of Stealing Cinderella: How I Became an International Fugitive for Love. Mark’s book is his true-life story of growing up with an emotionally unstable mother, his resulting rebellious streak and drug use, and the wild ride of his forbidden love affair with a South Korean woman. The story details the couple’s narrow escape from her rich, abusive family in a journey where they almost lost their lives. Tune in for a true-life fairy tale that’s stranger than fiction. SUBSCRIBE & REVIEW G...
Source: World of Psychology - March 12, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: The Psych Central Podcast Tags: General Interview Motivation and Inspiration Podcast Relationships The Psych Central Show Trauma Source Type: blogs

Inside Schizophrenia: Comorbidity with Schizophrenia
Comorbidity is the presence of one or more additional conditions co-occurring with a primary condition. In this episode, host schizophrenic Rachel Star Withers with her cohost Gabe Howard will be discussing comorbidity with schizophrenia. Comorbidity is associated with worse health outcomes, more complex clinical management and increased health care costs. Occupational therapist and host of the podcast Occupied, Brock Cook, will be joining us to discuss ways that he works with people with schizophrenia to manage multiple health issues.  Highlights from “Comorbidity with Schizophrenia” Episode [01:28] What ...
Source: World of Psychology - January 22, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Rachel Star Withers Tags: Antipsychotic Inside Schizophrenia Mental Health and Wellness Psychiatry Psychology Psychotherapy Bipolar disorder and schizophrenia comorbid comorbid psychiatric conditions Comorbidities Comorbidity Diagnosis Of Schizophrenia Livi Source Type: blogs

A Deeper Dive:  How Vulnerable Can a Therapist Be?
For as long as I can remember, “Peeling off the layers to reveal the real” has been my credo. In a dream, the words “Bare Boldly,” echoed through my sleeping but ever so active brain.” When messages come through that insistently, they can’t be ignored. My inner and outer work as a hybrid therapist-journalist prepare me to take this on every day. When that happens, I question if I am too self-revealing. Last year, I penned an article for Psych Central called When A Therapist and Journalist Comes Clean About Her Self Doubt. It takes a confessional tone as I admit that the way I present isn...
Source: World of Psychology - January 17, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Edie Weinstein, MSW, LSW Tags: Aging Personal Authenticity Shame Vulnerability Source Type: blogs

Computational Psychiatry, Self-Care, and The Mind-Body Problem
Schematic example of how the “mind” (cerebral cortex) is connected to the “body” (adrenal gland) - modified from Fig. 1 (Dum et al., 2016):“Modern medicine has generally viewed the concept of‘psychosomatic’disease with suspicion. This view arose partly because no neural networks were known for the mind, conceptually associated with the cerebral cortex, to influence autonomic and endocrine systems that control internal organs. ”Psychosomatic illnesses are typically seen in pejorative terms — it's all in your head so it must not be real! Would a known biological mechanism...
Source: The Neurocritic - December 31, 2019 Category: Neuroscience Authors: The Neurocritic Source Type: blogs

A Sign Of Borderline Personality Disorder (M)
The childhood experience that is linked to borderline personality disorder. → Support PsyBlog for just $4 per month. Enables access to articles marked (M) and removes ads. → Explore PsyBlog's ebooks, all written by Dr Jeremy Dean: Accept Yourself: How to feel a profound sense of warmth and self-compassion The Anxiety Plan: 42 Strategies For Worry, Phobias, OCD and Panic Spark: 17 Steps That Will Boost Your Motivation For Anything Activate: How To Find Joy Again By Changing What You Do (Source: PsyBlog | Psychology Blog)
Source: PsyBlog | Psychology Blog - November 20, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Jeremy Dean Tags: Child Psychology Personality subscribers-only Source Type: blogs

Mental Health Awareness Week is October 6-12, 2019
Each year, the first full week in October has been designated as MENTAL ILLNESS AWARENESS WEEK to raise awareness, educate the public, fight stigma and help support children and adults living with a mental health condition. This year, the dates are October 6th through the 9th.Here Are Some Statistics19.1% of U.S.adults experienced mental illness in 2018 (47.6 million people). This represents 1 in 5 adults.4.6%of U.S. adults experienced serious mental illness in 2018 (11.4 million people). This represents 1 in 25 adults.16.5%of U.S. youth aged 6-17 experienced a mental health disorder in 2016 (7.7 million people)3.7% o...
Source: Dr. Deborah Serani - October 1, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Tags: awareness campaigns mental health Source Type: blogs

October 6-12 is MENTAL HEALTH AWARENESS WEEK
Each year, the first full week in October has been designated as MENTAL ILLNESS AWARENESS WEEK to raise awareness, educate the public, fight stigma and help support children and adults living with a mental health condition. This year, the dates are October 6th through the 9th.Here are some Statistics19.1% of U.S. adults experienced mental illness in 2018 (47.6 million people). This represents 1 in 5 adults.4.6% of U.S. adults experienced serious mental illness in 2018 (11.4 million people). This represents 1 in 25 adults.16.5% of U.S. youth aged 6-17 experienced a mental health disorder in 2016 (7.7 mil...
Source: Dr. Deborah Serani - October 1, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Tags: awareness campaigns mental health Source Type: blogs

Podcast: Family on the Run: A Story of Delusional Disorder
 When Pauline Dakin was 10 years old, her mother took the family into hiding to escape imminent danger.  Fifteen years later, Pauline was told that they were on the run from the mafia.  At first, accepting of this explanation, Pauline’s doubts grew until she could no longer deny the truth: that there was no danger and she was being misled. Join us as Pauline shares how she came to this heartbreaking conclusion. SUBSCRIBE & REVIEW   Guest information for ‘Delusional Disorder’ Podcast Episode Pauline Dakin is the bestselling author of Run, Hide, Repeat: A Memoir of a Fugitive Childho...
Source: World of Psychology - June 20, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: The Psych Central Podcast Tags: Borderline Personality Schizophrenia The Psych Central Show Trauma Source Type: blogs

Depth Electrodes or Digital Biomarkers? The future of mood monitoring
Stereoelectroencephalography (SEEG) vs.Mindstrong HealthMood Monitoring via Invasive Brain Recordings or Smartphone SwipesWhich Would You Choose?That's not really a fair question. The ultimate goal of invasive recordings is one of direct intervention, by delivering targeted brain stimulation as a treatment. But first you have to establish a firm relationship between neural activity and mood. Well, um, smartphone swipes (the way you interact with your phone) aim to establish a firm relationship between your “digital phenotype” and your mood. And then refer you to an app for a precision intervention. Or to your t...
Source: The Neurocritic - February 19, 2019 Category: Neuroscience Authors: The Neurocritic Source Type: blogs

Podcast: How to Make the Transition to Adulthood Easier
 The transition from youth to adult is a difficult one for most people, filled with unexpected events and changes that we are ill-prepared for. Many find themselves seriously lacking not only the life skills needed, but also the psychological and emotional tools that would make this huge change easier. Our guest this week explains how we can use mindfulness to develop these tools and make adulting much less intimidating. Subscribe to Our Show! And Remember to Review Us! About Our Guest Lara Fielding is a clinical psychologist in Los Angeles, and an adjunct professor at Pepperdine Graduate School of Ed...
Source: World of Psychology - January 10, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: The Psych Central Show Tags: General Mindfulness Students The Psych Central Show Adulthood adulting Gabe Howard Transition Vincent M. Wales Source Type: blogs

Stigmatizing Narcissists & Narcissism: Are They the Secondhand Smoke of Our Time?
The thing about smoking cigarettes is that the behavior is something we wanted to stigmatize, in order to decrease its frequency in people. At its height in the 1950s and 1960s, 2 out of every 5 people smoked in the U.S. It’s a huge health hazard, decreasing lifespan and increasing health problems in smokers. But smoking doesn’t just impact the person who smokes. Through decades’ worth of research findings, we now understand the smoking also affects the people around smokers, causing health problems and decreasing lifespans through secondhand smoke. Secondhand smoke, therefore, is also something people se...
Source: World of Psychology - December 9, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: John M. Grohol, Psy.D. Tags: General Mental Health and Wellness Minding the Media Narcissism Personality Policy and Advocacy Relationships Stigma Narcissistic Personality Disorder second-hand smoke secondhand smoke Source Type: blogs

Best of Our Blogs: December 7, 2018
I’m reading a phenomenal book by Dr. Joe Dispenza called, “Becoming Supernatural: How Common People Are Doing the Uncommon.” There are so many pearls of wisdom in it and statements full of hope for anyone suffering from physical or mental illness. So far, this is one of my favorites: “The only thing I can assure you of is this: The unknown has never let me down.” Dispenza says we often get stuck in the same routine, ways of thinking, and feelings that keep us in the past. The way to change is to open up to the unfamiliar, putting your attention on how you want to be versus what you don’t...
Source: World of Psychology - December 7, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Brandi-Ann Uyemura, M.A. Tags: Best of Our Blogs Source Type: blogs

Podcast: Growing Up With a Mentally Ill Parent
 Growing up with a mentally ill parent can be a traumatic experience for any child. For Ally Golden, her mother’s mental illness was major depression, later diagnosed as borderline personality disorder. Ally’s book, A Good Soldier, chronicles her life growing up in this environment, with a mentally ill mother who frequently threatened suicide, and the psychological trauma that resulted for her. Decades later, her mother carried out her threat. Listen to hear Ally’s fascinating story. Subscribe to Our Show! And Remember to Review Us! About Our Guest Ally Golden is the author ...
Source: World of Psychology - December 6, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: The Psych Central Show Tags: Borderline Personality General Relationships The Psych Central Show Gabe Howard Suicide Vincent M. Wales Source Type: blogs

Best of Our Blogs: December 4, 2018
The holidays can be a time to look forward to and it can be a time to dread. For this in the latter category, can you find a way to carve out time for yourself? Think of it as sifting through the unnecessary stuff to find the jewels of the holidays or create your own holiday. Maybe it’s the holiday lights or cuddling up with a good book and hot cup of cocoa. Maybe it’s the time of year when you decide to volunteer. Maybe it’s about scheduling self-care sessions that involve things like meditating, having coffee with a friend or seeking therapy. The holidays can be stressful. But it can also be fun, joyful...
Source: World of Psychology - December 4, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Brandi-Ann Uyemura, M.A. Tags: Best of Our Blogs Source Type: blogs

Best of Our Blogs: November 2, 2018
After Halloween, the holiday madness begins. Every year I tell myself I won’t get swept up in the busy-ness, but somehow by New Year’s Eve I’m sick and burnt out. It’s hard not to plan, predict and expect certain outcomes. It’s difficult not bracing yourself for impact instead of softening to the possibility of the unknown. But I’m intent to not get wrapped up in the temptation of perfection this year by finding the beauty in rainy days or at least appreciate my inability to know the end result. You can prepare yourself with these posts on various personality types to watch out...
Source: World of Psychology - November 2, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Brandi-Ann Uyemura, M.A. Tags: Best of Our Blogs Source Type: blogs

On “ us ” and “ them ” : what if we ’ re one of “ them ” ?
Over the past few years I’ve been pondering the presumed gap between people living with pain and the people who “treat” or work with them.  Most of my readers will know that I live with widespread pain (aka fibromyalgia) or pain that is present in many parts of my body, and the associated other symptoms like DOMS that last for weeks not a day or two, and increased sensitivity to heat, cold, pressure, chilli, sound and so on. I first “came out” with my pain about 15 years ago: that is, I first disclosed to people I worked with that I had this weird ongoing pain – and finally joined...
Source: HealthSkills Weblog - October 7, 2018 Category: Anesthesiology Authors: BronnieLennoxThompson Tags: Chronic pain Professional topics Research Therapeutic approaches inclusion inequality Source Type: blogs

How To Find A Mother Figure When Your Mom Has a Mental Illness
You're reading How To Find A Mother Figure When Your Mom Has a Mental Illness, originally posted on Pick the Brain | Motivation and Self Improvement. If you're enjoying this, please visit our site for more inspirational articles. My name is Ally Golden and I wrote my memoir, A Good Soldier, about my relationship with my mother, who suffered from Borderline Personality Disorder. Because of her disease, my mother and I never had a normal relationship. The love she gave was never without strings attached. Her affections depended on the amount of attention I paid to her and her mood on the given day. Our relationship was not a...
Source: PickTheBrain | Motivation and Self Improvement - August 30, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: AllyGolden Tags: blogging featured happiness health and fitness motivation psychology relationships self improvement best self-improvement blogs better mental health better yourself mental illness mom mother figure pickthebrain self growth Source Type: blogs

What Is Affect or Emotion Dysregulation?
In research, clinical and therapeutic settings, we sometimes use the term Affect Dysregulation. Affect is the clinical term that is used to describe emotions and feelings. Many practitioners also use the term Emotion Dysregulation. Essentially, Affect Dysregulation and Emotion Dysregulation are interchangeable terms in the psychiatric literature. What is Affect/Emotion Dysregulation? Emotion Dysregulation may be thought of as the inability to manage the intensity and duration of negative emotions such as fear, sadness, or anger. If you are struggling with emotion regulation, an upsetting situation will bring about strongl...
Source: World of Psychology - August 9, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Fabiana Franco, Ph.D. Tags: Borderline Personality Psychology PTSD Substance Abuse Trauma Treatment Source Type: blogs

Omega-3 fatty acids for mood disorders
Omega-3 fatty acids are found primarily in fish oil and certain marine algae. Because depression appears less common in nations where people eat large amounts of fish, scientists have investigated whether fish oils may prevent and/or treat depression and other mood disorders. Two omega-3 fatty acids — eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) — are thought to have the most potential to benefit people with mood disorders. How might omega-3s improve depression? Different mechanisms of action have been proposed. For example, omega-3s can easily travel through the brain cell membrane and interact w...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - August 3, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: David Mischoulon, MD, PhD Tags: Anxiety and Depression Behavioral Health Drugs and Supplements Mental Health Source Type: blogs

Best of Our Blogs: July 3, 2018
Having an illness whether physical or mental, can feel stifling and imprisoning. So can being in an unhealthy relationship. But having a sense of freedom in what you do and think can be incredibly healing and restorative. This holiday as you prepare for the quintessential 4th of July hotdog hamburger fireworks celebration, consider what things breaks you out of the chain of suffering and do more of that. It could mean releasing the need to wait for permission to cry or accept your body. It could mean freeing yourself from the constant need to compare. Our top posts will give you ideas for many ways you can celebrate freedo...
Source: World of Psychology - July 3, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Brandi-Ann Uyemura, M.A. Tags: Best of Our Blogs Source Type: blogs

Adults Can and Do Have Tantrums
When we hear the word tantrum, we picture a 2-year-old lying on the floor kicking and screaming. Very rarely do we use it to describe an adult having an outburst. In reality, adults can have this kind of outburst at any moment in time. We don’t typically refer to an adult as having a tantrum. We refer to them as being angry or “just blowing off some steam.” However, when their behavior becomes cyclical, predictive, or problematic the impact of their behavior should be assessed and addressed. Tantrums typically follow an action made by another person that results in the recipient feeling angry, disappoint...
Source: World of Psychology - June 14, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Anjail Ameen-Rice, LCSW Tags: Agitation Anger Communication Violence and Aggression Anger Management Emotional Dysregulation Rage Tantrums Source Type: blogs

Borderline personality disorder in medical practice
What is borderline personality disorder (BPD)? According to the National Institute of Mental Health, unstable moods; impulsive and reckless behavior, and unstable or volatile relationships may be indicative of BPD. People with BPD often have high rates of co-occurring disorders, such as depression, anxiety disorders, substance abuse, and eating disorders, along with self-harm, suicidal behaviors, and completed suicides. They often make poor life choices and take unwise risks. Thus, adults with borderline personality disorder are considerably more likely to be the victim of violence, including rape and other crimes. Ho...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - June 6, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/peggy-a-rothbaum" rel="tag" > Peggy A. Rothbaum, PhD < /a > Tags: Conditions Psychiatry Source Type: blogs

Psychology Around the Net: June 2, 2018
It’s that time of week again, Psych Central readers! Time to tap into some of the latest in mental health and psychology news. This week’s Psychology Around the Net brings you the psychology of workplace romances, insight on the people who are most likely to believe in conspiracy theories, how students can maintain their mental health treatment after moving to campus (sure, it’s just June, but now’s the time to start preparing!), and more. The Psychological Reasons Why You Fall in Love with Your Colleagues: Depending on your work schedule, chances are you spend more time during the days with your co...
Source: World of Psychology - June 2, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Alicia Sparks Tags: Celebrities Children and Teens College Industrial and Workplace Men's Issues Parenting Psychology Around the Net Relationships Research Students Women's Issues Borderline Personality Disorder Co Workers Colleagues Conspiracy Th Source Type: blogs

Best of Our Blogs: May 18, 2018
There’s one thing you can do now to improve almost every area of your life. Strengthening your intuition, developing a strong inner knowing and then listening to it can help minimize relationship problems, foster better physical and emotional health and keep you from disastrous situations. If you’re struggling this week with your emotions, self-esteem, or your relationship, you’ll benefit from a few moments of stillness. Tap into that inner voice. Listen. Then, read our posts to give you extra support and advice, and see which one seems fit for your situation. Stop the Drama: 4 Steps to Manage Emotions (A...
Source: World of Psychology - May 18, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Brandi-Ann Uyemura, M.A. Tags: Best of Our Blogs Source Type: blogs

Psychology Around the Net: May 12, 2018
Happy Saturday, sweet readers! This week’s Psychology Around the Net is packed with the latest on WOOP’ing (yep, you read that correctly), the psychology of apologizing and how Starbucks’ CEO Kevin Johnson nailed it, why believing people tend to get happier as they get older isn’t just wishful thinking, and more. A Study of 7,000 Workers Showed the Standout Trait of Productive People Can Easily Be Learned: Do you know how to “WOOP”? This “more nuanced version of positive thinking” could help boost your productivity. The Psychology of Apology: How Did Starbucks’ CEO Kev...
Source: World of Psychology - May 12, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Alicia Sparks Tags: Aging Books Borderline Personality Children and Teens Disorders Habits Happiness Psychology Around the Net Research Apology Bad Habits boderline personality disorder symptoms Borderline Personality Disorder Kevin Johnson Medica Source Type: blogs

Best of Our Blogs: May 11, 2018
I was at the hospital and heard a boy scream. He was getting his hand stitched. Over and over again, the nurses and his mom said, “You have to do this.” There’s one thing I learned from kids that can make anything harder. Feeling forced. Believing we don’t have a choice can make us feel helpless, terrified and victimized. Although they were only trying to help, the mindset of, “You can do this,” instead of, “You have to,” can go along way empowering someone especially in a situation where they feel helpless and out of control. If you’re feeling forced about your situati...
Source: World of Psychology - May 11, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Brandi-Ann Uyemura, M.A. Tags: Best of Our Blogs Source Type: blogs

Best of Our Blogs: May 1, 2018
We’ve got a lot of fears and hangups when it comes to therapy. Some believe, it’s exclusively for the severely ill and those with mental disorders. That’s not necessarily true. Some people who seek therapy may be grieving, dealing with a chronic physical illness or need support for a loved one. Judging the reasons why others attend therapy is another shaming technique. It’s a way to make us feel better about ourselves because we don’t need help. The truth is there will come a time when we all need support. Instead of judgment, we can offer acceptance, support and validation for the insight it ...
Source: World of Psychology - May 1, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Brandi-Ann Uyemura, M.A. Tags: Best of Our Blogs Source Type: blogs

6 Ways to Stop Absorbing Other People ’ s Emotions
“Sometimes I think I need a spare heart to feel all the things I feel.” — Sanober Khan I felt her agony and loneliness as if it were my own. Even as I write that sentence, my eyes well up and heaviness fills my heart. Then, I’m reminded to apply the advice I give others. My mom was a special person, a sensitive soul just like me. Actually, I’m so much like she was, yet so different. One of the differences between us is that I had an opportunity to observe her life’s challenges. I saw her challenges reflected within myself and made a conscious choice to find healthy ways to cope. You see,...
Source: World of Psychology - April 21, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Psych Central Staff Tags: Parenting Personal Publishers Self-Help Tiny Buddha Boundaries compassionate Emotions Empathy Feelings Highly Sensitive Person sensitive people Sensitivity Sympathy Source Type: blogs

The Peril of Online Physician Reviews
By NIRAN AL AGBA, MD You may have heard that before you pick a doctor you are supposed to look them up online and see what other people have to say about them before you set up an appointment. In the Age of Amazon this makes sense. Why wouldn’t you? Allow me to give you a little insider information.  While they may well be a good idea in theory, Yelp.com and other online physician review sites have evolved in recent years to become the bane of my and fellow doctors existence.  This past summer, Physicians Working Together, a non-partisan physician organization, started a petition on Change.org reque...
Source: The Health Care Blog - February 28, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: John Irvine Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: blogs

Free Live Webinar: The Gifting of Borderline Personality Disorder
Do you know someone who has an intense fear of abandonment, does dangerous and impulsive acts, is unstable in relationships, and expresses extreme emotions? They might have severe depression, anger, anxiety, rage, substance abuse and even self-harming behaviors. Yet, they can be the most passionate loving people who are highly sensitive to their moods and the moods of others. If so, you might ht be dealing with a person who has borderline personality disorder. Their hot and cold interaction can be frustrating and confusing. But it doesn’t have to be. Join us for this webinar and discover the gifting of this disorder....
Source: World of Psychology - January 20, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Gabe Howard Tags: Borderline Personality Disorders Webinar Borderline Personality Disorder bpd Stigma Source Type: blogs

Best of Our Blogs: December 12, 2017
I recently read this post by a singer with bipolar disorder. It opened my eyes to what self-care actually looks like when you’re suffering from a mental illness. Instead of spa days, and yoga, she says for her it looks like slowing down, finding your own way and spending time with friends. This holiday season as you get lost in other people’s expectations, why not create your own list? Not a self-care list that looks good, but one that feels good to you. Our posts this week on dealing with emotional neglect, a loved one with borderline personality disorder and high conflict may be tips you want to add to y...
Source: World of Psychology - December 12, 2017 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Brandi-Ann Uyemura, M.A. Tags: Best of Our Blogs Source Type: blogs

6 Gifts of Borderline Personality Disorder
I was twenty-four-years-old on my way to a residential treatment center in Chicago for an eating disorder when I got what I thought was devastating news that I had borderline personality disorder (BPD). When BPD hit my brain I lashed out inside. “Not another diagnosis,” I screamed while lines of thoughts trailed rapidly through my head. These thoughts came in all shapes and sizes. Some thoughts of abandonment flew by, other thoughts of suicidal ideation zoomed by. My mood was up and down like I was on a roller coaster, and not the kiddy one. I was a lost soul living in a world of self-destructive torment w...
Source: World of Psychology - December 11, 2017 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Brianna Ricotta Tags: Borderline Personality Eating Disorders Stigma Suicide bpd Character Strengths personality treats self-compassion Self-Esteem Source Type: blogs

Best of Our Blogs: October 10, 2017
We think we need big change to cause significant improvement in our emotional well-being and mental health. Sometimes it’s the small things, the things we don’t even think about that can cause dramatic shifts in our lives. It’s the ordinary things, the day to day things that we can change. While it’s not be as sexy as a getaway, spa visit or workshop, returning to the basics can be life changing. This week, consider how much sleep you’re getting. Is your diet up to par? And when is the last time you went for a walk, and read something just for the fun of it? Why not try one thing and see how y...
Source: World of Psychology - October 10, 2017 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Brandi-Ann Uyemura, M.A. Tags: Best of Our Blogs Source Type: blogs

Deliberately Untruthful: Normal vs. Abnormal Lying
Everyone lies at some point. When a child reaches 2-3 years old, they can understand the rules set in place by parents. They can also break them. When children become teenagers, the art of deception often increases. Usually, this stage of lying is normal. Abnormal lying occurs when the reasons for the lies change. These two scenarios demonstrate normal lying versus compulsive and pathological lying: Mark enjoyed his job even though it was stressful. He worked six days a week and although his wife had voiced her concern about a lack of quality time together, he continued to work long hours. Every year, despite the workloa...
Source: World of Psychology - October 2, 2017 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Rebecca Lee Tags: Habits Personality Relationships Treatment Communication Compulsive lying Deceit deception habitual lying untruths White Lies Source Type: blogs

The Chronically Suicidal Patient and Stigma from Within the Mental Health System
There's an on-line psychiatrist discussion group where docs exchange information, ideas and resources.  As in all things on-line, it's sometime is invaluable, and it sometimes makes me shake my head.  Today, I was tagged in a post that discussed an article in Psychiatric Times calledWe Need to Talk About Stigma in the Mental Health System.  Louise Harvey writes about her hospitalizations in the UK.   Here is an excerpt so that you get the idea, and in the UK the term "sectioned" means involuntarily hospitalized.Quickly it became clear that I was considered to be a histrionic, attention-se...
Source: Shrink Rap - September 23, 2017 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Dinah Source Type: blogs

Women know better than men what other women are thinking and feeling
In this study, the researchers found that the female volunteers got significantly better scores than the men. This didn’t come as a huge surprise, as other work has found that, on average, women are better at inferring other people’s mental states and identifying facial expressions. But the analysis also revealed that women were better at mind-reading other women than they were at reading men. Men were also slightly better at reading women than men, but they still scored lower than the female participants. Part of the explanation for women being easier to read could be that they are more emotionally expressive ...
Source: BPS RESEARCH DIGEST - September 18, 2017 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: BPS Research Digest Tags: Emotion Gender Social Source Type: blogs

Borderline Personality Disorder: 8 Classic Signs You Should Know
How to tell if someone has a borderline personality disorder. • Try one of PsyBlog's ebooks, all written by Dr Jeremy Dean: Activate: How To Find Joy Again By Changing What You Do (NEW) The Anxiety Plan: 42 Strategies For Worry, Phobias, OCD and Panic Spark: 17 Steps That Will Boost Your Motivation For Anything (Source: PsyBlog | Psychology Blog)
Source: PsyBlog | Psychology Blog - August 20, 2017 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Jeremy Dean Tags: Psychology Source Type: blogs

Surviving Mental Health Issues: Am I Unique or a Freak?
Years ago, when I experienced debilitating bouts of anxiety, I would easily lose my perspective and feel like an outcast — a freak. I momentarily transformed into a negative abstract of myself that possessed undignified emotional and behavioral idiosyncrasies. But, over time when I regained perspective, I appreciated my odd peculiarities as not only “unique” but as vital assets that helped me achieve some success in my life. Perspective: Use it or lose it. Got it. Seems easy. Not. The hard part was weathering the often betraying nature of this positive, elusive outlook. Whenever life flipped the coin on ...
Source: World of Psychology - August 1, 2017 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: John Tsilimparis, MFT Tags: Anxiety and Panic Celebrities Creativity Motivation and Inspiration Personal Personality Psychology Psychotherapy Creative Genius Depression Generalized Anxiety Disorder Improving Self Esteem Mental Health Mental Illness Perspe Source Type: blogs

Does the high-risk psychiatric patient pose a risk for the patient or the doctor?
A woman recently requested a medication evaluation at the suggestion of her psychotherapist.  The caller told me her diagnosis was borderline personality disorder. She hoped medication might ease her anxiety.  She also admitted that two other psychiatrists refused to see her because she was too “high risk.”  I asked if she was suicidal.  Yes, thoughts crossed her mind. However, she never acted on them, and was not suicidal currently.  I was curious whether my colleagues recoiled at the caller’s diagnosis, her suicide risk, her wish for anxiety-relieving medication, or something el...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - July 31, 2017 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="http://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/steven-reidbord" rel="tag" > Steven Reidbord, MD < /a > Tags: Conditions Psychiatry Source Type: blogs

Swiping for Therapists
Over inThe New York Times, Melissa Miller has an article titled "How to Find the Right Therapist."Miller compares it to dating, and she makes the very valid point that good chemistry helps, it's really nice to like and respect your psychotherapist, and to feel a sense of rapport.  In psychotherapy, the talking is an integral part of the treatment and the relationship itself can be healing.  So it is important in therapy that the patient be comfortable confiding in the therapist, be open and honest, and feel safe saying things that can make one feel vulnerable.Miller compares it to dating, and talks abou...
Source: Shrink Rap - July 18, 2017 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Dinah Source Type: blogs

Best of Our Blogs: July 7, 2017
When things are going right, we seldom grow. It’s the hard stuff that makes us pause, reflect on how we’ve been living and stretch for something better. But those difficult times require grit and resilience. How do you get through days when you’re dragging your feet, feel out of sorts and everything seems to be going wrong? Nothing floors me like illness. Since I still have to raise two toddlers when I’m faced with fatigue or a general sense of dis-ease I look toward the following to lift me back up. Listen or read about people who have suffered, survived and succeeded through it. Podcasts, Super S...
Source: World of Psychology - July 7, 2017 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Brandi-Ann Uyemura, M.A. Tags: Best of Our Blogs Abnormal Psychology Antisocial Personality Disorder Borderline and relationships Borderline Personality Disorder bpd and relationships Histrionic personality disorder Iyanla Vanzant Narcissism Narcissism and boundaries Source Type: blogs

Best of Our Blogs: June 30, 2017
I think the reason why many of us don’t take care of ourselves is not because we don’t believe it’s important. We don’t do what we need to do, because it requires us to do the hard stuff. We’re forced to put up boundaries. We’re forced to confront issues, people and situations we would rather deny and avoid. Instead of running or escaping, we’re face to face with the thing, and it can either make us tough, gritty and self-confident or it can bury us deeper in self-denial and resentment. It’s not easy to do the hard thing. Sometimes we’re just not up for it. Real positiv...
Source: World of Psychology - June 30, 2017 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Brandi-Ann Uyemura, M.A. Tags: Best of Our Blogs Antisocial Personality Disorder Borderline Personality Disorder Borderline signs Emotional Wellness Histrionic personality disorder manipulation and narcissists narcissist survival guide Narcissistic Personality Disorder Source Type: blogs

Best of Our Blogs: June 9, 2017
At any time, I’ve got something in the palm of my hand be it a phone, remote control or my laptop. I often wonder if this constant need to be busy is affecting my ability to stay present with myself and my sons. More importantly, why am I doing it? Is it really serving me? Is my need to be in the know affecting my ability to know what’s going around me now? If you’re like me and can’t seem to stay hands-free, consider why you’re doing it. Is knowing the best city to move to or most trendy paint color really more important than the flower in front of you, or feeling of peace? I have t...
Source: World of Psychology - June 9, 2017 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Brandi-Ann Uyemura, M.A. Tags: Best of Our Blogs argument Borderline and relationships Borderline personality and partner Borderling males Decluttering for more creativity Ending friendship Feeling Interpersonal relationship Jean Harlow Organizing tips Signs of to Source Type: blogs

Self-Harm: Legitimate Coping Skill or a Silent Scream for Help?
In an article I wrote titled “Why I’m Grateful for My Son’s Self-Injury,” I describe my son’s depression and the use of cutting to release some of his inner pain. This self-injury turned into an addictive and compulsive act that culminated in several suicide attempts. Cutting became his demon; one that needed to be fed, demanded attention, and was in control. No longer was my son the master of himself, the demon was. He described it as a monster, an obsession, “I want to cradle my obsession and love my obsession. . .the monster that has festered for, it seems like an eternity, inside of ...
Source: World of Psychology - June 3, 2017 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Theresa Larsen Tags: Depression Personal Self-Esteem Suicide Borderline Personality Disorder Coping Skills Cutting Major Depressive Disorder Mortification of the flesh Self Harm Suffering suicidal gestures Source Type: blogs

How To Spot The 3 Types Of Personality Disorder
What it means to have a schizoid, paranoid or borderline personality disorder. • Try one of PsyBlog's ebooks, all written by Dr Jeremy Dean: Activate: How To Find Joy Again By Changing What You Do (NEW) The Anxiety Plan: 42 Strategies For Worry, Phobias, OCD and Panic Spark: 17 Steps That Will Boost Your Motivation For Anything (Source: PsyBlog | Psychology Blog)
Source: PsyBlog | Psychology Blog - May 25, 2017 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Jeremy Dean Tags: Psychology Source Type: blogs

Best of Our Blogs: May 16, 2017
Mother’s Day has come and passed. But you may still be reeling from the dysfunctional festivities. Hurt can lay dormant for years before it’s plucked back into consciousness from an insensitive remark. All it takes is criticism from a toxic mother or reminder that the person who raised you never really knew you to start the spiral of deep emotional pain. If you need a little healing, grab a cup of tea and curl up with these five good reads. These posts will relieve your guilt, transform the way you saw your childhood and help you recreate what Mother’s Day means to you. Toxic Mothers Don’t Deserve Y...
Source: World of Psychology - May 16, 2017 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Brandi-Ann Uyemura, M.A. Tags: Best of Our Blogs Antisocial Personality Disorder Avoidant personality disorder Borderline Personality Disorder Emotion Histrionic personality disorder Mother's Day guilt Mother\'S Day Narcissistic Personality Disorder Narcissists versus Source Type: blogs