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CAR T-cell therapy for leukemia leads to remissions in clinical trial
(Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center) Researchers at Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center showed about 70 percent of patients with the most common adult leukemia had their tumors shrink or disappear following an experimental chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T-cell immunotherapy. The researchers also found that measuring genetic traces of cancer cells taken from bone marrow biopsies might be a better indicator of prognosis than the standard lymph node scan. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - July 17, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Mayo Clinic PathWays: What's the diagnosis?
This week's case study reviews the bone marrow biopsy and myeloproliferative neoplasm ??malignant disease associated with increased production of blood cells ??workup from a 60-year-old woman who presented with two years of progressive transfusion-dependent anemia. Can you make the diagnosis? View the case and make your diagnosis. Learn more about Mayo Clinic PathWays. (Source: News from Mayo Clinic)
Source: News from Mayo Clinic - April 26, 2017 Category: Databases & Libraries Source Type: news

Parasite Wonders: A parasitologist's view of the world
This week's case involves review of the bone marrow biopsy from?an immunocompromised man with hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis ? a rare disorder caused by pathologic activation of the immune system?? and fever. He reports travel throughout the U.S. and Italy. What is it? Every week, Mayo Clinic microbiologist Dr. Bobbi Pritt?posts a new case, along with the [...] (Source: News from Mayo Clinic)
Source: News from Mayo Clinic - April 25, 2017 Category: Databases & Libraries Source Type: news

UK Medical in management buyout from BD
The management of Becton Dickinson & Co. (NYSE:BDX) subsidiary UK Medical bought the company from its parent for an undisclosed amount. The Sheffield, U.K.-based company, which was acquired by CareFusion in 2012 before BD paid $12 billion for CareFusion in 2015, makes products for the breast radiology, urology, interventional radiology and cardiology markets. UK Medical will keep distributing BD’s soft tissue and bone marrow biopsy products in Great Britain after the MBO, according to a press release. “This is a great deal for both companies and we look forward to a continued and long partnership,...
Source: Mass Device - April 5, 2017 Category: Medical Equipment Authors: Brad Perriello Tags: Hospital Care Mergers & Acquisitions Wall Street Beat Becton Dickinson & Co. CareFusion Corp. UK Medical Ltd. Source Type: news

Young Doctor Diagnosed With A Death Sentence Hopes To Cure Himself -- Before It's Too Late
David Fajgenbaum has nearly died five times. He’s had his last rites read to him, and he knows he could relapse at any moment. Still, the 32-year-old doctor doesn’t waste energy on self-pity. He can’t. He’s too busy trying to find a cure for the rare disease that’s come so close to killing him. “I realized that if I didn’t dedicate the rest of my life to trying to cure this disease, that no one else was going to do it,” Fajgenbaum said. “I didn’t have many more shots.” When Fajgenbaum was 25 and in his third year at the Perelman School of Medicine at t...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - April 4, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Researchers propose noninvasive method to detect bone marrow cancer
(Boston University Medical Center) For the first time, researchers have shown that using magnetic resonance imaging can effectively identify bone marrow cancer (myelofibrosis) in an experimental model.The findings, published in the journal Blood Cancer, may change the way this disease is diagnosed which is now through invasive bone marrow biopsies. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 14, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Make the Diagnosis: Survival Stumper
(MedPage Today) -- Case Findings: The image below shows a bone marrow biopsy of a 75-year-old man. Which of the following has the greatest impact on this patient's survival? (Source: MedPage Today Dermatology)
Source: MedPage Today Dermatology - September 20, 2016 Category: Dermatology Source Type: news

Make the Diagnosis: Post-cancer Conundrum
(MedPage Today) -- Case Findings: An 82-year-old woman with a past medical history of ovarian cancer treated with surgery and chemotherapy in 2008, who is currently in remission for treatment-related AML presents to the emergency department with a recent fever of 101.2 degrees Fahrenheit, bruising, and altered mental status. The patient is undergoing consolidation chemotherapy for the treatment of her AML. Her most recent bone marrow biopsy and flow cytometry results show no minimal residual disease. Further laboratory testing shows the following image of her peripheral smear. What organism caused the infection? (Source:...
Source: MedPage Today Public Health - September 8, 2016 Category: American Health Source Type: news

Medical News Today: Bone Marrow Biopsy: What to Expect
This article looks at how bone marrow biopsies are carried out, how long they take, and whether or not they hurt. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - August 12, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Surgery Source Type: news

Global Stem Cells Group Announces Stem Cell Training Course in South...
Global Stem Cells Group will host a stem cell training course in SVF and bone marrow aspiration techniques July 28 and 20, 2016.(PRWeb July 28, 2016)Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/GlobalStemCellsGroup/KoreaTrainingCourseN-Biot/prweb13582720.htm (Source: PRWeb: Medical Pharmaceuticals)
Source: PRWeb: Medical Pharmaceuticals - July 28, 2016 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Slide Show: Acute Myeloid Leukemia
This slide show features bone marrow biopsies showing acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cells replacing the bone marrow, and skin biopsies with AML infiltrating the dermis. (Source: CancerNetwork)
Source: CancerNetwork - July 22, 2016 Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Cesar A. Moran, MD Source Type: news

Side Effects May Include: HLH
It was June 2015, and the whole thing had started as hot flashes and a headache at a friend's summer kick-off party. He must've put in some funky ingredients in the punch, I thought to myself after. Or maybe I just drank too much of it? As the days went on the flashes turned into out-of-this-world, 104-105 degree fevers, followed by bed-drenching sweats, then full-on teeth-chattering shivers. I felt like a lobster reaching full boil, only to be transferred to a cryogenic chamber. This went on for almost two weeks. I dreaded the nights the most, when the fevers were at their worst. I couldn't sleep. I went to the emergency...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - July 6, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Scientists Block Breast Cancer Cells From Hiding in Bones
Contact: Samiha Khanna Phone: 919-419-5069 Email: samiha.khanna@duke.edu https://www.dukehealth.org EMBARGOED FOR RELEASE until 2 p.m. (ET) on WEDNESDAY, MAY 25, 2016 Scientists Block Breast Cancer Cells From Hiding in Bones DURHAM, N.C. -- Scientists at the Duke Cancer Institute have identified a molecular key that breast cancer cells use to invade bone marrow in mice, where they may be protected from chemotherapy or hormonal therapies that could otherwise eradicate them.  Through years of experiments in mice, the scientists have found ways to outmaneuver this stealth tactic by not only preventing breast cancer cells...
Source: DukeHealth.org: Duke Health Features - May 26, 2016 Category: Pediatrics Tags: Duke Medicine Source Type: news

Living With Cancer: Tips for Safe Food Choices
Tips for safe food choices during cancer treatment Try these suggestions to help you to eat healthy and avoid food infections during cancer treatment. Cancer treatment and the heart Although radiation treatment and chemo help with cancer, they can also increase the chance of heart damage. Here's what you should know. Bone marrow biopsy and [...] (Source: News from Mayo Clinic)
Source: News from Mayo Clinic - February 19, 2016 Category: Databases & Libraries Source Type: news

Two startups win seed funding for pediatric med devices
The Philadelphia Pediatric Medical Device Consortium said today it issued 2 seed grants of $50,000 each to 2 medical device companies focused on pediatric care. The 1st is Bellefonte, Penn.-based Actuated Medical, which is developing a device to reduce insertion force and needle slippage during bone biopsies and bone marrow aspiration procedures in children.  Because of the difference in size and curvature in children’s bones, traditional methods often have high rates of needle slippage and damage to surrounding tissue.  The 2nd company to win seed funding is Austin, Texas-based ENTvantage Di...
Source: Mass Device - January 14, 2016 Category: Medical Equipment Authors: Fink Densford Tags: Business/Financial News Diagnostics Actuated Medical ENTvantage Diagnostics Philadelphia Pediatric Medical Device Consortium Source Type: news

Scientist Featured On 'Humans Of New York' Can Put Your Immune System Into A Mouse's Body
Humans of New York, the popular blog that uses images of New Yorkers to create a photographic census of the city, featured a scientist last week who caught our eye: She can put your entire immune system into the body of a mouse! As she put it to Humans of New York, “I can take your immune system and transplant it into a mouse that I’ve genetically engineered to have no immune system of it’s [sic] own, so that I can model the genetics of your immune system and find immunoregulatory defects that will determine how you are going to respond to the cellular therapy needed to treat your disease.&rdquo...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - October 26, 2015 Category: Science Source Type: news

A brotherly bond: Family makes a new home after boys are diagnosed with rare blood disorder
The two boys in a sixth floor room at Boston Children’s Hospital – 4-year-old  Zachary in bed playing a bike race game on an iPad and 2-year-old Gabriel asleep on his mother’s shoulder – are recovering from stem cell transplants  for a pre-leukemia condition so rare in pediatrics that only 50 other cases have been reported globally. The brothers are among the seven children that Dr. Inga Hofmann has treated for myelofibrosis, a blood disorder that usually strikes older adults. This is why the Kaiser boys and their family moved here in February 2015 from Ohio to be treated at the Dana-...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - October 13, 2015 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Irene Sege Tags: Cancer Our patients’ stories Dana-Farber/Boston Children's Cancer and Blood Disorders Center Dr. Inga Hofmann leukemia Source Type: news

My Choice To Live: Part II
Last week, Jay Michael revealed his stage 4 cancer diagnosis in "My Choice to Live: Part I" on the Splash blog. Here, he continues his story... For most of my life, I have set lofty goals -- often very far-reaching goals that really pushed me to perform. My main goal in high school was to get the highest grades I could while doing as little work as possible -- admittedly, not an impressive goal. I made it my mission to find a way to move to London at 18, a city I was certain was my next hometown although I had never even been once; I celebrated my 18th birthday with a bunch of international students living in a ...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - June 3, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

8 Rare 'House, M.D.' Cases That Can Actually Happen (And How To Avoid Them)
"House, M.D.," starring Hugh Laurie as a pill-popping genius, was conceived as the medical version of "Sherlock Holmes" and ran for eight seasons on Fox. Sunday, Nov. 16, marked the 10-year anniversary of the premiere. Though it's easy to look back on the show and focus on some of the unbelievable details of the cases, it might surprise you to learn that "House" was actually much more realistic than you thought. Yeah, the odds of all these rare medical cases coming to one hospital in New Jersey are pretty slim, but a variety of sources -- including Andrew Holtz, former CNN Medical Corresponde...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - November 17, 2014 Category: Science Source Type: news

Overcoming Cancer Consent
Part I: Non-Consensual Cancer Growing up, one of my heroes was Sir Ernest Shackleton. He was a polar explorer at the turn of the century who led an expedition straight south to explore Antarctica in his ship, aptly named The Endurance, with a motley crew of burly Englishmen wrapped in layers of wool, icicles hanging from their thick beards. After their ship was stuck in ice and capsized, Shackleton had to abandon his exploration mission and lead his crew through the harsh Antarctic conditions to safety. To his men, Shackleton was a true leader, heroic, humble and selfless. I have not thought much about Shackleton since t...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - October 31, 2014 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Bone marrow drug could treat alopecia
Conclusion This is valuable laboratory research that identifies the specific type of immune cell (CD8+NKG2D+ T cells) that is involved in the disease process of alopecia. It further identifies several signalling molecules that are drivers of this T cell activity. The researchers then demonstrate that giving two molecular treatments to block the signalling molecules – ruxolitinib (currently licensed in the UK to treat certain bone marrow disorders) and tofacitinib (not currently licensed for any condition in the UK) – were effective in preventing and reversing the disease process in mice with alopecia. These fi...
Source: NHS News Feed - August 18, 2014 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Medication Source Type: news

Detecting Bone Marrow Involvement in Hodgkin LymphomaDetecting Bone Marrow Involvement in Hodgkin Lymphoma
Is FDG-PET/CT a better option than bone marrow biopsy for patients with Hodgkin's Lymphoma? Annals of Oncology (Source: Medscape Today Headlines)
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - June 13, 2014 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Hematology-Oncology Journal Article Source Type: news

Measles virus used to treat bone marrow cancer
ConclusionThis research has shown that a modified measles virus can produce a long-term remission of cancerous lesions in a person with multiple myeloma that has not responded to chemotherapy. Patients such as this have limited remaining treatment options, so a new treatment would offer an important development.The article describes the response of two women in a phase I trial who received the highest dose of the virus. One of the women had a lasting response; the other woman showed some signs of an early response, but these were not as good and were not as long-lasting. As yet, we don’t know what proportion of patie...
Source: NHS News Feed - May 16, 2014 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Cancer Medical practice Source Type: news

Tumor cells in blood may indicate poor prognosis in early breast cancer
Tumor cells in bone marrow of early breast cancer patients predict a higher risk of relapse as well as poorer survival, but bone marrow biopsy is an invasive and painful procedure. Now, it may be possible to identify tumor cells in a routine blood sample and use them as prognostic markers, according to a study. The authors conclude that "Our data offer support for the clinical potential of CTCs to assess the individual risk of patients at the time of primary diagnosis and may be used for treatment tailoring in the absence of other strong quantitative markers." (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - May 15, 2014 Category: Science Source Type: news

Tumor cells in the blood may indicate poor prognosis in early breast cancer
(Oxford University Press USA) Tumor cells in bone marrow of early breast cancer patients predict a higher risk of relapse as well as poorer survival, but bone marrow biopsy is an invasive and painful procedure. Now, it may be possible to identify tumor cells in a routine blood sample and use them as prognostic markers, according to a study published May 15 in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - May 15, 2014 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

What scientific idea is ready for retirement?
Each year a forum for the world's most brilliant minds asks one question. This year's drew responses from such names as Richard Dawkins, Ian McEwan and Alan Alda. Here, edge.org founder John Brockman explains how the question came into being and we pick some of the best responsesEdge.org was launched in 1996 as the online version of "the Reality Club", an informal gathering of intellectuals who met from 1981 to 1996 in Chinese restaurants, artist lofts, investment banking firms, ballrooms, museums, living rooms and elsewhere. Though the venue is now in cyberspace, the spirit of the Reality Club lives on in the li...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - January 12, 2014 Category: Science Authors: The Observer Tags: Astronomy Biology Mathematics Technology Physics Features Internet Animal behaviour The Observer Science Source Type: news

Advanced Breast Cancer First Diagnosed on Bone Marrow BiopsyAdvanced Breast Cancer First Diagnosed on Bone Marrow Biopsy
The first major North American study since 1978 of solid tumor metastases to bone marrow has found a frequency of about 0.2% for breast cancer. Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Today Headlines)
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - September 25, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Pathology & Lab Medicine News Source Type: news

PET/CT bests gold standard bone marrow biopsy for diagnosis and prognosis of lymphoma patients
(Society of Nuclear Medicine) A more precise method for determining bone marrow involvement in patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma -- a key factor in tailoring patient management plans -- has been identified by researchers in a study published in the August issue of The Journal of Nuclear Medicine. Imaging with 18F-FDG positron emission tomography/computed tomography, when compared to bone marrow biopsy, was more sensitive, showed a higher negative predictive value and was more accurate. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - August 1, 2013 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Medicine: the appliance of science
A cure for HIV? A new approach to obesity? Tailor-made therapies for cancer? Medical science surges aheadMore than once last year, researchers described leaps in medical science that were so breathtaking, and held so much potential for patients, that they immediately joined the list of fields to watch in the year ahead. In most cases, the work was, and is, at an early stage and its future success far from certain. Such is the nature of science. Most of today's breakthroughs will be tomorrow's failures. But some may go down in history for transforming how medicine is done.Often, medical science surges ahead when different a...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - January 1, 2013 Category: Science Authors: Ian Sample Tags: The Guardian Genetics Biology Medical research Microbiology Society Features Cancer Aids and HIV Chemistry Biochemistry and molecular biology Science Source Type: news

Stem Cells for Cell-Based Therapies
The world of stem cells We know the human body comprises many cell types (e.g., blood cells, skin cells, cervical cells), but we often forget to appreciate that all of these different cell types arose from a single cell—the fertilized egg. A host of sequential, awe-inspiring events occur between the fertilization of an egg and the formation of a new individual: Embryonic stem (ES) cells are also called totipotent cells. The first steps involve making more cells by simple cell division: one cell becomes two cells; two cells become four cells, etc. Each cell of early development is undifferentiated; that is, it is no...
Source: ActionBioscience - December 28, 2012 Category: Biology Authors: Ali Hochberg Source Type: news

Stem Cells for Cell-Based Therapies
The world of stem cells We know the human body comprises many cell types (e.g., blood cells, skin cells, cervical cells), but we often forget to appreciate that all of these different cell types arose from a single cell—the fertilized egg. A host of sequential, awe-inspiring events occur between the fertilization of an egg and the formation of a new individual: Embryonic stem (ES) cells are also called totipotent cells. The first steps involve making more cells by simple cell division: one cell becomes two cells; two cells become four cells, etc. Each cell of early development is undifferentiated; that is, it is...
Source: ActionBioscience - December 28, 2012 Category: Biology Authors: Ali Hochberg Source Type: news