Pickles | Comics
http://www.arcamax.com/thefunnies/pickles/s-1460375 (Source: Psychology of Pain)
Source: Psychology of Pain - January 29, 2014 Category: Psychiatrists and Psychologists Source Type: blogs

Pain Medicine News - Neuropathic Pain Trial Results Often Not Publicly Available, Survey Shows
Toronto—One-third of results from registered clinical trials of neuropathic pain treatments are not readily available, according to an extensive survey of neuropathic pain literature.According to Michael Rowbotham, MD, scientific director of the California Pacific Medical Center Research Institute in San Francisco, the unavailability of such a swath of trial results, compounded with selective publication bias, carry significant ethical, research and clinical implications."One problem is that the aggregating of these data tends to inflate treatment effect sizes," said Dr. Rowbotham. "If you overestimate...
Source: Psychology of Pain - January 26, 2014 Category: Psychiatrists and Psychologists Source Type: blogs

International Association for the Study of Pain | Buenos Aires 2014
The International Association for the Study of Pain will hold its 15th World Congress on Pain October 6-11, 2014, in Buenos Aires, Argentina! The Congress will attract more than 6,000 pain specialists from all over the world who will converge on Buenos Aires and present the most up-to-date information on the field of pain, from laboratory science to clinical diagnosis, management, and prevention.The Buenos Aires Scientific Program Committee will organize a program to include plenary sessions, topical workshops, refresher courses, and poster sessions covering every aspect of acute and chronic pain from basic science to clin...
Source: Psychology of Pain - January 25, 2014 Category: Psychiatrists and Psychologists Source Type: blogs

Pain In The Back? Exercise May Help You Learn Not To Feel It : Shots - Health News : NPR
More than 1 in 4 adult Americans say they've recently suffered a bout of low-back pain. It's one of the most common reasons people go to the doctor. And more and more people are being treated for it. America spends more than $80 billion a year on back pain treatments. But many specialists say less treatment is usually more effective. In fact, there's evidence that many standard treatments for back pain — surgery, spinal injections and painkillers — are often ineffective and can even worsen and prolong the problem. Dr. Jerome Groopman agrees with that premise. He suffered back pain for almost 20 y...
Source: Psychology of Pain - January 15, 2014 Category: Psychiatrists and Psychologists Source Type: blogs

Half Of A Drug's Power Comes From Thinking It Will Work : Shots - Health News : NPR
When you take a pill, you and your doctor hope it will work — and that helps it work.That's not a new idea. But now researchers say they know just how much of a drug's effect comes from the patient's expectation: at least half.When patients in the midst of a migraine attack took a dummy pill they thought was a widely used migraine drug, it reduced their pain roughly as much as when they took the real drug thinking it was a placebo."There was no difference between the pharmacology of the drug in reducing pain and the placebo dressed up with a nice word," study author Ted Kaptchuk tells Shots. "...
Source: Psychology of Pain - January 14, 2014 Category: Psychiatrists and Psychologists Source Type: blogs

The Brain: Adaptation and Maladaptation in Chronic Pain, June 15-20, 2014, Keystone Resort, Keystone, Colorado, USA
SIGNIFICANCE: The Institutes of Medicine indicate that pain affects more than 100 million Americans and costs more than an estimated $540-630 billion, a number predicted to only increase as our population ages and is influenced by lifestyle. We have few effective treatments for migraine or chronic pain. GOALS: Understanding the complexities of brain circuits involved in pain and migraine headache has been a major challenge in neurobiology that has limited the discovery of new therapies. For decades, the pain and headache communities have separately focused on peripheral mechanisms. INNOVATION: This conference bri...
Source: Psychology of Pain - January 13, 2014 Category: Psychiatrists and Psychologists Source Type: blogs

Pain-Topics News/Research UPDATES: Another Book About Pain; Only Much Better
Of nearly 240 million adults in the United States, more than 4 in 10, or about 100 million, live with chronic pain of some sort. Yet, the professional and popular news media focus more on abuses of pain medications than the dreaded conditions the drugs are intended to treat. Meanwhile, the suffering of untreated or mistreated patients with pain is largely overlooked. In her new book — A Nation in Pain: Healing Our Biggest Health Problem — author Judy Foreman provides a deeply researched account of today's chronic pain crisis and reasons behind it, and she discusses some solutions that could be within reach...
Source: Psychology of Pain - January 7, 2014 Category: Psychiatrists and Psychologists Source Type: blogs

Chronic widespread pain, including fibromyalgia: a pathway for care developed by the British Pain Society
Chronic widespread pain (CWP), including fibromyalgia, is a highly prevalent condition with a range of disabling symptoms, both physical and psychological. The British Pain Society (BPS) is supporting the treatment of this group of patients through a care pathway and this article describes the rationale and discussion points relevant to the CWP and fibromyalgia pathway. There are several aims in producing this pathway: to reduce variation in the standards of care, to reduce delays at all stages of care, and in particular, to enable clinicians to help patients accept a diagnosis of CWP. This diagnosis should be based on the...
Source: Psychology of Pain - January 6, 2014 Category: Psychiatrists and Psychologists Source Type: blogs

Anticipation of pain can be worse than pain itself - health - 22 November 2013 - New Scientist
This study demonstrates that the fear of anticipation is so strong it can reverse the usual pattern of time discounting," says George Loewenstein, a professor of economics and psychology at Carnegie-Mellon University in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. "It's probably not an exaggeration to say that as much, or more, of the pains of life come from anticipation and memory than from actual experience."The study could well have implications for medicine and health policy, because an understanding of how people judge pain is important for presenting them with options about potentially painful treatments."You s...
Source: Psychology of Pain - November 24, 2013 Category: Psychiatrists and Psychologists Source Type: blogs

Pain and Relief Signals Muted in Fibromyalgia - MedPage Today
Patients with fibromyalgia showed less activation in brain responses to pain-related "punishment and reward" anticipatory signaling on functional MRI than healthy controls, a small study showed.Compared with patients with fibromyalgia, controls had significant increases in signaling in the right ventral tegmental area (VTA) while anticipating pain (P
Source: Psychology of Pain - November 6, 2013 Category: Psychiatrists and Psychologists Source Type: blogs

Study Finds Blind People Hypersensitive to Pain - National Pain Report - National Pain Report
This study is noteworthy for research on multisensory interactions and plasticity, because it shows a strong link between vision and pain. The next step is to understand the nature of the interaction between visual loss and pain sensitivity. Which aspect of pain processing is involved in the interplay with vision, and what is its neural basis? The hope is that this work will open the door to pain investigations into the world of sensory loss, left unexplained for too long." Interesting cultural differences also emerged from the study. People in Italy were found to be more emotionally expressive and responsive to pain...
Source: Psychology of Pain - November 6, 2013 Category: Psychiatrists and Psychologists Source Type: blogs

Welcome | Cochrane Pain, Palliative and Supportive Care Group
BackgroundThe PaPaS Review Group was registered with the Collaboration on the 28th January 1998. Exploratory meetings for the PaPaS Review Group were held on the 3rd of June 1996 (Oxford) and the 22nd of June 1997 (Boston). Mr Phil Wiffen was involved in the set-up of the PaPaS Review Group and held the post as Co-ordinating Editor until March 2008 when he stepped down to become an Editor for PaPaS. Chris Eccleston, one of our long standing Editors, then took up the post as Co-ordinating Editor in April 2008.ScopeWe are interested in studies of interventions for • Acute pain arising accidentally or through d...
Source: Psychology of Pain - November 6, 2013 Category: Psychiatrists and Psychologists Source Type: blogs

Welcome | Cochrane Back Review Group
The Cochrane Back Review Group (CBRG) is one of 53 international Review Groups. The CBRG coordinates the publication of literature reviews of diagnosis, primary and secondary prevention and treatment of neck and back pain and other spinal disorders, excluding inflammatory diseases and fractures.The CBRG is hosted by the Institute for Work & Health (IWH) in Toronto, Canada. The Institute for Work & Health is an independent, not-for-profit organization. Its mission is to conduct and share research that protects and improves the health of working people and is valued by policy-makers, workers ...
Source: Psychology of Pain - November 6, 2013 Category: Psychiatrists and Psychologists Source Type: blogs

Pain Medicine News - American Pain Society President: Budget Cuts Not Only Reason for Underfunded Pain Research
New Orleans—Pain research in the United States is severely underfunded, despite the fact that chronic pain costs the economy more than $600 billion annually in medical expenses and lost productivity. Although the 5% cut to the National Institutes of Health (NIH) budget across the board is partly to blame, it is not the only contributing factor, according to Roger B. Fillingim, PhD, professor, College of Dentistry, University of Florida, Gainesville, and director of the university's Pain Research and Intervention Center of Excellence. Dr. Fillingim, who also is president of the American Pain Society (APS), spoke with&...
Source: Psychology of Pain - October 31, 2013 Category: Psychiatrists and Psychologists Source Type: blogs

The Pain And Interoception Imaging Network (PAIN)
The Pain And Interoception Imaging Network (PAIN) seeks to improve understanding of the brain's role in chronic disease, with a particular emphasis on chronic pain states.  PAIN provides an infrastructure for storage of functional and structural brain imaging data and associated behavioral metadata from multiple scanning sites and provides infrastructure for automated analysis of the resulting comprehensive data sets. Through these efforts, PAIN facilitates new discoveries in brain endophenotypes and biomarkers of chronic pain states. http://painrepository.org/ (Source: Psychology of Pain)
Source: Psychology of Pain - October 30, 2013 Category: Psychiatrists and Psychologists Source Type: blogs

UCLA To Host Global Chronic Pain Database - HDM Latest News Article
A new database at the University of California, Los Angeles, featuring hundreds of brain scans and other key clinical information will help researchers tease out similarities and differences between migraine, irritable bowel syndrome, fibromyalgia, rheumatoid arthritis, and many other chronic-pain conditions, UCLA Health officials say. The Gail and Gerald Oppenheimer Family Center for Neurobiology of Stress at UCLA will serve as the main hub for this new Pain and Interoception Imaging Network (PAIN); UCLA Health says it is the first-ever standardized database for brain imaging associated with chronic pain. So far, 14 inst...
Source: Psychology of Pain - October 30, 2013 Category: Psychiatrists and Psychologists Source Type: blogs

How A Wandering Brain Can Help People Cope With Pain : Shots - Health News : NPR
When some people are in pain, the experience is so intense that they can't think of anything else. But others can turn their minds elsewhere and feel better. Why? The difference may be due in part to brain wiring, researchers say, and knowing more about how it works may someday make it easier to match people with effective pain treatments. Prescription painkillers like Vicodin don't work for everyone, and alternative treatments like meditation or cognitive behavioral therapy work for some but not all. Right now, doctors can't tell in advance which pain treatment will work best for a patient. The problem intr...
Source: Psychology of Pain - October 30, 2013 Category: Psychiatrists and Psychologists Source Type: blogs

'Chimera' protein could lead to drug treatments for chronic pain - ScienceDaily
Scientists have manufactured a new bio-therapeutic molecule that could be used to treat neurological disorders such as chronic pain and epilepsy.A team of 22 scientists from 11 research institutes, including Dr Enrico Ferrari from the University of Lincoln, UK, created and characterised a new molecule that was able to alleviate hypersensitivity to inflammatory pain.The work is featured on the cover of the October 2013 issue of the scientific journal Bioconjugate Chemistry.Dr Ferrari joined the School of Life Sciences in October last year from the Medical Research Council's Laboratory of Molecular Biology in Cambridge,...
Source: Psychology of Pain - October 30, 2013 Category: Psychiatrists and Psychologists Source Type: blogs

New Wrinkle for Old Drug It’s not just for smoothing laugh lines. Botulinum toxin may have the potential to ease OA pain.| Arthritis Today Magazine
Widely used by doctors to soften forehead wrinkles and reduce uncontrollably sweaty armpits, researchers now are exploring botulinum toxin as a potential therapy for osteoarthritis (OA) pain. Although botulinum toxin (Botox, Dysport, Myobloc) has been studied since the 1950s, recent studies on its use in osteoarthritis pain suggest it could be a new analgesic option for a group of patients that's been hard to treat. "The Botox story is very intriguing," says David Felson, MD, professor of medicine and epidemiology at Boston University. "It isn't just muscles. It can paralyze nerves. Just like celeb...
Source: Psychology of Pain - October 30, 2013 Category: Psychiatrists and Psychologists Source Type: blogs

Judy Foreman's pain book and blog
A Nation in Pain: Healing our Biggest Health ProblemJudy ForemanBased on interviews with hundreds of scientists and many hundreds of research studiesWritten in an informal, conversational tone, and accessible to anyone interested in painIncludes a thoughtful analysis of the politics of opioid and marijuana regulationExplores the many possible reasons for women's extra pain burden, including the complex role of estrogen, and the reasons why women receive inferior pain treatment,http://global.oup.com/academic/product/a-nation-in-pain-9780199837205?cc=us&lang=en&q=judy%20foreman&tab=reviewsVideo:http://www.yo...
Source: Psychology of Pain - October 26, 2013 Category: Psychiatrists and Psychologists Source Type: blogs

F.D.A. Urging a Tighter Rein on Painkillers - NYTimes.com
The Food and Drug Administration on Thursday recommended tighter controls on how doctors prescribe the most commonly used narcotic painkillers, changes that are expected to take place as early as next year.The move, which represents a major policy shift, follows a decade-long debate over whether the widely abused drugs, which contain the narcotic hydrocodone, should be controlled as tightly as more powerful painkillers like OxyContin.The drugs at issue contain a combination of hydrocodone and an over-the-counter painkiller like acetaminophen or aspirin and are sold either as generics or under brand names like Vicodin or Lo...
Source: Psychology of Pain - October 25, 2013 Category: Psychiatrists and Psychologists Source Type: blogs

'Love Hormone' May Mediate Placebo Effect - MedPage Today
Intranasal oxytocin, sometimes called the "love hormone," intensified the painkilling effect of placebo in a clinical study, suggesting a physical basis for the placebo effect, researchers said.Among 75 healthy young men exposed to painful heat stimuli on their forearms in the randomized, double-blind study, ratings of a placebo cream's analgesic effect were greater after the participants received active intranasal oxytocin than when they snorted a saline solution, with a difference of 5.76 points out of 60 (95% CI 0.59-10.93, P=0.03), according to Ulrike Bingel, MD, of the University of Duisberg-Essen ...
Source: Psychology of Pain - October 23, 2013 Category: Psychiatrists and Psychologists Source Type: blogs

Prescription Drug User Fee Act (PDUFA) > Public Meeting on Fibromyalgia Patient-Focused Drug Development
Public Meeting on Fibromyalgia Patient-Focused Drug DevelopmentOn  December 10, 2013, FDA is conducting a public meeting on Patient-Focused Drug Development for fibromyalgia. FDA is interested in obtaining patient input on the impact of fibromyalgia on daily life and patients' views on currently available therapies to treat the condition.This website will be updated as registration and additional meeting information become available.Date: December 10, 2013 Time: 1:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m. Location:FDA White Oak Campus10903 New Hampshire Ave.Building 31, Room 1503A (Great Room)Silver Spri...
Source: Psychology of Pain - October 23, 2013 Category: Psychiatrists and Psychologists Source Type: blogs

Brain treats rejection like physical pain say scientists - Science - News - The Independent
The human brain treats rejection in a similar way to the way it process physical pain, new research has suggested.A scientific study conducted by the University of Michigan Medical School has shown that the brain uses a similar reaction to ease the pain of social rejection as it does to deal with pain caused by physical injury.A team led by Dr David T. Hsu also found that people who showed high levels of resilience on a personality test also had higher levels of natural painkiller activation.When the body experiences physical pain, the brain releases chemical opioids into the empty space between neurons, which &q...
Source: Psychology of Pain - October 17, 2013 Category: Psychiatrists and Psychologists Source Type: blogs

Congress Probes VA Painkiller Prescribing - MedPage Today
Lawmakers on Capitol Hill hammered the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) for the way it handles pain management in patients during a hearing Thursday on the topic.Rep. Dan Benishek, MD (R-Mich.), chair of the House Veterans Affairs Health Subcommittee, questioned the VA's pain management approach, which places primary care providers at the center of care teams."As I know from personal experience, the multifaceted nature of chronic pain, particularly when multiple medications are being prescribed, should not be managed by primary care physicians but rather by a qualified pain specialist who is trained to underst...
Source: Psychology of Pain - October 17, 2013 Category: Psychiatrists and Psychologists Source Type: blogs

Graduate Certificate in Chronic Pain Management (online learning) | School of Physical & Occupational Therapy - McGill University
Chronic pain management is a major and growing challenge for patients, healthcare professionals and the global healthcare system. This certificate is an ongoing collaboration between the School of Physical and Occupational Therapy and the Alan Edwards Centre for Research on Pain to provide healthcare professionals with the most recent and relevant approaches and technologies for the care and management of chronic pain.An interdisciplinary approach is represented by the participants as well as by the educators of the certificate. By teaching evidence-based clinical practice with an interdisciplinary perspective, this g...
Source: Psychology of Pain - October 14, 2013 Category: Psychiatrists and Psychologists Source Type: blogs

When more medicine isn’t always better: High costs of unnecessary radiation for terminal cancer patients - ScienceDaily
For cancer patients dealing with the pain of tumors that have spread to their bones, doctors typically recommend radiation as a palliative therapy. But as in many areas of medicine, more of this treatment isn't actually better. Medical evidence over the past decade has demonstrated that patients with terminal cancer who receive a single session of radiotherapy get just as much pain relief as those who receive multiple treatments. But despite its obvious advantages for patient comfort and convenience -- and the associated cost savings -- this so-called single-fraction treatment has yet to be adopted in routine practice....
Source: Psychology of Pain - October 12, 2013 Category: Psychiatrists and Psychologists Source Type: blogs

Sensorimotor cortex reorganization: a ghost story | NeuWrite San Diego
Ugh … not again. The all-too-familiar pain appears in your hand. The muscles cramp and the crushing pressure mounts. Nothing you do alleviates the ache, and the longer it persists, the more intolerable it becomes. You try with all your might to unclench it, move it to any other position. But, as in those nightmares where you try desperately to run, but cannot coax your legs to move, your hand feels paralyzed – because there is no hand. The sensation is so real, so intense, yet its origin is but a ghost … a phantom pain.As surreal as the phenomenon may sound, phantom pain emanating from a lost limb is a ...
Source: Psychology of Pain - October 12, 2013 Category: Psychiatrists and Psychologists Source Type: blogs

Sex Matters in Migraines: Scientific American
Halos, auras, flashes of light, pins and needles running down your arms, the sudden scent of sulfur—many symptoms of a migraine have vaguely mystical qualities, and experts remain puzzled by the debilitating headaches' cause. Researchers at Harvard University, however, have come at least one step closer to figuring out why women are twice as likely to suffer from chronic migraines as men. The brain of a female migraineur looks so unlike the brain of a male migraineur, asserts Harvard scientist Nasim Maleki, that we should think of migraines in men and women as "different diseases altogether." Maleki is...
Source: Psychology of Pain - October 8, 2013 Category: Psychiatrists and Psychologists Source Type: blogs

5 Things I Wish I Learned in Medical School about Managing Pain - HCPLive.com
With most medical schools devoting only a few curriculum hours to pain management training, many physicians begin their medical career underprepared to meet the needs of patients suffering with chronic pain. Here, Barry Cole, MD, identifies several key concepts that would help improve pain care in the US if only more physicians would learn about them sooner. Pain is highly variable, personal, and cannot be managed with "blanket" order sets. How much someone hurts with a painful condition is based upon past pain experiences, understanding of the present pain circumstance, expectations and outcome, and ma...
Source: Psychology of Pain - October 6, 2013 Category: Psychiatrists and Psychologists Source Type: blogs

Conservatives launching billion-dollar free market in medical marijuana - The Globe and Mail
The Conservative government is launching a $1.3-billion free market in medical marijuana this Tuesday, eventually providing an expected 450,000 Canadians with quality weed. Health Canada is phasing out an older system on Monday that mostly relied on small-scale, homegrown medical marijuana of varying quality, often diverted illegally to the black market. In its place, large indoor marijuana farms certified by the RCMP and health inspectors will produce, package and distribute a range of standardized weed, all of it sold for whatever price the market will bear. The first sales are expected in the next few weeks, delivered...
Source: Psychology of Pain - September 30, 2013 Category: Psychiatrists and Psychologists Source Type: blogs

HealthBoards - Fibromyalgia and Pain Management
Dealing with a medical condition is often difficult. Connecting with others who are going through the same thing can make a world of difference. HealthBoards.com is where you can make those connections. HealthBoards provides a unique one-stop support group community offering over 200 message boards on various diseases, conditions, and health topics. The HealthBoards community is one of the largest and most dynamic on the Web, with over 10 million monthly visitors, 850,000 registered members, and over 4.5 million messages posted. HealthBoards was rated as one of the top 20 health information websites by Consumer R...
Source: Psychology of Pain - September 27, 2013 Category: Psychiatrists and Psychologists Source Type: blogs

Grand Challenge on Chronic Pain - NIH
The ChallengeChronic pain is a major public health problem, and treatments are limited. More research is needed to fully understand how acute pain evolves into chronic pain, and who will transition from acute to chronic pain. The Blueprint Grand Challenge on Chronic Pain seeks to shed light on the molecular, cellular and circuit-level changes – or neuroplasticity – underlying chronic pain. A key element of the program is to form research collaborations between experts on pain and experts on neuroplasticity.Mechanisms of SupportThe Grand Challenge on Chronic Pain supports research through:Multi-PI...
Source: Psychology of Pain - September 26, 2013 Category: Psychiatrists and Psychologists Source Type: blogs

How Does Acute Pain Become Chronic? | NIH Director's Blog
Chronic pain is a major medical problem, affecting as many as 100 million Americans, robbing them of a full sense of well-being, disrupting their ability to work and earn a living, and causing untold suffering for the patient and family. This condition costs the country an estimated $560-635 billion annually—a staggering economic burden [1]. Worst of all, chronic pain is often resistant to treatment. NIH launched the Grand Challenge on Chronic Pain [2] to investigate how acute pain (which is part of daily experience) evolves into a chronic condition and what biological factors contribute to this transition.But y...
Source: Psychology of Pain - September 26, 2013 Category: Psychiatrists and Psychologists Source Type: blogs

Pain (sensation) - Quora
About Pain (sensation)This is a topic about the pain people feel when they get physically hurt. It's not about emotional pain.http://www.quora.com/Pain-sensationRelated:http://www.quora.com/Kate-Simmons/Seeking-Comfort (Source: Psychology of Pain)
Source: Psychology of Pain - September 23, 2013 Category: Psychiatrists and Psychologists Source Type: blogs

How a salt jab could be more effective for lower back pain than steroids | Mail Online
A saline injection in the spine could be more effective than steroids for treating lower back pain, a new study has revealed. Spinal pain is a leading cause of disability in the industrialised world and epidural steroid injections - the most common nonsurgical treatment - have been the standard treatment for more than 50 years. Yet the alternative spinal injection in the space around the spinal cord may provide better relief than steroids which can have adverse side effects. Steroids raise blood sugar in diabetic back patients, slow the healing of wounds and accelerate bone disease in older women, the Johns Hopkins Univ...
Source: Psychology of Pain - September 23, 2013 Category: Psychiatrists and Psychologists Source Type: blogs

Pain and its Meanings - Wellcome Collection
Nearly everyone has experienced bodily pain, yet describing it is notoriously difficult. In 1930, Virginia Woolf lamented that even a schoolgirl, "when she falls in love, has Shakespeare and Keats to speak her mind for her; but let a sufferer try to describe a pain in his head to a doctor and language at once runs dry".Is pain really so difficult to articulate? Or can it actually generate creative expression? If so, what do these narratives tell us about the meaning of pain? Some believe it has the power to purge sin; others interpret it as an unjust punishment. Pain can even be regarded as intrinsic to...
Source: Psychology of Pain - September 23, 2013 Category: Psychiatrists and Psychologists Source Type: blogs

Perspectives on Pain - 19: Interdisciplinary Studies in the Long Nineteenth, No 15 (2012)
This issue of 19, guest edited by Louise Hide, Joanna Bourke, and Carmen Mangion, examines the meaning of pain - for sufferers, physicians, and other witnesses - in the nineteenth century. Articles by social and cultural historians, and by literary scholars, discuss the implications of shifting discourses in personal narratives, in religious communities, and in philosophical, medical, and psychiatric texts. Analysing language in the diverse theories of the period, this issue extends and deepens our understanding of the complex interaction between the body, mind, and culture in order to gain insight into the ...
Source: Psychology of Pain - September 23, 2013 Category: Psychiatrists and Psychologists Source Type: blogs

The Story of Pain: Joanna Bourke - Oxford University Press in press
The Story of Pain: From Prayer to PainkillersJoanna Bourke • The story of pain and suffering since the eighteenth century • Addresses the big questions about the experience and nature of suffering - and how to respond to it • Charts how our understanding of pain has changed completely over the last three centuries - from positive function to ultimate evil • A fascinating investigation for the 21st century reader into how we have coped with suffering in the past - both our own suffering and that of the ones we loveEveryone knows what is feels like to be in pain. Scraped knees, to...
Source: Psychology of Pain - September 23, 2013 Category: Psychiatrists and Psychologists Source Type: blogs

Girl who feels no pain could inspire new painkillers - health - 15 September 2013 - New Scientist
A girl who does not feel physical pain has helped researchers identify a gene mutation that disrupts pain perception. The discovery may spur the development of new painkillers that will block pain signals in the same way.People with congenital analgesia cannot feel physical pain and often injure themselves as a result – they might badly scald their skin, for example, through being unaware that they are touching something hot.By comparing the gene sequence of a girl with the disorder against those of her parents, who do not, Ingo Kurth at Jena University Hospital in Germany and his colleagues identified...
Source: Psychology of Pain - September 16, 2013 Category: Psychiatrists and Psychologists Source Type: blogs

Neuroscientists Identify a Brain Signature of Pain: Scientific American
Like truth and beauty, pain is subjective and hard to pin down. What hurts one moment might not register the next, and our moods and thoughts color the experience of pain. According to a report in April in the New England Journal of Medicine, however, researchers may one day be able to measure the experience of pain by scanning the brain—a much needed improvement over the subjective ratings of between one and 10 that patients are currently asked to give.Led by neuroscientist Tor Wager of the University of Colorado at Boulder, researchers used functional MRI on healthy participants who were given heated touches t...
Source: Psychology of Pain - September 11, 2013 Category: Psychiatrists and Psychologists Source Type: blogs

Neuropeptide May Be Biomarker for Chronic Migraine
Levels of calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), a neurotransmitter that causes vasodilation, are elevated in the peripheral blood of women with chronic migraine (CM), and to a lesser extent in women with episodic migraine, compared with levels in healthy controls without a history of headache, new research reveals.The study shows, for the first time, increased CGRP levels in patients with CM outside migraine attacks and in the absence of medication for symptoms.The results suggest that CGRP levels could be used as a biomarker for permanent trigeminovascular activation and therefore help diagnose chronic migraine. Until n...
Source: Psychology of Pain - August 28, 2013 Category: Psychiatrists and Psychologists Source Type: blogs

Bacteria can cause pain on their own | Genes & Cells | Science News
Bacteria can directly trigger the nerves that sense pain, suggesting that the body's own immune reaction is not always to blame for the extra tenderness of an infected wound. In fact, mice with staph-infected paws showed signs of pain even before immune cells had time to arrive at the site, researchers report online August 21 in Nature. "Most people think that when they get pain during infection it's due to the immune system," says coauthor Isaac Chiu of Boston Children's Hospital and Harvard Medical School. Indeed, immune cells do release pain-causing molecules while fighting off invading microbes. ...
Source: Psychology of Pain - August 22, 2013 Category: Psychiatrists and Psychologists Source Type: blogs

The Color of Pain | Illusion Chasers, Scientific American Blog Network
Want to know an effective way to reduce pain from burns? Cover the affected red area, so you are unable to look at it. Ideally, use a blue bandage. Painfully hot stimuli applied to red skin feel more painful than applied to blue skin, a new research article published in Frontiers in Human Neuroscience shows.The scientists, Matteo Martini, Daniel Perez-Marcos and Maria Victoria Sanchez-Vives from  the University of Barcelona, used immersive virtual reality in combination with the application of real heat stimuli to the wrists of experimental subjects. Participants saw their virtual arms get increasingly red, ...
Source: Psychology of Pain - August 17, 2013 Category: Psychiatrists and Psychologists Source Type: blogs

Throbbing pain isn’t a matter of the heart, UF researchers find » News » University of Florida
Throbbing pain may pound like a heartbeat, but University of Florida scientists have discovered the sensation is all in your head, or more precisely, in your brain waves.The finding could drastically change how researchers look for therapies that can ease pain, said Dr. Andrew Ahn, a neurologist at the UF College of Medicine, a part of UF Health. Ahn and his colleagues reported their findings in the July issue of the journal Pain."Aristotle linked throbbing pain to heart rhythm 2,300 years ago," Ahn said. "It took two millennia to discover that his presumption was wrong."People who have experi...
Source: Psychology of Pain - August 14, 2013 Category: Psychiatrists and Psychologists Source Type: blogs

Study Finds ‘Doctor Shopping’ Uncommon - National Pain Report - National Pain Report
Less than one percent of patients – about 135,000 people — who purchase prescription painkillers in the U.S. were classified as "doctor shoppers" in the first national study of opioid prescriptions and sales records.But while they make up only a small proportion of the 48 million patients who are prescribed painkillers, researchers say patients who visit multiple doctors and pharmacies to obtain opioids are having an outsized impact on the system. Federal and state officials have cracked down on the illicit use of painkillers by making it harder for patients to obtain opioids – even ones with le...
Source: Psychology of Pain - August 14, 2013 Category: Psychiatrists and Psychologists Source Type: blogs

Backlash Against Walgreen’s New Painkiller Crackdown | CommonHealth
You may be in for a shock if you try to get a prescription for any controlled substance – from Ambien to opioid pain relievers – filled at Walgreens anywhere around the country.Walgreens recently announced what it calls a new "Good Faith Dispensing" policy under which the pharmacy giant – the largest in the nation – is suddenly requiring its pharmacists to take "additional steps" to verify prescriptions for controlled substances.In plain English, this means that Walgreens pharmacists are going to call your doctor, or at least your doctor's office, to see if your doctor did the ri...
Source: Psychology of Pain - August 14, 2013 Category: Psychiatrists and Psychologists Source Type: blogs

SciBite: Latest pharma & biotech news and competitor intelligence for Pain
http://scibite.com/site/topic/MESHDISEASE:SCB2X23714 (Source: Psychology of Pain)
Source: Psychology of Pain - August 12, 2013 Category: Psychiatrists and Psychologists Source Type: blogs

Risk of Adult Anxiety Seen in Children’s Stomachaches - NYTimes.com
Children with chronic stomach pains are at high risk for anxiety disorders in adolescence and young adulthood, a new study has found, suggesting that parents may wish to have their children evaluated at some point for anxiety.Researchers at Vanderbilt University tracked 332 children with recurring stomachaches that could not be traced to a physical cause — so-called functional abdominal pain — comparing them as they reached young adulthood with 147 children who had never had such stomachaches.About half the teenagers and young adults who had had functional abdominal pain as children developed an anxiety di...
Source: Psychology of Pain - August 12, 2013 Category: Psychiatrists and Psychologists Source Type: blogs

Chronic Pain Conditions News & Articles | dailyRx
http://www.dailyrx.com/conditions/chronic-pain-conditions (Source: Psychology of Pain)
Source: Psychology of Pain - August 8, 2013 Category: Psychiatrists and Psychologists Source Type: blogs