Dr. Sandra Camelo-Piragua's upcoming atlas will fill a needed niche in the neuropathology literature
I recently received an email from the illustrious neuropathologis at the University of Michigan, Sandra Camelo-Piragua, MD: "I just wanted to let you know about a book I have been working on, in conjunction with two neuropathy colleagues from England, Drs. Kathreena Kurian and Tim Moss. The book is coming out in September of this year.  Atlas of Gross Neuropathology: A Practical Approach has a large collection of gross images covering a wide range of adult and pediatric CNS-related diseases. The aim of this book is to give a visual reference and guide for a variety of gross neuropathologic entities during post-mo...
Source: neuropathology blog - April 23, 2014 Category: Pathologists Tags: books neuropathologists Source Type: blogs

Dr. Mike Lawlor is recognized for making critical strides in treatment of myotubular myopathy
X-linked myotubular myopathy (XLMTM) is a severe and fatal congenital myopathy for which there is currently no treatment.  As part of an international group of scientists studying treatments for this disease, Dr. Mike Lawlor (the neuropathologist serving Children's Hospital of Wisconsin) was recently featured on Milwaukee's WTMJ 10 o'clock news for his part in the work.  The piece is quite touching. Mike conveys a sense of urgency in finding a cure for this disease because he has gotten to know several children stricken with XLMTM, and even has pictures of many of the little tikes up on his office ...
Source: neuropathology blog - April 16, 2014 Category: Pathologists Tags: muscle neuropathologists Source Type: blogs

Nobel Laureate Prusiner Tells His Story
Just published by Yale University Press: Stanley Prusiner's new book, Madness and Memory: The Discovery of Prions - A New Biological Principle of Disease, is now available for purchase. Although I am not personally a big fan of Dr. Oliver Sacks's work, his blurb on Prusiner's book is worth reading: “Stanley Prusiner is a brilliant scientist whose boldness and tenacity enabled him, against all odds and despite near-universal skepticism, to discover and prove the importance of a new class of disease-producing agents—prions—a discovery as fundamental as that of bacteria and viruses. Prions, by subverting the...
Source: neuropathology blog - April 8, 2014 Category: Pathologists Tags: books prion disease Source Type: blogs

Patches of Disorganization in the Neocortex of Children with Autism
(Source: neuropathology blog)
Source: neuropathology blog - April 3, 2014 Category: Pathologists Source Type: blogs

Abstracts now being accepted for the XVIII International Congress of Neuropathology
\ The program for the next International Congress of Neuropathology is now ready and abstract submission is open. The meeting this year will be held in beautiful Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. As this meeting only takes place once every four years, it's a valuable opportunity for the world's neuropathology experts to convene. The preliminary program looks strong. One example: the illustrious Dr. Beatriz Lopes will discuss pitfalls in diagnosing histoplasmacytic-rich CNS lesions.See you in Rio! (Source: neuropathology blog)
Source: neuropathology blog - April 1, 2014 Category: Pathologists Tags: meetings Source Type: blogs

Vulnerability of Glioblastoma Cells to Catastrophic Vacuolization and Death Induced by a Small Molecule
Researchers at the Karolinska Institute in Sweden have introduced what could possibly be a revolution in article in Cell, researchers found that molecules known as vacquinols "reliably and selectively compromised" neoplastic cell viability. Vacquinols stimulates cell death by membrane ruffling, vacuolization, and -- ultimately -- cytoplasmic membrane rupture. Although in vivo testing has been restricted to mice thus far, this paper may prove to be the beginning of a new avenue of research into the selective killing glioblastoma cells in patients.glioblasoma treatment. In a recent (Source: neuropathology blog)
Source: neuropathology blog - March 21, 2014 Category: Pathologists Tags: neoplasms therapies Source Type: blogs

Best Post of November 2013: Nanotechnology joins with cancer genomics in silencing glioblastoma oncogene
The next in our "Best of the Month" series is from November 1, 1013:Gold nanoparticles (yellow) with small interfering RNAs (green) knock down an oncogene in glioblastoma.In a study of mice released this week in Science Nanomedicine, researchers were able to reduce glioblastoma size three- to four-fold by switching off the oncogene Bcl2Like12 by means of nanotechnology-assisted delivery of small interfering RNAs. Normal (linear) nucleic acids cannot get into cells, but these spherical nucleic acids can. Small interfering RNA (siRNA) surrounds a gold nanoparticle like a shell; the nucleic acids are highly oriented...
Source: neuropathology blog - March 7, 2014 Category: Pathologists Tags: Best of the Month series neoplasms therapies Source Type: blogs

Seizing Control of Brain Seizures
How can trauma lead to chronic seizures? Berkeley researcher Daniela Kaufer found that only when albumin in the blood breaches the blood-brain barrier does the likelihood of post-traumatic epilepsy go up. Accelerated signaling between neurons results from this exposure, leaduing to seizures. “We were surprised, even a little disappointed, that it was such a common component of the blood  – nothing exotic at all  – that led to epilepsy,” recalls Kaufer, associate professor of integrative biology. She and colleagues went on to Daniela Kaufer in the labshow that albumin interacts with a ubiqu...
Source: neuropathology blog - February 27, 2014 Category: Pathologists Tags: research trauma Source Type: blogs

New Edition of Robbins coming out in June 2014
9th EditionA commenter asked when the next edition (9th) of "Robbins and Cotran Pathologic Basis of Disease" will be coming out. According to Amazon, the release date is June 16, 2014. I'm not sure yet what differencesin the CNS, muscle and nerve, and eye portions of the book there will be as compared to the current edition. (Source: neuropathology blog)
Source: neuropathology blog - February 17, 2014 Category: Pathologists Tags: books Source Type: blogs

Best Post of October 2013: New Study Suggests "Glymphatic System" Flushes Brain of Toxins During Sleep
The next in our "Best of the Month Series comes from a post that appeared on October 22, 2013. Since this posting, The New York Times has picked up on this topic. Perhaps they read it here first? In any case, it's a post worth re-posting:A new study published in the journal Science on Thursday and reported in the Washington Post suggests that a so-called "glymphatic system" seems capable of flushing toxins (including perhaps  beta-amyloid) from brain -- particularly during sleep.“Sleep puts the brain in another state where we clean out all the byproducts of activity during the daytime,” said...
Source: neuropathology blog - February 13, 2014 Category: Pathologists Tags: Best of the Month series cerebrospinal fluid Source Type: blogs

The Alzheimer Conundrum: New Book Challenges Long-Held Assumptions
Margaret Lock, PhD.Professor Margaret Lock supplies and ethnographic account of Alzheimer disease in her recent book, The Alzheimer Conundrum. Lock furnishes a comprehensive description of the events leading up to the recasting of the phenomenon of Alzheimer’s as a condition to be prevented. The author challenges traditional assumptions and statistics about Alzheimer’s and takes us on a journey from the disease’s original clinical case through the vacillations in the science world and the media regarding possible causes, diagnostics, biomarkers, genetics and cures. She questions prevalence estim...
Source: neuropathology blog - January 16, 2014 Category: Pathologists Tags: books Source Type: blogs

Best Post of September 2013
The next in our "Best of the Month" series is from September 16, 2013Two UC Davis Neurosurgeons Resign After Intentionally Infecting Intracranial Glioblastomas with Bowel Bacteria The Sacramento Bee recently reported that two UC Davis neurosurgeons who intentionally infected three glioblastoma patients with bowel bacteria have resigned their posts after the university found they had "deliberately circumvented" internal policies, "defied directives" from top leaders and sidestepped federal regulations, according to newly released university documents.Neurosurgeon J. Paul Muizelaar, MDDr. J. Pau...
Source: neuropathology blog - December 18, 2013 Category: Pathologists Tags: Best of the Month series therapies Source Type: blogs

The Solution to the Football Concussion Dilemma: Hold All Games at High Altitude
A new study shows that high school athletes playing at higher altitudes suffer fewer concussions than those closer to sea-level, a phenomenon attributed to physiological changes in the brain causing it to fit more tightly in the skull. "This is the first time any research has linked altitude to sports-related concussion," said Dawn Comstock, PhD, associate professor of epidemiology at the Colorado School of Public Health and co-author of the study. "It appears that when you are at altitude there may be a little less free space in the skull so the brain can't move around as much." The study, first-author...
Source: neuropathology blog - December 10, 2013 Category: Pathologists Tags: trauma Source Type: blogs

What happened to neuropathology in 1946?
The esteemed Dr. Jim Mandell and his son were recently playing with the amazing Google Books Ngram Viewer. Google Ngram searches a huge corpus of books for the mention of a particular search term. It then graphs the frequency with which that term appears over time. On a whim, the Mandell's entered the search term "neuropathologist". Here's the resulting graph:I couldn't fit the y-axis label in the picture, but it ranges from 0% up to 0.00000300%. Dr. Mandell challenges his neuropathology colleagues to explain the sharp spike in the usage of "neuropathologist" around 1946-47. Please enter your speculatio...
Source: neuropathology blog - December 3, 2013 Category: Pathologists Tags: facts and figures history Source Type: blogs

Best Post of August 2013: Profile of Wash U NP Fellow Dr. PJ Cimino
The next in our "Best of the Month" series is from August 1, 2013, when I profiled Dr. PJ Cimino, a prominent first-year neuropathology fellow at Washington University in St. Louis. After a short biographical sketch, Dr. Cimino answers a few of my questions:Dr. PJ CiminoP.J. Cimino grew up in Seattle, WA, where he did both his undergraduate studies (double major in neurobiology and biochemistry) and Medical Scientist Training Program (combined MD/PhD program) at the University of Washington. He earned his PhD in Neurobiology and Behavior while working in the laboratory of Tom Montine MD, PhD in the Department of ...
Source: neuropathology blog - November 22, 2013 Category: Pathologists Tags: Best of the Month series neuropathologists Source Type: blogs

Best Post of July 2013: New Muscle Pathology Text edited by Goebel, Sewry, and Weller is available
This post, which origninally appeared on July 11, 2013, is being re-posted as part of the "Best of the Month" series for those who would consider purchasing it now that it is available on the market. Amazon is selling the paper version for $229.48, and a Kindle edition for $124.99. The second edition of Muscle Disease: Pathology and Genetics will be released in August 2013. The publisher states that the book "clarifies the pathology and genetics of muscle disease for pathologists, clinicians, geneticists and researchers to aid in the diagnosis and management of patients. Organized around the 'motor unit' con...
Source: neuropathology blog - November 7, 2013 Category: Pathologists Tags: Best of the Month series books Source Type: blogs

Nanotechnology joins with cancer genomics in silencing glioblastoma oncogene
Gold nanoparticles (yellow) with small interfering RNAs (green) knock down an oncogene in glioblastoma.In a study of mice released this week in Science Nanomedicine, researchers were able to reduce glioblastoma size three- to four-fold by switching off the oncogene Bcl2Like12 by means of nanotechnology-assisted delivery of small interfering RNAs. Normal (linear) nucleic acids cannot get into cells, but these spherical nucleic acids can. Small interfering RNA (siRNA) surrounds a gold nanoparticle like a shell; the nucleic acids are highly oriented, densely packed and form a tiny sphere. (The gold nanoparticle core is only 1...
Source: neuropathology blog - November 1, 2013 Category: Pathologists Tags: therapies Source Type: blogs

Guest Post from Dr. Keith Kaplan: Why Pathology?
The following post appeared yesterday in Dr. Keith Kaplan's Digital Pathology Blog. I thought the message was important enough to re-post it here:“What animates a great pathologist? Is it the desire to cure disease, to save life? Surely not, save perhaps as an afterthought. He is too intelligent, deep in his soul, to see anything praiseworthy in such a desire. He knows from life-long observation that his discoveries will do quite as much harm as good, that a thousand scoundrels will profit to every honest man, that the folks who most deserve to be saved will probably be the last to be saved. … What actually mo...
Source: neuropathology blog - October 30, 2013 Category: Pathologists Tags: general pathology Source Type: blogs

New study suggests "glymphatic system" flushes brain of toxins during sleep
Douglas Shevlin, MDA new study published in the journal Science on Thursday and reported in the Washington Post suggests that a so-called "glymphatic system" seems capable of flushing toxins (including perhaps beta-amyloid) from brain -- particularly during sleep.“Sleep puts the brain in another state where we clean out all the byproducts of activity during the daytime,” said study author and University of Rochester neurosurgeon Maiken Nedergaard. (Thanks to avid NP Blog reader and friend, Dr. Doug Shevlin, for alerting me to this significant new finding.) (Source: neuropathology blog)
Source: neuropathology blog - October 22, 2013 Category: Pathologists Tags: Alzheimer's disease Source Type: blogs

Duke Docs say: Don't ignore microvasculature in evaluating muscle biopsies
Dr. Anne BuckleyDrs. Anne Buckley and Edward Bossen of Duke University have a nice review article in the current issue of Journal of Neuropathology and Experimental Neurology entitled Skeletal Muscle Microvasculature in the Diagnosis of Neuromuscular Disease. Buckley and Bossen bring attention to the often overlooked blood vessels in skeletal muscle biopsies. They state that "there are many vascular features in skeletal muscle biopsies that, when interpreted in the context of other histologic patterns and clinical history, provide useful information that allows muscle pathologists to narrow their differential diagnose...
Source: neuropathology blog - October 16, 2013 Category: Pathologists Tags: neuromuscular disease Source Type: blogs

Best Post of June, 2013: Mutations in COQ2 in Familial and Sporadic Multiple System Atrophy
The next in our "Best of the Month" series is from June 15, 2013:Researchers from the Multiple System Atrophy (MSA) Research Collaborative in Japan just published online in the New England Journal of Medicine findings providing evidence that functionally impaired variants of the COQ2 gene (involved in the biosynthetic pathway for coenzyme Q10) are associated with an increased risk of developing MSA. This group previously identified multiplex families with MSA, indicating a genetic component in a disease that had previously been considered a non-genetic disorder. (Source: neuropathology blog)
Source: neuropathology blog - October 10, 2013 Category: Pathologists Tags: Best of the Month series molecular studies Source Type: blogs

Best Post of May 2013: Angulated intramitochondrial inclusions in the left leg of a man with a left-sided limp
Here's the next in our Best of the Month Series. No definitive diagnosis has been suggested since the original post on May 9, 2014:A 59-year-old male with a one-year history of limping as well as pain, weakness, and paresthesia of the left lower extremity who underwent lumbar microdiscectomy with cord decompression. Although the patient's pain subsided post-operatively, his other symptoms persisted. Since his CPK levels were chronically elevated (around the 500's), biopsies were later performed on the quadriceps bilaterally. Light microscopic examination was underwhelming except for some denervation effect on the left. How...
Source: neuropathology blog - October 3, 2013 Category: Pathologists Tags: neuromuscular disease Best of the Month series Source Type: blogs

Thirteen patients in New England put at risk for iatrogenic CJD
CNN reports that a patient who had undergone neurosurgery in New Hampshire later developed autopsy-confirmed sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (sCJD). Before the patient's disease was discovered, the same nonsurgical equipment used on the CJD patient was used on thirteen subsequent patients, putting those patients at risk for prion infection. The Centers for Disease Control has said that no cases of the disease linked to the use of contaminated medical equipment have been reported in the United States since 1976. (Source: neuropathology blog)
Source: neuropathology blog - September 25, 2013 Category: Pathologists Tags: infectious disease Source Type: blogs

Thirteen patients in New England put at risk for iatragenic CJD
CNN reports that a patient who had undergone neurosurgery in New Hampshire later developed autopsy-confirmed sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (sCJD). Before the patient's disease was discovered, the same nonsurgical equipment used on the CJD patient was used on thirteen subsequent patients, putting those patients at risk for prion infection. The Centers for Disease Control has said that no cases of the disease linked to the use of contaminated medical equipment have been reported in the United States since 1976. (Source: neuropathology blog)
Source: neuropathology blog - September 25, 2013 Category: Pathologists Tags: infectious disease Source Type: blogs

Two UC Davis Neurosurgeons Resign After Intentionally Infecting Intracranial Glioblastomas with Bowel Bacteria
The Sacramento Bee recently reported that two UC Davis neurosurgeons who intentionally infected three glioblastoma patients with bowel bacteria have resigned their posts after the university found they had "deliberately circumvented" internal policies, "defied directives" from top leaders and sidestepped federal regulations, according to newly released university documents.Neurosurgeon J. Paul Muizelaar, MDDr. J. Paul Muizelaar, 66, the former head of the neurosurgery department, and his colleague, Dr. Rudolph J. Schrot, violated the university's faculty code of conduct. All three patients consented to ...
Source: neuropathology blog - September 16, 2013 Category: Pathologists Tags: neurosurgery Source Type: blogs

Best Post of April 2013: A Rich Focus
The next in our "Best of the Month" series is a post from April 16, 2013. The grey arrow is pointing to a Rich focus that has hemorrhaged into the subarachoid spaceA Rich focus is a tuberculoma in the cerebral cortex. Rich foci become particularly significant when they rupture into the subarachnoid space and cause tuberculous meningitis. This entity is named for Johns Hopkins pathologist Dr. Arnold Rice Rich (1893-1968), who first described it. (Source: neuropathology blog)
Source: neuropathology blog - September 11, 2013 Category: Pathologists Tags: infectious disease Best of the Month series Source Type: blogs

Dr. Marta Couce joins neuropathology staff at Case Western
Dr. Marta E. CouceMarta E. Couce, MD, PhD, will be joining the staff of University Hospitals of Cleveland, Case Western Reserve University  next week. She will teaming up to handle surgical neuropathology with the illustrious Dr. Mark Cohen, who has been on staff at Case since 1993.Dr. Couce attended Medical School in Santiago de Compostela, Spain. She pursued her graduate school training at the same University in the Department of Pathology.  After research stints at East Carolina University and the Mayo Clinic, Dr. Couce did her training in Anatomic Pathology at Yale New Haven Hospital, followed by two fellowsh...
Source: neuropathology blog - September 4, 2013 Category: Pathologists Tags: neuropathologists Source Type: blogs

Best Post of March 2013: An oddball sellar region mass
The next in our "Best of the Month" series is from Friday, March 15, 2013: In the last post, it was noted that Dr. Peter Burger presented a series of sellar region "oddball lesions" at the recent USCAP meeting. The esteemed Dr. Mark Cohen was good enough to provide photographs (above) of one particular lesion that was discussed at the meeting: an osteolipoma of the tuber cinereum. Thank you, Dr. Cohen! (Source: neuropathology blog)
Source: neuropathology blog - August 27, 2013 Category: Pathologists Tags: Best of the Month series Source Type: blogs

What's on your tumor biomarker wish list?
Photo courtesy of Shellie SherrodThe College of American Pathologists Neuropathology Committee (pictured, minus the illustrious Dr. Aaron Wagner) poses the following question to the neuropathology community worldwide:"If you were constructing a panel of eight biomarkers there were well-established prognostic/predictive markers for CNS neoplasms, what markers would be included? Note: this is not for diagnosis, but for predicting behavior and should include adult and pediatric brain tumors and can include immunohistochemical and molecular tests."Thanks in advance for providing your opinion in the comments section. ...
Source: neuropathology blog - August 16, 2013 Category: Pathologists Tags: neoplasms immunohistochemistry molecular studies Source Type: blogs

Best Post of February 2013: Review by Dr. Mark Cohen of "Neuropathology: A Volume in the Hight Yield Pathology Series", edited by Yachnis and Rivera-Zengotita
The next in our "Best of the Month" series appeared on February 26, 2013: Mark L. Cohen, MDI am honored to present a guest post by the inimitable Dr. Mark Cohen of the illustrious Case Western Reserve University. Dr. Cohen not only reviews a great new neuropathology textbook, but illustrates yet again why he is widely known as the Maxwell Smart of Neuropathology. (Not really) Full disclosureSelf-annihilating conflicts of interest, as follows:Long-standing professional relationship with unbridled admiration for lead editor Tony Yachnis, both as a person and as a pathologist (he's not the Moderator of the wor...
Source: neuropathology blog - August 13, 2013 Category: Pathologists Source Type: blogs

Featured Neuropathologist: PJ Cimino, MD, PhD
Today I profile Dr. PJ Cimino, a prominent first-year neuropathology fellow at Washington University in St. Louis. After a short biographical sketch, Dr. Cimino answers a few of my questions: Dr. PJ CiminoP.J. Cimino grew up in Seattle, WA, where he did both his undergraduate studies (double major in neurobiology and biochemistry) and Medical Scientist Training Program (combined MD/PhD program) at the University of Washington. He earned his PhD in Neurobiology and Behavior while working in the laboratory of Tom Montine MD, PhD in the Department of Pathology. His graduate work mainly focused on the biology of microglia rela...
Source: neuropathology blog - August 1, 2013 Category: Pathologists Tags: neuropathologists Source Type: blogs

Children's Oncology Group Seeking Applicants for Young Investigator Program
Dr. Chris PiersonI heard today from Dr. Christopher Pierson, neuropathologist and vice-chair of Children's Oncology Group Young Investigators. He asked me to share the following announcement about a fantastic program:The Children’s Oncology Group Young Investigator (COG YI) mentor/mentee program is currently soliciting applications for potential mentees. The purpose of this program is to provide an opportunity for a junior pathologist to work with a senior pathologist and possibly advance toward serving as part of central pathology review for COG protocols and/or serving on COG committees. The program pairs a young i...
Source: neuropathology blog - July 29, 2013 Category: Pathologists Tags: neuropathologists research Source Type: blogs

What about this cell with red granular cytoplasm?
I'm working on a high-grade glioma and am coming across scattered presumably neoplastic cells that have course red granular cytoplasm. How does one interpret such cells? Does it raise the possibility of a granular cell astrocytoma? Or are these often present and I've just ignored them until now? Thanks for any help you might be able to provide in the comments section! (Source: neuropathology blog)
Source: neuropathology blog - July 25, 2013 Category: Pathologists Tags: neoplasms Source Type: blogs

Disgruntled lab worker arrested in murder of neuropathologist Roger Brumback and three others
I had reported in May of this year on the tragic death of Dr Roger Brumback. Here is a follow-up on the case from CNN:updated 8:34 PM EDT, Mon July 15, 2013(CNN) -- Police arrested a former Creighton University lab worker Monday for two double homicides over five years, both sets of victims were connected to the pathology department at the Nebraska school.Anthony Joseph Garcia, 40, was arrested during a traffic stop in Illinois, Omaha Police Chief Todd Schmaderer said. Officers were making preparations to arrest him Tuesday, but the Indiana resident "became mobile" and police felt they needed to arrest ...
Source: neuropathology blog - July 16, 2013 Category: Pathologists Tags: neuropathologists Source Type: blogs

Endovascular proliferation (circled) adjacent to colon-to-brain metastasis
(Source: neuropathology blog)
Source: neuropathology blog - July 15, 2013 Category: Pathologists Tags: metastasis Source Type: blogs

New Muscle Pathology Text edited by Goebel, Sewry, and Weller out next month
The second edition of Muscle Disease: Pathology and Genetics will be released in August 2013. The publisher states that the book "clarifies the pathology and genetics of muscle disease for pathologists, clinicians, geneticists and researchers to aid in the diagnosis and management of patients. Organized around the 'motor unit' concept, this book presents the latest understanding of muscle disease, and how this can help identify new treatments." (Source: neuropathology blog)
Source: neuropathology blog - July 11, 2013 Category: Pathologists Tags: books Source Type: blogs

Best Post of January 2013: The Biggest Alzheimer Disease Discovery in 2012
Kári StefánssonThe next in our "Best of the Month" series is from January 4, 2013:Perhaps the biggest discovery in the Alzheimer research world last year was the identification of a mutation in APP that significantly decreases its cleavage by β-secretase, leading to 40% less production of amyloidogenic peptides in vitro. The researchers found the mutation (A673T) in the APP gene protects against Alzheimer’s disease and cognitive decline in the elderly without Alzheimer’s disease.Future drugs that can recreate this Aβ-reducing effect “should perhaps be given not only to pe...
Source: neuropathology blog - July 9, 2013 Category: Pathologists Source Type: blogs

International Congress of Neuropathology to be held for the first time ever in Latin America
The XVIIIth International Congress of Neuropathology will be held in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, the first time ever in Latin America, on 14-18 September 2014. It will be organized by Brazilian and Argentinian neuropathologists and an international scientific committee will be established to plan the Congress programme. Organizers say the emphasis will be on promoting the exchange of expertise between the different branches of neuropathology and allied fields of neuroscience. (Source: neuropathology blog)
Source: neuropathology blog - July 5, 2013 Category: Pathologists Tags: meetings Source Type: blogs

Dr. Mike Lawlor's Proposed Muscle Biopsy Checklist
Comment are encouraged!!!! Clinical History1.  Gender of patient:    __male ___female2.  Age at presentation:  _ _ years _ _ months3.  Age at biopsy: _ _ years _ _ months4.  Symptoms at presentation (check all that apply): Weakness Hypotonia Muscle pain Cardiac disease Central nervous system disease Respiratory difficulties Contractures Failure to thrive Others (see item 8)5.  Elevated creatine kinase:  Yes  No  Unknown _______ Patient Value _________(Normal Range)6.  Familial Inheritance:____None    ...
Source: neuropathology blog - June 28, 2013 Category: Pathologists Tags: muscle Source Type: blogs

Best Post of December 2012: "the NFL is a breeding ground for mental illness" -- Former Denver Bronco Nate Jackson
The next in our "Best of the Month" series is from December 4, 2012:Today, a friend forwarded me this opinion piece about the murder-suicide of NFL linebacker Jovan Belcher. I responded that I blogged about such cases before, and I didn't intend to write yet another blog post about chronic traumatic encephalopathy. I felt as though lethal violence among football players is happening so often now, it's not even worth yet another post. But, the fact that the violence has reached this level of banality is in itself worthy of comment. Don't worry, though, the next time an NFL player commits homicide or suicide, I pro...
Source: neuropathology blog - June 26, 2013 Category: Pathologists Tags: Best of the Month series trauma Source Type: blogs

Mutations in COQ2 in Familial and Sporadic Multiple System Atrophy
Researchers from the Multiple System Atrophy (MSA) Research Collaborative in Japan just published online in the New England Journal of Medicine findings providing evidence that functionally impaired variants of the COQ2 gene (involved in the biosynthetic pathway for coenzyme Q10) are associated with an increased risk of developing MSA. This group previously identified multiplex families with MSA, indicating a genetic component in a disease that had previously been considered a non-genetic disorder. (Source: neuropathology blog)
Source: neuropathology blog - June 15, 2013 Category: Pathologists Tags: multiple system atrophy Source Type: blogs

Best Post of November 2012: Photos reveal unique features of Einstein's cerebral cortex
The next in our "Best of the Month" series is from November 21, 2012: Photographs taken shortly after his death, but never before analyzed in detail, have now revealed that Einstein’s brain had several unusual features, providing clues about the neural basis of his extraordinary mental abilities.Nature.com reports that, while doing Einstein's autopsy, the pathologist Thomas Harvey removed the physicist's brain and preserved it in formalin. He then took dozens of black and white photographs of it before it was cut up into 240 blocks. Now, anthropologist Dean Falk of Florida State University in Tallahassee an...
Source: neuropathology blog - June 13, 2013 Category: Pathologists Tags: anatomy Best of the Month series history Source Type: blogs

Best Post of October 2012: IDH1 Mutations in Oligodendrogliomas: PNA-clamping PCR is best analytic method
Time for the next in our "Best of the Month" series.. At the time of it's original publication, Dr. Craig Horbinski had this to say about a study which had recently been published in Brain Pathology: "Only catch is whether the method is TOO sensitive. After all, if all oligos are positive for IDH1, why do the "inferior" IDH tests effectively stratify prognosis? I'll be keen to see if anyone else can replicate this work."Here's the original post from October 22, 2012: Although direct sequencing of mutations in isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1) has been considered to be the gold standard method ...
Source: neuropathology blog - May 31, 2013 Category: Pathologists Tags: neoplasms molecular studies Best of the Month series Source Type: blogs

Neuropathologist Roger Brumback found murdered in his home
Neuropathologist Roger Brumback, 65, and his wife were found murdered in their Nebraska home on Tuesday. Dr. Brumback, an active member of the neuropathology community, was the former chair of pathology at Creighton University in Omaha.Roger Brumback, MDThe bodies of Dr. Brumback and his wife, Mary, were discovered by a piano mover who had arrived at their home to find the front door ajar. In addition to his work as a neuropathologist, Dr. Brumback was a clinical pediatric neurologist and was the founding Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of Child Neurology. At a memorial held at Creighton in his honor, medical students ...
Source: neuropathology blog - May 18, 2013 Category: Pathologists Tags: neuropathologists Source Type: blogs

Dr. Mark Cohen's "Wicked Clown" Mitochondrion
Inspired by the last post regarding unusual mitochondrial inclusions, the insurmountable Dr. Mark Cohen of Case Western sent in his favorite picture of an aberrant mitochondrion, which he likens to a "wicked clown": (Source: neuropathology blog)
Source: neuropathology blog - May 14, 2013 Category: Pathologists Source Type: blogs

Angulated intramitochondrial inclusions in the left leg of a man with a left-sided limp
A 59-year-old male with a one-year history of limping as well as pain, weakness, and paresthesia of the left lower extremity who underwent lumbar microdiscectomy with cord decompression. Although the patient's pain subsided post-operatively, his other symptoms persisted. Since his CPK levels were chronically elevated (around the 500's), biopsies were later performed on the quadriceps bilaterally. Light microscopic examination was underwhelming except for some denervation effect on the left. However, subsarcolemmal clumping was evident with NADH histochemisty on both the right and left. This clumping prompted me to perform ...
Source: neuropathology blog - May 6, 2013 Category: Pathologists Tags: neuromuscular disease Source Type: blogs

Annual AANP meeting is two months away
The Charleston Place Hotel in Charleston, South CarolinaNeuropathologists across the country are starting to make plans to attend the 89th Annual Meeting of the American Association of Neuropathologists, which will be held June 20-23, 2013 in Charleston, SC at the Charleston Place Hotel. The meeting with commence on Thursday the 20th with two half-day courses. There will be a morning course directed by Dr. Charles L. White entitled Practical Issues and Challenging Diagnoses in Forensic Neuropathology. The afternoon course is called Update in Frontotemporal Lobar Degenerations and is directed by Dr. Elizabeth J. Cochran...
Source: neuropathology blog - April 27, 2013 Category: Pathologists Tags: meetings Source Type: blogs

A Rich Focus
The grey arrow is pointing to a Rich focusA Rich focus is a tuberculoma in the cerebral cortex that ruptures into the subarachnoid space, causing tuberculous meningitis. It is named for Johns Hopkins pathologist Dr. Arnold Rice Rich (1893-1968), who first described it. (Source: neuropathology blog)
Source: neuropathology blog - April 16, 2013 Category: Pathologists Tags: infectious disease history Source Type: blogs

Best Post of September 2012: DecisionDx-GBM: Should every glioblastoma patient be getting this test?
The next in our Best of the Month Series is from September 12, 2012. It's worth revisiting the question of whether or not genetic testing of brain tumors is appropriate in patients who are not on research studies: What does the neuropathology community think of DecisionDx-GBM? This is a product offered by Castle Biosciences, based in Phoenix, AZ. DecisionDx-GBM is a gene expression profile test developed at The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center for the purpose of increasing the accuracy of the prognosis and predicted responsiveness of glioblastoma multiforme to first line radiation plus temozolomide. The tes...
Source: neuropathology blog - April 9, 2013 Category: Pathologists Source Type: blogs

How do you calculate a brain tumor's MIB-1 index?
Elizabeth J. Cochran, MDI was recently contacted by the affable Elizabeth Cochran, MD  asking if I would post a query regarding MIB-1 counts on brain tumors. Does anyone know if there is a standardized approach to this?  Please tell us your approach to MIB-1 quantification in the comment section. Dr. Cochran takes an approach based on an article she had read in Human Pathology some time ago, summarized as follows: 1. Examine control section stained with MIB-1 antibody to confirm that the stain worked.2. Survey the slide of the case to be counted to find the area(s) that have the most stained nuclei.3. Put reticul...
Source: neuropathology blog - March 21, 2013 Category: Pathologists Tags: neoplasms neuropathologists Source Type: blogs