Uveal Melanoma: The Basics
The uvea of the eye is a vascular tunic comprised of the iris, ciliary body, and choroid. Located between the sclera and the retina, the uvea contains dendritic pigmented melanocytes which have the potential to give rise to malignant melanoma. Patients with choroidal melanoma typically present as adults with painless monocular vision loss, while a cataract or glaucoma may be the presenting feature of an anterior segment melanoma.Approximately half of patients with choroidal and ciliochoroidal melanomas eventually die from their tumors. Prognosis is better in cases localized to the iris, presumably because they are recogniz...
Source: neuropathology blog - February 1, 2018 Category: Radiology Tags: eye Source Type: blogs

Choroidal ganglioneuronal hamartoma in an NF1 patient
Thanks to Dr. Ahmed Gilani (pediatric pathology fellow at the University of Colorado) for providing me with slides of an enucleation specimen from a patient with Von Recklinghausen Neurofibromatosis (NF-1). The specimen exhibits a region of choroidal expansion with hamartomatous neuroglial tissue. Distributed throughout this choroidal expansion are non-pigmented ovoid bodies, which have a delicately laminated appearance reflecting the presence of concentric Schwann cell processes. One might conceive of these choroidal expansions as cousins of iridic Lisch nodules.Choroidal expansion in an enucleation specimen from a child ...
Source: neuropathology blog - January 30, 2018 Category: Radiology Tags: eye Source Type: blogs

What is amyloid?
The following is adapted fromPhenomena, the Phenopath newsletter, Winter 2018 (21:1):Rudolph Virchow, introduced the term “amyloid” to refer to extracellular deposits in human tissues that exhibited a positive blue-violet staining reaction to iodine and dilute acid. Based on this reaction, Virchow mistakenly identified these aggregates as composed of starch (amylum is Latin for starch).  Subsequent microscopic studies have shown that amyloid deposits exhibit an affinity for Congo red dyes, which also yield a property known as “dichroic birefringence” in which crossed polarizing filters pro...
Source: neuropathology blog - January 29, 2018 Category: Radiology Tags: nerve Source Type: blogs

Today's Google Doodle Honors Neurosurgeon Wilder Penfield
Quoted fromKN Smith ofForbes:Today's Google Doodle celebrates the 127th birthday of Canadian neurosurgeon Wilder Penfield, who developed a groundbreaking epilepsy treatment called the Montreal Procedure.In the 1930s, while working as a neurosurgeon at the Montreal Neurological Institute at McGill University, Penfield had a patient who reported smelling burned toast just before her seizures. He realized that he could use that hallucinatory scent to pinpoint the part of the brain that was seizing - and put a stop to it.With the patient wide awake, but under local anesthetic, he used electrodes to stimulate parts of her expos...
Source: neuropathology blog - January 26, 2018 Category: Radiology Tags: neurosurgery Source Type: blogs

Endolymphatic Sac Tumor in an Elderly Man
Papillary architecture is typical for this entityThe patient is not known to have Von Hippel Lindau Syndrome, which can be associated with this tumor. According toExpert Path, the differential diagnosis for endolymphatic sac tumor is middle ear adenoma, middle ear adenocarcinoma, metastatic renal cell carcinoma, metastatic papillary thyroid carcinoma, paraganglioma, choroid plexus papilloma, and ceruminous adenoma. (Source: neuropathology blog)
Source: neuropathology blog - January 19, 2018 Category: Radiology Tags: neoplasms Source Type: blogs

Guest Post from Dr. Mike Lawlor: Audentes Announces Positive Interim Data from First Dose Cohort of ASPIRO, a Phase 1/2 Clinical Trial of AT132 in Patients With X-Linked Myotubular Myopathy
Dr. Mike LawlorRegular contributor Mike Lawlor, MD, PhD passed this development along from the X-linked myotubular myopathy clinical research front:Audentes Therapeutics has released an interim data update on the ASPIRO gene therapy clinical trial for X-linked myotubular myopathy.  In the 4thquarter of 2017, three patients were given a single dose of an adeno-associated virus containing the human myotubularin gene.  To quote the press release:" The early AT132 efficacy data observed in our first dose cohort of patients have exceeded our expectations, " stated Dr. Suyash Prasad, Senior Vice President and...
Source: neuropathology blog - January 16, 2018 Category: Radiology Tags: muscle Source Type: blogs

Best Post of October 2017: Neuropathologist Hannes Vogel featured in New York Times for examining brain of Las Vegas mass murderer
The next in our " Best of the Month " series is from Friday, October 27, 2017:Prominent neuropathologist Hannes Vogel of Stanford University was featured in the New York Times yesterday as he is examining the brain of Stephen Paddock, who killed 58 concertgoers in Las Vegas this month in a rampage without any clear motive. Here's the link to the NYT article.Hannes Vogel, MD (Source: neuropathology blog)
Source: neuropathology blog - December 22, 2017 Category: Radiology Tags: Best of the Month series neuropathologists Source Type: blogs

A message from American Association of Neuropathologists President Elizabeth Cochran
Louisville, KYAANP members are already prepping for the 94th Annual Meeting, to be held in Louisville, KY, June 7-10, 2018. Annual Meeting registration and theabstract submission site have launched, and the call for DSS cases has been sent. We are looking forward to seeing you in Kentucky! (Source: neuropathology blog)
Source: neuropathology blog - December 18, 2017 Category: Radiology Tags: meetings Source Type: blogs

Best Post of September 2017 -- Guest Post from Dr. PJ Cimino: Blue discoloration of the gray matter in a patient who received methylene blue for respiratory distress prior to death
The next in our " Best Post of the Month " series is from Monday, September 11, 2017:Dr. PJ Cimino, whom we profiled when he was a fellow back in November of 2013, is a now faculty member at the University of Washington. I was delighted to receive this email from him today:" I had an autopsy case with interesting gross pathology findings, which made for some nice clinical images (below). The patient received therapeutic methylene blue in the setting of respiratory distress prior to death. The gross pathology showed striking widespread green-blue gray matter discoloration. I thought these images mig...
Source: neuropathology blog - December 14, 2017 Category: Radiology Tags: anatomy Best of the Month series Source Type: blogs

Best Post of August 2017: Choroid plexus carcinoma in an infant
The next in our " Best of the Month " Series is from August 1, 2017:Some papillary architecture is maintained (Source: neuropathology blog)
Source: neuropathology blog - December 1, 2017 Category: Radiology Tags: Best of the Month series neoplasms Source Type: blogs

Best Post of June 2017: Remarkable en bloc dissection of human central and peripheral nervous system accomplished at University of Colorado
Discussion is underway about loaning the specimen to the Denver Museum of Nature and Science for community health education.CNS en bloc dissection with extensive portion of PNSConnection to the eyeballs is maintained, with plans to dissect away extraocular musclesDetail showing maintained connection with digital nerves of the left hand (Source: neuropathology blog)
Source: neuropathology blog - November 28, 2017 Category: Radiology Tags: anatomy Best of the Month series Source Type: blogs

Choroidal hemangioma in a patient with Stuge-Weber Syndrome
Sclera is at bottom of picture; retinal pigment epithelium is at top right. Between them is choroid with cavernous hemangioma (Source: neuropathology blog)
Source: neuropathology blog - November 6, 2017 Category: Radiology Tags: eye Source Type: blogs

Guest Post from Sandro Santagata, MD, PhD: Papillary Craniopharyngioma Trial
I am pleased to present a guest post from Dr. Sandro Santagata of Brigham and Women ’s Hospital/Dana Farber Cancer Center, who writes:Our group of collaborators has recently opened a Phase II Trial of BRAF/MEK Inhibitors in Papillary Craniopharyngiomas that is sponsored by the Alliance for Clinical Trials in Oncology.The eligibility criteria are listed here:https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT03224767The trial is based on work published in these two papers:https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24413733https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26498373I am happy to answer any questions that our colleagues may have about th...
Source: neuropathology blog - November 1, 2017 Category: Radiology Tags: molecular studies Source Type: blogs

Neuropathology Blog is Ten Years Old Today
Ten years ago today, I put up thefirst post to neuropathology blog. At the time, I didn't intend for anyone to actually read any of this stuff. I thought the blog would be a convenient way of taking searchable notes on various neuropathology topics I came across.  Ten years (and 703 posts!) later, the blog has thus far had more than 850,000 page views. I'd like to particularly thank two early supporters: Drs. John Donahue and Mark Cohen. Thanks to both of you for your encouragement early on. And thanks to all the readers and contributors who have participated in making this blog a success over the last decade. Here's ...
Source: neuropathology blog - October 31, 2017 Category: Radiology Source Type: blogs

Neuropathologist Hannes Vogel featured in New York Times for examining brain of Las Vegas mass murderer
Prominent neuropathologist Hannes Vogel of Stanford University was featured in the New York Times yesterday as he is examining the brain of Stephen Paddock, who killed 58 concertgoers in Las Vegas this month in a rampage without any clear motive.Here's the link to the NYT article.Hannes Vogel, MD (Source: neuropathology blog)
Source: neuropathology blog - October 27, 2017 Category: Radiology Tags: forensics neuropathologists Source Type: blogs

Audentes Therapeutics Announces Dosing of First Patient in ASPIRO, a Phase 1/2 Clinical Trial of AT132 for the Treatment of X-Linked Myotubular Myopathy
Following up on the last post, Dr. Mike Lawlor sent me this in an email:"Audentes Therapeutics officially announced the dosing of the first patient for the X-linked myotubular myopathy treatment trial that we ’ve been working on over the past few years.  We ’ve been very involved in the translation from dogs to humans, and will be doing the human pathology work for the trial. Here ’s a link to that press release. " (Source: neuropathology blog)
Source: neuropathology blog - October 11, 2017 Category: Radiology Tags: muscle Source Type: blogs

Lawlor featured in video about his work in myotubular myopathy
Michael Lawlor, MD, PhDMedical College of Wisconsin is highlighting the work of our colleagueDr. Michael Lawlor in the area of gene therapy for myotubular myopathy. Check out this wonderful 4-minute video! (Source: neuropathology blog)
Source: neuropathology blog - October 2, 2017 Category: Radiology Tags: muscle neuropathologists Source Type: blogs

Murat Gokden releases " Neuropathologic and Neuroradiologic Correlations: A Differential Diagnostic Text and Atlas "
I got this email from medical student extraordinaire Stephen Nix:Murat Gokden, MD" I'm not sure if this would be something to feature on the neuropathology blog or not, but Murat Gokden just edited and released a book with Cambridge Press entitled " Neuropathologic and Neuroradiologic Correlations " (link below) focusing on combining neuropathology and neuroradiology information/findings into one resource. I just got my copy today and the images and text look great. Pathology contributors include Travis Danielsen, Robin Elliott, Bret Evers, Theodore Friedman, Melissa Gener, Humayun G...
Source: neuropathology blog - September 29, 2017 Category: Radiology Tags: books Source Type: blogs

Aaron Hernandez Had Severe C.T.E. When He Died at Age 27
The New York Timesreported yesterday that an autopsy report on 27-year-old Aaron Hernandez, the former New England Patriots tight end and convicted murderer, showed evidence of severe chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE). Hernandez committed suicide earlier this year. Excerpts from the article:"Dr. Ann McKee, chief of neuropathology at the VA Boston Healthcare System and director of the CTE Center at Boston University, examined his brain and said in a statement that Mr. Hernandez had “early brain atrophy” and “large perforations in the septum pellucidum, a central membrane” of the brain....
Source: neuropathology blog - September 22, 2017 Category: Radiology Tags: trauma Source Type: blogs

" I'm a brain scientist and I let my son play football " -- Peter Cummings, MD
Peter Cummings, MD with his sonDr. Peter Cummings, an accomplished forensic neuropathologist, just posted an article on Yahoo Sports giving his perspective on the controversial question of whether we should let our children play football given the risk for chronic traumatic encephalopathy.Here is the link. Thanks toDr. John Donahue of Brown University for alerting me to this article. (Source: neuropathology blog)
Source: neuropathology blog - September 19, 2017 Category: Radiology Tags: trauma Source Type: blogs

Guest Post from Dr. PJ Cimino: Blue discoloration of the gray matter in a patient who received methylene blue for respiratory distress prior to death
Dr. PJ Cimino, whom weprofiled when he was a fellow back in November of 2013, is a now faculty member at the University of Washington. I was delighted to receive this email from him today:" I had an autopsy case with interesting gross pathology findings, which made for some nice clinical images (below). The patient received therapeutic methylene blue in the setting of respiratory distress prior to death. The gross pathology showed striking widespread green-blue gray matter discoloration. I thought these images might be of interest to share with the general neuropatholgy community, and thought your blog might be a...
Source: neuropathology blog - September 12, 2017 Category: Radiology Tags: anatomy Source Type: blogs

American Board of Pathology Maintenance of Certification Exam Pass Rate Dips to 97.7%!!!
The American Board of Pathology (ABP) recently published their pass rates for the Spring 2017 administration. After maintaining a 100% pass rate for the previous four administrations of the exam over two years, the Spring 2017 exam pass rate has dipped to an appalling 97.7%!A total of 265 individuals took the exam (at $700 per examinee, the ABP brought in a paultry $185,000 from this administration). Included in this number is probably the few like me who only took the neuropathology exam, with the majority likely taking the AP/CP exam.)Bottom line: No need to worry about either your likelihood of passing the MOC exam or t...
Source: neuropathology blog - September 9, 2017 Category: Radiology Tags: MOC Source Type: blogs

I took the American Board of Pathology Neuropathology Maintenence of Certification Exam
I took the American Board of Pathology neuropathology maintenance of certification exam this week. Given that the ABP goal is virtually a 100% pass rate, I found the test more difficult than I anticipated. I suppose I shouldn't have been surprised by the level of difficulty of some of the questions, given that the ABPpublishes the topics covered. But in some cases knowing the topic does not really help with preparation. For example, one topic listed is: " abnormal corticospinal tracts/pyramids " . In any case, I am sure the cut-off score for passing is relatively low. Results, which only entail whether or not one...
Source: neuropathology blog - August 25, 2017 Category: Radiology Tags: MOC Source Type: blogs

Best Post of June 2017: Additional photograph of remarkable CNS/PNS dissection
The next in our " Best of the Month " series is from June 12, 2017:Taken by our staff photographer, Lisa Litzenberger. (Source: neuropathology blog)
Source: neuropathology blog - August 17, 2017 Category: Radiology Source Type: blogs

College of American Pathologists Neuropathology Committee met in Monterey, CA this past weekend
The College of American Pathologists Neuropathology (CAP-NP) Committee met in Monterey, CA this past weekend.  We are making plans for our next SAM-eligible educational product that will, among on things, update you on the latest World Health Organization system of pituitary adenoma classification.After a long day at work on the CAP-NP educational product, committee members retired to a nearby restaurant where this picture was snapped:Some of the CAP Neuropathology Committee members (left to right, in the foreground) " Brett Harris, Andrea Weins, Areli Cuevas-Ocampo, Matt Scheiderjan (sta...
Source: neuropathology blog - August 8, 2017 Category: Radiology Tags: meetings Source Type: blogs

Choroid plexus carcinoma in an infant
Some papillary architecture is maintained (Source: neuropathology blog)
Source: neuropathology blog - August 1, 2017 Category: Radiology Tags: neoplasms Source Type: blogs

Best Post of May 2017 - Guest Post: A Case from the Hawkeye State
The next in our " Best of the Month " series is from May 19, 2017:From the illustrious Dr. Karra Jones of the University of Iowa:Karra Jones, MD, PhD40 year old female with progressive headaches over 6-8 months. MRI showed a large cystic and solid mass, favored to be extra-axial and arising from the anterior skull base just left of midline with possible dural attachment. Sections showed a densely cellular mass arranged in a mostly haphazard, slightly fascicular pattern. Alternating hypercellular and hypocellular areas were seen. Tumor cells were ovoid to spindle shaped with scant eosinophilic cytop...
Source: neuropathology blog - July 14, 2017 Category: Radiology Tags: Best of the Month series neoplasms Source Type: blogs

Best Post of April 2017: Screenshots of the surgical neuropathology volume of the Johns Hopkins Atlases of Pathology
The next in our " Best of the Month " series is from April 6, 2017:A month ago I put up a post regarding the release of Volume 3 of the Johns Hopkins Atlases of Pathology for the iPad. This app only costs $4.99 . Here are some screenshots of the app provided to me by series editor Toby Cornish, MD, PhD: (Source: neuropathology blog)
Source: neuropathology blog - July 5, 2017 Category: Radiology Tags: apps Best of the Month series Source Type: blogs

Which subtypes of pituitary adenoma must you be aware of as tending to be more clinically agressive?
Certain subtypes of pituitary adenoma have been shown to be more clinically aggressive in that they tend to be more invasive, have earlier recurrence, and are more resistant to treatment. The following adenoma subtypes are recognized as having a more aggressive clinical behavior:- Acidophil stem cell adenoma- Crooke cell adenoma- Lactotroph adenomawhen occurring in men- Pit-1 positive plurihormonal adenoma- Sparsely granulated somatotroph adenoma- Silent corticotroph adenomaThanks to Dr. Bea Lopes of the University of Virginia for consulting on the compilation of list! (Source: neuropathology blog)
Source: neuropathology blog - June 23, 2017 Category: Radiology Tags: pituitary Source Type: blogs

Best Post of March 2017: Why is the confluence of the cerebral venous sinuses called the " torcula " ?
The next in our " Best of the Month " series is from March 3, 2017:Torcula is derived from a Latin word meaning to “twist” and was also used to refer to a wine press. Within the cranium the venous sinuses come together at the back of the skull in a structure called the confluence of the sinuses. This cavity has four large veins radiating from it, supposedly resembling the spigots that pour dark purple juice out of the four sides of the ancient wine press used to squeeze grapes with a handled screw on the top. The same stem is found in common words such as torture and tortuous. (Source: neuropathology blog)
Source: neuropathology blog - June 22, 2017 Category: Radiology Tags: anatomy Best of the Month series Source Type: blogs

Additional photograph of remarkable CNS/PNS dissection
I wanted to share this additional photo related to the last post. It was taken by our staff photographer, Lisa Litzenberger. (Source: neuropathology blog)
Source: neuropathology blog - June 12, 2017 Category: Radiology Tags: anatomy Source Type: blogs

Remarkable en bloc dissection of human central and peripheral nervous system accomplished at University of Colorado
Discussion is underway about loaning the specimen to theDenver Museum of Nature and Science for community health education.CNS en bloc dissection with extensive portion of PNSConnection to the eyeballs is maintained, with plans to dissect away extraocular musclesDetail showing maintained connection with digital nerves of the left hand (Source: neuropathology blog)
Source: neuropathology blog - June 7, 2017 Category: Radiology Tags: anatomy Source Type: blogs

Prominent Neuropathologist Dan Brat named Pathology Chair at Northwestern
Leading neuropathologist Dan Brat, MD, PhD has beennamed chairof the pathology department at Northwestern University Feinberg School of MedicineDaniel Brat, MD, PhDBrat has been serving as professor and vice chair for Translational Programs in the Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine at Emory University School of Medicine.Brat joins a lengthening list of neuropathologists who are departmental chairs. The list includes:Douglas Anthony at BrownJennifer Baccon at AkronSteven Carroll at Medical University of South CarolinaRobert Corona at SUNY UpstateJeffrey Golden at Brigham and Women's Hospital...
Source: neuropathology blog - June 4, 2017 Category: Radiology Tags: neuropathologists Source Type: blogs

Best Post of February 2017: Hunched Over a Microscope, Santiago Ramon y Cajal Sketched the Secrets of How the Brain Works
The next in our " Best of the Month " series comes from February 20, 2017:Last month, the Weisman Art Museum in Minneapolis opened a traveling exhibit that is the first dedicated solely to Ram ón y Cajal’s work. According to a New York Times article, it will make stops in Minneapolis; Vancouver, British Columbia; New York City; Cambridge, Mass.; and Chapel Hill, N.C., through April 2019.Ramon y Cajal in his laboratory, circa 1885 Thanks to Drs. Mark Cohen and John Evans for alerting me to this exhibit. (Source: neuropathology blog)
Source: neuropathology blog - June 1, 2017 Category: Radiology Tags: Best of the Month series history Source Type: blogs

Guest Post: A Case From the Hawkeye State
From the illustriousDr. Karra Jones of theUniversity of Iowa:Karra Jones, MD, PhD40 year old female with progressive headaches over 6-8 months. MRI showed a large cystic and solid mass, favored to be extra-axial and arising from the anterior skull base just left of midline with possible dural attachment. Sections showed a densely cellular mass arranged in a mostly haphazard, slightly fascicular pattern. Alternating hypercellular and hypocellular areas were seen. Tumor cells were ovoid to spindle shaped with scant eosinophilic cytoplasm. No eosinophilic bands of wire-like collagen were noted, and only focal staghorn-like va...
Source: neuropathology blog - May 19, 2017 Category: Radiology Tags: guest post neoplasms Source Type: blogs

Best Post of January 2017: Corneal ulceration secondary to Candidal keratitis
The next in our " Best of the Month " Series is from January 20, 2017. A good photomicrograph is worth a thousand words.GMS stain highlights fungal forms in the corneal stroma (Source: neuropathology blog)
Source: neuropathology blog - May 17, 2017 Category: Radiology Tags: Best of the Month series ophthalmic pathology Source Type: blogs

Registration still open for annual meeting of the American Association of Neuropathologists
https://aanp.memberclicks.net/2017_AANP_Annual_Meeting_FINAL#/ (Source: neuropathology blog)
Source: neuropathology blog - May 12, 2017 Category: Radiology Tags: meetings Source Type: blogs

Diagnostic Slide Session cases have been released by AANP
The American Association of Neuropathologists has released the cases for the2017 Diagnostic Slide Session, which will be held at the association'sannual meeting on Saturday, June 10 from 8 to 11 pm. The session, which will be moderated by Drs. Caterina Giannini Rebecca D. Folkerth, focuses on a discussion of 10 cases submitted by members far and wide. (Source: neuropathology blog)
Source: neuropathology blog - May 3, 2017 Category: Radiology Tags: meetings Source Type: blogs

Best Post of December 2016: Fibrous Bodies Nicely Demonstrated in a Smear from a Somatotroph Pituitary Adenoma
The next in our " Best of the Month Series " is from December 2, 2016:Christian Davidson, MDDr. Christian Davidson, director of neuropathology at the Robert Wood Johnson University Hospitalin New Jersey, provides today's blog post:A 30-year-old man presented with bitemporal hemianopsia and a 3.0 cm pituitary mass was discovered upon MRI. His IGF-1 was elevated to 900, but he had no signs of acromegaly. A smear of tissue sent for frozen section evaluation (see below) revealed that most cells had round, eosinophilic, perinuclear inclusions suggestive of fibrous bodies (some examples are circled). Dot-like...
Source: neuropathology blog - April 25, 2017 Category: Radiology Tags: Best of the Month series neoplasms pituitary Source Type: blogs

Screenshots of the surgical neuropathology volume of the Johns Hopkins Atlases of Pathology
A month ago Iput up a post regarding the release of Volume 3 of the Johns Hopkins Atlases of Pathology for the iPad. This app only costs $4.99 . Here are some screenshots of the app provided to me by series editorToby Cornish, MD, PhD: (Source: neuropathology blog)
Source: neuropathology blog - April 7, 2017 Category: Radiology Tags: apps Source Type: blogs

This slow growing " pineal mass " was thought by radiologists to be a pineocytoma
Not definitively attached to the dura, but the neuroradiologist wisely put meningioma on the differential diagnosis. Microscopy showed WHO grade I meningioma. (Source: neuropathology blog)
Source: neuropathology blog - March 24, 2017 Category: Radiology Tags: neoplasms Source Type: blogs

An update on SF-1 driven pituitary adenomas
Adenomas driven by the transcription factor SF-1, which are exclusively gonadotroph adenomas, are a common subtype encountered by the surgical pathologist. Traditionally, gonadotroph adenomas have been defined by positive immunostaining for luteinizing hormone (LH) and/or follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) with or without alpha-subunit ( αSU). However, evidence is now emerging that replacement of these three immunostains by the single SF-1 stain results in a more cost-effective and sensitive means of detecting gonadotrophin adenomas. Further, the majority of previously classified " null cell " adenomas -- n...
Source: neuropathology blog - March 22, 2017 Category: Radiology Tags: pituitary Source Type: blogs

" Gross only " sign out of intraocular lens prosthesis
When signing out our gross only IOL cases, my ophthalmologists want me to comment as to whether the " haptics " are completely present to confirm that nothing has been inadvertently left behind in the patient. If you are wondering what a " haptic " is, it the curving blue filament that emerges from the prosthetic lens serving to keep the lens in place. The term " haptic " means " related to the sense of touch " ; but I am not sure why this term is used in this context. Perhaps a reader knows?IOL with blue haptics in place (Source: neuropathology blog)
Source: neuropathology blog - March 21, 2017 Category: Radiology Tags: ophthalmic pathology Source Type: blogs

Retinal biopsy from an elderly woman with suspected ocular lymphoma
The patient had multiple foci of markedly thickened retina on exam. Ophthomologists were able to obtain a relatively large retinal biopsy. We did not find lymphoma in this case, and infections of many sorts were ruled out. But the ophthalmologists wanted an opinion as to whether retinal vasculitis was present. I wonder whether the threshold for calling vasculitis in the retina should be lower than in other tissues. Your input in the comments section would be greatly appreciated.Low power viewMedium power showing diffuse edemaArterioles with focus of intramural inflammatory infiltrate on right side of right vessel (Source: neuropathology blog)
Source: neuropathology blog - March 16, 2017 Category: Radiology Tags: ophthalmic pathology Source Type: blogs

Emory Neuropathologist Dan Brat delivers Nathan Kaufman Timely Topics Lectures at 2017 USCAP annual meeting
On Monday, March 6,Dan Brat, MD, PhD delivered a presentation entitled " Platforms, Diagnosis and Disease: An Evolution Rooted in Pathology " to attendees of the 2017 annual meeting of theUnited States and Canadian Academy of Pathology (USCAP) in San Antonio, Texas. Dr. Brat is director of the neuropathology division of the Emory University pathology Department. (Source: neuropathology blog)
Source: neuropathology blog - March 8, 2017 Category: Radiology Tags: meetings neuropathologists Source Type: blogs

Johns Hopkins Atlas of Surgical Neuropathology now available on iTunes
Dr. EberhartDr. RodriquezSurgical neuropathology is the focus of volume 3 in the Johns Hopkins Atlases of Pathology.This app was released on March 3, 2017 for iPad download for only $4.99 . Authors Charles Eberhart and Fausto Rodriquez introduce us to the next generation in surgical neuropathology reference with a variety of educational features, updates to the 2016 WHO grading system system for CNS tumors, algorithms for the evaluation of diffuse gliomas, and practice quizzes. Congratulations to Drs. Eberhart and Rodriguez on the creation of a magnificent product! (Source: neuropathology blog)
Source: neuropathology blog - March 7, 2017 Category: Radiology Tags: websites Source Type: blogs

Why is the confluence of the cerebral venous sinuses called the " torcula " ?
Torcula is derived from a Latin word meaning to “twist” and was also used to refer to a wine press. Within the cranium the venous sinuses come together at the back of the skull in a structure called the confluence of the sinuses. This cavity has four large veins radiating from it, supposedly resembling the spigots that pour dark purple juice out of the four sides of the ancient wine press used to squeeze grapes with a handled screw on the top. The same stem is found in common words such as torture and tortuous.Source: https://www.dmu.edu/dose/2009/11/anatomy-word-of-the-month-torcular-herophili/ (Sour...
Source: neuropathology blog - March 3, 2017 Category: Radiology Tags: history Source Type: blogs

Hunched Over a Microscope, Santiago Ramon y Cajal Sketched the Secrets of How the Brain Works
Last month, the Weisman Art Museum in Minneapolis opened a traveling exhibit that is the first dedicated solely to Ram ón y Cajal’s work. According to a New York Times article, it will make stops in Minneapolis; Vancouver, British Columbia; New York City; Cambridge, Mass.; and Chapel Hill, N.C., through April 2019.Ramon y Cajal in his laboratory, circa 1885 Thanks to Drs.Mark Cohen andJohn Evans for alerting me to this exhibit. (Source: neuropathology blog)
Source: neuropathology blog - February 20, 2017 Category: Radiology Tags: history Source Type: blogs

Best Post of November 2016: Calcifying Pseudoneoplasm of the Neuroaxis (CAPNON)
The next in our " Best of the Month " series is from November 11, 2016:Approximately 59 cases of CAPNON have been reported in the literature, A non-neoplastic entity that can be found in either an intra-axial or extra-axial location, the pathogenesis of CAPNON is unclear but a reactive process has been favored. The outcome is generally considered to be excellent, with gross total resection typically curative. This case is somewhat unique in that it harbors adipose tissue.Foci of calcification and fat are present in this midline exampleNodules of basophilic calcificationThe calcifications have a chondromyxoid appe...
Source: neuropathology blog - February 16, 2017 Category: Radiology Tags: Best of the Month series reactive processes Source Type: blogs

Ophthalmologist and Eye Pathologist David Wilson Visits University of Colorado Pathology Department
Dr. David Wilson (left) with residents and attendings at University of Colorado Pathology Dept todayThe pathology department was one stop made byDr. David Wilson, ophthalmologist and eye pathologist from Oregon Health and Science University, when he visited the University of Colorado today. (Source: neuropathology blog)
Source: neuropathology blog - February 3, 2017 Category: Radiology Tags: ophthalmic pathology Source Type: blogs