Today is Glioblastoma Awareness Day
Last month, a resolution recognizing today, July 17, as Glioblastoma Awareness Day was passed with unanimous consent in the U.S. Senate – a date on which we honor GBM patients, families, and caregivers, as well as recognize the tireless work of researchers and medical providers. Find out more at  "Glioblastoma Awareness Day"  (Source: neuropathology blog)
Source: neuropathology blog - July 17, 2019 Category: Radiology Tags: neoplasms Source Type: blogs

Best Post of March 2019: Glial cytoplasmic inclusions filling putaminal pencillary fibers in a case of multiple system atrophy (striatonigral type)
The next in our " Best of the Month " series is from Thursday, March 14, 2019, which is simply comprised of a nice representative photomicrograph of an MSA-P case:Putamen (alpha-synuclein immunohistochemistry) (Source: neuropathology blog)
Source: neuropathology blog - July 12, 2019 Category: Radiology Tags: Best of the Month series multiple system atrophy Source Type: blogs

Best Post of February 2019: Dr. Fausto Rodriguez presents on the topic of tumefactive pseudoneoplasms on PathCast
The next in our " Best of the Month " series comes from Thursday, February 28, 2019:Here's a link to the whole PathCast series on YouTube. Great lectures from prominent pathologists -- completely free! Dr. Rodriguez has another lecture uploaded on the site, and Dr. Arie Perry has two. (Source: neuropathology blog)
Source: neuropathology blog - July 3, 2019 Category: Radiology Tags: Best of the Month series websites Source Type: blogs

Neuropathology Blog Hits Million Pageview Mark!
I just noticed today that this blog now has more than one million pageviews since it inception in October 2007. And this marks the 856th post. Cheers! (Source: neuropathology blog)
Source: neuropathology blog - June 27, 2019 Category: Radiology Tags: blogging Source Type: blogs

Neuropathology Hits Million Pageview Mark!
I just noticed today that this blog now has more than one million pageviews since it inception in October 2007. And this marks the 856th post. Cheers! (Source: neuropathology blog)
Source: neuropathology blog - June 27, 2019 Category: Radiology Tags: blogging Source Type: blogs

Dr. Hilary Nickols: neuropathologist and artist
Hilary Nickols, MD, PhDFrom time to time, I feature neuropathologists who exhibit talents beyond the strict confines of neuropathology. For example, I recently features the inimitableMark Cohen and his prodigious classical guitar skills. I discovered another neuropathologist/artist during the recent annual meeting of the American Association of Neuropathologists: Hilary Nickols, MD, PhD, of Norton Healthcare in Louisville, Kentucky. Dr. Nickols shared with me her detailed drawing of a craniotomy surgical field which she recently witnessed during a visit to the operating room.The scene in the operating room, including ...
Source: neuropathology blog - June 17, 2019 Category: Radiology Tags: neuropathologists Source Type: blogs

Recap of the final day of the AANP meeting
by Dr. Karra Jones:The final day of the American Association of Neuropathologists annual meeting kicked off with our fearless leader, President Dr. Matthew Frosch.  Dr. Frosch entertained us with thought experiments related to our current methods of sampling tissue and their limitations.  He suggested that newer modalities developed by the following speakers will allow for interrogation of entire volumes of tissue drastically increasing our knowledge about the brain and disease. Dr. Kwanghun Chung from MIT talked about rapid 3D imaging and phenotyping of large-scale tissues.  He has devel...
Source: neuropathology blog - June 10, 2019 Category: Radiology Tags: meetings Source Type: blogs

Recap of the third day of the AANP meeting
by J. Stephen NixThe Saturday session of the 95th Annual Meeting of the AANP began with platform sessions on Alzheimer Disease and new technologies, highlighting cutting-edge developments in neuropathology research and techniques. The morning continued with the Korey lecture given by Dr. Jean Paul Vonsattel. Dr. Vonsattel delivered an insightful lecture on the investigation and mechanisms of hypokinetic and hyperkinetic disorders and the basal ganglia, including an in-depth review of relevant anatomy and history. Dr. Raymond Sobel was honored with a Meritorious Award presented by Dr. Jeffrey Golden for his innumerable cont...
Source: neuropathology blog - June 9, 2019 Category: Radiology Tags: meetings Source Type: blogs

Recap of the third day of AANP meeting
by J. Stephen NixThe Saturday session of the 95th Annual Meeting of the AANP began with platform sessions on Alzheimer Disease and new technologies, highlighting cutting-edge developments in neuropathology research and techniques. The morning continued with the Korey lecture given by Dr. Jean Paul Vonsattel. Dr. Vonsattel delivered an insightful lecture on the investigation and mechanisms of hypokinetic and hyperkinetic disorders and the basal ganglia, including an in-depth review of relevant anatomy and history. Dr. Raymond Sobel was honored with a Meritorious Award presented by Dr. Jeffrey Golden for his innumerable cont...
Source: neuropathology blog - June 9, 2019 Category: Radiology Tags: meetings Source Type: blogs

Recap of the second day of the AANP meeting
The second day of the American Association of Neuropathologists annual meeting started with, of course, coffee. Our caffeinated brains were then further stimulated by the morning platform sessions (non-Alzheimer neurodegenerative and muscle/nerve running concurrently). Among the many excellent platform presentations was Lindsey Lowder's " Dementia in ALS: the role of the cerebellum " . Dr. Lowder's work sheds light on the role of the cerebellum, an under-appreciated organ, in connecting ALS and cognitive dysfunction.After the platform presentations, a second caffeine load was appreciated during the refreshment br...
Source: neuropathology blog - June 8, 2019 Category: Radiology Tags: meetings Source Type: blogs

Recap of the first day of the AANP annual meeting
Dr. Maria Martinez-Lage was  kind enough to write the following summary of events at today ’s American Association of Neuropathologists meeting in Atlanta:The opening day of the 95th Annual Meeting of the American Association of Neuropathologists in Atlanta featured a special course dedicated to a topic both old and new: what happens when treatments go awry? Under the title “Unintended Consequences: The Iatrogenic Neuropathology of Systemic Therapies” the faculty discussed neurologic adverse effects of novel immunotherapies,other cancer and non-cancer related t...
Source: neuropathology blog - June 7, 2019 Category: Radiology Tags: meetings Source Type: blogs

American Association of Neuropathologists annual meeting gets underway
I arrived in Atlanta this afternoon in anticipation of tomorrow's kick-off of the American Association of Neuropathologists annual meeting. I've already run into a number of neuropathologists from around the country, including:Howard Chang, William Taylor,Eddie Lee,Beatriz Lopes, Roberta Seidman,Doug Miller,Mary Fowkes, Clare Bryce, Ray Sobel,Tessa Hedley-White, andLeroy Sharer. Looking forward to a great meeting!I caught up with the inimitable Dr. Leroy Sharer (right) while checking in for the meeting (Source: neuropathology blog)
Source: neuropathology blog - June 6, 2019 Category: Radiology Tags: meetings Source Type: blogs

Abstracts for the AANP annual meeting are now available online
The 95th Annual Meeting abstracts are now available onlinehere.They can also be found in the current JuneJNEN issue.  (Source: neuropathology blog)
Source: neuropathology blog - May 28, 2019 Category: Radiology Tags: meetings Source Type: blogs

Best Post of January 2019: Radiologically suspected meningioma turns out to be WHO grade II Pleomorphic Xanthoastrocytoma
The next in our " Best of the Month " series comes from January 18, 2019:Rosethal fiber in oval. Eosinophilic granular body in rectangleRosenthal fibers can be seen in non-neoplastic " compressed " brain tissue. For example, I once saw Rosenthal fibers in the spinal cord adjacent to an epidural abscess. (Source: neuropathology blog)
Source: neuropathology blog - May 23, 2019 Category: Radiology Tags: Best of the Month series neoplasms Source Type: blogs

Diagnostic Slide Session cases have been released
The American Association of Neuropathologists has released the cases for the2019 Diagnostic Slide Session (DSS) cases, which will be held at the association'sannual meeting on Saturday, June 8 from 8 to 11 pm. The session, which will be moderated by Drs. Caterina Giannini and Rebecca D. Folkerth, focuses on a discussion of 10 cases submitted by members from far and wide. (Source: neuropathology blog)
Source: neuropathology blog - May 14, 2019 Category: Radiology Tags: meetings Source Type: blogs

Helpful glossary of pathology terms
(Source: neuropathology blog)
Source: neuropathology blog - May 9, 2019 Category: Radiology Source Type: blogs

Mark Cohen's hidden genius as a classical guitarist
The neuropathology community may be aware of the extraordinary musical talents ofDr. Arie Perry, but there is another among us who has hidden genius as a classical guitarist. I present to you the inimitable Dr. Mark Cohen:https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VHfBmXbnKGA&feature=youtu.beCase Western's Mark Cohen (right) with accompianist (Source: neuropathology blog)
Source: neuropathology blog - May 6, 2019 Category: Radiology Tags: neuropathologists Source Type: blogs

A Jungian Approach to Individual Neuropathological Specimens
I was readingThe Undiscovered Self (1958) by Carl Jung today, and noted that Jung's description of individual patients could also be applied to individual tumors:" The statistical method shows the facts in the light of the ideal average but does not give us a picture of their empirical reality.... The distinctive thing about real facts, however, is their individuality.... There is and can be no self-knowledge based on theoretical assumptions, for the object of this knowledge is an individual - a relative exception and an irregular phenomenon. Hence, it is not the universal and the regular that characterize the individ...
Source: neuropathology blog - May 1, 2019 Category: Radiology Tags: people Source Type: blogs

Live PathCast Tomorrow: Rodriguez on Meningomas
 Tuesday, April 30th - 8 AM ESTTopic: MeningiomasPresented by Fausto Rodriguez, M.D., Associate Professor of Pathology, JHUSOMThis seminar can be accessed livethrough the following links at 8 AM on Tuesdsay:Facebook:https://www.facebook.com/events/355454475302665/YouTube:https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCVxosS9hPP3ikMQXAE9Pamw/videosWebsite:http://pathologycast.com/ (Source: neuropathology blog)
Source: neuropathology blog - April 29, 2019 Category: Radiology Tags: websites Source Type: blogs

Sclerosing orbital lesions: broadening the differential diagnosis of " idiopathic sclerosing pseudotumor "
Sclerosing orbital lesion(the biopsy revealed it to be Erdheim-Chester disease)Sclerosing lesions of the orbit can present a diagnostic conundrum. Often submitted with a differential diagnosis that includes idiopathic sclerosing pseudotumor, it is incumbent upon the pathologist to rule out other diagnostic possibilities before designating the lesion as idiopathic. In order to survey the range of diagnoses for such specimens, we searched over a 10-year period for specimens submitted to the University of Colorado pathology department which either clinically or pathologically raised the possibility of idiopathic sclerosing ps...
Source: neuropathology blog - April 19, 2019 Category: Radiology Tags: ophthalmic pathology Source Type: blogs

cIMPACT-NOW Update 4: diffuse gliomas characterized by MYB, MYBL1, or FGFR1 alterations or BRAFV600E mutation
This cIMPACT-NOW update was published this month:Summary:cIMPACT (Consortium to Inform Molecular and Practical Approaches to CNS Tumor Taxonomy) has reviewed the status of WHO grade II IDH-wt/H3-wt diffuse gliomas, focusing on those with a BRAFV600E mutation, FGFR1 alteration, or a MYB or MYBL1 rearrangement, and recommends the use of an integrated diagnosis to combine their histologic and genetic features. The consortium ecommends the use of an integrated diagnosis to combine their histologic and genetic features, as suggested in the following:Diffuse glioma, MYB...
Source: neuropathology blog - April 16, 2019 Category: Radiology Tags: molecular studies neoplasms Source Type: blogs

PML in a patient with idiopathic CD4 lymphopenia
My last post prompted the inimitableDr. Murat Gokden to write to me about an interesting case he published in 2015 of a 33-year-old man who with idiopathic CD4 lymphopenia (ICL) who was ultimately diagnosed with progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML).Image from Dr. Gikden's paper: A and B are MRI FLAIR images showing hyperintense areas with gyral swelling and sulcal effacement (curved arrows). Image C depicts MR spectroscopy with abnormally elevated choline peak. Image D shows multifocal punctate enhancement in white matter.Murat Gokden, MD (Source: neuropathology blog)
Source: neuropathology blog - April 15, 2019 Category: Radiology Tags: infectious disease Source Type: blogs

Progressive Multifocal Leukoencephalopathy in patients without obvious immunosuppression
I recently received a case in consultation which turned out to be progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML). Reading the clinical history, it was not entirely clear what predisposed the patient to PML. It wasn't clear, that is, until my mentor (the illustrious BK DeMasters) to a nine-year-old paper by Sarah Gheuens, Gerald Pierone, Patrick Peeters, and Igor J. Koralnik entitled Progressive Multifocal Leukoencephalopathy in individuals with minimal or occult immunosuppression (J Neurol Neurosurg Psychiatry 2010;81:247-254). In this series, hepatic cirrhosis -- which was what my patient had -- was among the more commo...
Source: neuropathology blog - April 12, 2019 Category: Radiology Tags: infectious disease Source Type: blogs

Psychiatrist Hand-Knits an Anatomically Correct Textile Sculpture of the Human Brain
A psychiatrist from the National Bureau of Economic Research in Cambridge, MA,Dr. Karen Norberg spent an entire year knitting detailed replica of the central organ.  (Source: neuropathology blog)
Source: neuropathology blog - April 1, 2019 Category: Radiology Tags: anatomy Source Type: blogs

Miller selected as division director of neuropathology at University of Alabama
C. Ryan Miller, MD, PhDThe University of Alabama at Birmingham Department of Pathology has recently named C. Ryan Miller, MD, PhD as director of the neuropathology division. He starts in that position on April 1.Miller was most recently a professor in the Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine at the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill. Miller also served as faculty director of the UNC Translational Pathology Laboratory in conjunction with the Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center“We are excited to have Dr. Miller back at UAB in the Department of Pathology, where his experience in research on tumors of...
Source: neuropathology blog - March 27, 2019 Category: Radiology Tags: neuropathologists Source Type: blogs

Polymer coating embolism from intravascular medical devices
The deaths of at least three people who had hospital procedures in Vancouver were caused by coatings that sloughed off medical devices like catheters and scattered through blood vessels to major organs,a recent study has found.Here's a link to the relevant news article.Rupal I. Mehta, MDThanks toDr. Rupal I. Mehta of the University of Rochester for alerting me to this article. Dr. Mehta herself has published on this increasing recognized phenomenon.Here's a link to her update on the topic.Dr. Harry Vintershad this to say about the new study coming out of Canada: “Their study is especially intriguing in that...
Source: neuropathology blog - March 26, 2019 Category: Radiology Tags: vascular disease Source Type: blogs

Glial cytoplasmic inclusions filling putaminal pencillary fibers in a case of multiple system atrophy (striatonigral type)
Putamen (alpha-synuclein immunohistochemistry) (Source: neuropathology blog)
Source: neuropathology blog - March 14, 2019 Category: Radiology Tags: multiple system atrophy Source Type: blogs

Best Post of December 2018: Giant cell GBM masquerading as an anaplastic PXA
The next in our " Best of the Month " series is from December 4, 2018:At first glance, this tumor with pleomorphic cells and prominent perivascular lymphocytic cuffing strikes one as a pleomorphic xanthoastrocytoma (PXA).The relative circumscription, as demonstrated by the stark difference in tumor burden in adjacent gyri depicted above also suggests the possibility of  PXA.The presence of mitotic figures (center of picture above) and a small amount of necrosis and microvascular proliferation (not pictured) suggests the possibility of anaplastic PXA.However, perivascular lymphocytes and relative circumscript...
Source: neuropathology blog - March 12, 2019 Category: Radiology Tags: Best of the Month series neoplasms Source Type: blogs

Best Post of December 2018: Giant cell GBM masquerading as an anaplastic PCA
The next in our " Best of the Month " series is from December 4, 2018:At first glance, this tumor with pleomorphic cells and prominent perivascular lymphocytic cuffing strikes one as a pleomorphic xanthoastrocytoma (PXA).The relative circumscription, as demonstrated by the stark difference in tumor burden in adjacent gyri depicted above also suggests the possibility of  PXA.The presence of mitotic figures (center of picture above) and a small amount of necrosis and microvascular proliferation (not pictured) suggests the possibility of anaplastic PXA.However, perivascular lymphocytes and relative circumscript...
Source: neuropathology blog - March 12, 2019 Category: Radiology Tags: Best of the Month series neoplasms Source Type: blogs

Donahue does it again: a case of type 2 myotonic dystrophy from Providence, Rhode Island
A case from Dr. John Donahue, inimitable neuropathologist and neuropathology fellowship program director at Brown University:" This is a fast myosin immunostain on a gluteus maximus biopsy from a 45-year-old woman who went on to have genetically-proven myotonic dystrophy, type 2 (DM2; proximal myotonic myopathy; PROMM).  The type 2 muscle fibers are EXTREMELY atrophic. " (Source: neuropathology blog)
Source: neuropathology blog - March 1, 2019 Category: Radiology Tags: muscle Source Type: blogs

Dr. Fausto Rodriguez presents on the topic of tumefactive pseudoneoplasms on PathCast
Here's a linkto the whole PathCast series on YouTube. Great lectures from prominent pathologists -- completely free!Dr. Rodriguez has another lecture uploaded on the site, andDr. Arie Perry has two. (Source: neuropathology blog)
Source: neuropathology blog - February 28, 2019 Category: Radiology Tags: websites Source Type: blogs

Primum non nocere
Dr. Edward LeeDr. Edward Leeis among several others who have authored an interesting commentary on CTE entitled:Primum non nocere: a call for balance when reporting on CTE. It's worth a read! (Source: neuropathology blog)
Source: neuropathology blog - February 15, 2019 Category: Radiology Tags: neuropathologists trauma Source Type: blogs

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Dr. Edward LeeDr. Edward Leeis among several others who have authored an interesting commentary on CTE entitled:Primum non nocere: a call for balance when reporting on CTE. It's worth a read! (Source: neuropathology blog)
Source: neuropathology blog - February 15, 2019 Category: Radiology Tags: neuropathologists trauma Source Type: blogs

Neuropathologist Robert Corona named CEO of Upstate Medical University
Robert J. Corona, DO, MBADr. Robert Corona has been named chief executive officer of Upstate University Hospital in Syracuse, NY. Corona had been serving as the hospital ’s interim CEO before his permanent appointment last month.Corona did his neuropathology fellowship at the Armed Forces Institute of Pathology in Washington, DC (1990) and SUNY Health Sciences Center at Syracuse (1991).At Upstate, Corona has served as chair of the pathology department, and medical director of neuropathology. He previously worked as a vice president at Welch Allyn in Skaneateles, NY.Corona was on my 2016 list of neuropathologists...
Source: neuropathology blog - February 6, 2019 Category: Radiology Tags: neuropathologists Source Type: blogs

Stanford neuropathologist Hannes Vogel featured on cover of the Palo Alto Weekly
Ablog fan spotted this while walking his dog down a street in Palo Alto today:The story aboutDr. Vogel can be seenhere. (Source: neuropathology blog)
Source: neuropathology blog - January 25, 2019 Category: Radiology Tags: neuropathologists Source Type: blogs

Radiologically suspected meningioma turns out to be WHO grade II Pleomorphic Xanthoastrocytoma
Rosethal fiber in oval. Eosinophilic granular body in rectangleRosenthal fibers can be seen in non-neoplastic " compressed " brain tissue. For example, I once saw Rosenthal fibers in the spinal cord adjacent to an epidural abscess. (Source: neuropathology blog)
Source: neuropathology blog - January 18, 2019 Category: Radiology Tags: neoplasms Source Type: blogs

An inquiry from Dr. Mike Lawlor
Dr. Mike Lawlor (Medical College of Wisconsin)Hi Everyone,The time has come for me to pursue re-certification from the American Board of Pathology, and my test period is in March.  As I ’ve become a bit super-specialized in a single area, I feel that I’ll likely need to brush up on some topics in order to continue to be considered a neuropathologist.  I haven ’t kept up very well with the range and type of educational resources available to neuropathologists for test preparation, and I could use some advice.  Does anyone have advice on educational materials appropriate for ABP re-certificat...
Source: neuropathology blog - January 17, 2019 Category: Radiology Tags: books Source Type: blogs

AANP 94th Annual Meeting Highlights on YouTube
Check out thisthree and a half minute video on last year's annual meeting of the American Association of Neuropathologists! (Source: neuropathology blog)
Source: neuropathology blog - January 11, 2019 Category: Radiology Tags: meetings Source Type: blogs

Escourolle and Poirier's Manual of Basic Neuropathology, sixth edition, is now available
The newest (2019) edition of this classic is now available! (Source: neuropathology blog)
Source: neuropathology blog - January 10, 2019 Category: Radiology Tags: books Source Type: blogs

The new WHO Ocular Tumour “Blue Book” is now available!
Prepared by 64 contributors from 22 countriesMore than 400 tables and color photos The new edition of the WHO Classification of Tumours of the Eye isnow on sale, just in time for Christmas! The latest edition is edited by Drs. Hans E. Grossniklaus, Charles Eberhart, and Tero Kivela. There are sections on all recognized neoplasms of the eye, lacrimal apparatus, and conjuctiva. Included are substantial changes to the classification of conjunctival neoplasia and melanoma, based on the latest molecular studies.  Information on clinical features in addition to prognostic and predictive factors for each tumour typ...
Source: neuropathology blog - December 20, 2018 Category: Radiology Tags: ophthalmic pathology Source Type: blogs

Creating a Google Earth of the Brain
A recentNew York Times article describes a $50 million project by more than a dozen research centers aiming to create a sort ofGoogle Earth of the brain. In a series of 11 papers, published in Science and related journals, a consortium of researchers has produced the most richly detailed model of the brain ’s genetic landscape to date, one that incorporates not only genes but also gene regulators, cellular data and developmental information across the human life span.The PsychENCODE Consortium, initiated in 2015 and financed by the National Institute of Mental Health, involves more than a dozen research cen...
Source: neuropathology blog - December 19, 2018 Category: Radiology Tags: research Source Type: blogs

Best Post of November 2018: The exquisite cellular uniformity of the central neurocytoma
The next in our " Best of the Month " series is from November 20, 2018:Intraoperative ThinPrep smear demonstrates the striking cellular uniformityPermanent section of the same tumor (Source: neuropathology blog)
Source: neuropathology blog - December 14, 2018 Category: Radiology Tags: Best of the Month series neoplasms Source Type: blogs

A Pattern-Based Approach to the Interpretation of Skeletal Muscle Biopsies
Chunyu (Hunter) Cai, MD, PhDChunyu (Hunter) Cai,Douglas Anthony, andPeter Pytel have authored a wonderfully useful review article in Modern Pathology entitledA Pattern-Based Approach to the Interpretation of Skeletal Muscle Biopsies.Dr. Cai wrote the following to me: "In this review, we take a pathology-friendly approach and categorize muscle biopsies into 6 morphologic groups, and discuss common differential diagnoses for each group. I think this review fills a void that there is not a good quick guide for NP fellows, residents and even neuropathologists who don ’t sign out muscle cases on a routine base. ...
Source: neuropathology blog - December 10, 2018 Category: Radiology Tags: muscle Source Type: blogs

Giant cell GBM masquerading as an anaplastic PXA
At first glance, this tumor with pleomorphic cells and prominent perivascular lymphocytic cuffing strikes one as a pleomorphic xanthoastrocytoma (PXA).The relative circumscription, as demonstrated by the stark difference in tumor burden in adjacent gyri depicted above also suggests the possibility of  PXA.The presence of mitotic figures (center of picture above) and a small amount of necrosis and microvascular proliferation (not pictured) suggests the possibility of anaplastic PXA.However, perivascular lymphocytes and relative circumscription can be seen in giant cell glioblastoma (GC-GBM). Pointing away from anaplast...
Source: neuropathology blog - December 4, 2018 Category: Radiology Tags: neoplasms Source Type: blogs

A middle-aged patient with panhypopituitarism
The clinicoradiological suspicion in this case of a middle-aged patient with panhypopituitarism was hypophysitis.T1 sagittal post-contrastTransphenoidal hypohysectomy yielded the following specimen:Two populations of cells predominate: small monomorphic cells and larger pleomorphic cellsImmunohistochemistry identified the larger pleomorphic cells as representing a large B-cell lymphoma, while the small cells were intermixed non-neoplastic T-cells.This ACTH immunostain demonstrates the progressive obliteration of the pituitary gland by the invading lymphomaDiffuse large B-cell lymphoma presenting as a pituitary mass is rare...
Source: neuropathology blog - November 28, 2018 Category: Radiology Tags: pituitary Source Type: blogs

Unexpected Neuropathology Fellowship opening at Mount Sinai starting July 2019
John F. Crary, MD, PhDDr. John Crary just informed me that his institution, Mount Sinai, has an unexpected opening for a neuropathology fellowship starting in July 2019.  Interested candidates can contact him at john.crary@mountsinai.org. (Source: neuropathology blog)
Source: neuropathology blog - November 23, 2018 Category: Radiology Source Type: blogs

Iridociliary melanoma invading sclera
The sclera (upper right part of picture) is being invaded by the heavily pigmented melanoma (Source: neuropathology blog)
Source: neuropathology blog - November 21, 2018 Category: Radiology Tags: eye ophthalmic pathology Source Type: blogs

The exquisite cellular uniformity of the central neurocytoma
Intraoperative ThinPrep smear demonstrates the striking cellular uniformityPermanent section of the same tumor (Source: neuropathology blog)
Source: neuropathology blog - November 21, 2018 Category: Radiology Tags: neoplasms Source Type: blogs

Perforating injury of globe
Ocular perforation caused by BB gun is a through-and-through injury with entrance and exit wounds in limbus and sclera, respectively. The track of the BB is marked by fresh blood. Posteriorly detached vitreous also contains ochre-colored degenerated blood.(Source: Eagle R. Eye Pathology: An Atlas and Text. Second Edition. 2011) (Source: neuropathology blog)
Source: neuropathology blog - November 19, 2018 Category: Radiology Tags: eye Source Type: blogs

Q & A with Dr Peter Cummings, co-author of “Brainwashed: The Bad Science Behind CTE and the Plot to Destroy Football”
Peter Cummings, MD1.   Chronic traumatic encephalopathy has been considered by many to be a distinct nosologic entity since 1928, when Dr. Harrison Martland published the article“Punch Drunk ” in JAMA. Do you believe that CTE is a distinct entity? If so, what, in your opinion, defines CTE?That's a good question! If you look at the totality of the literature in a historical context, you see the'classic'boxers neuropathological changes followed by the Omalu cases and then the McKee cases. Looking at all of these cases you can see that there is a wide spectrum of changes considered to be "...
Source: neuropathology blog - November 14, 2018 Category: Radiology Tags: trauma Source Type: blogs