Obamacare Loophole Puts Caps on Some Student Health Insurance
Obamacare was supposed to end lifetime caps on insurance payments, but a loophole is allowing some universities that administer a self-funded insurance plan to place lifetime caps on care. University of California student Micha Rahder is learning this the hard way as she has been cut off from the insurance plan that allows her to receive medication she needs to walk. She is afflicted with a rare neurological disorder that causes chronic demyelination of her nerves. Colleges that offer this type of insurance and in fact require students to have insurance are located largely in the Ivy League and in the University of Califor...
Source: Inside Surgery - February 1, 2013 Category: Surgeons Authors: Editor Tags: Medical News Wire caps lifetime loophole micha rahder Obamacare student insurance Source Type: blogs

Doctor Murdered in Exam Room, Patient Held as Suspect
Dr. Ronald Gilbert, a urologist by training, was shot to death in a patient exam room as he worked through his daily office hours at the Hoag Health Center in Newport Beach, Califorina. Patient Stanwood Elkus was arrested and is being held without bail as the investigation unfolds. The post Doctor Murdered in Exam Room, Patient Held as Suspect appeared first on InsideSurgery Medical Information Blog. (Source: Inside Surgery)
Source: Inside Surgery - January 30, 2013 Category: Surgeons Authors: Editor Tags: Medical News Wire Hoag Health Center murdered Ronald Gilber shot Stanwood Elkus urologist Source Type: blogs

Stem Cell Transplant Increasingly Sought by Patients
Stem cell transplant and treatment is offered in hundreds of clinics outside of the United States for conditions ranging from cancer to arthritis to autism, but American physicians warn patients of potential dangers, saying clinics like to use the term autologous and FDA approved to mislead people. Blood containing stem cells for transplant The post Stem Cell Transplant Increasingly Sought by Patients appeared first on InsideSurgery Medical Information Blog. (Source: Inside Surgery)
Source: Inside Surgery - January 27, 2013 Category: Surgeons Authors: Editor Tags: Oncology arthritis autologous bone marrow Cancer stem cell treatment Source Type: blogs

Sarcoma – Signs, Histology, and Treatment
Pathophysiology of Soft Tissue Sarcoma 1) sarcomas of the soft tissue are a family of neoplasms affecting the soft tissue of the body Causes 2) previous radiation 3) HIV 4) genetic predisposition such as L-Fraumeni syndrome 5) asbestosis 6) congenital immunodeficiences 7) dioxin exposure 8) Herpes virus Signs and Symptoms 1) most common presentation is an enlarging mass 2) pain 3) neuralgia and neurologic deficits, if the tumor encases a nerve structure 4) metastases are usually via the blood system and most commonly go to the lungs Characteristic Test Findings Radiology – mass on MRI Histology/Gross Pathology ...
Source: Inside Surgery - January 27, 2013 Category: Surgeons Authors: Editor Tags: Oncology angiosarcoma leimyosarcoma malignant fibrous histiocytosis p53 Schwannoma tumor suppressor Source Type: blogs

Babesia Infection – Signs, Symptoms, and Treatment
Pathophysiology of Babesia Infection 1) Babesiosis is caused by the intracellular protozoan parasite Babesia microti and in Europe B. divergens 2) most severe symptoms occur in immunosuppressed, diabet6ic, splenectomized, and elderly 3) now clinically important in the USA and Candada as a coinfection of Lyme disease, ehrlichiosis, and Bartonella (which are all transmitted via the bite of the Ixodes tick) Signs and Symptoms 1) acute flu-like symptoms – fever, chills, sweats, muscle pain, fatigue, arthralgias, and headache 2) petechiae 3) jaundice/dark urine 4) if occurs as coinfection with Lyme disease, the clinical ...
Source: Inside Surgery - January 27, 2013 Category: Surgeons Authors: Editor Tags: Infectious Disease atovaquone babesia babesiosis bartonella coinfection ixodes Lyme microti tick Source Type: blogs

Varicella-Zoster Virus Signs, Symptoms, and Treatment
Pathophysiology of Varicella-Zoster Virus Varicella-Zoster causes two separate disease 2) initial disease is chickenpox 3) after a latency period (can be decades) patients can develop zoster (shingles) Signs and Symptoms Chickenpox – 1) fever 2) malaise 3) painful vesicular rash, starting on head and spreading to limbs, mouth, vagina, and trunk that ulcerates and crusts over in 3-5 days 4) vesicles appear in crops (different areas of body have lesions in different stages) 5) in older children and adults, causes life-threatening interstitial (as opposed to a bacterial intra-alveolar) pneumonia with lung hemorrhage, co...
Source: Inside Surgery - January 25, 2013 Category: Surgeons Authors: Editor Tags: Infectious Disease Source Type: blogs

Pulmonary Hypertension
Pathophysiology 1) increased arterial pressure in lungs 2) primary or idiopathic form occurs in absence of known precipitating causes 3) secondary form caused by – mitral stenosis, pulmonary venous occlusive disease, extreme obesity (Pickwickian syndrome), chronic hypoxemia, recurrent pulmonary embolism, kyphosis, infiltrative lung disease, chronic bronchitis, long periods at high altitude Signs and Symptoms 1) insidious onset of dyspnea idiopathic form 2) right heart failure with venous distention of neck 3) peripheral cyanosis late in disease 4) palpable right ventricular heave (owing to cor pulmonale) 5) fatigue ...
Source: Inside Surgery - January 23, 2013 Category: Surgeons Authors: Editor Tags: Pulmonology arterial pressure cyanosis dyspnea high altitude lungs obesity right heart failure Source Type: blogs

Rheumatic Fever
Pathophysiology 1) caued by group A beta-hemolytic streptococci infection 2) this organism produces anti-M protein antibodies, which cross-react with human heart tissue 3) most important long-term sequelae (Source: Inside Surgery)
Source: Inside Surgery - January 19, 2013 Category: Surgeons Authors: Editor Tags: Infectious Disease Source Type: blogs

USMLE Questions – Characteristic Disease Findings
The United States Medical Licensing Examination (USMLE) is designed to emphasize knowledge of clinical scenarios and clinical pearls, even on Step I. Listed below are some commonly encountered disease findings and characteristics. Feature Disease 45, X chromosome Turner’s syndrome 5-HIAA increased in urine Carcinoid syndrome Aganglionic rectum Hirschsrpung’s disease Apple-core sign on barium enema Colon cancer Arched back (opisthotonos) Tetanus Argyll-Robertson pupil Syphilis Ash leaf on forehead Tuberous sclerosis Auer rods  Acute myelogenous leukemia Austin Flint murmur Aortic r...
Source: Inside Surgery - January 18, 2013 Category: Surgeons Authors: Editor Tags: Surgpedia USMLE diseases findings VMA water hammer pulse Source Type: blogs

Nonabsorbable Sutures
Suture material can be classified as absorbable sutures or nonabsorbable sutures. Nonabsorbable sutures are used in many fascial closures of the abdomen and in skin closures and vessel ligation. The following are categories of nonabsorbable suture. (Source: Inside Surgery)
Source: Inside Surgery - January 5, 2013 Category: Surgeons Authors: Editor Tags: Tip of the Day Source Type: blogs

Indiana University Hospital Fires Eight Who Refuse Flu Shots
In an ominous development for the autonomy of healthcare workers, Indiana University Goshen hospital has fired eight staff members who refused to get the influenza vaccine, saying that doing so put patients with potentially compromised immune systems at risk. There was no indication in the statement issued by the hospital that it would require patient visitors who might come in contact with those with compromised immune systems to get the vaccine before visiting their friends and family in the hospital. (Source: Inside Surgery)
Source: Inside Surgery - January 2, 2013 Category: Surgeons Authors: Editor Tags: Infectious Disease Medical News Wire fired flu vaccine Indiana University refused Source Type: blogs

Absorbable Sutures
Although the use of surgical staples and clips has become more common in the last thirty years, the competent surgeon needs to have a thorough understanding of surgical sutures. Perhaps the key characteristic of a suture is whether it is an absorbable or nonabsorbable material. Absorbable sutures have a varying time period before they are absorbed by the body. The classic absorbable suture was a gut suture. A list of suture types is as follows: Surgical gut (plain) – made from the serosa of beef intestine or submucosa of sheep intestine Surgical gut (chromic) – made by soaking plain gut suture in the salts of ...
Source: Inside Surgery - January 1, 2013 Category: Surgeons Authors: Editor Tags: Surgpedia Tip of the Day chromic maxon monocryl pds plain gut silk suture Source Type: blogs