Friday Feature: CyberPatriot
Colleen HroncichIt sounds clich é, but the world is changing rapidly. Careers that are now essential didn’t even exist when I was young. That makes it tough for parents and teachers to ensure kids are prepared for the future. This can be particularly challenging for homeschoolers or kids in rural areas who don ’t have the resources often found in larger schools.When my then ‐​15‐​year‐​old daughter expressed interest in cyber security, we found a program calledCyberPatriot, which is sponsored by the Air Force Association. Kids form teams, learn about cyber security, and work in online competition...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - July 8, 2022 Category: American Health Authors: Colleen Hroncich Source Type: blogs

Stablecoin Issuers Should Not Have to Compete with the Federal Government
Nicholas AnthonyThe market for stablecoins, and cryptocurrencies in general, has grown increasingly competitive over recent years, but there ’s one competitor that the market may not stand a chance against: the federal government. While Federal Reserve (Fed) officials seem to think the Fed is just another competitor, there are many reasons to doubt that proposition.For instance, Fed Vice Chair Lael Brainard argued ina testimony before Congress that therecould be a place for stablecoins alongside the Fed ’s central bank digital currency (CBDC). In making the case, Brainard stressed the importance of ensur...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - July 8, 2022 Category: American Health Authors: Nicholas Anthony Source Type: blogs

2023 NDAA Amendments on Arms Sales
Jordan CohenOn July 5, 2022, members of the House introduced amendments to the 2023 National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA), which are now viewableonline. Out of the 1,172 amendments, 25 deal with restricting U.S. weapons sales abroad. These amendments can be broken down in three ways: creation and enforcement of new reporting requirements; protection and implementation of human rights measures in the U.S. arms sales process; and reducing dispersion of weapons away from the intended recipient.Reporting requirements are an easy way for Congress to start reform without needing to debate politically charged issues. For exam...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - July 7, 2022 Category: American Health Authors: Jordan Cohen Source Type: blogs

Employer ‐​Sponsored Green Card Processing Delays Cross the 3‑Year Threshold
David J. BierImmigrant workers seeking a green card —which denotes legal permanent residence in the United States—now face more than a three-year wait to make it through the government’s regulatory morass. Paying a $2,500 fee could cut this wait to " only " 2 years and 5 months. The government has added nearly 16 months to the average green card process since 2016, with more than a year added in 2021 and 2022 alone. These processing delays come on top of the time towait for a green card cap slot to become available under the annual limits (which can be many years). They also do not include the time spent to comply wi...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - July 7, 2022 Category: American Health Authors: David J. Bier Source Type: blogs

FDA Wisely Permits Pharmacists to Prescribe Paxlovid
Jeffrey A. SingerWhen the Food and Drug Administration granted Emergency Use Authorization to the antiviral drugs Paxlovid and monupiravir in the beginning of this year, I co ‐​authored anoped in the New York Daily News, along with Josh Bloom of the American Council on Science and Health, complaining about, among other things, the FDA ’s requirement that a patient who tests positive for COVID must get a prescription from a doctor, nurse practitioner, or physician assistant to obtain the drug. For the drugs to be effective they must be started within five days of the start of COVID symptoms. Not ev...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - July 7, 2022 Category: American Health Authors: Jeffrey A. Singer Source Type: blogs

Racial Equity Is Beyond the Fed ’s Scope
ConclusionAdding a new mandate that requires the Fed to eliminate economic disparities across racial and ethnic groups —and achieve “economic justice”—is impractical, unconstitutional, and a threat to what Hayek calls the“central concept of liberalism,” namely:That under the enforcement of universal rules of just conduct, protecting a recognizable private domain of individuals, a spontaneous order of human activities of much greater complexity will form itself than could ever be produced by deliberate arrangement, and that in consequence the coercive activities of government should be limited to the enforcement...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - July 6, 2022 Category: American Health Authors: James A. Dorn Source Type: blogs

The Limits of Independent State Legislature Theory
Andy CraigAt the end of a term with many high-profile and controversial decisions, the Supreme Court agreed to hear a case next term that could upend election law in the United States. InMoore v. Harper, the court agreed to hear an argument known as the independent state legislature (ISL) theory. This case has the potential to have a wide-ranging impact and many election law experts aresounding the alarm.I have beencritical of the ISL theory and mostly unpersuaded of its merits, at least in its more radical forms with regard to elections. Helen White of Protect Democracy offersa good explanation of why originalists should ...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - July 6, 2022 Category: American Health Authors: Andy Craig Source Type: blogs

Minor Tariff Relief Appears To Be Coming; More Is Needed
Clark PackardOver the Fourth of July weekend,The Wall Street Journalreported that the Biden administration is likely to lift some tariffs on imports from China as Washington tries to combat inflation and Beijing reels from COVID ‐​19‐​related shutdowns. The report indicates that the tariff “pause” would likely cover consumer goods “such as clothing and school supplies, as well as launching a broad framework to allow importers to request tariff waivers. ” Politico, meanwhile, isreporting that the value of tariff relief will be a meager $10 billion out of the approximately $370 billion imposed by th...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - July 6, 2022 Category: American Health Authors: Clark Packard Source Type: blogs

Colombia ’s Duque Got Almost Everything Wrong
Daniel RaisbeckAccording toThe Atlantic’s David Frum, Colombia’s outgoing president, Ivan Duque, is a misunderstood statesman. Ungrateful voters,he argues, fail to recognize Duque ’s brilliance and thus assign him “an approval rating in the low 20’s.”Frum cites Colombia ’s vaccination policy, a 10 ‐​year work permit granted to Venezuelan refugees, and the country’s current economic growth as examples of “a record of policy success unmatched in recent South American history.” Which is why Duque, as Frum learned during the president’s recent visit to Washington, D.C., “is as baffl ed as ...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - July 2, 2022 Category: American Health Authors: Daniel Raisbeck Source Type: blogs

Friday Feature: Educational Freedom
Colleen HroncichAs we head toward Independence Day on Monday, it seems like a good time to consider educational freedom.If we were designing a system of education today, it ’s unlikely anyone would suggest building schools and assigning kids to them based on where they live. No other area of life works that way—not even other levels of education, like preschool or college. Food stamp recipients aren’t assigned to government‐​run grocery stores. Medicare and M edicaid don’t require recipients to see a ZIP ‐​code assigned doctor. K‑12 education is an anomaly.It ’s easy to see why children w...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - July 1, 2022 Category: American Health Authors: Colleen Hroncich Source Type: blogs

Supreme Court Makes “Major” Improvement to Administrative Law in West Virginia v. EPA
William YeatmanBy a 6 –3 vote, the Supreme Court inWest Virginia v. Environmental Protection Agency took an important step toward restoring constitutional balance to federal policymaking. ThoughWashington Post columnist George Will probably overstates the case in calling it the “term’s most momentous decision,” he is right that this is a big deal. As I discuss below, the Cato Institute perhaps played a role in this welcome result.So, what happened? Setting aside the case ’s backstory (explainedhere), the immediate result is that the EPA doesn ’t have the power to impose a nationwide cap...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - July 1, 2022 Category: American Health Authors: William Yeatman Source Type: blogs

Countries With Higher Interest Rates Have Higher Inflation
Alan ReynoldsA recent headline exclaimed: “Central Banks Should Raise Rates Sharply or Risk High‐​Inflation Era,BIS Warns. ” The Bank for International Settlements is owned by 61 central banks, so they should know better than to equate higher interest rates with lower inflation.Countries with the lowestcentral bank interest rates (below zero) include Switzerland and Japan, according tothe BIS.Those with the highest policy rates include Argentina and Turkey, with rates of 49% and 14% respectively.Should we conclude that Argentina and Turkey are valiantly fighting inflation with high interest rates while Switzerland ...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - July 1, 2022 Category: American Health Authors: Alan Reynolds Source Type: blogs

A Federal Right To Online Drama In the Workplace?
Walter OlsonAccording to a widely discussed article by Ryan Grim in The Intercept, staff meltdowns over social justice issues have lately been paralyzing some well ‐​known progressive organizations. Meanwhile publications like the Washington Post have become the scene of pitched public social media battles in which writers and editors call each other out publicly over purported insensitivity or privilege. If some Biden administration officials have their w ay, dramas like these may soon be coming to a workplace like yours.It ’s all due to a little ‐​known and still‐​unsettled portion of the New...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - July 1, 2022 Category: American Health Authors: Walter Olson Source Type: blogs

CBO ’s Misleading Description of the Tax Exclusion for Employer‐​Sponsored Health Insurance
Michael F. CannonMuch of the language that scholars, policymakers, and employers use to describe the tax exclusion for employer ‐​sponsored health insurance is nonsense that hides the exclusion’s harmful effects.A case in point is a  study the non‐​partisan Congressional Budget Office recently released,Federal Subsidies for Health Insurance Coverage for People Under 65. It reports that in 2022, the federal government will “spend” $316 billion on employer‐​sponsored health insurance (ESI). It similarly describes that $316 billion as federal “support” and “subsidies” for ESI.Source: U.S. Congressio...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - July 1, 2022 Category: American Health Authors: Michael F. Cannon Source Type: blogs

Ecuador ’s New Left Shows Its True Colors
Gabriela Calderon de Burgos andDaniel RaisbeckThe president of Ecuador ’s job description could fall under temporary labor. Between 1997 and 2005, the Confederation of Indigenous Nationalities of Ecuador (Conaie) led a series of protests in the capital city of Quito that toppled three sitting presidents. In 2019, former president Lenin Moreno, who tried to get rid of a fuel subsidy and unleashed Conaie ’s wrath, decided to transfer the seat of government to the coastal city of Guayaquil as Quito came under siege. Unlike his defenestrated predecessors, Moreno managed to ensure the loyalty of the top military b...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - June 30, 2022 Category: American Health Authors: Gabriela Calderon de Burgos, Daniel Raisbeck Source Type: blogs