Summer Heat Can Be Deadly for Elders
Whether we are taking an elderly person to a family reunion or a backyard picnic this summer, we need to be aware that summer heat can become deadly as people age. From less efficient cooling systems to more illnesses and medications, elders have many issues that can make them vulnerable to extreme temperatures.   Don’t let the heat stop you from taking your elder out for some fun, but prevent problems by finding a shady place for... (Source: Carol Bradley Bursack's SharePosts)
Source: Carol Bradley Bursack's SharePosts - June 27, 2013 Category: Dementia Authors: Carol Bradley Bursack Source Type: blogs

BACE Inhibitors Fail Safety Controls for Alzheimer’s Drugs
Clinical trials for BACE inhibitors, thought to be a possibility for Alzheimer’s treatment, were stopped last week because of potential toxicity problems. BACE inhibitors are a drug class known as beta secretase. This particular study was being conducted by Eli Lilly, though other companies have been testing similar drugs.   The need to stop the BACE study represents another significant blow to drug companies in their race to... (Source: Carol Bradley Bursack's SharePosts)
Source: Carol Bradley Bursack's SharePosts - June 17, 2013 Category: Dementia Authors: Carol Bradley Bursack Source Type: blogs

World Elder Abuse Awareness Day
June 15th, the day widely recognized as World Elder Abuse Awareness Day, is fast approaching. If you work or live in any situation where elders are even peripherally involved, this is a good time to remind people that elders can be vulnerable to many types of abuse and we have a responsibility to protect them.   It’s natural to think that abuse is physical, and often it is. However, elder abuse can also be emotional or financial.... (Source: Carol Bradley Bursack's SharePosts)
Source: Carol Bradley Bursack's SharePosts - June 11, 2013 Category: Dementia Authors: Carol Bradley Bursack Source Type: blogs

Sleep Deprivation May Contribute to Alzheimer’s
A study published in JAMA Neurology reports that participants with evidence of preclinical Alzheimer's experienced worse sleep efficiency than those with no evidence of potential Alzheimer’s. One hundred forty five people between ages 45 and 75 took part in the study conducted by researchers at the Charles F. and Joanne Knight Alzheimer's Disease Research Center, Washington University School of Medicine.   While none of the study... (Source: Carol Bradley Bursack's SharePosts)
Source: Carol Bradley Bursack's SharePosts - June 6, 2013 Category: Dementia Authors: Carol Bradley Bursack Source Type: blogs

Agitation, Aggression in Alzheimer’s Challenge Caregivers
Caregivers to people with Alzheimer’s disease and other types of dementia often have the unsettling, frustrating challenge of trying to quiet an agitated and possibly aggressive elder who is unable to communicate the source of his or her distress. We know that the behavior is an expression of discomfort either of body or mind, yet we are left trying to comfort our loved ones with few clues as to the root problem. Even experienced... (Source: Carol Bradley Bursack's SharePosts)
Source: Carol Bradley Bursack's SharePosts - June 1, 2013 Category: Dementia Authors: Carol Bradley Bursack Source Type: blogs

Male Caregivers Need Unique Support
Traditionally, most men have a harder time sharing feelings and emotions than women do. They seek medical advice less often than women and they tend to resist attending specialized support groups more than women. While the trend for younger men may be leading them toward a more open way of communicating, it’s the older generation whose wives have developed Alzheimer’s that is faced with caregiving. These men are often uncomfortable... (Source: Carol Bradley Bursack's SharePosts)
Source: Carol Bradley Bursack's SharePosts - May 29, 2013 Category: Dementia Authors: Carol Bradley Bursack Source Type: blogs

High Blood Sugar Levels May Increase Alzheimer’s Risk, Study Shows
Research has repeatedly shown that people with diabetes have an increased risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease. Additionally, some studies have demonstrated that intra-nasal insulin, sometimes used to treat diabetes, may help improve memory in those already diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease. This background of knowledge prompted a group of researchers from the University of Arizona to conduct their own research to see if high... (Source: Carol Bradley Bursack's SharePosts)
Source: Carol Bradley Bursack's SharePosts - May 25, 2013 Category: Dementia Authors: Carol Bradley Bursack Source Type: blogs

High Blood Sugar Impacts Alzheimer's Risk
Research has repeatedly shown that people with diabetes have an increased risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease. Additionally, some studies have demonstrated that intra-nasal insulin, sometimes used to treat diabetes, may help improve memory in those already diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease. This background of knowledge prompted a group of researchers from the University of Arizona to conduct their own research to see if high... (Source: Carol Bradley Bursack's SharePosts)
Source: Carol Bradley Bursack's SharePosts - May 25, 2013 Category: Dementia Authors: Carol Bradley Bursack Source Type: blogs

Vitamins B12, B6 and Folic Acid Shown to Slow Alzheimer’s in Study
Could a combination of the vitamins B12, B6 and folic acid be first effective “drug” to slow down the progression of Alzheimer’s disease? The concept looks promising. The Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences recently published information about a study on aging volunteers that has demonstrated how this combination of B vitamins has, in their trials, slowed atrophy of gray matter in brain areas affected by... (Source: Carol Bradley Bursack's SharePosts)
Source: Carol Bradley Bursack's SharePosts - May 22, 2013 Category: Dementia Authors: Carol Bradley Bursack Source Type: blogs

Leukemia Drug May Stop Dementia Related Plaque Buildup
An existing drug already used to treat leukemia has shown promise as a treatment for neurological diseases such as Lewy body dementia, Alzheimer’s disease and Parkinson’s disease. Researchers from Georgetown University successfully used small doses of the drug nilotinibin in experiments using mice.  This drug, which is used to treat chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML), appears to eliminate abnormal protein build-up in the... (Source: Carol Bradley Bursack's SharePosts)
Source: Carol Bradley Bursack's SharePosts - May 15, 2013 Category: Dementia Authors: Carol Bradley Bursack Source Type: blogs

Choosing a Care Facility? Listen To Your Gut
People often ask what to look for when choosing an assisted living facility or a nursing home for a loved one. There are grading sites such as the Medicare Nursing Home Guide, found on Medicare.gov, and I suggest you use them. However, there are many things that go into good care that can’t be measured on a chart. In order to see the heart of a facility, you need to spend some time there. Observe routines and pay attention to the... (Source: Carol Bradley Bursack's SharePosts)
Source: Carol Bradley Bursack's SharePosts - May 11, 2013 Category: Dementia Authors: Carol Bradley Bursack Source Type: blogs

Alzheimer’s Treatment Fails in Wider Study
Less than a year ago, I wrote about the promising results in an Alzheimer’s trial of an infusion called Gammagard. A story on CBSNews.com then reported that the experimental drug had been shown to halt the mental decline in some patients. Admittedly, this was a small study, but the results were exciting.     Unfortunately, an announcement this week has given us a very disappointing update. USAToday.com reports that a larger... (Source: Carol Bradley Bursack's SharePosts)
Source: Carol Bradley Bursack's SharePosts - May 9, 2013 Category: Dementia Authors: Carol Bradley Bursack Source Type: blogs

More Evidence That Mediterranean Diet Could Combat Alzheimer's
Scientists researching several diseases have been studying the effects of a Mediterranean diet on health. The most recent study results came from collecting the diet information from more than 17,000 men and women whose average age was 64.   Cognitive ability, which is our interest here, was one of several elements studied over a four-year period of time. The participants took tests that measured their memory and thinking... (Source: Carol Bradley Bursack's SharePosts)
Source: Carol Bradley Bursack's SharePosts - May 8, 2013 Category: Dementia Authors: Carol Bradley Bursack Source Type: blogs

Evidence Mounting That Mediterranean Diet Could Prevent Alzheimer’s
Scientists researching several diseases have been studying the effects of a Mediterranean diet on health. The most recent study results came from collecting the diet information from more than 17,000 men and women whose average age was 64.   Cognitive ability, which is our interest here, was one of several elements studied over a four-year period of time. The participants took tests that measured their memory and thinking... (Source: Carol Bradley Bursack's SharePosts)
Source: Carol Bradley Bursack's SharePosts - May 8, 2013 Category: Dementia Authors: Carol Bradley Bursack Source Type: blogs

Exercise Could Slow Physical Decline in Alzheimer's
Like it or not, exercise is good for us. Exercise helps to speed up our metabolism and strengthen our bones. Also, we’ve known for decades that exercise is good for the heart, and lately there have been many studies that have shown it’s good for the brain. So good, as a matter of fact, that now, according to a recent paper published in the Journal of Biological Chemistry, Researchers at Kyoto University Graduate School of Medicine in... (Source: Carol Bradley Bursack's SharePosts)
Source: Carol Bradley Bursack's SharePosts - May 1, 2013 Category: Dementia Authors: Carol Bradley Bursack Source Type: blogs

Going Public with an Alzheimer’s Diagnosis
  Sadly, even after years of work to educate the public about any illness that affects the brain, a stigma remains. No matter that most, if not all, mental illnesses have a biological basis. No matter that people aren’t any more responsible for a brain illness than they are for other illnesses. The fact remains that whether the disease affects the brain occurs at a younger age in the form of depression or bi-polar disease or an older... (Source: Carol Bradley Bursack's SharePosts)
Source: Carol Bradley Bursack's SharePosts - April 27, 2013 Category: Dementia Authors: Carol Bradley Bursack Source Type: blogs

Option of Hospice Care Freeing for Many
People who read my work on a regular basis know that I am grateful to hospice for the care of both of my parents. Without the skilled, compassionate care of the hospice staff, both of my parents would have suffered far more than they did. As it was, they’d both had long, slow declines. Pain had become the focus of their lives even though they received excellent care in the nursing home. First Dad, and eventually Mom, qualified for hospice... (Source: Carol Bradley Bursack's SharePosts)
Source: Carol Bradley Bursack's SharePosts - April 25, 2013 Category: Dementia Authors: Carol Bradley Bursack Source Type: blogs

Communicating With a Person Who Has Dementia Takes Skill, Heart
Communicating with someone who has dementia can be an ever-changing challenge. But some things never change. One of those constants is that caregivers and friends must fully understand and accept that the person with dementia is not a child any sense of the word.    Dementia may have robbed our friends or loved ones of their ability to understand their own environment, follow a sequence of directions or even understand how to use the... (Source: Carol Bradley Bursack's SharePosts)
Source: Carol Bradley Bursack's SharePosts - April 17, 2013 Category: Dementia Authors: Carol Bradley Bursack Source Type: blogs

Where Is the Line Between Caregiver Stress and Burnout?
Every person who becomes a caregiver will have unique personality traits, yet we nearly always share certain feelings and experiences as we travel a road similar to one another. That’s one reason that caregivers often turn to other caregivers for support. It’s a version of the adage that we need to walk in another’s shoes in order to truly understand what they feel.   One of those shared experiences is a certain amount... (Source: Carol Bradley Bursack's SharePosts)
Source: Carol Bradley Bursack's SharePosts - April 10, 2013 Category: Dementia Authors: Carol Bradley Bursack Source Type: blogs

BRAIN Initiative Embraces More Than Alzheimer’s Disease
Alzheimer’s disease is not only devastating those who develop the disease. It affects the family and others who love the person who must live with the disease, and it affects our nation as a whole because of the high cost of care.    According to research led by an economist at the RAND Corporation, expenses for dementia, including nursing home care, were $109 billion in 2010. To put that into perspective, heart disease costs... (Source: Carol Bradley Bursack's SharePosts)
Source: Carol Bradley Bursack's SharePosts - April 6, 2013 Category: Dementia Authors: Carol Bradley Bursack Source Type: blogs

Researchers Isolate Olive Oil Component That Protects Against Alzheimer’s
The Mediterranean diet is widely recommended by health professionals as a way to promote heart health as well as for possible Alzheimer’s protection. For most people, the fish, fruits, vegetables, whole grains, nuts, and olive oil-based salad dressings that make up the bulk of a Mediterranean diet are excellent foods for general health. However, the liberal use of extra virgin olive oil used for cooking and as flavoring for bread and... (Source: Carol Bradley Bursack's SharePosts)
Source: Carol Bradley Bursack's SharePosts - April 4, 2013 Category: Dementia Authors: Carol Bradley Bursack Source Type: blogs

Not All Caregivers Care for “Loved One”
We who write about caregiving often find ourselves challenged to find different words to express similar concepts in order to give variety to our writing. For example, we often substitute “loved one” for parent, spouse, relative or care receiver. In real life, not every caregiver is jumping with joy over caring for a parent who once abused them or an in-law who never treated them as one of the family. These readers can,... (Source: Carol Bradley Bursack's SharePosts)
Source: Carol Bradley Bursack's SharePosts - March 30, 2013 Category: Dementia Authors: Carol Bradley Bursack Source Type: blogs

Dementia Caregivers Grief Soul Deep, Defies Labeling
When a beloved elder dies, we may have varying reactions, frequently changing moment by moment. Naturally, there’s grief and the realization that we’ve seen the last of our loved one’s physical presence. Often, however, if the death follows a long illness or significant pain, we can also feel a sense of relief that their suffering is over and we can get on with healing. It’s often the in between time – the... (Source: Carol Bradley Bursack's SharePosts)
Source: Carol Bradley Bursack's SharePosts - March 25, 2013 Category: Dementia Authors: Carol Bradley Bursack Source Type: blogs

Individual Attention Important Benefit of Alzheimer’s Eating Study
It’s natural for caregivers to worry if their loved one is getting sufficient nourishment. People with dementia are often a challenge because they forget to eat, or they may have problems remembering how to transfer food from the plate to their mouths. Some people have trouble chewing and swallowing, especially during later stages of dementia.   Since depression is another issue that is common for people with dementia, a Taiwanese... (Source: Carol Bradley Bursack's SharePosts)
Source: Carol Bradley Bursack's SharePosts - March 23, 2013 Category: Dementia Authors: Carol Bradley Bursack Source Type: blogs

More Evidence Shows Chronic Stress Increases Alzheimer's Risk
A new doctoral thesis by Sara K. Bengtsson, Department of Clinical Sciences, Umeå University, Sweden, examines the reason why chronic stress can increase one’s risk for Alzheimer’s disease.    Allopregnanolone, one of the steroids produced by a body under stress, can inhibit general brain activity. Bengtsson's thesis shows that chronically elevated levels of allopregnanolone accelerated Alzheimer’s disease... (Source: Carol Bradley Bursack's SharePosts)
Source: Carol Bradley Bursack's SharePosts - March 20, 2013 Category: Dementia Authors: Carol Bradley Bursack Source Type: blogs

Delaying Alzheimer's with Mental Enrichment
For years researchers have tried to understand the impact and significance of a person's education level on the development of Alzheimer's disease. Many studies have shown that people who often challenge themselves to learn complex tasks will show Alzheimer’s symptoms later than those who don’t. Scientists theorized that people who work to enrich their minds, whether through formal means or through a mentally challenging lifestyle,... (Source: Carol Bradley Bursack's SharePosts)
Source: Carol Bradley Bursack's SharePosts - March 16, 2013 Category: Dementia Authors: Carol Bradley Bursack Source Type: blogs

Green Tea Molecules Interfere With Formation of Plaques That May Cause Alzheimer’s
For the second time in less than a month I’ve found myself drawn to reports on the efficacy of green tea extract as a possible prevention or treatment for Alzheimer’s disease. In February, I wrote about a study conducted in the UK using purified extracts from green tea and red wine in early animal studies to interrupt the pathway that may lead to Alzheimer’s disease. The result of this study was published in the Journal of... (Source: Carol Bradley Bursack's SharePosts)
Source: Carol Bradley Bursack's SharePosts - March 8, 2013 Category: Dementia Authors: Carol Bradley Bursack Source Type: blogs

Nutrition One Weapon to Reduce Risk of Alzheimer’s
In recent years, stories about Alzheimer’s disease have led a significant number of news broadcasts. Whether the story is about researchers discovering a promising new treatment or daunting statistics about what Alzheimer’s in the future will look like without a cure, few adults haven’t heard about the increasing numbers of people developing the disease.   While drug studies are apt to get the lion’s share of... (Source: Carol Bradley Bursack's SharePosts)
Source: Carol Bradley Bursack's SharePosts - March 5, 2013 Category: Dementia Authors: Carol Bradley Bursack Source Type: blogs

Acceptance of Change Important in Alzheimer’s Caregiving
My dad went into surgery with a smile and hope. He came out with severe dementia. Something unexplainable at the time had happened and Dad became a statistic – one of those “poor outcomes” we hear about. My head knew this tragedy was permanent, but my heart wanted my “real” dad back. The kind, loving, intelligent man whose love for me was steadfast. I wanted him back. Unfortunately, my family and I had to learn... (Source: Carol Bradley Bursack's SharePosts)
Source: Carol Bradley Bursack's SharePosts - February 28, 2013 Category: Dementia Authors: Carol Bradley Bursack Source Type: blogs

HRT May Prevent Accelerated Biological Aging for Alzheimer’s Gene Carriers
A little more than a decade ago, most physicians considered hormone replacement therapy an important part of treating postmenopausal women because of its ability to help control hot flashes, maintain bone health and lower the risk of colorectal cancer. Their enthusiasm for this treatment came to a halt in July of 2002, when the same physicians took their patients off HRT nearly across the board.   An article in the New York Times explains... (Source: Carol Bradley Bursack's SharePosts)
Source: Carol Bradley Bursack's SharePosts - February 24, 2013 Category: Dementia Authors: Carol Bradley Bursack Source Type: blogs

Infections May Speed the Progression of Alzheimer’s Disease
Last December, a team of scientists working collaboratively under the guidance of the University of Bonn and the University of Massachusetts discovered that there was an association between chronic inflammation and the death of brain nerve cells. This discovery led them to theorize that chronic inflammation could possibly lead to the development of Alzheimer’s disease.    A different study now underway is focusing on a similar... (Source: Carol Bradley Bursack's SharePosts)
Source: Carol Bradley Bursack's SharePosts - February 14, 2013 Category: Dementia Authors: Carol Bradley Bursack Source Type: blogs

Green Tea, Grape Skin Extracts May Interrupt Alzheimer's Path
Green tea and red wine have both been shown in numerous studies to contain antioxidants thought to increase overall health and possibly prevent some diseases. Now, a recent study, published in the Journal of Biological Chemistry, has shown that purified extracts from green tea and red wine (specifically, the resveratrol in the red grape skins) have been shown in early animal studies to interrupt the pathway that may lead to Alzheimer’s... (Source: Carol Bradley Bursack's SharePosts)
Source: Carol Bradley Bursack's SharePosts - February 13, 2013 Category: Dementia Authors: Carol Bradley Bursack Source Type: blogs

Elders’ Loss of Appetite Complicated
Adult children often worry about their aging parents’ eating habits. Sometimes the elders live alone and don’t feel like cooking or even going out to buy groceries. They may have pain issues that keep them from enjoying food, or dentures that make chewing uncomfortable. Depression can be a factor for some people, as can medication side effects. Loneliness, especially for people who have lost a spouse to a nursing home or death, can... (Source: Carol Bradley Bursack's SharePosts)
Source: Carol Bradley Bursack's SharePosts - February 9, 2013 Category: Dementia Authors: Carol Bradley Bursack Source Type: blogs

Book Relates First Hand Account of Marriage Challenged by Early Onset Alzheimer’s
It’s a rare marriage that lasts for decades without some tumultuous times and Pat Moffett’s marriage to his wife Carmen was no exception. However, despite a legal separation along the way, they eventually endured. As their children began their adult lives away from the family home, the Moffetts looked forward to retirement and more quality time together.    That dream evaporated the day Carmen flew into an uncontrollable... (Source: Carol Bradley Bursack's SharePosts)
Source: Carol Bradley Bursack's SharePosts - February 5, 2013 Category: Dementia Authors: Carol Bradley Bursack Source Type: blogs

Bilingual people may be better protected against Alzheimer's
The first elder for whom I became a primary caregiver was my neighbor, Joe. He was born of Norwegian immigrant parents who spoke Norwegian at home. As a result, Joe needed to repeat first grade because he spent his first year in school learning English. While Joe went on to become a well educated engineer who spoke English with no Norwegian accent, in his later years he did occasionally talk about the challenges he faced as a Norwegian speaking... (Source: Carol Bradley Bursack's SharePosts)
Source: Carol Bradley Bursack's SharePosts - January 31, 2013 Category: Dementia Authors: Carol Bradley Bursack Source Type: blogs

Lewy Body Dementia Often Confused With Alzheimer’s
When most people think of dementia they probably think of Alzheimer’s disease. Since Alzheimer’s is the most common form of dementia, and one of the biggest risk factors for developing AD is age, new developments to combat the disease are often in the news.   There are, however, other types of dementia that are just as devastating as Alzheimer’s disease and they are not necessarily rare. The dementia we’ll focus on... (Source: Carol Bradley Bursack's SharePosts)
Source: Carol Bradley Bursack's SharePosts - January 27, 2013 Category: Dementia Authors: Carol Bradley Bursack Source Type: blogs

Positive Coping Strategies Help Slow Alzheimer's
For the most part, I’ve always been a “glass half full” person. Even during very trying times, I try to find the good in what’s happening, or at least contemplate what I can learn from the negative aspects of life. After reading about a study done by Utah State University, I realize that as a caregiver for multiple people, looking on the brighter side of life may have helped my care receivers, as well.   The study,... (Source: Carol Bradley Bursack's SharePosts)
Source: Carol Bradley Bursack's SharePosts - January 26, 2013 Category: Dementia Authors: Carol Bradley Bursack Source Type: blogs

Tips to Prevent Alzheimer’s Related Wandering
During a time when my father-in-law was ill, I sat with him while my mother-in-law went to the grocery store. This store was only a few blocks away from their home and she’d made the trip routinely for years. Only this time, she was gone so long we were worried. Once she finally returned she admitted to getting lost and having had trouble finding her way home. What happened to her is what Alzheimer’s disease experts call... (Source: Carol Bradley Bursack's SharePosts)
Source: Carol Bradley Bursack's SharePosts - January 21, 2013 Category: Dementia Authors: Carol Bradley Bursack Source Type: blogs

Global Attention to Alzheimer’s Must Include Educating Public
The United States Senate Special Committee on Aging recently released a report examining how five nations with developed economies are approaching the growing numbers of aging adults with dementia, including Alzheimer’s disease, within their borders. The nations studied are the United States, Australia, France, Japan and Britain. Each of these five countries now has a strategy for fighting the devastating effects of dementia.   A... (Source: Carol Bradley Bursack's SharePosts)
Source: Carol Bradley Bursack's SharePosts - January 17, 2013 Category: Dementia Authors: Carol Bradley Bursack Source Type: blogs

Driving and Dementia: When and How to Have the Talk
Taking away an elder’s driving privileges is one of the most dreaded challenges that adult children, or spouses of people with dementia, face. The ability to drive oneself to a chosen destination is often the ultimate sign of independence. Conversely, being forced to stop driving is generally viewed by elders as a major loss of independence. Yet, an unfit driver is a potential killer. When should a person quit driving, and how do we... (Source: Carol Bradley Bursack's SharePosts)
Source: Carol Bradley Bursack's SharePosts - January 12, 2013 Category: Dementia Authors: Carol Bradley Bursack Source Type: blogs

Alzheimer's Vaccine May Be Available in Three to Five Years
If we choose, we may view the many conflicting reports on drug trials for Alzheimer’s during 2012 as discouraging. After all, two very promising drugs in late-stage trials last fall failed to show the potential that researchers were looking for. Yet, on a quieter level, progress was being made.   CBS News recently aired a segment about an Alzheimer’s vaccine that may be available, depending on funding – and volunteers... (Source: Carol Bradley Bursack's SharePosts)
Source: Carol Bradley Bursack's SharePosts - January 9, 2013 Category: Dementia Authors: Carol Bradley Bursack Source Type: blogs

Alzheimer’s Study Focuses on Knowledge Based Impairment
Alzheimer’s disease studies that focus on the earliest stage of the disease, which is mild cognitive impairment (MCI), have typically focused on short-term memory loss. Now, a study published last month in the American Journal of Psychiatry has concluded that people who develop Alzheimer’s may have shown knowledge based (semantic) impairment prior to memory loss, had they been tested for this cognitive deficit.    Terry... (Source: Carol Bradley Bursack's SharePosts)
Source: Carol Bradley Bursack's SharePosts - January 4, 2013 Category: Dementia Authors: Carol Bradley Bursack Source Type: blogs

Caregiving Rewards Can Outlast Challenges
Caregivers of elderly or disabled loved ones work hard. There’s no getting around the sacrifices of time, energy, private life and often financial wellbeing that caregivers, be it family or professional, often make. However, the rewards that accompany this self-sacrifice can be priceless.   With a caregiving history involving decades of caring for multiple loved ones, I know quite a bit about the hard times as well as the blessings... (Source: Carol Bradley Bursack's SharePosts)
Source: Carol Bradley Bursack's SharePosts - January 1, 2013 Category: Dementia Authors: Carol Bradley Bursack Source Type: blogs