On Explainable AI, Trade Secrets, and Bread
by Daniel W. Tigard, Ph.D. I frequent a bakery in my neighborhood, every two or three days. I buy my bread—usually the same sort, but sometimes I switch things up. I consume it and enjoy it. End of story. I don’t know exactly how bread is made. I believe it involves yeast, which I understand is alive in some sense. If I really wanted to know more, I suppose I could ask the baker. But he would most likely give me an agitated look and move on to sell his goods to the next customer.… (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - December 19, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Daniel Tigard Tags: Featured Posts Science Social Justice Technology AI artificial intelligence big data Current Affairs Ethics regulation society Source Type: blogs

Dementia and the value of human life
Recent public reporting of some cases in Canada of people with dementia whose lives have been ended by euthanasia have caused me to think about the value of human life in those who have dementia. Canadian law requires the person whose life is ended by euthanasia to have mental capacity for informed consent, intolerable suffering, … Continue reading "Dementia and the value of human life" (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - December 18, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Steve Phillips Tags: Health Care bioethics end of life Health Care Practice human dignity Medical Decision Making syndicated Source Type: blogs

Cruel Death, Heartless Aftermath – My Family ’ s End-of-Life Nightmare and How To Avoid It
In 2013, Barbara Mancini was falsely charged with trying to assist her father in an alleged suicide attempt. Mancini fought back in a case that consumed a year of her life, cost more than $100,000, and drew national media attention, including a New York Times column by Frank Bruni, PBS story and 60 Minutes piece. Mancini has now published a book to raise awareness about end-of-life care issues, and to warn caregivers of the pitfalls that can ensnare them when providing care to their dying loved ones. Cruel Death, Heartless Aftermath is a compelling narrative that holds valuable lessons for the familie...
Source: blog.bioethics.net - December 18, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Trump, “Jewish-Americans”, Othering, and the Lessons of Dividing
by Craig Klugman, Ph.D. Last week I became a Jewish-American. No, I did not change my citizenship. No, I did not change religions. In the morning I was an American (born a U.S. Citizen) who was raised in conservative Judaism and by the afternoon, I was part of a new nationality. What changed last week was President Trump signing an order stating that Title VI applies to anti-Semitism. According to Title VI, “No person in the United States shall, on the ground of race, color, or national origin, be excluded from participation in, be denied the benefits of, or be subjected to discrimination under any program or activit...
Source: blog.bioethics.net - December 18, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Craig Klugman Tags: Cultural Ethics Featured Posts Genetics Justice Politics Social Justice Jewish Nazi Title VI Trump Source Type: blogs

Sociopaths in Medical School
The NEJM recently had an interesting article calling on medical schools to do a better job identifying students who exhibit “unprofessional behavior” before allowing them to graduate. The link for that article is HERE (subscription required). While admitting that it was difficult to consistently and reliably identify such students, the authors claimed that every medical … Continue reading "Sociopaths in Medical School" (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - December 17, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Mark McQuain Tags: Health Care bioethics Culture / Ethnicity / Gender / Disability Health Care Practice human dignity syndicated Source Type: blogs

Radical Life Extension & Physical Immortality
Much of my scholarship focuses on how individuals can avoid a bad death. But some are more interested in "radical life extension and physical immortality,"  If this is you, check out RAADfest, the world's largest gathering of radical life extensi... (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - December 17, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Infertility Injustice: Why We Need Better Options to Treat Male Factor Infertility
Reproduction is generally associated with women and consequently men’s reproductive is often neglected. One clear example of this is the discrepancy in female and male contraceptives. Women have over a dozen types of contraceptives, including hormonal, nonhormonal, barrier, and long-acting reversible contraceptives. In contrast, men have only 2 options: vasectomy and condoms. Men do not have hormonal methods, nor do they have long-acting reversible contraceptives, both of which tend to be the most effective and often the easiest to use (e.g. methods like the IUD you can “set and forget” for years). This d...
Source: blog.bioethics.net - December 16, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Bioethics Today Tags: Health Care Justice Author: Campo-Engelstein Fertility reproductive medicine reproductive rights syndicated Women's Reproductive Rights Source Type: blogs

Quixote Reimagined: Magical Realism Meets the Opioid Epidemic
What is Don Quixote, Cervantes’ 17th-century Spanish “Ingenious Gentleman of La Mancha,” doing in a 21st-century novel about America? He’s on a quest to wed his Beloved. And what does this obsession have to do with the present-day opioid epidemic?  Salman Rushdie’s new novel Quichotte links these unlikely events and much more.   The opioid… Read more The post Quixote Reimagined: Magical Realism Meets the Opioid Epidemic appeared first on The Hastings Center. (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - December 16, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Susan Gilbert Tags: Health Care Arts & Ideas Hastings Bioethics Forum Opioid Epidemic Quichotte Salman Rushdie syndicated Source Type: blogs

Brain Death Exemption – Do Not Include It on New Jersey Advance Directive Forms
An official New Jersey state advance directive form specifically prompts individuals to indicate whether they want to be declared dead on neurological criteria. I understand that New Jersey law has granted a religious exemption from brain death for th... (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - December 16, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Voluntary Stopping Eating & Drinking (VSED) to Hasten Death – Prevalence
Sabrina Stängle and André Fringer have been publishing quite a bit on VSED. In some of their most recent work, they calculate the incidence of VSED in Switzerland is 0.7%, and for all deaths in long-term care facilities the incidence is 1.7%. That compares favorably to MAID rates. (Stängle, S., Schnepp, W., Büche, D., & Fringer, A. (2019). Long-term care nurses´ attitudes and the incidence of voluntary stopping of eating and drinking: a cross-sectional study. Journal of Advanced Nursing. doi:10.1111/jan.14249). (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - December 15, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Bad Surgical Informed Consent (video)
This less-than-two-minute scene from CHICAGO MED depicts a deplorable lack of shared decision making.  Sadly, this is fairly representative of the quality of informed consent for a wide range of clinical interventions in U.S. healthcare. (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - December 14, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Ethics and Society Newsfeed – December 13, 2019
Biomedical/Medical Ethics A Genetic Dating App Is a Horrifying Thing That Shouldn’t Exist “The app is being developed by a team of geneticists led by George Church, who, in the same interview, defended accepting money for his lab donated by convicted pedophile Jeffrey Epstein. Church’s lab is most famous for its work on the gene-editing technology CRISPR/Cas9, […] (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - December 13, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Ethics and Society Tags: Environmental Ethics Health Care Politics Science Sports Ethics Technology bioethics biomedical ethics business business ethics Ethics and society human rights Humanitarian ethics humanity research syndicated Technology Eth Source Type: blogs

Court Will Rule on Constitutionality of Texas Advance Directives Act 10-Day Medical Futility Rule – Tinslee Lewis
The Supreme Court of Texas recently ducked ruling on the constitutionality of the Texas Advance Directives Act. The court ruled that the underlying case (concerning Chris Dunn) was moot, because the patient had already died. In contrast, Tinslee Lewis is still very much alive. Therefore, the constitutionality of TADA in Tinslee's case is not a moot question. At an extended hearing on Thursday, Texas Fourth District Court of Appeals Chief Justice Sandee B. Marion explained: “We’re here to determine whether 046 is unconstitutional." The judge extended the TRO requiring Cook Children's to continue life-sustai...
Source: blog.bioethics.net - December 13, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Can We Teach Physician Activism?
  by Keisha Ray, Ph.D. This week Doctors for Camp Closures posted a video of protesters, including physicians, being arrested by police and military personnel after physicians went to the U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) headquarters in San Diego to offer flu vaccinations to detained migrants. Despite their well intentions the authorities turned them away. In the video protesters can be seen laying on the ground in front of the facility’s driveway and being picked up off the ground by police officers and men in military uniforms and placed in restraints.… (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - December 12, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Keisha Ray Tags: Ethics Featured Posts Health Care Public Health activism medical education Source Type: blogs

Religion and Medical Ethics: Palliative Care and the Mental Health of the Elderly
Today is the second day of a conference in Rome by the Pontifical Academy for Life and the World Innovation Summit for Health: "Religion and Medical Ethics: Palliative Care and the Mental Health of the Elderly." The symposium examines the role that re... (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - December 12, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Simon ’ s Law – More States Consider Legislation Prohibiting Unilateral Pediatric DNR Orders
In 2017, Kansas enacted “Simon's Law,” which is directed at prohibiting unilateral DNR orders for minors. (Kan. Stat. Ann. §38-150)   Simon's Law imposes three mandates on physicians. First, a DNR order “shall not be instituted…unless at least one parent…has first been informed” and a “reasonable attempt has been made to inform the other parent.” Information about a proposed DNR order must be provided “both orally and in writing” unless the urgency of the situation precludes that. Second, Simon's Law requires the physician to contemporaneously doc...
Source: blog.bioethics.net - December 12, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Brain Dead Patients in the ICU Are Not Being " Kept Alive "
For All Mankind is a new American science fiction web television series produced for Apple TV+. The series dramatizes an alternate history depicting "what would have happened if the global space race had never ended" after the Soviet Union succeeds in ... (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - December 11, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Human Genetic Enhancement Might Soon Be Possible – But Where Do We Draw the Line?
Written by Tess Johnson, University of Oxford   How far will we allow genetic enhancement to go? vchal/ Shutterstock The first genetically edited children were born in China in late 2018. Twins Lulu and Nana had a particular gene – known as CCR5 – modified during embryonic development. The aim was to make them (and their […] (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - December 11, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Practical Ethics Tags: Ethics Genetics Health Care Cross Post genetic enhancement medical ethics syndicated Tess Johnson's Post The Conversation Source Type: blogs

Preserving Patient Dignity (Formerly: Patient Modesty):Volume 107
And this is how it all started for many men who have come to write to this blog thread.  Do you think this would be the time for the youth to display  VIP characteristics, and say "NOT THIS WAY!"?I would be interested to read if you were that... (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - December 11, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Maurice Bernstein, M.D. Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Shared Decision Making – in 4 Minutes
What is shared decision making? Shared decision making relies on an individual and their families having accurate information and a clear understanding of their situation in order to make the best decision for themselves with their healthcare provider.... (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - December 11, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Physician-Assisted Death and Journalism Ethics
A New York Times special report on euthanasia of a Paralympics champion in Belgium was ethically problematic for several reasons. The post Physician-Assisted Death and Journalism Ethics appeared first on The Hastings Center. (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - December 10, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Susan Gilbert Tags: Health Care Chronic Conditions and End of Life Care euthanasia Hastings Bioethics Forum journalism ethics New York Times Physician Aid in Dying syndicated Source Type: blogs

Paternalism Versus Autonomy: A Case Report of Knowledge Versus Perception About Influenza Medication
by Amy Reese, PharmD, MA. Tamiflu (oseltamivir) is a neuraminidase inhibitor which decreases the viral spread of Influenza A and B. It was a revolutionary drug when it was approved by the FDA in December 2000 because it was indicated to reduce the duration and severity of both influenza viruses. It was also proven to prevent a patient from being infected with either influenza virus. The only stipulation with the medication was that its efficacy was only shown within the first 48 hours of influenza symptoms.… (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - December 10, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Keisha Ray Tags: Decision making Featured Posts Health Care Health Policy & Insurance Pharmaceuticals Source Type: blogs

Virtue and Suffering: Where the Personal and Professional Collide
By Lauren Rissman A distraught, exhausted mother asked through her tears, “Doctor, what would you do?” The palliative care, neurology and pediatric intensive care team sat in silence in the cold glow of fluorescent light. At that moment, I felt a zap of pain to my heart. It was sharp, followed by a lingering ache. […] (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - December 9, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: reflectivemeded Tags: Health Care syndicated Uncategorized Source Type: blogs

Medical Aid in Dying – Legal in 18 Jurisdictions on Earth
With Western Australia set to finalize legislation on medical aid in dying, MAID will be affirmatively legal in 18 jurisdictions on Earth: Australia (Victoria) Australia (Western Australia) Belgium Canada Colombia Luxembourg Netherlands Switzerland Un... (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - December 9, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Medical Aid in Dying on Earth – Legal in 18 Jurisdictions on Earth
With Western Australia set to finalize legislation on medical aid in dying, MAID will be affirmatively legal in 18 jurisdictions on Earth: Australia (Victoria) Australia (Western Australia) Belgium Canada Colombia Luxembourg Netherlands Switzerland U... (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - December 9, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Project Nightingale: The Need to Connect Data with Dignity
by Ann Mongoven, Ph.D. Informed by a Google employee-whistleblower, the Wall Street Journal recently broke a story about a controversial collaboration between Catholic healthcare giant Ascension Health and Google. Ascension hospitals provided Google identifiable medical data for cloud storage and analysis without the knowledge or consent of patients. Ironically named “Project Nightingale,” this clandestine data-sharing violated both specific commitments of Catholic healthcare and general expectations of American patients. The Department of Health and Human Services has launched an investigation into whether the...
Source: blog.bioethics.net - December 9, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Ann Mongoven Tags: Ethics Featured Posts Health Care Health Regulation & Law Informed Consent Philosophy & Ethics Privacy professional ethics artificial intelligence big data Source Type: blogs

End of Life Care in India: A Model Legal Framework
The Vidhi Centre for Legal Policy has worked with the Indian Society for Critical Care Medicine, the Indian Association of Palliative Care, and the Indian Academy of Neurology to draft A Model Legal Framework for End of Life Care in India. The model b... (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - December 9, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Hot Topics: Cool Talk – Physician Assisted Suicide
Join me on March 18, 2020 at the University of Saint Thomas School of Law in Minneapolis for "Hot Topics: Cool Talk - Physician Assisted Suicide." (No, I did not pick the title.) (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - December 7, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Experimental Subjects for Life?
More than a year after the birth announcement of genome-edited babies in China, we are only slightly more informed of He Jiankui’s experimentation, the results of which are named “Lulu” and “Nana.” Although apparently approached, neither Nature nor the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) chose to publish He’s work. Antonio Regalado reported on … Continue reading "Experimental Subjects for Life?" (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - December 7, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: D. Joy Riley Tags: Genetics Health Care Lulu Nana Antonio Regalado bioethics biotechnology China Consent / Research CRISPR babies Greely He Jiankui human dignity reproduction syndicated Urnov Vassena Source Type: blogs

BioethicsTV (Dec 2-6, 2019): #TheResident
by Craig Klugman, Ph.D. The start of the winter holidays means winter hiatus for many shows. This week only one show dealt with bioethical issues. The Resident (Season 3: Episode 9): Maternal-fetal conflict; Politics, Business, and Torture; Problems with outpatient surgery in offices In one storyline, a pregnant patient has trouble breathing during a standard ultrasound. She is diagnosed with an enlarged heart, cardiomyopathy brought on by her prior chemo. Okafor suggests delivering the baby early to protect her heart. This situation is a classic case of maternal-fetal conflict: What is good for the baby (being carried to...
Source: blog.bioethics.net - December 6, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Craig Klugman Tags: BioethicsTV Featured Posts Professionalism Reproductive Ethics harm Source Type: blogs

Consider the Mouse
The American species of the common house mouse (Mus musculus) does an odd thing when going through opioid withdrawal. It jumps involuntarily, rearing up on its hind legs and leaping 3-to-4 feet in the air. I was a spectator to this phenomenon this summer, while working at a research hospital in New York City. The post Consider the Mouse appeared first on The Hastings Center. (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - December 6, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Susan Gilbert Tags: Health Care Hastings Bioethics Forum syndicated Source Type: blogs

Is the U.S. Drug Enforcement Agency (DEA) Impeding Medical Aid In Dying?
In 2006, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled that the DEA could not enforce the federal Controlled Substances Act against physicians who prescribed drugs in compliance with the Oregon Death with Dignity Act. Since state law authorized the drugs for medical ai... (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - December 6, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Texas Judge ’ s Removal from Baby Life Support Dispute Case Highlights Hypocrisy
Yesterday, Cook Children's Hospital succeeded in removing Texas Judge Alex Kim from the Tarrant County court case between the hospital and the family of Tinslee Lewis. The Hospital argued that Judge Kim violated judicial standards by assigning himself... (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - December 5, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs