Lawsuits of Last Resort: Employees Fight for Safe Workplaces during Covid-19
As more workplaces open up, a seldom-used legal action is being taken against employers charged with inadequately protecting employees from the coronavirus: public nuisance lawsuits. The post Lawsuits of Last Resort: Employees Fight for Safe Workplaces during Covid-19 appeared first on The Hastings Center. (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - July 29, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Susan Gilbert Tags: Health Care Public Health COVID-19 Hastings Bioethics Forum public nuisance lawsuits syndicated workplace hazards Source Type: blogs

New Zealand End of Life Choice Referendum – More like Canada than USA
New Zealand's referendum on end of life choice is September 19, 2020. Parliament already passed the End of Life Choice Act, but it has not come into force. The Act will come into force only if more than 50% of voters in the referendum vo... (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - July 29, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Pandemic Ethics: Good Reasons to Vaccinate: COVID19 Vaccine, Mandatory or Payment Model?
The best chance of bringing the Coronavirus pandemic to an end with the least loss of life and the greatest return  to normality seems to be the introduction of an effective vaccine. But how should such a vaccine be distributed? To be effective, particularly in protecting the most vulnerable in the population, it would need […] (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - July 28, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Julian Savulescu Tags: Health Care Julian Savulescu's Posts Pandemic Ethics syndicated Source Type: blogs

World Congress of Bioethics – Free Videos
A fair number of videos from last month's World Congress of Bioethics are available for free on Vimeo. (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - July 28, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

#MedBikini: A Lesson in Irony and the Pitfalls of Policing Professionalism
by Andrew Helmers, MDCM, MHSc (Bioethics), MSc, FRCPC The Journal of Vascular Surgery (and Irony) published a rather odd piece that set Twitter ablaze even amidst the wildfire that is COVID-19. The seemingly innocuous piece was entitled “Prevalence of unprofessional social media content among young vascular surgeons”; it was first published online in advance (December 2019), and was then formally published in the August edition of the journal in question, accompanied by a laudatory commentary piece. It was quickly retracted after the resultant public outcry, but its thankfully brief existence still warrants som...
Source: blog.bioethics.net - July 27, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Blog Editor Tags: Featured Posts Gender Disparities Informed Consent Media Politics Privacy Social Media #MedBikini Source Type: blogs

The Americans with Disabilities Act at 30: A Cause for Celebration During Covid-19?
A central mandate of the ADA is to make the goods of society accessible to people with disabilities and overcome their segregation in civil society through reasonable accommodation that allows them to go to work, live with their neighbors, and avoid institutionalization. But let’s not delude ourselves with historic sentimentality as disability law is placed under tremendous stress by the pandemic. The post The Americans with Disabilities Act at 30: A Cause for Celebration During Covid-19? appeared first on The Hastings Center. (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - July 27, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Susan Gilbert Tags: Health Care Americans with Disabilities Act CARES Act civil rights COVID-19 disability Hastings Bioethics Forum syndicated Source Type: blogs

Legal Status of the Texas Advance Directives Act
On Friday, the Texas Court of Appeals issued such a lengthy opinion on the constitutionality of TADA that one might think (like the dissenting justice) that the question has now been definitively answered. But it has not. The appeals court ruled on on... (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - July 27, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Brain Death Conflict in Michigan – 3rd High Profile Case in Past Year
DeVonte Andrews, 18, was shot four times in a drive-by shooting in Detroit. But his mother claimed that his condition was improving despite doctors at Ascension St. John Hospital declaring him brain dead. The case was starting to look like other ... (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - July 27, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

The Good Death Society Blog
Lamar Hankins is stepping down as chief blogger at The Good Death Society Blog. Next month, Final Exit Network board member and hospice chaplain Kevin Bradley takes over. (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - July 26, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

UK High Court Criticizes Hospital ’ s Lack of Procedural Due Process in Medical Futility Conflict
Coincidentally, the same day that the Texas Court of Appeals ruled that the Texas Advance Directives Act is "likely unconstitutional," the British High Court of Justice ruled that Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children similarly violated principles ... (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - July 25, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

New In Depth Inquiry: Future of Ageing
The Nuffield Council on Bioethics announced that it is beginning a new in-depth inquiry on the future of ageing. The inquiry will explore the ethical implications of the emerging role of science and technology in helping people live well in old age. T... (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - July 25, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Texas Appeals Court Rules Against Hospital in Medical Futility Case (Tinslee Lewis v. Cook Children ’ s)
Today, the Texas Court of Appeals issued a 150-page decision in Tinslee Lewis v. Cook Children's Hospital.  The court ruled against the hospital, sending the case back to the trial court to continue. But this is a serious challenge to the constit... (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - July 24, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

On Being a Foster Parent During Covid
I knew that being a foster parent would be demanding, but I was unprepared for the extent of the challenges, which were exacerbated by the pandemic. The post On Being a Foster Parent During Covid appeared first on The Hastings Center. (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - July 24, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Susan Gilbert Tags: Health Care caregiving Children and Families COVID-19 financial challenges food insecurity foster care Hastings Bioethics Forum syndicated Source Type: blogs

Symposium on Cruzan and the Right to Die
I just received my copy of the SMU Law Review, Vol. 73, No. 1 (Winter 2020). This is a special issue focused on the 30th Anniversary of Cruzan and the Right to Die.  FOREWORD: CRUZAN AND THE "RIGHT TO DIE" Thomas Wm. Mayo FIRST MAN AND SECOND WO... (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - July 24, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Baruch A. Brody Award & Lecture in Bioethics – Call for Nominations
Nominations are now being accepted until August 7, 2020, for the 2020-2021 Baruch A. Brody Award & Lecture in Bioethics.  The Baylor College of Medicine Center for Medical Ethics and Health Policy, Houston Methodist, and the Rice University Department of Philosophy are pleased to renew this international $10,000 award and named lectureship in Baruch Brody’s memory. This award will perpetuate Baruch’s legacy by recognizing junior and mid-career scholars who have made important theoretical contributions to the field of bioethics. They are thrilled to honor someone in the field who embodies the values and...
Source: blog.bioethics.net - July 23, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Freedom and Fear: Reflections on American Gun Violence in Response to My Father ’s Shooting
STUDENT VOICES | CHYNN PRIZE THIRD-PLACE WINNERBy Theodore Berg I have probably written between twenty and thirty pages in total about the March 5th, 2015 shooting of my father. I write about it now again, for what I doubt will be the last time, looking not to the incident itself, but to the narratives fashioned […] (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - July 23, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Ethics and Society Tags: Health Care Chynn Prize community policing Fordham University Center for Ethics Education Fordham University Student Voices gun control gun laws gun violence Law Enforcement local government mass shootings policy Political Parties Source Type: blogs

Who Are We Kidding: There ’s No Way We Should Be Heading Back to Campus
by Craig Klugman, Ph.D. Since mid-March I have been part of my university’s response to the COVID-19 pandemic. At first, I served on the “Response” task force and that transformed into our “Re-Opening” group. I’ve been working on how do we safely have students in dorms, bring people up and down the elevators in the downtown towers, enforce a mask ban, how to do contact tracing, and more. After months of working on the minutiae of having people on campus I have come to one conclusion, we should not be bringing people back to campus.… (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - July 23, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Craig Klugman Tags: Featured Posts Politics Public Health #covid19 #diaryofaplagueyear COVID-19 schools Source Type: blogs

Guest Post- Pandemic Ethics: Your Freedom Really Matters. So What?
Written by Farbod Akhlaghi (University of Oxford) The coronavirus pandemic rages on. To the surprise of many, the enforcement of mask wearing, imposition of lockdowns, and other measures taken to try to halt the pandemic’s march have been met with some heavy and vocal resistance. Such resistance has materialised into protests in various countries against […] (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - July 23, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Practical Ethics Tags: Health Care Current Affairs Guest Post Pandemic Ethics syndicated Source Type: blogs

Concerning Trend for Rural Physicians Makes a Risky Business Even Riskier
The COVID-19 virus is wreaking havoc on healthcare providers. Hospitals and outpatient practices are struggling from a combination of lost revenue, from people delaying or canceling appointments, and increased expenses, related to the measures they are taking to reduce the spread of the virus within healthcare settings. As always, when American healthcare providers are in […] The post Concerning Trend for Rural Physicians Makes a Risky Business Even Riskier appeared first on Peter Ubel. (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - July 23, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Peter Ubel Tags: Health Care Peter Ubel syndicated Uncategorized Source Type: blogs

Guidance for Treating Unrepresented Patients in the ICU Why the Ethical Principles Matter More Than Ever
Our new Official ATS/AGS Policy Statement "Making Medical Treatment Decisions for Unrepresented Patients in the ICU" is the subject of the "Ask the Ethicist" column in today's Neurology Today. (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - July 23, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Pandemic Ethics: Testing times: An ethical framework and practical recommendations for COVID-19 testing for NHS workers
Dr Alberto Giubilini, Senior Research Fellow at the Oxford Uehiro  Centre for Practical Ethics and Wellcome Centre for Ethics and Humanities was part of an independent rapid-response project to develop an ethical framework for COVID-19 swab testing for NHS workers. Following a stakeholder consultation, the expert group have published a report identifying ethical considerations and providing […] (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - July 23, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Practical Ethics Tags: Health Care Public Health Alberto Giubilini's Posts Pandemic Ethics regulation syndicated Source Type: blogs

The Loud Silence of Racism: It is Killing Us All
This post will also appear as an editorial in a special January 2021 issue of The American Journal of Bioethics by Bridgette L. Jones, MD MS Audre Lorde wrote in her essay The Transformation of Silence into Language to Action, “I have come to believe over and over again that what is most important to me must be spoken, made verbal and shared, even at the risk of having it bruised or misunderstood (Lourde 1984). I recently decided to tell my story, for the first time in my life, to the staff at my hospital during a gathering service for George Floyd. … (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - July 22, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Blog Editor Tags: Featured Posts #blackbioethics racism Source Type: blogs

Advance Directive Completion Rate Increases 500%
Last month, I blogged how Gallup measured an uptick in advance directive completion rates. This month, a study from the University of Pennsylvania measured an even larger increase (almost 500%). Researchers examined how many people completed advance d... (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - July 22, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Pandemic Language
Language used to describe the response to the pandemic can illuminate, and it can distort. Here I focus on language that obfuscates thinking about the pandemic. As the death toll mounted in New York City in April, New York Governor Andrew Cuomo was reported to have declared, “Ventilators are to this war what bombs were… Read more The post Pandemic Language appeared first on The Hastings Center. (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - July 21, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Susan Gilbert Tags: Health Care Public Health COVID-19 Hastings Bioethics Forum syndicated Source Type: blogs

Guest Post: Is it Wrong to Lower Your Chances of Doing What You Ought to Do?
Written by Farbod Akhlaghi (University of Oxford) Suppose you have a moral obligation to take care of your ailing parent tomorrow. If you did something that would lower your chances of fulfilling that moral obligation – like going out partying all night tonight – would you thereby have done something morally wrong? We do things […] (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - July 21, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Practical Ethics Tags: Ethics Health Care Guest Post syndicated Source Type: blogs

Abortion, Res judicata, Stare decisis and the “Rightness of Things”
Oddly, I enjoy reading Supreme Court decisions, particularly the dissents, even though I am not a lawyer. I gain similar enjoyment watching a good game of chess even though I am not a great chess player. Nerd that I am, I think I become smarter for the effort in both cases. I beg the reader’s … Continue reading "Abortion, Res judicata, Stare decisis and the “Rightness of Things”" (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - July 21, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Mark McQuain Tags: Health Care abortion bioethics Health Care Practice human dignity syndicated Source Type: blogs

Canadian Tribunals Side with Physicians in Three Medical Futility Cases
Over the past few weeks, Canadian tribunals have wrestled with a number of medical futility cases. Here are some of them. Two were decided by the Ontario Health Professions Appeal and Review Board. This tribunal reviews cases adjudicated by the Inquir... (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - July 21, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Ambulance Charters During the COVID-19 Pandemic and Equitable Access to Scarce Resources
by Daniel Du Pont, MD, MBE and Jill Baren, MD, MS, MBA, FACEP, FAAP The novel coronavirus outbreak, like any pandemic, has brought with it many difficult choices. When demand for medical resources exceeds supply, healthcare providers have to make excruciating decisions about which patients will be offered treatment—not just intensive treatments, but any basic life support measures. The fundamental problem of rationing is that the distribution of hospital resources and services, such as ICU beds or ventilators, is a zero-sum game: If the healthcare system is overwhelmed, each patient who receives treatment represents ...
Source: blog.bioethics.net - July 20, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Blog Editor Tags: Featured Posts Health Disparities Health Policy & Insurance Health Regulation & Law Justice Social Justice #covid19 #diaryofaplagueyear COVID-19 Source Type: blogs

Medical Aid in Dying for Alzheimer ’ s? Unlikely, Try SED by AD Instead
Conclusion (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - July 20, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Patients Still Overestimate Success of CPR
Studies showing that public overestimates the success of CPR have been around for decades. One more was published this week in Emergency Medicine Journal. Sacramento researchers asked 500 emergency department patients and their companions. Here is wh... (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - July 19, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

If Beale St. Was In Gotham
I’d never read James Baldwin. Why this is precisely, I’m not sure. We could go into the structural and personal reasons I, an English lit major, managed to make it three decades without, but that’s another post. I hadn’t read or seen any Batman anything (yes, including the animated series) until I was in my [...] (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - July 19, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Kyle Munkittrick Tags: Health Care bioethics syndicated Source Type: blogs

Court Revokes Health Care Agent ’ s Powers
Health care agents must act consistent with the incapacitated patient's known wishes. If those are unknown, they must act within the patient's best interests. When they materially deviate from these duties, agents (like other types of surrogates) can a... (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - July 17, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

The Betrothed During the 2020 Pandemic By J. Russell Teagarden
[read more] (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - July 17, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: GalN Tags: Health Care Current Topics syndicated Source Type: blogs

Improving the Informed Consent Process for Seniors Regarding AICDs: The Need for Bioethicist Involvement
by Arnold R. Eiser, MD MACP Our healthcare system is failing our most senior citizens by assuming they want and need to receive maximal technological intervention despite modest or minimal benefit to them and the increasing of substantial discomfort to them. Every year in the United States about 140,000 automated implantable defibrillators (AICD) are implanted for primary and secondary prevention of sudden death (probably less in this COVID pandemic). Over 60% of AICDs are implanted in patients 65 years or older with 42% in people over 70 years of age.… (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - July 17, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Blog Editor Tags: End of Life Care Featured Posts Informed Consent Technology AICD Source Type: blogs

The “Give Back”: Is There Room For It?
by Nneka Sederstrom, PhD, MPH, MA, FCCP, FCCM In my previous article, Unblinded, I challenged the actions of using the crisis standards of care scoring systems to allocate scares resources like ventilators and argued against a color-blind ideology. To take that argument further it is time to address the question of “if not that scoring system, then what?” The Sequential Organ Failure Assessment score or SOFA is the clinical tool that has been most widely accepted as the scoring mechanism to address which patient, in a crisis standards of care situation, has the better survival potential if provided the scarce r...
Source: blog.bioethics.net - July 16, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Nneka Sederstrom Tags: Featured Posts Health Disparities Justice Social Justice #blackbioethics #covid19 #diaryofaplagueyear COVID-19 racism Source Type: blogs

American Clinicians Academy on Medical Aid in Dying – Videos
The American Clinicians Academy on Medical Aid in Dying has completed the accreditation process for CME and CE credits for online learning, for physicians, nurses, and social workers.If you were unable to attend the National Clinici... (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - July 16, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Michigan Physician Agrees to Treat Tinslee Lewis Despite Repeated Determinations Treatment Is Non-Beneficial and Inappropriate
Last year, Clinicians at Cook Children's Hospital determined that continued life-sustaining treatment for Tinslee Lewis offered no benefit and would be "cruel" and "unethical." Accordingly, they planned to stop that treatment even over her mother's obj... (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - July 16, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Preserving Patient Dignity (Formerly Patient Modesty) Volume 112
The ongoing anguish being presented by the participants on this web blog topic is whether being a patient who doesn't conform ("be yourself") with the behavior and requests or even demands of the medical system itself  will provide harm to the pat... (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - July 15, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Maurice Bernstein, M.D. Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Video Series: Why Parental Status Matters When Allocating Scarce Medical Resources
Which patients should we treat, if we can’t treat them all? The Covid-19 pandemic has brought questions about how to allocate scarce medical resources to the forefront. In this Thinking Out Loud interview with Katrien Devolder, Philosopher Moti Gorin (Colorado State University) argues that parents (or primary caregivers) of a dependent child should (sometimes) get […] (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - July 15, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Katrien Devolder Tags: Health Care Coronavirus; Pandemic; Ethics; Public Health Katrien Devolder Interview Pandemic Ethics resource allocation syndicated Video Series Youtube interview Source Type: blogs

New Horizon in Palliative Care: Psilocybin Therapy for Relief of Anxiety and Depression
This event "New Horizon in Palliative Care: Psilocybin Therapy for Relief of Anxiety and Depression" will stream on July 22, 2020. See also here. (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - July 14, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

New Horizon in Palliative Care: Psilocybin Therapy for Relief of Anxiety and Depression
This event "New Horizon in Palliative Care: Psilocybin Therapy for Relief of Anxiety and Depression" will stream on July 23, 2020. See also here. (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - July 14, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Daughter Convicted of Attempted Murder Says Mom Wanted Me to Do It
Kimberly Hopkins pleaded guilty to zip-tying her 80-year-old mother's hands and trying to put a plastic bag with helium over her head. In October 2019, she was convicted of attempted first-degree murder. But in a recent Tennessee parole hearing, Hopkins claims that her mother asked her to to do it. "I would never have done anything that I did without my mother’s permission." Hopkins apparently used the book FINAL EXIT to make the planned death look like a suicide. But what Hopkins did is very different from the inert gas bag method used by the Final Exit Network. Their exit guides do not handle th...
Source: blog.bioethics.net - July 14, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Life Kit: Planning For The End of a Life
Talking about death makes many of us uncomfortable, so we don't plan for it. NPR's Life Kit offers tips for starting an advanced directive to prepare for a good death. After all, we wear a seatbelt even though we do not expect to be in a car accident. (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - July 13, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Pandemic Ethics: Moral Reasoning in a Pandemic [Guest Post]
Cross-Posted with The Boston Review By Professor Frances Kamm, Harvard University Policy discussions during the pandemic have raised concerns for me, as a moral philosopher, about how policy analysts and policy makers are thinking about deaths from COVID-19 and the right way to combat them. The policy discussions I have in mind have ranged from […] (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - July 13, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Practical Ethics Tags: Health Care Guest Post Pandemic Ethics syndicated Source Type: blogs

Veterans Affairs OIG Issues Caution on Goals of Care Compliance
The Veterans Affairs Office of Inspector General just released an inspection report of the Oscar G. Johnson VA Medical Center in Iron Mountain, Michigan. Care coordination concerning life-sustaining treatment decisions was one of the four focus areas. VHA requires practitioners to initiate goals of care conversations with high-risk patients—including hospice patients or their surrogates—within a time frame that meets the medical needs of the patient or at the time of a triggering event. The GOC conversations are discussion between a healthcare provider and a patient or surrogate to help define the patient&...
Source: blog.bioethics.net - July 12, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs