An Incoherent Proposal to Revise the Uniform Determination of Death Act
It has been 50 years since the medical profession adopted the determination of death according to neurological criteria, known as “brain death.”  This doctrine was codified in 1981 in the Uniform Determination of Death Act (UDDA), which declares,  “An individual who has sustained either (1) irreversible cessation of circulatory and respiratory functions or (2) irreversible… Read more The post An Incoherent Proposal to Revise the Uniform Determination of Death Act appeared first on The Hastings Center. (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - January 23, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Susan Gilbert Tags: Health Care Brain Death end of life Hastings Bioethics Forum syndicated Uniform Determination of Death Act Source Type: blogs

The Long Kiss Goodbye (art exhibition)
The Lawrence Wilson Art Gallery at the University of Western Australia has a new exhibition – The Long Kiss Goodbye – opening on February 8, 2020. The exhibition explores the ways in which art can be a strategy for addressing and reflecting on intense and difficult feelings like loss. UWA Chief Cultural Officer Professor Ted Snell said the exhibition is an excellent example of art’s power and potency to think through complex and difficult topics. (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - January 23, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Edmund Pellegrino – 100th Birthday Event
Georgetown University is celebrating the 100th birthday of Edmund Pellegrino with a two-day conference.  The John Collins Harvey Lecture and dinner is on the evening of Thursday, March 5, 2020. The all-day Centennial Pellegrino Seminar is on Friday, March 6, 2020. Registration is free. The conference will take a fresh look at Pellegrino’s work in the philosophy of medicine, with one eye looking back to his original body of work and another eye looking forward to how his writing might inform contemporary conversations regarding the philosophy of medicine. Pellegrino was one of the earliest writers in the modern e...
Source: blog.bioethics.net - January 23, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

The Torture Doctors: Human Rights Crimes and the Road to Justice, by Steven H. Miles, MD, Georgetown University Press, March 2020, ISBN: 9781626167520,
by Steven H Miles, MD The Nazi Doctors at Nuremberg in 1945 brought enormous attention on medical war crimes. The unearthing of complicity of United States physicians and psychologists with interrogational torture during the war on terror of  at the beginning of the 21st century reignited attention to participation of physicians in human rights crimes. In retrospect, two aspects of that renewed attention deserved more scrutiny. There was a lack of attention to international context for the United States experience and, against this background, the fact that no US physicians were held accountable for complicity with t...
Source: blog.bioethics.net - January 23, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Steven Miles Tags: Featured Posts professional ethics Professionalism physicians in torture Source Type: blogs

New technology, old moral problem
Many of our discussions in bioethics are about whether the things that are possible to do with advances in medical technology are things that we ought to do. However, some of the moral concerns in medicine are much more basic. They have to do with the idea that dates back at least to the Hippocratic … Continue reading "New technology, old moral problem" (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - January 23, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Steve Phillips Tags: Health Care bioethics biotechnology Health Care Practice reproduction syndicated Source Type: blogs

Love Drugs: The Chemical Future of Relationships
Announcement: Brian Earp and Julian Savulescu’s new book ‘Love Drugs: The Chemical Future of Relationships‘, published by (Stanford University Press) is now available. Is there a pill for love? What about an “anti-love drug”, to help us get over an ex? This book argues that certain psychoactive substances, including MDMA—the active ingredient in Ecstasy—may help ordinary couples […] (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - January 22, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Practical Ethics Tags: Ethics Health Care Neuroethics Announcements books love drugs neuroscience psychology syndicated Source Type: blogs

Climate Ought to Change Politics
Written by Stephen Rainey In the midst of global climate change set to devastate entire ways of life, and ultimately on track to render the biosphere uninhabitable for all but the most adaptable organisms, it seems timely to question how political legitimacy relates to matters of scientific fact. While it seems mostly desirable that groups […] (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - January 22, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Stephen Rainey Tags: Environmental Ethics Health Care Politics Science climate political legitimacy Political Philosophy Stephen Rainey's Posts syndicated Source Type: blogs

Biotechnology and the Future of Medicine – Harvard Annual Bioethics Conference
The Annual Bioethics Conference at Harvard Medical School is world class programming for only $50.  This year's program, on March 9-10 2020, will explore: 1. The potential of biotechnology to drive and shape the future of clinical care ... (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - January 22, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Pharma Says Price Regulation Will Take Life-Saving Drugs Away From Us. Here ’s The Truth.
The US isn’t the only country struggling with the high price of prescription drugs. A decade ago, Germany was facing rapidly rising medication prices. In 2011, it struck back, with a law regulating the price of new medications. Here’s how that law works, and what it has meant for whether Germans have access to new […] The post Pharma Says Price Regulation Will Take Life-Saving Drugs Away From Us. Here’s The Truth. appeared first on Peter Ubel. (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - January 21, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: peter Tags: Health Care health care cost Peter Ubel syndicated Source Type: blogs

Autonomy of Access vs. Autonomy of Decision Making in Opioid Addiction
A recent Perspective in The NEJM by Dr. Amy Caruso Brown discussed the ethics consultation involved in treating addiction as a terminal disease. Since the article is behind a subscription firewall, I will briefly summarize the case and some of the ethical problems outlined by Dr. Brown. The focus of this blog is to ask … Continue reading "Autonomy of Access vs. Autonomy of Decision Making in Opioid Addiction" (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - January 21, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Mark McQuain Tags: Health Care Allocation / Access / Public Health bioethics human dignity Medical Decision Making syndicated Source Type: blogs

Institutional Conscientious Objection
by Roger Crisp In a recent work-in-progress seminar at the Oxford Uehiro Centre, Xavier Symons, from the University of Notre Dame Australia, gave a fascinating and suggestive presentation based on some collaborative work he has been doing with Reginald Chua OP, from the Catholic Theological College, on institutional conscientious objection. Conscientious objection is usually discussed […] (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - January 21, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Roger Crisp Tags: Health Care abortion conscience conscientious objection Freedom of conscience institutional conscientious objection religion Roger Crisp's Posts syndicated Source Type: blogs

Nondiscrimination in Involuntary Denial of Treatment Act
West Virginia is considering legislation titled the "Nondiscrimination in Involuntary Denial of Treatment Act."  In essence, H.B. 2227 provides: "If a patient, the terms of a patient's advance directive, or a person legally authorized to make he... (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - January 21, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Determination of Death by Neurologic Criteria in the United States: The Case for Revising the Uniform Determination of Death Act
I am delighted that "Determination of Death by Neurologic Criteria in the United States: The Case for Revising the Uniform Determination of Death Act" is now available in the Journal of Law, Medicine & Ethics. Since 1981, the Unifor... (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - January 20, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Advance Directives: WHAT are they and WHY are they important?
Over the past decades, increasing emphasis on individual autonomy has led to the view that competent adults should decide for themselves how they want to be treated medically.  This shift in practice and policy has been accompanied by the adoption of advance directives that allow competent adults to specify in advance how they want to be treated, with the goal of extending respect for autonomy into periods of decisional incapacity. Advance Directives are written instructions about health care treatment made by adult patients before they lose decision-making capacity.  These instructions are completed ahead of ti...
Source: blog.bioethics.net - January 20, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Bioethics Today Tags: Health Care advance directives Author: Breslin syndicated Source Type: blogs

New Jersey Enacts Mini Patient Self Determination Act to Improve End-of-Life Care
Like others, I have lamented (and here) the abject failure of the federal Patient Self Determination Act. Over the past thirty years, it has done little to improve the quantity or quality of advance care planning. Seeking to fill this gap, New Jersey... (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - January 20, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

The Price for Eternal Youth is $1 Million and Dumping Ethics
by Craig Klugman, Ph.D. As the legend goes, in the 16th Century, when he was 51 years of age, Ponce de Leon received permission from the King and Queen of Spain to explore the islands north of Puerto Rico to search for the fountain of youth, a fabled spring that would grant eternal life and youth to whomever drank from it or bathed in it. He eventually discovered Florida and the southeast United States.1 Every few years, it seems that the next fountain of youth splashes across the news pages.… (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - January 20, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Craig Klugman Tags: Clinical Trials & Studies Featured Posts Genetics Informed Consent Research Ethics Science anti-aging ethics dumping Source Type: blogs

Parental Accessibility Rights for Emergency and Negligent Treatment (PARENT) Act
Iowa Senator Mike Lee recently introduced the Parental Accessibility Rights for Emergency and Negligent Treatment (PARENT) Act and the Parental Right to Know Act, a pair of bills designed to ensure that parents have access to the policies regarding the care and medical records of their children from hospitals and organizations that use taxpayer funding. “Parents play the most important role in caring for the health of their children,” Sen. Lee said in a press release. “It is critical that they have information about the policies of the health organizations to which they bring their children for care, and ...
Source: blog.bioethics.net - January 19, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Preserving Patient Dignity (Formerly: Patient Modesty):Volume 108
Continuing on with our current commentaries comparing physician vs veterinarians with regard to their relationship to the subjects (not objects)of their attention,  I thought the above graphic tells us something for allphysicians to also cons... (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - January 19, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Maurice Bernstein, M.D. Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Current Brain Death Conflicts in UK and US Courts
Yet another brain death dispute between parents and clinicians heads to court next week. Clinicians at St. Mary's Hospital in Manchester determined that 4-month-old Midrar Ali is dead. But his parents contest that determination and want organ-sust... (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - January 18, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Medical Aid in Dying: Assessing the Illinois Patient Choices at End of Life Act
I am delighted to be the 2020 John and Marsha Ryan Bioethicist in Residence at the Southern Illinois University School of Law and School of Medicine. Join me at the law school on February 26 for "Medical Aid in Dying: Assessing the Illinois Patient Choices at End of Life Act." Nearly 110,000 Illinoisans die every year. Many of these patients want control over the timing and manner of their death. Indeed, terminally ill patients in Illinois already have and use several legal “exit options.” But they generally do not have access to medical aid in dying (MAID). This may soon change. Across the country, a...
Source: blog.bioethics.net - January 18, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

A Year in Review: HIV & Drug Abuse Research in 2019
The Fordham HIV and Drug Abuse Prevention Research Ethics Training Institute (RETI), now in its eighth year, is a training grant sponsored by the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA). Each year, early career investigators across various fields receive research ethics training under principal investigator Dr. Celia Fisher. RETI fellows also conduct studies focused on ethical issues […] (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - January 17, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Ethics and Society Tags: Health Care Celia Fisher drug abuse Fordham University HIV and Drug Abuse Prevention Research Ethics Training Institute National Institute on Drug Abuse RETI syndicated Source Type: blogs

The Life Expectancy Of Your Favorite Presidential Candidate
Many of the front runners in the presidential campaign are octogenarians. President Trump, a virtual lock to be the Republican nominee, is 73 years old. Bernie Sanders and Joe Biden are 78 and 77, respectively. Which raises a question: if elected, how likely are they to survive a 4-year term in office? There’s no perfect […] The post The Life Expectancy Of Your Favorite Presidential Candidate appeared first on Peter Ubel. (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - January 17, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: peter Tags: Health Care Behavioral Economics and Public Policy Health & Well-being Peter Ubel syndicated Source Type: blogs

Kentucky Considers Medical Aid in Dying
When I made this Clinical Ethics Grand Rounds presentation (and here), just a few months ago, at the University of Kentucky, the state had never considered MAID legislation. That has now changed. Representative Mary Lou Marzian h... (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - January 17, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Controlling gene editing
The title does not mean societal or legal control of gene editing technology.  Rather, it speaks of controlling, or shutting off, a specific gene editing process.  In retrospect, it had to be the case that there is a resistance, or control, mechanism for the CRISPR system, the gene-editing machinery that functions as a way for … Continue reading "Controlling gene editing" (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - January 17, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Jon Holmlund Tags: Genetics Health Care bioethics biotechnology enhancement syndicated Source Type: blogs

BioethicsTV (January 13-16, 2020)
“Exploring ethical issues in TV medical dramas” by Craig Klugman, Ph.D. The Good Doctor (Season 3; Episode 11): Anesthesia and addiction; the limits of compassion; The Resident (Season 3; Episode 12): Dying (or not) on your own terms; Suing patients for medical debt; Chicago Med (Season 5; Episode 11): Quid pro quo—switched embryos, safe injection sites; surrogate withdrawal of life support The Good Doctor (Season 3; Episode 11): Anesthesia and addiction; the limits of compassion Carrie is a patient who arrives with a complicated leg fracture after falling while mountain biking.… (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - January 16, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Craig Klugman Tags: BioethicsTV End of Life Care Featured Posts Reproductive Ethics Technology #ChicagoMed #thegooddoctor #TheResident safe injection sites Source Type: blogs

To Restore Humanity in Health Care, Address Clinician Burnout
Health care in America is at a critical juncture. The number of people who need it continues to grow and costs have skyrocketed. But instead of being a beacon of healing, many health care organizations are beleaguered and overwhelmed. Burnout has become a rallying cry for nurses and doctors because it impedes their ability to uphold the foundational values of their professions and to serve in accordance with them. These realities have eroded the fundamental humanity of health care. The post To Restore Humanity in Health Care, Address Clinician Burnout appeared first on The Hastings Center. (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - January 16, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Susan Gilbert Tags: Health Care professional ethics clinician burnout Hastings Bioethics Forum Health and Health Care health care qualty National Academy of Medicine syndicated Source Type: blogs

MAID – Hawaii Department of Health Recommends Statutory Changes
While all ten MAID jurisdictions in the United States follow the Oregon model, they do not follow it exactly. There are key variations in (1) the waiting periods, (2) the manner of drug administration, (3) opt-out rights, and (4) other dimensions. Haw... (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - January 16, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Evidence Based Law Making on Voluntary Assisted Dying
Ben White and Lindy Willmott argue in the Australian Health Review that legislators need evidence-based law making as they deliberate proposed voluntary assisted dying laws. There has been limited recognition of the value of evidence-based approaches i... (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - January 16, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

What does the future hold for gene editing in China?
by Vera Lúcia Raposo, Ph.D. Last December it was made public that He Jiankui was sentenced to 3 years in prison and a fine of 3M yuan due to the genetic modification of two twin babies. This story is an epic science-fiction drama that might dictate the future of gene editing in China. Let’s go back in time, however, to late November 2018, when He Jiankui announced the birth of the first genetically modified babies in the entire world. The twin girls, Nana and Luna, were born in the aftermath of a scientific experiment (this is the proper designation for what happened) involving several couples in which th...
Source: blog.bioethics.net - January 15, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Blog Editor Tags: Clinical Ethics Clinical Trials & Studies Featured Posts Genetics HIV/AIDS Public Health Source Type: blogs

Medical Aid in Dying – No $1 Billion Savings
Twenty-five years ago, Zeke Emanuel and Peggy Battin estimated that widespread access to MAID would save $1 billion (in 2020 dollars). This was a high estimate, because (among other reasons) they assumed a MAID usage rate between 2.7% and 7.0%. I... (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - January 15, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

In the Defense of Plastic Surgery as a Feminist Choice
by Anu Antony   I am a plastic surgeon, a profession that involves understanding women’s aspirations not only in the corporeal sense, but also being cognizant and mindful of their psyche – the inner thoughts and feelings that drive them to choose plastic surgery. While choosing plastic surgery can be an empowering undertaking, many women […] (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - January 14, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: reflectivemeded Tags: Health Care syndicated Uncategorized Source Type: blogs

Time To Ban Kid-Friendly Flavors For E-Cigarettes
Cinnamon. Buttered popcorn. Strawberry and banana. Yummy tastes and smells that have lingered in my TV room, after my teenage son and his friends finish vaping. E-cigarette companies like Juul are creating flavors designed to lure young customers, following a tradition established by their cigarette-manufacturing predecessors. For a while, the Trump administration appeared poised to […] The post Time To Ban Kid-Friendly Flavors For E-Cigarettes appeared first on Peter Ubel. (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - January 14, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: peter Tags: Ethics Health Care Behavioral Economics and Public Policy Choice & Behavior Peter Ubel syndicated Source Type: blogs

Ethical Challenges in Discharge Planning: Stories from Patients (call for stories)
Narrative Inquiry in Bioethics will publish a collection of personal stories from patients who have navigated challenges in creating transition plans for discharge from acute or post-acute care hospitals. Elizabeth Pendo will edit the symposium: "Ethical Challenges in Discharge Planning: Stories from Patients." Discharge plans are meant to ensure a safe transition home or to another care facility. Patient goals, values, preferences, financial resources, abilities, support systems, and other resources available in the community should be considered. While many discharge decisions go smoothly, conflicts can...
Source: blog.bioethics.net - January 14, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

When My Time Comes – Conversations about Whether Those Who Are Dying Should Have the Right to Determine When Life Should End
Diane Rehm's second book on medical aid in dying will be available next month: When My Time Comes - Conversations about Whether Those Who Are Dying Should Have the Right to Determine When Life Should End. Through interviews with terminally ill patients, and with physicians, ethicists, spouses, relatives, and representatives of those who vigorously oppose the movement, Rehm gives voice to a broad range of people who are personally linked to the realities of medical aid in dying.  The book presents the fervent arguments–both for and against–that are propelling the current debates across the nation about...
Source: blog.bioethics.net - January 14, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs