An argument for heritable genome editing
Some weeks ago, a utilitarian perspective in favor of heritable genome editing was published (purchase or subscription required to read).  In it, the author, Kevin Smith of Abertay University in the United Kingdom, begins with a general defense of utilitarianism, the ethical philosophy that what is morally good is what produces the greatest good for … Continue reading "An argument for heritable genome editing" (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - February 7, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Jon Holmlund Tags: Genetics Health Care bioethics biotechnology reproduction syndicated Source Type: blogs

Inspector General Advises Consent, Not Mere Assent, to DNR Orders
In late January 2020, the Department of Veterans Affairs Office of Inspector General published an inspection report criticizing the manner in which a physician obtained consent for DNR orders. In contrast to significant other guidance, it appears that the OIG is suggesting that an "assent" approach to DNR orders is inappropriate. The OIG determined that the physician failed to engage in a "collaborative discussion with family involvement to include patients’ preferences and quality of life" and that this "likely led to the requests for a reversal of the DNR orders." For one patient,...
Source: blog.bioethics.net - February 6, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

BioethicsTV (January 27-31, 2020)
by Craig Klugman, Ph.D. The Good Doctor (Season 3; Episode 13): Making emotional decisions regarding cancer care; New Amsterdam (Season 2; Episode 12): Withdrawing ANH in PVS; Treating the Physical to Heal the Mental The Good Doctor (Season 3; Episode 13): Making emotional decisions regarding cancer care Reznick’s mother is dying of brain cancer. She is an artist and is unwilling to do any treatments that will affect her ability to create art. When her mother becomes unconscious and has a brain bleed, Reznick chooses a brain surgery to remove part of the brain that is bleeding rather than the full tumor removal that...
Source: blog.bioethics.net - February 6, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Craig Klugman Tags: BioethicsTV End of Life Care Featured Posts Professionalism Psychiatric Ethics Source Type: blogs

Yes, Virginia, Ethics Does Recognize Humor
by Craig Klugman, Ph.D. A Facebook connection, we can call them Virginia, recently posted an image of a metal ring with electrical prongs. The caption said “Introducing the new Trump is not my president ring, insert it into an outlet and bam, Trump is not your president.” Of course, plugging in a metal ring that you are holding into an electrical outlet would electrocute and potentially kill a person. The message is that people who are not supportive of the President should be die.… (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - February 6, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Craig Klugman Tags: Art Cultural Ethics Featured Posts Gender Disparities Politics Humor improv Source Type: blogs

Why Health Care Organizations Need Technology Ethics Committees
There is big money in using technology to find information in patient and medical staff data. Companies are rushing to cash in. The Food and Drug Administration has approved more than 40 artificial intelligence-based products for use in medicine. Tens of thousands of medical phone apps are tracking patients and gathering detailed medical information about them. These new technologies bring new ethical questions that health care organizations are poorly equipped to answer. The post Why Health Care Organizations Need Technology Ethics Committees appeared first on The Hastings Center. (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - February 5, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Susan Gilbert Tags: Ethics Health Care apps artificial intelligence Hastings Bioethics Forum Health and Health Care health care technology syndicated Source Type: blogs

Carter v Canada – Five Year Anniversary
Today is the fifth anniversary of the Supreme Court of Canada judgment in Carter v. Canada. This landmark decision held that prohibiting assisted suicide is contrary to the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms. The case compelled Parliament to legis... (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - February 5, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Patenting foundational technologies – recent developments in the CRISPR patent struggle
by Julian Cockbain[1] and Sigrid Sterckx[2] In a target article in this Journal in 2018, for which we were two of the co-authors, we discussed the problematic nature of the patenting of foundational (bio)technological processes, in particular the CRISPR-Cas9 (CRISPR) gene-editing technique. This note is intended to bring the Journal’s readers up to speed on a couple of important recent developments in the CRISPR patent sphere. In the case of CRISPR, the patent situation is complicated by the sheer number of parties seeking patents, as a result of which any entity seeking to use or develop CRISPR faces a forest of pat...
Source: blog.bioethics.net - February 4, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Blog Editor Tags: Featured Posts Genetics Health Regulation & Law OPC CRISPR patents Source Type: blogs

Twenty-first Century Divorce: Who Gets Custody of the Embryos?
A recent CBS news story provides yet another example of the technology and legal cart pulling the ethical horse. In short, in 2014, an Arizona couple used in vitro fertilization (IVF) to preserve her eggs after she learned she had breast cancer and would require chemotherapy. The woman’s then boyfriend originally declined to be the … Continue reading "Twenty-first Century Divorce: Who Gets Custody of the Embryos?" (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - February 4, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Mark McQuain Tags: Health Care bioethics biotechnology human dignity reproduction syndicated Source Type: blogs

Nursing Homes Fined for Failing to Verify Advance Directives
I just had a long discussion about the growing number of civil lawsuits brought when healthcare facilities treat incapacitated patients inconsistent with their advance directives. But I hastened to add that verdicts and settlements for money damages ar... (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - February 4, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

What Higher Ed Can Learn From Health Care
Check out my recent interview with The Chronicle of Higher Education about the rising costs of education and healthcare: For decades, higher education has come under public scrutiny for rising costs. But there is at least one other sector that seems to feel even more heat from policy makers and ire from the public. That […] The post What Higher Ed Can Learn From Health Care appeared first on Peter Ubel. (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - February 3, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: peter Tags: Health Care health care cost Peter Ubel syndicated Source Type: blogs

Domain Specific AI in Healthcare: An Ethical Perspective
What is Artificial Intelligence? This central question has captivated the minds of specialists – mathematicians, computer scientists, cognitive scientists, and the like – and passive observers since the days of Alan Turing and John von Neumann. In this discussion I will distinguish between three types of Artificial Intelligence – human level, superhuman, and domain specific. Through this exercise I hope to shed light on the difficulties in conceptually defining the term Artificial Intelligence, as well as dispel misconceptions about the state of the art in Artificial Intelligence. To what end? I hope that...
Source: blog.bioethics.net - February 3, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Bioethics Today Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Ecological Rationality: When Is Bias A Good Thing?
By Rebecca Brown Many people will be broadly familiar with the ‘heuristics and biases’ (H&B) program of work, made prominent by the psychologists Amos Tversky and Daniel Kahneman in the 1970s. H&B developed alongside the new sub-discipline of Behavioural Economics, both detailing the ways in which human decision-makers deviate from what would be expected of […] (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - February 3, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Rebecca Brown Tags: Decision making Health Care heuristics psychology rationality Rebecca Brown's Posts syndicated Source Type: blogs

What Is on the Horizon for Bioethics?
The Nuffield Council on Bioethics has published an info-graphic summary of its 2020 horizon scanning program. By holding workshops, engaging with a wide range of organisations and individuals, and by monitoring literature and news, across a wide ... (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - February 3, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

On Justice & Healthcare
At a bioethics conference two years ago, I heard the Surgeon General of the state of Florida say that one’s zip code was a more accurate determinant of one’s health than one’s DNA.  It took a while for that statement to sink in, but when it finally did, it was nothing short of shocking. Her comment … Continue reading "On Justice & Healthcare" (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - February 3, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Neil Skjoldal Tags: Health Care bioethics syndicated Source Type: blogs

Medical Aid in Dying: Six Variations Among U.S. State Laws
In  my upcoming talk at NCCMAID, I will discuss "Six Variations Among U.S. State Laws." (PPT handout here) But there may soon be more variations.  Several states that already have MAID laws are moving to amend them. For example, Hawaii has s... (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - February 2, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Justified Quarantine?
The 2019 novel coronavirus (2019-nCoV) is a force to be reckoned with, despite its unclear origins (see here and here).  From Wuhan, China, the virus has spread to all of the Chinese provinces, and, by 31 January, eighteen other countries.  By 30 January, the World Health Organization (WHO) had declared the situation a public health … Continue reading "Justified Quarantine?" (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - February 1, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: D. Joy Riley Tags: Health Care 2019-nCoV bioethics Corona virus PHEIC quarantine syndicated Upshur Wuhan Source Type: blogs

Hot Topics: Cool Talk- Physician Assisted Suicide
Join me in Minneapolis on March 18, 2020, for "Hot Topics: Cool Talk- Physician Assisted Suicide" at the University of St. Thomas Terrence J. Murphy Institute for Catholic Thought, Law, and Public Policy. I will be debating John Kelly, Secon... (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - February 1, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Why Epistemologists Should Sniff
By Charles Foster There are lots of big and clever books about epistemology. It’s a complex business. Although one can do some epistemology (some icy thinkers say all) without making any empirical claims about what the senses show (and hence how the senses work), such empirical claims are essential for the discipline to get any […] (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - February 1, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Charles Foster Tags: Decision making Health Care Science Charles Foster's Posts Reflections syndicated Source Type: blogs

Report from China: Ethical Questions on the Response to the Coronavirus
Hastings Center fellows in China discuss ethical questions about the response to the spreading coronavirus. The post Report from China: Ethical Questions on the Response to the Coronavirus appeared first on The Hastings Center. (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - January 31, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Susan Gilbert Tags: Health Care Public Health China coronavirus global health Hastings Bioethics Forum syndicated Source Type: blogs

Rosemary Bowen – Controlling Death with VSED (video)
At age 94, Rosemary Bowen hastened her death by voluntarily stopping eating and drinking (VSED) in 2018.  For twenty years, Rosemary Bowen had told her family that she would hasten her death when she was no longer able to live independently. Seve... (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - January 31, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Ethics of Pandemics: Coronavirus and Large Scale Quarantine
by Craig Klugman, Ph.D. The World Health Organization (WHO) has just declared “a public health emergency of international concern” for the coronavirus. The statement means that all countries should take this disease seriously and allows countries to close borders, cancel flights, and screen people in airports, all measures that some countries (such as the U.S.) were already taking. As scientists learn more about this disease and governments respond, China has taken several drastic measures to block the spread of the infection including an unprecedented quarantine of 50 million people.… (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - January 31, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Craig Klugman Tags: Cultural Featured Posts Global Ethics Health Care Politics Public Health China coronavirus Source Type: blogs

Can the Principles of Research Ethics Help Us Distribute Clinical Resources More Fairly?
by Hannah Giunta D.O., Ph.D. & Richard Sharp, Ph.D. In their article, MacKay and Saylor analyze the issue of fair subject selection in clinical research and suggest that this overarching principle is best understood as a collection of four sub-principles, namely fair inclusion, fair opportunity, fair burden sharing, and fair distribution of third-party risks. After describing these principles, the authors suggest several strategies for managing potential tensions between these four sub-imperatives, as conflicts are likely in practice. The authors’ strategies for negotiating the multiple ethical perspectives highl...
Source: blog.bioethics.net - January 30, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Blog Editor Tags: Clinical Trials & Studies Editorial-AJOB Featured Posts Health Disparities Research Ethics ECMO Source Type: blogs

Dementia Advance Directives – Legal Issue to Watch in 2020
Rutgers law professor Norman Cantor rightly  flags dementia advance directives as a legal issue to watch in 2020. "Progressive dementia afflicts millions of people, ultimately entailing precipitous mental decline and years of complete dependence ... (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - January 30, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Baby Yodas Everywhere
Celeste Ng’s Little Fires Everywhere is a great novel but that’s not why I love it. It is an exceptional bioethics puzzle box, where every time you think you’ve ‘solved’ it, the situation fractals out from underneath you. 1 The Mandalorian is a pretty good show in the vein of [...] (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - January 30, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Kyle Munkittrick Tags: Health Care bioethics Star Wars syndicated Source Type: blogs

Growing Consensus on the Need to Revise the Uniform Determination of Death Act
With law and neurology colleagues, I published two articles, in the past few weeks, that propose a Revised Uniform Determination of Death Act, the RUDDA. The shorter article is in the Annals of Internal Medicine. The longer article is in the&nbs... (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - January 30, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Growing Consensus on the Need to Revise the Uniform Determination of Death Act: Response to Miller and Nair-Collins
To address recent lawsuits that question whether the persistent of hormonal functions is consistent with death by neurologic criteria (such as the case of Jahi McMath), we proposed specific mention in a UDDA that loss of hormonal functions is not required for declaration of death by neurologic criteria. The post Growing Consensus on the Need to Revise the Uniform Determination of Death Act: Response to Miller and Nair-Collins appeared first on The Hastings Center. (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - January 29, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Susan Gilbert Tags: Health Care Brain Death end of life Hastings Bioethics Forum Jahi McMath syndicated Uniform Determination of Death Act Source Type: blogs

Is personhood a biased term?
In ethics it is very important to communicate with clearly defined terms. This becomes especially important when dealing with a very divisive topic such as abortion. Fifty years ago, in the ethical debates about abortion, some expressed concern about how the term human being was used by those who claimed that abortion was wrong. The … Continue reading "Is personhood a biased term?" (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - January 29, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Steve Phillips Tags: Health Care abortion bioethics Ethical Method / Grounding human dignity syndicated Source Type: blogs

American Healthcare Prices -Simply Outrageous
When it comes to healthcare spending, the U.S. is without peer. Consider the 20 countries making up the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (called the OECD by the cool kids). The organization includes countries like Australia, Austria, Belgium, Canada, Chile, and the Czech Republic. Oh also Finland, France, Germany…you get the idea. It also […] The post American Healthcare Prices -Simply Outrageous appeared first on Peter Ubel. (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - January 29, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: peter Tags: Health Care health care cost Peter Ubel syndicated Source Type: blogs

British Court Allows Clinicians to Stop Treatment for Dead Baby (Midrar Ali)
The British High Court has again ruled with clinicians in a brain death conflict.  Sadly, four-month-old Midrar Ali suffered a catastrophic anoxic brain injury during birth. By October 2019, clinicians at St Mary's Hospital in Manchester determin... (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - January 29, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Titus Cromer Dies – Again
Michigan clinicians determined that Titus Cromer died (on neurological criteria) in October 2019. But since his family contested that determination, Cromer's organs have been sustained for the past three months. It appeared that the family's confl... (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - January 28, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

10:56 – The Minute a Patient’s Life Ends and a Medical Student’s Life Changes
By Rachael D’Auria The hierarchy in medicine, dark humor used to cope with difficult patients, and embarrassment of not knowing answers to endless questions being thrown your way are some of the many horror stories students above me have attempted to prepare me for. However, no amount of preparation could prepare me for witnessing my […] (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - January 28, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: reflectivemeded Tags: Health Care syndicated Uncategorized Source Type: blogs

Health vs Choice? The Vaccination Debate.
On Sunday 3 November, OUC’s Dr Alberto Giubilini participated in a debate on compulsory vaccination at 2019 Battle of Ideas Festival (Barbican Centre, London). Chaired by Ellie Lee, the session also featured Dr Michael Fitzpatrick (GP and author, MMR and Autism: what parents need to know and Defeating Autism: a damaging delusion); Emilie Karafillakis (Vaccine Confidence Project); and Nancy McDermott (author, The Problem with […] (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - January 28, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Practical Ethics Tags: Health Care Alberto Giubilini's Posts children choice Debate medical ethics public discourse responsibility syndicated vaccination Video Series Source Type: blogs

A Responsible Death
As debates continue about the decisions people make about how to die, I wish to draw wider attention to the death of Paul Drier. There was little extraordinary about his death. He was a widower, had suffered from multiple health problems, and had been on kidney dialysis for 18 months. Considered to be too ill to qualify for a transplant, he decided to end dialysis. Two aspects of Mr. Drier’s death seem worth putting on record for bioethicists to remember. The post A Responsible Death appeared first on The Hastings Center. (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - January 27, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Susan Gilbert Tags: Health Care dialysis end of life Hastings Bioethics Forum hospice Paul Drier syndicated Source Type: blogs

The Scope of Advance Directives in Planning for Dementia
In conclusion, advance directives are important to avoid unwanted medical interventions, including simple interventions to address life-threatening conditions. But advance directives cannot preclude someone from entering dementia—to do that, one needs to consider VSED while having capacity. At the point of dementia, standard of care comfort care, with an appropriate strategy of feeding, should be provided.   (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - January 27, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Bioethics Today Tags: End of Life Care Health Care advance directives Author: Shelton dementia syndicated Source Type: blogs

Tinslee Lewis v. Cook Children ’ s Medical Center – Appellate Argument on February 4, 2020
Cook Children's Medical Center argues that continuing life-sustaining treatment for its 11-month-old patient Tinslee Lewis offers her no clinical benefit and causes her to suffer. But the hospital must continue that disputed treatment pending litigatio... (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - January 27, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

BioethicsTV (January 21-24, 2020): #NewAmsterdam; #ChicagoMed
New Amsterdam (Seaons 2; Episode 11): Role of electronic medical records; Experimental medicine; Chicago Med (Season 5; Episode 12): When the personal compromises the professional New Amsterdam (Seaons 2; Episode 11): Role of electronic medical records; Experimental medicine Goodwin makes a new policy that no screens are allowed in patient rooms—no tablets, cellphones, laptops, or computers. The reaction from the doctors is fast and furious—”that isn’t possible.” They need screens to document patient information and to know the name of the patient in front of them.… (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - January 27, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Craig Klugman Tags: BioethicsTV Featured Posts #ChicagoMed #NewAmsterdam Source Type: blogs

Hospital Transfers Corpse to Michigan Rehabilitation Facility (Titus Cromer)
Clinicians at Beaumont Health determined that Titus Cromer was brain dead on October 24, 2019. But they have continued organ-sustaining treatment for 88 days while a conflict has been litigated in the U.S. District Court for the Eastern District of Michigan. Last Monday, Cromer was discharged from Beaumont and transported to a rehabilitation facility in mid-Michigan. But the family plans to continue its litigation seeking to annul the state’s “Determination of Death” law. The family's attorney stated: "The next battle is should Michigan have this statute that doesn't give a person...
Source: blog.bioethics.net - January 26, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs