Biotechnology and the Future of Medicine
This is one of the best bargains in bioethics continuing education - $50 for two days of world class programming at Harvard Medical School on March 9-10, 2020. The 2020 Annual Bioethics Conference will explore the potential of biotechnology to drive a... (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - February 27, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Cross Post: Climate change: How do I cope with inevitable decline?
Written by Neil Levy Originally published in The Conversation I recently watched an interview with David Attenborough, in which he was asked whether there is hope that things can get better for our planet. He replied that we can only slow down the rate at which things get worse. It seems to me that this […] (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - February 27, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Neil Levy Tags: Environmental Ethics Health Care Neil Levy's Posts syndicated The Conversation Source Type: blogs

Pandemic Ethics: Should Frontline Doctors and Nurses Get Preferential Treatment?
Dominic Wilkinson, University of Oxford It is mid-March 2020. James is a 29-year-old junior doctor working in a London hospital. Last week, James cared for a man who had become sick after returning from abroad. The man had been treated in isolation and is now improving. However, James has since become unwell. He developed a […] (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - February 26, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Dominic Wilkinson Tags: Health Care Pandemic Ethics syndicated Source Type: blogs

Should Patients Diagnosed With Alzheimer ’s Or Dementia Be Able To Choose Assisted Suicide?
I was on KPCC (NPR) in Los Angeles, yesterday, to address the question "Should Patients Diagnosed With Alzheimer’s Or Dementia Be Able To Choose Assisted Suicide?" A recent op-ed in the L.A. Times titled, “My friend has dementia and wants to end her life. California’s assisted-suicide law excludes her,” shines a light on the complexities of expanding the state’s law beyond patients with a cancer diagnosis or terminal illness. The law, passed in 2015 and modeled after a 1997 Oregon statute, allows physicians to give lethal drugs to mentally competent adults when they’re faced wi...
Source: blog.bioethics.net - February 26, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

The Cost Of Dying In The US Is Exorbitant. Behavioral Economics Explains Why.
Six-year old Kimmy Merrill fell into an abandoned well outside of Oswega, Pennsylvania, her cries unnoticed in the remote countryside until her mother Susan wandered within earshot of the well. Unable to save Kimmy even with the help of local firefighters, Susan pleaded for rescue workers to dig a hole parallel to the well. Desperate […] The post The Cost Of Dying In The US Is Exorbitant. Behavioral Economics Explains Why. appeared first on Peter Ubel. (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - February 25, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: peter Tags: Health Care health care cost Peter Ubel syndicated Source Type: blogs

Immigrant Health in the Public Charge Era: 15 Essential Articles
The public charge rule went into effect nationwide yesterday, formalizing the “public charge era” that began when the draft rule was leaked three years ago. The rule jeopardizes eligibility for legal permanent residency if applicants are deemed public charges based on even short-term use of federally funded programs, such as health insurance, housing subsidies, or food stamps. Anticipation of the rule has had chilling effects on the behavior of immigrants, who have avoided or withdrawn from health-related programs for which they are eligible. What follows is a selected bibliography designed to support learning ...
Source: blog.bioethics.net - February 25, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Susan Gilbert Tags: Health Care Hastings Bioethics Forum immigrant health syndicated Source Type: blogs

Medical Aid in Dying – Evidence & Data
Compassion & Choices has published a new 37-page report that collects a lot of evidence and data on medical aid in dying.  Notably, similar evidence was recently carefully collected, reviewed, and evaluated by the Quebec Superior Court. And s... (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - February 25, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Pandemic Ethics – Resources 2020
With all the concern at present about the coronavirus outbreak in China (and the rest of the world), we will host a special series on the blog relating to ethical issues during pandemics. We last ran a series on this topic in 2009 during the Swine flu outbreak. In this blog, I’ll collect together blogs […] (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - February 25, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Dominic Wilkinson Tags: Health Care Pandemic Ethics syndicated Source Type: blogs

BioethicsTV (Feb. 10-21, 2020): #TheGoodDoctor #NewAmsterdam #ChicagoMed
by Craig Klugman, Ph.D. The Good Doctor (Season 3; Episode 14): Lying; Social Media; Internet Medicine; The Good Doctor (Season 3; Episode 15): Pressuring a patient; Surgery to correct social problems;  New Amsterdam (Seasons 2; Episode 13): End of life; Battery; Chicago Med (Season 5; Episode 14): Can an abuser’s victim make his medical decisions?; Misdiagnosis The Good Doctor (Season 3; Episode 14): Lying; Social Media; Internet Medicine Cassie is a patient with a rare disorder—hey hyoid bone is too long and this causes problems.… (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - February 25, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Craig Klugman Tags: BioethicsTV Decision making End of Life Care Featured Posts Media Professionalism Source Type: blogs

Clinical Ethics Boot Camp: Religious and Cultural Implications at the End of Life.
Join the Clinical Ethics Department at Children's Minnesota for the Clinical Ethics Boot Camp: Religious and Cultural Implications at the End of Life. This year's Clinical Ethics Boot Camp on March 20th and 21st will address the specific needs of pati... (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - February 25, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

A Dangerous Son: Tragic Circumstances and Tough Conversations
This past weekend, I watched A Dangerous Son, Liz Garbus’ documentary about the overwhelming obstacles that U.S. parents—especially mothers—face in getting help for their mentally ill children.   The film follows three mothers who in the course of the filming each face a barrage of insults, death threats, and violent behavior from their critically mentally ill adolescent sons.  In the face of this, each of these mothers advocate fiercely for their sons to gain access to mental and behavioral health services while simultaneously trying to keep themselves and other family members safe at home...
Source: blog.bioethics.net - February 24, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Bioethics Today Tags: Health Care Adolescent Health Author: Bunch Bioethics and Public Policy mental health syndicated Source Type: blogs

New Aging and Disability Law " Explainer " Series Covers Healthcare Proxies, Ethics Committees
The Government Law Center at Albany Law School has released the first four publications in its "explainer" series on Aging and Disability Law for state and local policy makers. Healthcare Proxies: Appointing People with the Power to Make Healthcare Decisions for OthersDescribes how patients can plan achieving their desired medical treatment even if they lose decision-making capacity by executing a health care proxy which authorizes their agent to act on the incapable patient's behalf. 'Act Now’ Healthcare ProxiesDescribes how the "act now" healthcare proxy differs from a traditional health care pr...
Source: blog.bioethics.net - February 24, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Spanish Flu Epidemicby Jacalyn Duffin, MD, PhD
[read more] (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - February 23, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Lucy Bruell Tags: Health Care history of medicine Short Takes syndicated Source Type: blogs

Video Advance Directives: Growth and Benefits of Audiovisual Recording
Conclusion (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - February 23, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Final Exit Network Resurrected in Arizona as Choice and Dignity
Episcopal priest and thanatologist John L. Abraham has started Choice and Dignity, a right-to-die non-profit in Tucson, Arizona. The core mission is to take over the sort of counseling on how to non-medically hasten death that he used to do for Fi... (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - February 22, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Who Decides? Medical Intervention for Transgender and Intersex Children
Who should decide whether medical intervention on a child’s body is necessary? Ideally, the person who will undergo the treatment should have a say in these decisions. Patients themselves, even if they are children, should understand all their options and assent to whatever procedures are on the table. Technically, parents are the ones providing consent… Read more The post Who Decides? Medical Intervention for Transgender and Intersex Children appeared first on The Hastings Center. (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - February 21, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Susan Gilbert Tags: Health Care Children and Families Hastings Bioethics Forum intersex legislation medical treatment syndicated Transgender Source Type: blogs

Portugal Parliament Approves 5 Bills Legalizing Medically Assisted Death
Portugal’s parliament voted in favor of allowing euthanasia and medical aid in dying for terminally ill people. (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - February 21, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

A principalist argument against heritable genome editing
In May of 2019 The New Bioethics carried a paper (purchase or subscription required) by Jennifer Gumer of Columbia and Loyola Marymount Universities, summarizing an argument against heritable genome editing (the kind in which an embryo’s genes are edited so that the change will be passed down to the subject’s descendants), based on Belmont principalism.  … Continue reading "A principalist argument against heritable genome editing" (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - February 21, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Jon Holmlund Tags: Genetics Health Care bioethics biotechnology enhancement human dignity reproduction syndicated Source Type: blogs

“Living robots”: Ethical questions about Xenobots
by Simon Coghlan, Ph.D. and Kobi Leins, Ph.D. Xenobots have been called “novel living machines” and “living robots”. A co-author of the paper that recently introduced xenobots, said: They’re neither a traditional robot nor a known species of animal. [They’re] a new class of artefact: a living, “programmable organism”. These “reconfigurable organisms” have already provoked philosophical and ethical questions. Xenobots are under 1mm in size and composed of 500-1000 cells from frog (Xenopus laevis) embryos. After culturing extracted embryonic stem cells, micro-s...
Source: blog.bioethics.net - February 20, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Blog Editor Tags: Environmental Ethics Featured Posts Philosophy & Ethics Science Technology Source Type: blogs

Supreme Court Rules Guardian Can Authorize Withdrawing Life Support without Court Approval
This week, the Supreme Court of New Hampshire issued a decision holding that court approval is not needed for a guardian's request to remove a patient from life support. The guardian’s general authority includes the decision to end life support. Especially where there is consensus among the guardian, the patient's attorney, and the hospital, a judge’s involvement is "neither necessary nor warranted." (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - February 20, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Bioethicist Lecture to Look at Medical Aid in Dying Possibilities in Illinois
A presentation that assesses why a proposal that would allow terminally ill patients to obtain medical assistance to end their lives should be passed by the Illinois General Assembly is the focus of the 2020 John and Marsha Ryan Bioethicist in Residence lecture next week at Southern Illinois University Carbondale.  Thaddeus Mason Pope, director of the Health Law Institute at Mitchell Hamline School of Law, will present “Medical Aid in Dying: Assessing the Illinois Patient Choices at End of Life Act.”  The lecture is at 5 p.m., Wednesday, Feb. 26, at the SIU School of Law in Carbondale. The lecture is ...
Source: blog.bioethics.net - February 20, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Simon ’ s Laws – Strong v. Weak Varieties
More state legislatures are considering Simon's Law. Bills are pending in Idaho (H.B. 519), Michigan (H.B. 5476), and other states. But a closer look at the bills and statutes (in Arizona, Kansas, Missouri, and other states) shows that there are two f... (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - February 19, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Dr Neil Armstrong – Why is Mental Healthcare so Ethically Confusing
In the first St. Cross seminar of the term, Dr. Neil Armstrong talked about ethical challenges raised by mounting bureaucratic processes in the institutional provision of mental healthcare. Drawing on vignettes from his ethnographic fieldwork, Dr. Armstrong argued that the bureaucratization of mental healthcare has led to a situation in which the provision of care […] (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - February 19, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Jonathan Pugh Tags: Health Care Jonny Pugh's Posts medical ethics podcasts syndicated Uncategorized Source Type: blogs

British Court of Appeal Upholds Brain Death (Midrar Ali)
Last week, the British Court of Appeal released a press summary of its judgment in the case of Midrar Ali v. Manchester University NHS Trust. This week, the court posted the full judgment. In short, the court sustained the trial court judgment. 1. It ... (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - February 18, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Assessing and Respecting Sentience After Brexit
Thanks to a generous grant from Open Philanthropy, last year the Uehiro Centre for Practical Ethics and the Wellcome Centre for Ethics and Humanities co-sponsored a workshop with the Royal Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (RSPCA) examining the ethical and legal implications of recent advancements in our ability to assess the mental […] (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - February 18, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Adam Shriver Tags: Animal Ethics Health Care Adam Shriver's Posts Brexit Sentience syndicated Source Type: blogs

Justified without Justice in the Realities of Warfare
STUDENT VOICES | A Reflection on The 2019 National Conference on Ethics in America at West PointBy Marla Hasin Imagine being stuck in a coffin-like box, with just enough room to feel the rise of your chest as you inhale. You attempt to look at your chest, but you are halted by the thump of […] (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - February 18, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Ethics and Society Tags: Health Care Justice CIA consequentialism Fordham University Center for Ethics Education Fordham University Student Voices Master of Arts in Ethics and Society Opinion Philosophical Ethics philosophy syndicated torture Uncategorized Source Type: blogs

Avoiding Compassion Fatigue: Drain Less, Recharge More
By Eran Magen You open yourself up to the pain of others, in order to be a comforting presence in the middle of a terrible experience. It helps them, and it drains you. It is exhausting to experience so much secondhand suffering. Over time, it sucks the color out of your own life, leaves you […] (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - February 18, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: reflectivemeded Tags: Health Care syndicated Uncategorized Source Type: blogs

The Advancing Slippery Slope of Organ Donation and Euthanasia
The timing of organ donation relative to death of the donor is critical to the survivability and future functioning of the donated organs in the transplant recipient. With cardiovascular death, circulation ceases in the donor causing his or her death, making it legally and ethically permissible to retrieve the organs for donation. Unfortunately, cardiovascular death … Continue reading "The Advancing Slippery Slope of Organ Donation and Euthanasia" (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - February 18, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Mark McQuain Tags: Health Care bioethics Euthanasia; Slippery Slope Arguments; human dignity organ donation syndicated Source Type: blogs

USMLE Step 1 Goes Pass/Fail: What Happens Now for U.S. Medical Students?
by Julia Knopes, Ph.D. Recently, the National Board of Medical Examiners (NBME) announced that the USMLE Step 1 exam for medical students will change its score reporting from a numeric score to pass/fail as of 2022. This news signals a substantial shift for medical education in North America and in particular the United States, as numeric Step 1 scores have been traditionally used to screen the most competitive applicants for physician residency programs. My hope is that the change in Step 1 scoring may lead to more holistic residency applications, as well as reduced medical student burnout when facing these life-altering ...
Source: blog.bioethics.net - February 18, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Blog Editor Tags: Education Ethics Featured Posts Professionalism Step ! USMLE Source Type: blogs

Globalized Science in a Deglobalizing World
The arrest of Harvard chemist and nanobiologist Charles Lieber on charges of lying about his research funding from China encapsulates two phenomena currently in tension: the global nature of modern science and attempts to nationalize the fruits of science. The post Globalized Science in a Deglobalizing World appeared first on The Hastings Center. (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - February 17, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Susan Gilbert Tags: Health Care Science Charles Lieber China global research Hastings Bioethics Forum nationalism Science and Society syndicated Source Type: blogs

Of Risks and Benefits
Among the most fundamental concerns regarding medical, biomedical, and bioethical decision making are the concepts of risk and benefit. Of course, benefit is better than risk so this might seem to be a fairly easy balance to calculate. But it is not. I... (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - February 17, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Bioethics Today Tags: Health Care Author: Kaplan risk syndicated Source Type: blogs

It ’s My Right: The Handmade Death of Herta Sturmann (VSED Video)
Watch this 25-minute film of a patient who does VSED. "My mother had congestive heart failure and decided not to submit herself to the indignities of medical intervention. When she got too weak to get out of bed, she decided to stop eating and drinking (in German it’s called Sterbefasten or Death Fast, in the US it’s called VSED – Voluntarily Stopping Eating and Drinking)." "My outspoken mother insisted I film our family as we navigated this fraught process together. My brother and I cared for her round the clock during the ten days it took her to die at home. We then washed her body, set h...
Source: blog.bioethics.net - February 17, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Leveraging Video Technology to Enhance Patient Safety and Deliver Concordant Care
Join me on Wednesday, February 19, 2020, for a C-TAC webinar, "Leveraging Video Technology to Enhance Patient Safety and Deliver Concordant Care." My talk is based on my forthcoming article: "Video Advance Directives: Growth and Benefits of Audiovisual Recording." This will be in a symposium issue of the SMU Law Review celebrating the 30th anniversary of Cruzan. Advance care planning conversations are the first step in ensuring that people communicate their preferences and goals of care, but how can we make sure that those wishes are understood and honored?  TRIAD VIII was the first evidence-based ...
Source: blog.bioethics.net - February 16, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

National Clinicians Conference on Medical Aid in Dying (NCCMAID) – Day 2
NCCMAID has been valuable. I have had the opportunity to meet both prescribing and consulting physicians from almost every state where it is available. I got a chance to catch up with leading Canadian clinicians like Stephanie Green and Ellen Wiebe. ... (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - February 15, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Medical Aid in Dying: Six Variations in U.S. State Laws (video)
This is a practice video of a presentation ("Medical Aid in Dying: Six Variations in U.S. State Laws") that I am doing, this morning, for the National Clinicians Conference on Medical Aid in Dying (NCCMAID) at U.C. Berkeley. (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - February 14, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs