Virginia Board of Health Promulgates Medical Futility Regulations
Last week, the Virginia Board of Health promulgated regulations that update the rules for the licensure of hospitals. The regulations were required to conform to last year's amendments to the Virginia medical futility statute. Here is the relevant text: Each hospital that is equipped to provide life-sustaining treatment shall develop a policy to determine the medical or ethical appropriateness of proposed medical care, which shall include: 1. A process for obtaining a second opinion regarding the medical and ethical appropriateness of proposed medical care in cases in which a physician has determined proposed care to be me...
Source: blog.bioethics.net - July 28, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Other Stuff: A child ’s right to an education
Some NYC ultra-Orthodox yeshivas provide little or no secular education to their boys, who leave school illiterate in English and with third-grade math skills.  They have never heard of the American Revolution, written an essay, or entered a science fair.  They cannot pass the GED and are virtually unemployable outside of their community.  Some of … Continue reading Other Stuff: A child’s right to an education (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - July 27, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: denasdavis Tags: Health Care syndicated Uncategorized Source Type: blogs

Parental Treatment Refusals: What Your Responsibilities Are When Mom and Dad Decline Cancer Treatment for a Child
In my latest Law and Ethics in Oncology column for the ASCO Post, I address "Parental Treatment Refusals: What Your Responsibilities Are When Mom and Dad Decline Cancer Treatment for a Child."  This is the opposite of a medical futility conflict.... (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - July 27, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Avoiding Dementia, Causing Moral Distress
In “Avoiding Deep Dementia,” an essay in the September/October 2018 issue of the Hastings Center Report, legal scholar Norman Cantor explains why he has an advance directive that calls  for voluntary stopping of eating and drinking as a means of ending his life if he develops dementia and reaches a particular state of decline. Cantor’s essay and three … Continue reading Avoiding Dementia, Causing Moral Distress (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - July 26, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: denasdavis Tags: Health Care syndicated Uncategorized Source Type: blogs

Oregon Expands Medical Aid in Dying Access
This week, Oregon Governor Kate Brown signed legislation to amend the Oregon Death with Dignity Act that allows doctors to waive the waiting period requirements for medical aid in dying if the patient is not expected to live long enough to complete them. The Act allows mentally capable, terminally ill adults with six months or less to live to have the option to request a doctor’s prescription for medication they can decide to take if their suffering becomes unbearable, and die peacefully in their sleep. The amendment, Senate Bill 579, was approved by the Senate in May and the House of Representatives last week a...
Source: blog.bioethics.net - July 26, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Promoting vaccination with a not-too-heavy hand
This week’s Nature has a worthwhile read, “Mandate Vaccination with Care.”    The recent rise in the number of cases of measles is well-documented in the general press, and there is a strong argument that it is a social good that sufficient numbers of children be vaccinated for a range of infectious diseases.  Your correspondent considers … Continue reading "Promoting vaccination with a not-too-heavy hand" (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - July 26, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Jon Holmlund Tags: Health Care Allocation / Access / Public Health Consent / Research Health Care Practice syndicated Source Type: blogs

Thaddeus Pope – Research Agenda 2019-2020
This is a summary of the research and writing projects that I have planned for 2019-2020. (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - July 25, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Puberty-Blocking Drugs: The Difficulties of Conducting Ethical Research
The ethics of research trials for young people with gender dysphoria are complicated. Billion Photos/Shutterstock Dominic Wilkinson, University of Oxford and Julian Savulescu, University of Oxford A recent Newsnight programme reported that a major UK puberty-blocking trial is under investigation. Doctors at a London clinic provided drugs to block the development of puberty in young […] (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - July 25, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Dominic Wilkinson Tags: Decision making Health Care Research Ethics bioethics Children and Families Dominic Wilkinson's Posts Julian Savulescu's Posts medical ethics syndicated Source Type: blogs

Medical Decision-Making for Unrepresented Patients – California Appeals Court Clarifies Procedures
This week, the California Court of Appeal published a 73-page decision on how nursing homes must make treatment decisions for unrepresented residents. The decades-old California Health and Safety Code § 1418.8 establishes an interdisciplinary team (IDT) procedure for nursing home residents who lack capacity to make their own health care decisions. But, in 2016, pursuant to a petition from California Advocates for Nursing Home Reform (CANHR), the Alameda County Superior Court held the statute unconstitutional for failing to offer due process protections such as notice to the resident.  The Court of ...
Source: blog.bioethics.net - July 25, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

New Patient Rights Bill Does Not Do Right by Patients
by Craig Klugman, Ph.D. One of the cornerstones of modern bioethics, at least in the area of death and dying, is the notion of autonomy, that people are able to make decisions about medical care at the end of life. One way that they can exercise autonomy is by completing advance directives—directives to physicians and families (i.e. living wills), powers of attorney for health care, and POLSTs. A new federal bill proposed by 3 Republicans (Cramer, Daines, and Blackburn) in the Senate might cut off federal funding for most hospitals that followed patient orders to withdraw and withhold medical care for the purposes of...
Source: blog.bioethics.net - July 24, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Craig Klugman Tags: End of Life Care Featured Posts Health Regulation & Law Politics Reproductive Ethics Source Type: blogs

Improving the Evidence Base for Autism Support and Assistive Technologies
by Leah McClimans, Ph.D. The Autism CARES (Collaboration, Accountability, Research, Education and Support) Act is currently up for reauthorization before Congress. Autism CARES is the main source of federal funding for ASD Spectrum Disorder (ASD) research, services, training and monitoring. A version of this Act was signed into law in 2006, and since then over $3.1 billion has been dedicated to ASD research and training. It’s a crucial piece of legislation in part because it aims to help us understand better what interventions and assistive technologies work to support people with ASD and their families.… (Sou...
Source: blog.bioethics.net - July 24, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Leah McClimans Tags: Clinical Ethics Featured Posts Health Care Health Regulation & Law Institutions, Centers, Funding Neuroethics Pediatrics Public Health autism Source Type: blogs

Mind Your Loved Ones – the App
Mind Your Loved Ones (MYLO) is a mobile App that gives individuals the ability to store their own and their loved ones’ critical medical information, healthcare directives, and other related data on their Apple or Android phones, iPads or tablets.  Users can send this information directly to healthcare providers or to their family members and trusted friends. Information can be sent via email, fax, text, or print. Here is a description from the July-August ABA Journal. (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - July 24, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Writing “The Presentation on Egypt,” An interview with author Camille Bordas by Sebastian Galbo
[read more] (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - July 23, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: GalN Tags: Health Care Literature Arts and Medicine Blog syndicated The Author Speaks Source Type: blogs

Constitutional Challenge to Uniform Determination of Death Act – Appeals Court Wants More Briefing
Last week, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit asked for more briefing in Fonseca v. Smith. This case challenges the constitutionality of the California Uniform Determination of Death Act. While oral argument was six months ago, in January, the court just now issued an order asking the parties to brief: 1.  Whether Appellant Jonee Fonseca’s claims are moot in light of counsel’s admission that an amended death certificate may not affect her likelihood of receiving government benefits or additional insurance coverage. 2.  Whether the court should alternatively affirm on t...
Source: blog.bioethics.net - July 23, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Partnership with Amazon Alexa and NHS Further Deflates Privacy Protections
by Craig Klugman, Ph.D. Last week, Amazon announced a new partnership with the UK’s National Health Service(NHS). In this arrangement, when patients ask their Alexa personal digital assistant health questions, the answers will come from the NHS’s website. Instead of scrolling through pages of web results that include some good sources and some not-so-good-sources, people in the UK will find their answers coming from the nation’s health care provider. The project could be an important step in helping people with access needs.… (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - July 23, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Craig Klugman Tags: Decision making Education Featured Posts Privacy Social Justice Technology Alexa NHS Source Type: blogs

Medical Photos, CPR Dolls, and Car Crash Dummies: When Women Aren ’t Represented in Research we Fail Women’s Health
by Keisha Ray, Ph.D.   In May a twitter user posted a picture depicting the muscular system of a female that included milk ducts. It quickly went viral as people realized that in their various health science and anatomy and physiology courses they had never seen a picture of a female muscular system, only a picture of a male muscular system. After thinking back to my own health and anatomy and physiology courses I took during high school and college, I myself was taken aback by the realization that I had never seen a picture like this before.… (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - July 22, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Keisha Ray Tags: Education Ethics Featured Posts Gender Disparities Health Disparities Justice Public Health Research Ethics Uncategorized Source Type: blogs

What I Learned from Dan Callahan About Bioethics, Writing, and Leadership
I will say it: Dan Callahan is the most important person in Bioethics. For his ideas; for his role in creating and nurturing The Hastings Center; and for his ability to spot, encourage, and motivate talent. Dan is credited as author or editor of 47 books and many hundreds of articles, chapters and the like.… Read more The post What I Learned from Dan Callahan About Bioethics, Writing, and Leadership appeared first on The Hastings Center. (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - July 22, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Marnie Klein Tags: Health Care bioethics syndicated Uncategorized Source Type: blogs

High fives and sobs greet UnitedHealthcare ’s reversal of denials for gene therapy
Two young children will receive a novel drug to treat spinal muscular atrophy thanks to UnitedHealthcare’s reversal of denials for gene therapy: https://www.washingtonpost.com/business/economy/high-fives-and-sobs-greet-unitedhealthcares-reversal-of-denials-for-child-gene-therapy/2019/07/18/8ddeb3ae-a974-11e9-9214-246e594de5d5_story.html … (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - July 22, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Sophie Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: blogs

Medical Futility / Therapeutic Obstinacy Case in Madrid – Maria Teresa Blanco
Until a few days ago, Spain was grappling with a medical futility case. But the conflict may now be moot, since the patient recovered and was discharged. THE PATIENT54-year-old Maria Teresa Blanco suffers from a neuro-degenerative ataxia that keeps her speechless and barely moving. Over the past three years, she has been admitted more than 20 times to Hospital Universitario Principe de Asturias. In early July 2019, she was admitted with sepsis. THE HOSPITALClinicians soon determined that "advanced techniques of resuscitation" which are "aggressive and invasive" should not be used&quo...
Source: blog.bioethics.net - July 22, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Kaiser Permanente National Bioethics Symposium
The third biennial Kaiser Permanente National Bioethics Symposium will be October 3-5, 2019 in Portland, Oregon. There is a wide range of great speakers, including Bob McCauley, Denise Dudzinski, and Paula Goodman-Crews. There is a keynote by Sharon Kaufman, "Ordinary Medicine – Ethical Rationality in an Aging Society." There is a second keynote by Tod Chambers, "Ritual in Medical Ethics." (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - July 21, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

National Clinicians Conference on Medical Aid in Dying
The National Clinicians Conference on Medical Aid in Dying has announced a call for proposals from potential speakers. Please see the tentative curriculum for guidance. This is intended as a guide only. The organizers encourage you to propose addition... (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - July 20, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Daniel Callahan – A Remembrance
There is a strange but charming tradition in the world of classical music of citing musical pedigrees. It’s not unlike the familiar parlor game Six Degrees of Kevin Bacon, but carried out with far greater seriousness. For instance, the renowned American pianist and conductor Leon Fleisher, still performing in his 90s, was a student of… Read more The post Daniel Callahan – A Remembrance appeared first on The Hastings Center. (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - July 20, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Susan Gilbert Tags: Health Care Hastings Bioethics Forum syndicated Source Type: blogs

Legal Requirements May Conflict With Clinicians ’ Ethical Obligations
The June 2019 issue of Medical Ethics Advisor includes interviews with me and others on how to navigate conflicts between ethical and legal obligations.  (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - July 19, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

“Safe” gene editing
The New England Journal of Medicine carries a brief article about “Controlling CRISPR-Cas9 Gene Editing” (subscription required).  The upshot: RNA used as a medicine, as in the case of “CRISPR” to edit genes, can hang around well after administration, and alter genes other than the ones intended to be altered.  These “off-target” effects could lead … Continue reading "“Safe” gene editing" (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - July 19, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Jon Holmlund Tags: Genetics Health Care bioethics biotechnology syndicated Source Type: blogs

A Tribute to Daniel Callahan 1930-2019
by Tom Murray, Ph.D. I will say it: Dan Callahan is the most important person in Bioethics. For his ideas; for his role in creating and nurturing The Hastings Center; and for his ability to spot, encourage, and motivate talent. Dan is credited as author or editor of 47 books and many hundreds of articles, chapters and the like. His 1970 book, Abortion: Law, Choice & Morality, set a standard for his future writing and for the nascent field of Bioethics: Thorough research, careful attention to the relevant facts, fair-minded weighing of the moral arguments, and the courage to take a stand on a profoundly controversi...
Source: blog.bioethics.net - July 18, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thomas Murray Tags: Featured Posts In Memoriam Source Type: blogs

Daniel Callahan: In Memoriam
Daniel Callahan, a national voice for responsible health and science, who pioneered the field of bioethics, died this week, just before his 89th birthday. The Hastings Center has a wonderful essay honoring Callahan's life and work. (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - July 18, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Daniel Callahan: In Memoriam
Daniel Callahan, a national voice for responsible health and science, who pioneered the field of bioethics, died Tuesday, two days before his 89th birthday. In 1969, Callahan cofounded The Hastings Center with Willard Gaylin. Callahan served as the Center’s director from 1969 to 1983, president from 1984 to 1996, and president emeritus, actively publishing numerous… Read more The post Daniel Callahan: In Memoriam appeared first on The Hastings Center. (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - July 18, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Millie Solomon Tags: Health Care Daniel Callahan Founder Hastings Bioethics Forum Hastings Center Founder Hastings Center founding syndicated Source Type: blogs

Another British Medical Futility Court Case -Tafida Raqeeb
The UK has another pediatric medical futility case. Clinicians at Royal London Hospital doctors said there is no hope that Tafida Raqeeb will recover from the traumatic brain injury she suffered in February. They say further invasive medical ... (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - July 18, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Another NY Hospital Refuses to Follow EOL Wishes
I just blogged about a new lawsuit against Montefiore Hospital for failing to follow the patient's end-of-life directives. Now, a family member writes that another NY healthcare facility, Parker Jewish Institute for Health Care and Rehabilitation, refuses to follow her father's end-of-life wishes. Jennifer Friedlin writes: "For the past month, my mother and I have been advocating for the deactivation of my father’s pacemaker. Yet despite my parents having taken every measure to ensure that they would control the ends of their lives, two months since a severe stroke destroyed whatever qua...
Source: blog.bioethics.net - July 17, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

California Family Questions Hospital ’ s Brain Death Determination
On July 7, 2019, California resident Anthony Vallejo (30) suffered an asthma attack that led to cardiac arrest. On July 12, clinicians at Sutter Delta Medical Center, declared him brain-dead. Since Vallejo is a registered organ donor, clinicians planne... (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - July 17, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Professional Guardian Filed Unauthorized DNR Orders
Florida Circuit Judge Janet C. Thorpe filed a “notice for removal” against Rebecca Fierle in 100 cases after determining that Fierle had filed numerous “do not resuscitate” orders on behalf of her wards without permission from either their families or the court. (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - July 17, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Should Abortion be a Trivial Event?
A recent NEJM Perspective by Drs. Jane Henney and Helene Gayle is calling for reduction in the current restrictions on Mifepristone, previously better known as RU-486. Mifepristone, a progesterone blocker, which effectively opens the cervix of the uterus, when combined with misoprostol, which promotes contractions of the uterus, forms the two-pill combination marketed as Plan … Continue reading "Should Abortion be a Trivial Event?" (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - July 16, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Mark McQuain Tags: Health Care abortion Allocation / Access / Public Health bioethics Health Care Practice human dignity Mifepristone RU-486 syndicated Source Type: blogs

A Proposal for Addressing Language Inequality in Academia
Written by Anri Asagumo Oxford Uehiro/St Cross Scholar Although more and more people see the importance of diversity in academia, language diversity is one type of diversity that seems to be diminishing: English is increasingly dominant in both areas. I would like to argue that people who are born and raised in an English-speaking country […] (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - July 16, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Practical Ethics Tags: Ethics Health Care academia Equality inequality Invited Guest posts language philosophy syndicated Source Type: blogs

Trump May Repeal the Dead Donor Rule
In his new Executive Order, President Trump declares: "It is the policy of the United States to increase access to kidney transplants by modernizing the organ recovery and transplantation systems and updating outmoded and counterproductive regulations.... (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - July 16, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

An American Horror Story: Dying in Florida
by Craig Klugman, Ph.D. Steven Stryker was 75 years old when he died on May 13 at St. Joseph’s Hospital in Tampa. His death was not avoided when health care providers did not perform cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Stryker had a DNR order even though he, his daughter, and his health care surrogate did not want it. Stryker had some capacity and some deficits, and a court-appointed a professional guardian to control his affairs. That guardian allegedly has a policy of always putting DNR orders on her wards, and thus, Stryker died.… (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - July 15, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Craig Klugman Tags: Clinical Ethics Decision making Featured Posts Health Regulation & Law Informed Consent advance directives eldercare gerontology guardianship Source Type: blogs

Teaching Ethics to Adolescents
I have been leading a weekly ethics class for middle- and early-high school-aged youth. My preconceived assumptions about the abilities of adolescents to discuss bioethics issues have been dispelled by the depth and nuance of their insights. The post Teaching Ethics to Adolescents appeared first on The Hastings Center. (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - July 15, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Susan Gilbert Tags: Education Health Care adolescents bioethics Hastings Bioethics Forum syndicated Source Type: blogs

NY Hospital Sued for Violating Advance Directive
The family of Pasquale Lanzetta has sued Montefiore Medical Center for not honoring his advance directive. The family alleges that but for the administration of unwanted treatment, Lanzetta would have died on April 17, 2017. Instead, he did not die un... (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - July 15, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Simon ’ s Law – Now in Missouri – No More Secret DNR Orders
After years of failed attempts, Missouri has finally enacted Simon's Law. This type of legislation first originated in Missouri years ago. But while other states have since enacted Simon's Laws, Missouri did not enact Simon's Law until this week. Appa... (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - July 14, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs