Pandemic Ethics: Infectious Pathogen Control Measures and Moral Philosophy
By Jonathan Pugh and Tom Douglas   Following the outbreak of the SARS-CoV-2 coronavirus, a number of jurisdictions have implemented restrictive measures to prevent the spread of this highly contagious pathogen. In January, Chinese authorities effectively quarantined the entire city of Wuhan, the epicentre of the outbreak, which has a population of around 11 million […] (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - March 16, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Jonathan Pugh Tags: Health Care Public Health bioethics Coronavirus; Pandemic; Ethics; Public Health Current Affairs Jonny Pugh's Posts medical ethics Pandemic Ethics syndicated Tom Douglas' Posts Source Type: blogs

Medical Aid in Dying in 2020
Across the globe, there have been more significant legal developments concerning medical aid in dying in the last six months than at any other time in history. Existing MAID jurisdictions, like Canada, dramatically expanded eligibility criteria. And ... (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - March 15, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Advance Directives to resolve Conflicts of Commitment in COVID-19 Triage Proposals
by Steven H. Miles, MD In the face of the COVID-9 pandemic, many bioethicists are turning their attention to scholarship of triage ethics. Some focus on technology, i.e., the commandeering or allocating of mechanical ventilators or extracorporeal membrane oxygenators (ECMO). Others focus on patients, i.e., who shall be given most or least priority for health care resources in dire scarcity? Implicit in all triage proposals is the potential for Conflicts of Commitment. There are nuanced differences between a Conflicts of Commitment and a Conflict of Interest.… (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - March 15, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Steven Miles Tags: End of Life Care Featured Posts Informed Consent Justice professional ethics Public Health #diaryofaplagueyear COVID-19 pandemic Triage Source Type: blogs

Florida Requires Guardians to Get Court Approval for DNR Orders
Rebecca Fierle signed dozens of DNR orders on behalf of incapacitated wards against their known wishes. (Yes, the patient or her surrogate must sign these in Florida.) Since this was an egregious violation of her duties, Fierle was removed as a court-a... (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - March 14, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Glossary for a Pandemic
by Craig Klugman, Ph.D. The last time the United States faced a pandemic on its shores was in 1976, when the threat of the Swine Flu circling the globe led to long lines of adults getting the flu vaccine. I remember going with my parents to my school gymnasium as they wait in a long line for the injection. Because of a strong public health response and the availability of a vaccine, nothing happened—a disaster (high numbers of ill and dying people that overwhelms the health care system) was averted.… (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - March 14, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Craig Klugman Tags: Featured Posts Global Ethics Health Care Public Health Science #diaryofaplagueyear COVID-19 pandemic Pandemic Ethics Source Type: blogs

COVID: Collective of Voices in Distress
I get off the phone with a dear friend and colleague in Italy, and the news is devastating. Health care workers dying, impossible choices of triaging limited resources, the real human toll is palpable in her voice. She says, this is not political, this is a public health “nightmare.” I then get on social media… Read more The post COVID: Collective of Voices in Distress appeared first on The Hastings Center. (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - March 13, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Susan Gilbert Tags: Health Care COVID-19 global health Hastings Bioethics Forum Pandemic Planning syndicated Source Type: blogs

Triage, Rationing, and Fair Allocation of Scarce Resources During Pandemics
As COVID-19 threatens to overcome the surge capacity of hospitals and other providers, governors in some states will trigger special disaster protocols. These protocols excuse providers from what would normally be their legal duties under both st... (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - March 13, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Pandemic Ethics: How Much Risk Should Social Care Workers and Their Families Be Expected to Take?
By Doug McConnell Recently many of the staff at an aged-care home in Sydney, Australia called in sick the day after the report of a CoVid-19 outbreak at that facility.1 Upon investigation of these absences, one of the reasons the workers gave was that they were concerned about protecting their own families. They didn’t want […] (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - March 13, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Doug McConnell Tags: Health Care professional ethics Public Health Doug McConnell's Posts easy rescue Pandemic Ethics pandemics positive duty professional role Social care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Video Advance Directives: Growth and Benefits of Audiovisual Recording
I have posted a draft copy of my article forthcoming in the SMU Law Review. This special symposium issue of the SMU Law Review commemorates the thirtieth anniversary of the U.S. Supreme Court’s decision in Cruzan v. Director, Missouri Department of Health. In that famous and seminal decision, the Court held that the U.S. Constitution permits states to require clear and convincing evidence of an incapacitated patient’s preferences before allowing that patient’s family to direct the withholding or withdrawing of life-sustaining medical treatment.The key question in Cruzan was one of substantiation and evide...
Source: blog.bioethics.net - March 12, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

“ If Masks Don ’t Work, Why Are You Wearing One? ”
by Stephen P. Wood, MS, ACNP-BC I haven’t had this question from a patient yet, but I know it’s coming. The information disseminated by us, to us and for us is a bit conflicting when it comes to COVID-19, the disease caused by the novel virus SARS-CoV-2. We saw a similar trend with the SARS outbreak in 2003, MERS in 2012 and one of the most devastating Ebola outbreaks in 2014. Especially with SARS and MERS, we knew little about these viruses, their transmission, incubation or natural course.… (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - March 12, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Blog Editor Tags: Clinical Ethics Education Featured Posts Professionalism Public Health Science #diaryofaplagueyear 2019-nCoV COVID-19 pandemic Source Type: blogs

Coronavirus and the Crisis of Trust
Influenza and coronavirus cause similar symptoms probably through similar modes of transmission. What is unique about coronavirus is that misinformation, missteps, conspiracies, and cover-ups have left their mark on public trust. The post Coronavirus and the Crisis of Trust appeared first on The Hastings Center. (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - March 12, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Susan Gilbert Tags: Health Care coronavirus COVID-19 global health Hastings Bioethics Forum Pandemic Planning Public Trust syndicated Source Type: blogs

A Call for Ethical Treatment of Those on Cruise Ships
by Charlene Sathi, HBSc, MS and Lydia Dugdale, MD, MAR When sailors used to become sick at sea, their mates had to decide whether to throw them overboard or isolate them below deck until they could find help in harbor towns. The crew of the Grand Princess cruise ship, recently stranded with COVID-19 off California’s coast, didn’t face decisions this stark. But the ship certainly met with resistance in port and the governmental response further muddied the waters, leaving thousands of individuals anxiously floating miles from American soil, without answers.… (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - March 12, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Blog Editor Tags: Decision making Featured Posts Global Ethics Health Care Justice Public Health 2019-nCoV COVID-19 cruise ship pandemic Source Type: blogs

Iowa Legislature – " Life " Means Life and " Death " Means Death
The Iowa Legislature is not taking any chances with confusion or ambiguity in what a "life prison sentence" means. (HT: The Gazette) The current Iowa penal code states that when a defendant is convicted of a class A felony, the court shall "commit the defendant into the custody of the director of the Iowa department of corrections for the rest of the defendant’s life." But the statute does not define "life." Apparently, the legislature thought the term was clear enough on its face. But now a bill (S.F. 2093) that has already passed the Senate, and is moving through the House, amends the ...
Source: blog.bioethics.net - March 11, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

What You Need To Know About The Keto Diet
Ketones are a family of chemicals made by your liver, usually out of the body’s fat, to provide energy when you need it. Right now, you’ve almost certainly got some ketones circulating in your blood. If you fast for the better part of a day, the level of ketones in your blood will rise, as […] The post What You Need To Know About The Keto Diet appeared first on Peter Ubel. (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - March 11, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: peter Tags: Health Care Health & Well-being Peter Ubel syndicated Source Type: blogs

Coronavirus 2019: A case of fear as a harm from technology
One of the ethical concerns in modern medicine is whether new technology developed out of a desire to help people may cause more harm than good. Most of the time we think about this in relation to therapeutic technology, but it may also be true of diagnostic technology. It is usually good to be able … Continue reading "Coronavirus 2019: A case of fear as a harm from technology" (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - March 11, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Steve Phillips Tags: Health Care Allocation / Access / Public Health bioethics biotechnology syndicated Source Type: blogs

New Jersey Considers POLST Registry at DMV
The New Jersey legislature is considering a bill (A.B. 2472 and here) that would establish a POLST registry. That is a public benefit that helps assure the treatment wishes of seriously ill patients are followed.  Just weeks ago, a new repor... (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - March 10, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Health Law Scholars Workshop – Call for Abstracts
The Health Law Scholars Workshop at Saint Louis University is a collegial forum in which faculty new to health law and bioethics scholarship present works-in-progress and receive in-depth advice from experienced scholars and teachers in the field of health law and bioethics.  The workshop encourages health and bioethics scholarship, fosters the professional development of emerging scholars and furthers the sense of community among health law academics. Past scholars have placed their papers for publication in preeminent law journals. Scholars workshop their work-in-progress before a group of experienced peer reviewers...
Source: blog.bioethics.net - March 10, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Covid19: Being Really Prepared
by Arthur Caplan, Ph.D. As the new coronavirus begins to spread widely in the USA and as the slowly increasing availability of tests reveals more actual infections we continue to hear a lot about preparation.  Much of this involves advice about thoroughly washing our hands, not touching our faces and social distancing.  Many businesses and groups have imposed travel bans of various sorts.  The White House continues to insist that all is well and everything is under control while the stock market has conniptions and the public grows more and more anxious. … (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - March 9, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Arthur Caplan Tags: Featured Posts Health Care Health Disparities Politics Public Health COVID-19 crisis standards of care infectious disease Source Type: blogs

Nondiscrimination in Health Care Coverage Act (aka Oklahoma Pro Life Advancement Act)
Oklahoma already has some of the strongest non-discrimination laws concerning end-of-life medical treatment. New legislation (H.B. 2587), originally titled the "Oklahoma Pro Life Advancement Act," will extend this non-discrimination rules to payment &a... (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - March 9, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Free Lawyers for Parents in Medical Futility Conflicts
The family of five-year-old Tafida Raqeeb, whose parents won a landmark court case to stop her life support being switched off, are calling for a change in British law to provide free legal advice for those who disagree with their doctors’ decision to end their child’s life. At present only parents with “exceptionally limited” financial resources can get help if they want to challenge a decision on their child’s treatment. The parents of Tafida — and others such as the parents of Charlie Gard, find themselves having to use crowdfunding to pay their legal fees. This push in the UK pa...
Source: blog.bioethics.net - March 8, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Alabama Senate Passes Simon ’ s Law
Alabama is the latest state to move forward Simon's Law legislation. The Senate just passed S.B. 153.  In contrast to recent enactments in other states, the Alabama version not only require clinicians to inform parents about a DNAR or similar ord... (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - March 7, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Assisting Suicide — for Everyone — in Germany
In what is manifestly a case of legal and verbal gymnastics, the Federal Constitutional Court of Germany has “found” a right to suicide. The Court announced its finding in a press release, dated 26 February: “Criminalisation of assisted suicide services unconstitutional.”  Calling self-killing, or suicide, “an act of autonomous self-determination,” the Court grounded suicide – … Continue reading "Assisting Suicide — for Everyone — in Germany" (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - March 7, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: D. Joy Riley Tags: Health Care bioethics syndicated Source Type: blogs

The Guilt Does Not Go Away: A Physician ’s Tribute to Elephant Mothers
By Maha Mahdavinia It started almost from the moment my son was born, after I held that precious little breathing miracle of life in my arms and he stopped crying right away. I was filled with joy and love, as if beautiful, peaceful music was playing in my ears. I wanted to hold him all […] (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - March 6, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: reflectivemeded Tags: Health Care syndicated Uncategorized Source Type: blogs

American Clinicians Academy on Medical Aid in Dying – MAID Referral System
The American Clinicians Academy on Medical Aid in Dying (ACAMAID) was born on February 15, 2020, in Berkeley, at the National Clinicians Conference on Medical Aid in Dying.  The Academy's first step is to establish a crucially-needed patient-to-p... (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - March 6, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

More notes on suicide —assisted or not
As one with the letters “M” and “D” after my name, I get emails from a service called Medscape (subscription generally required), with links to a variety of articles on things medical.  This week brings a link to a piece under the title “Inexact Science: is Patient Eligible for Medical Aid in Dying?”   The upshot: … Continue reading "More notes on suicide—assisted or not" (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - March 6, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Jon Holmlund Tags: Health Care bioethics syndicated Source Type: blogs

Why Tall People Feel So Intimidating. A Surprising Explanation.
Admit it: you can often tell a lot about a person’s personality from their facial expressions. Someone who glowers at you, forehead contracted in a glare, is probably trying to be intimidating. But what if that person isn’t glaring at you? What if they are simply so tall that, with their head tilted down to […] The post Why Tall People Feel So Intimidating. A Surprising Explanation. appeared first on Peter Ubel. (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - March 5, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: peter Tags: Health Care Choice & Behavior Peter Ubel syndicated Source Type: blogs

Festival of Arguments
by Liz Sanders Join the Oxford Uehiro Centre and colleagues from across Oxford in exploring how to think critically about life in this first public festival of practical ethics. The Festival of Arguments is free to take part in, and focusses on exploring today’s most pressing ethical dilemmas. Join us for talks, debates, walks, cafés, […] (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - March 5, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Liz Sanders Tags: Ethics Health Care applied ethics Event Announcements Festival of Arguments public engagement syndicated Uncategorized Source Type: blogs

Alabama Prison Officials Issuing DNR Orders without Patient Consent or Knowledge
The Alabama Department of Corrections has a documented history of issuing DNR orders to critically injured or ill prisoners without consulting with families. Injustice-Watch summarizes a whole series of recent lawsuits challenging this practice with s... (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - March 5, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Coronavirus Response Is Insufficient for Vulnerable New Yorkers
Like most New Yorkers, I take the subway to work. I commute from Brooklyn to my office in Manhattan. By the time I get on the train, there are no seats available. It is nearly assured I will be standing inches away from a stranger. Being in tight spaces is a reality that has faded… Read more The post Coronavirus Response Is Insufficient for Vulnerable New Yorkers appeared first on The Hastings Center. (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - March 4, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Susan Gilbert Tags: Health Care Public Health COVID-19 Hastings Bioethics Forum Health and Health Care health insurance syndicated vulnerable workers Source Type: blogs

Brain Death Conflict Continues After Baby ’ s " Second " Death
Clinicians at St. Mary's Hospital in Manchester determined that baby Midrar Ali had died in October 2019. But his parents disagreed. For months, the conflict escalated to both the British High Court and Court of Appeal. Both ru... (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - March 4, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Pandemic Ethics: the Unilateralist Curse and Covid-19, or Why You Should Stay Home
by Anders Sandberg In Scientific American Zeynep Tufekci writes: Preparing for the almost inevitable global spread of this virus, … , is one of the most pro-social, altruistic things you can do in response to potential disruptions of this kind. We should prepare, not because we may feel personally at risk, but so that we […] (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - March 4, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Anders Sandberg Tags: Decision making Ethics Health Care Anders Sandberg's Posts Collective Responsibility COVID-19 epidemic pandemic Pandemic Ethics social norms syndicated unilateralist curse work from home Source Type: blogs

What Happens To Your Pay When Coronavirus Closes Your Job?: Paid Leave and the People Who Make Our Society Go Round
by Keisha Ray, Ph.D.    On Monday my hometown of San Antonio, Texas declared a local public emergency after a woman who was quarantined for suspected exposure to Covid-19 was released from custody. It was only after the woman’s release that officials discovered her positive test and she returned to quarantine. For the past two weeks San Antonio’s Lackland Air Force Base has been the home of 122 people, including this woman who were evacuated from the Diamond Princess Cruise ship where they spent 2 weeks in quaran...
Source: blog.bioethics.net - March 3, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Keisha Ray Tags: Cultural Decision making Ethics Featured Posts Global Ethics Health Care Health Disparities Public Health Social Justice Source Type: blogs

The Non-Binary Doctor-Patient Relationship
Today’s blog entry continues another aspect of what Neil Skjoldal began yesterday. Shoshana Rockoff, writing in Yeshiva University’s The Commentator wrote about the changing landscape of physician private practice ownership and how that may be changing the doctor-patient relationship for the worse. She reflects on her grandfather’s private optometry practice when she describes the solid … Continue reading "The Non-Binary Doctor-Patient Relationship" (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - March 3, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Mark McQuain Tags: Health Care Allocation / Access / Public Health bioethics Health Care Practice syndicated Source Type: blogs

First Steps: Inclusive or Exclusive?
This post is presented in conjunction with the March 2020 issue of the American Journal of Bioethics. You can read the full article and commentaries here. by Denise M. Dudzinski In “What the HEC-C? An Analysis of the Healthcare Ethics Consultant-Certified (HEC-C) Program: One Year In,” Horner et al. provide an overview of the new HEC-C examination and note many opportunities for improvement. Their contributions, and those of the Open Peer Comment (OPC) authors, will help the HEC Certification Commission improve the certification process.… (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - March 3, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Blog Editor Tags: Clinical Ethics Editorial-AJOB Education Featured Posts professional ethics Source Type: blogs

New MAID Laws Expand Access
The Oregon Death with Dignity Act is a quarter-century old. Yet it still serves as the template for most U.S. bills to affirmatively authorize medical aid in dying (MAID). As with other older laws, it is time to revisit the model. Increasingly, many... (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - March 3, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

BioethicsTV (Feb. 24-28): #TheGoodDoctor #NewAmsterdam #ChicagoMed
by Craig Klugman, Ph.D. The Good Doctor (Season 3; Episode 16):Who consents when there is more than one personality; New Amsterdam (Season 2; Episode 15): Unanticipated DNA findings; Fudging clinical trials; Chicago Med (Season 5; Episode 15): Killing a death row prisoner, endangering patients The Good Doctor (Season 3; Episode 16):Who consents when there is more than one personality A college student comes into the hospital. Reznick and Brown get a history and learn that he is a serious, stressed student.… (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - March 3, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Blog Editor Tags: BioethicsTV Clinical Trials & Studies End of Life Care Featured Posts Genetics Informed Consent Source Type: blogs

The Healthcare Ethics Consultant-Certified Program: Fair, Feasible, and Defensible, But Neither Definitive Nor Finished
This post is presented in conjunction with the March 2020 issue of the American Journal of Bioethics. You can read the full article and commentaries here. by Armand H. Matheny Antommaria, Chris Feudtner, Mary Beth Benner, Felicia Cohn & on Behalf of the Healthcare Ethics Consultant Certification Commission In June 2018, the Healthcare Ethics Consultant (HCEC) Certification Commission (the Commission) began accepting applications, and since then three candidate cohorts have received the Healthcare Ethics Consultant-Certified (HEC-C) designation. While these individuals have reported favorable experiences, concerns about...
Source: blog.bioethics.net - March 3, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Blog Editor Tags: Clinical Ethics Editorial-AJOB Education Featured Posts professional ethics Source Type: blogs

Informed Consent: More than a Piece of Paper
Join me on May 18, 2020 for the Vermont Ethics Network Spring Palliative Care Conference.  Building off and updating my last big article in this space, I will describe the horrendous state of medical informed consent, why it is so very bad, and w... (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - March 2, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs