Preventative Measures and Treatments Meant to Help You Live Forever
Business Insider describes five ways the wealthy are investing to extend their lifespans as much as possible. 1. Young blood” transfusions meant to slow down the ageing process 2. Cryonic preservation of brains or bodies 3. Uploading brains to “digital consciousness” 4. Colonizing space in preparation for a future where Earth may no longer be inhabitable 5. Properties with panic rooms and underground bunkers as “apocalypse insurance” (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - August 5, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Charlie Gard ’ s Parents On Keeping Their Son ’ s Legacy Alive With Charlie ’ s Law
Charlie Gard's parents, Chris Gard and Connie Yates, just marked the second anniversary of their son's death. Charlie died on July 28, 2017, following a protracted legal campaign which saw him pick up support from people around the world.  Gard ... (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - August 4, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Decrying Human Fetal Tissue Research Justification
The National Institutes of Health (NIH) released on 26 July “Changes to NIH Requirements Regarding Proposed Human Fetal Tissue Research.”  A new bullet point is required for “Human Fetal Tissue Research Approach.”   The applicant for funds is obliged to justify the use of human fetal tissue (HFT) in proposed research: Why the research goals cannot … Continue reading "Decrying Human Fetal Tissue Research Justification" (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - August 3, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: D. Joy Riley Tags: Health Care bioethics HFT Human Fetal Tissue Research NIH Paul Ramsey syndicated Source Type: blogs

Washington D.C. Progress in Implementing Medical Aid-in-Dying Act
Compassion & Choices today praised D.C. Health for releasing two years of reports showing it is making progress in implementing the D.C. Death with Dignity Act, despite repeated congressional attempts to repeal the law since it took effect on Feb. 18, 2017. The D.C. Death with Dignity Act allows mentally capable, terminally ill adults with six months or less to live to have the option to request a doctor’s prescription for medication they can decide to take if their end-of-life suffering becomes unbearable, so they can die peacefully in their sleep. Eight states currently allow medical aid in dying: California...
Source: blog.bioethics.net - August 3, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Dead People Don ’ t Move – Mistaken Death Diagnosis Goes to Appeals Court
In October 2014, Michael Cleveland suffered a heart attack and collapsed. He was taken by ambulance to the DeGraff Memorial Hospital where he was declared dead. But a couple hours later, he was found alive. Cleveland was then transferred to Buffalo Gen... (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - August 2, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Contraception, Climate, and Population Control
This week’s New England Journal of Medicine (NEJM) carries an opinion piece (subscription required) pressing the concern that human-caused climate change should prompt a concerted effort to develop new methods of contraception and increase the ready availability of all forms of contraception worldwide.  About 222 million women in the lowest-income countries need family planning services, … Continue reading "Contraception, Climate, and Population Control" (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - August 2, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Jon Holmlund Tags: Health Care bioethics reproduction syndicated Source Type: blogs

Press Release: Tafida Raqeeb, Medical Ethics, and Difficult Decisions
by Professor Dominic Wilkinson, consultant neonatologist, Professor of Medical Ethics, University of Oxford.     In September, the high court will hear a legal challenge relating to the medical care of five-year old Tafida Raqeeb. She has been in intensive care since suffering a severe stroke in February this year. The doctors apparently believe that […] (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - August 1, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Dominic Wilkinson Tags: Clinical Ethics Health Care Children and Families Disability, Chronic Conditions and Rehabilitation Dominic Wilkinson's Posts syndicated Source Type: blogs

Health Issues from the Democratic Presidential Debates – Round II
by Craig Klugman, Ph.D. The Democratic Presidential Candidate Debates in Detroit this week often seemed less about differentiating between the candidates and more like the party trying to figure out its platform. Whereas the first set of debates focused a great deal on the new guard versus the old, this one focused on universal health care versus a public option in a health insurance marketplace. On the progressive left stood Bernie Sanders, Elizabeth Warren, Kirsten Gillibrand, Andrew Yang, and Bill de Blasio who want a universal health plan they call Medicare for All.… (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - August 1, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Craig Klugman Tags: Featured Posts Health Care Health Policy & Insurance Health Regulation & Law Politics Source Type: blogs

New Jersey Medical Aid in Dying for the Terminally Ill Act Takes Effect Today
In April 2019, New Jersey Governor Phil Murphy signed the New Jersey Medical Aid in Dying for the Terminally Ill Act.  The legislation provides that "this act shall take effect on the first day of the fourth month next following the date of ... (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - August 1, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Dan Callahan ’s Final Interview
Daniel Callahan's final interview was with an undergraduate eager to learn about bioethics. "I could tell that bioethics was far more than a job to him," she writes. The post Dan Callahan’s Final Interview appeared first on The Hastings Center. (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - July 31, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Susan Gilbert Tags: Health Care bioethics Daniel Callahan Hastings Bioethics Forum syndicated Source Type: blogs

Suicide in older adults
There is much discussion and debate within bioethics about the permissibility of physician-assisted suicide, but less discussion about suicide in general. We also spent a lot of time talking about end-of-life care and end-of-life decision-making. However, we tend to focus less on suicide in general and very little on suicide among older adults who are … Continue reading "Suicide in older adults" (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - July 31, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Steve Phillips Tags: Health Care bioethics end of life syndicated Source Type: blogs

Reversing Brain Death in Philadelphia
Philadelphia-based Bioquark wants a shot at bringing the dead back to life. The company’s CEO, Ira Pastor, wants to help humans tap into their regeneration superpowers. But is reviving the brain dead ethical or even possible? Philadelphia Magazine explores these questions.   (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - July 31, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Gender Identity Shouldn ’t Be Up for Debate
by Kelly McBride Folkers, MA Should academics ever set limits on what can be the subject of debate? Last week, twelve philosophers published an open letter calling for an end to sanctions and censures of academics that express “skepticism about the concept of gender identity or opposition to replacing biological sex with gender identity in institutional policy making.” They argue that contemporary discussions surrounding the concepts of gender identity and biological sex are acceptable topics for free academic inquiry. They were motivated by various scholarly works that call into question the notion that g...
Source: blog.bioethics.net - July 31, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Kelly McBride Folkers Tags: Featured Posts professional ethics gender non-binary sex trans Source Type: blogs

Socially Situated Brain Death – Call for Papers
The December 2020 issue of the AMA Journal of Ethics will investigate some of the ethical, social, and legal complexities of determining and declaring brain death. Consider submitting for this special issue on "Socially Situated Brain Death." In 1980, the Uniform Determination of Death Act (UDDA) defined death as “irreversible cessation of circulatory and respiratory function or irreversible cessation of all functions of the entire brain, including the brainstem in accordance with accepted medical standards.” Interpreting and applying the UDDA definition and the clinical standards for death by neurolo...
Source: blog.bioethics.net - July 30, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Cryonics Symposium at Perpetual Life
Last weekend, many companies offering cryonics services gathered for a Florida conference at, of course, the Church of Perpetual Life. Cryonics is the freezing and storing of a body after death until a future medical technology can restore that p... (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - July 30, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Mind the Gap: The Ethics Void Created by the Rise of Citizen Science in Health and Biomedical Research
by Bray Patrick-Lake MD, MSC & Jennifer C. Goldsack MS, MBA The target article by Wiggins and Wilbanks reports on the history and typology of the models of citizen science emerging in health and biomedical research with the rapid dispersion and repurposing of technology. Wiggins and Wilbanks describe the variety of models through which nonprofessionals collaborate in the generation of health and biomedical knowledge, and highlight the benefits of these citizen science models. It is inspiring to see the power of citizen science recognized.… (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - July 30, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Blog Editor Tags: Editorial-AJOB Featured Posts Research Ethics citizen science Common Rule Source Type: blogs

Preserving Patient Dignity (Formerly: Patient Modesty):Volume 103
There is no doubt that, in these modern times of medical system-patient interaction where we have taken away autonomy from the medical system and delivered it to the patient while scrubbing off the eons-long paternalism, a previous hallmark behavior of... (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - July 29, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Maurice Bernstein, M.D. Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

BioethicsTV: The Farewell Welcomes Us to Talk About Truth Telling at the End of Life
by Craig Klugman, Ph.D. The film, “The Farewell” claims to be a movie “based on an actual lie”. Billi is a first generation Chinese-American twenty-something artist living in New York near her parents. After not being awarded a Guggenheim fellowship (a fact she hides from her family), she learns that her parents are heading back to China to visit her grandmother (Nai nai) who has been diagnosed with stage 4 lung cancer and has a three-month life expectancy. The catch is that Nai nai does not know about her health situation and the family has decided not to tell her.… (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - July 29, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Craig Klugman Tags: Art BioethicsTV Cultural Decision making End of Life Care Featured Posts Source Type: blogs

Hello world!
Welcome to WordPress. This is your first post. Edit or delete it, then start writing! (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - July 29, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: brainethics.org Tags: Health Care syndicated Uncategorized Source Type: blogs

New Book on VSED – The Last Ten Days – Academia, Dementia, and the Choice to Die
Over the past five years, a number of family members have shared first person accounts of their loved one's death through voluntarily stopping eating and drinking (VSED). The latest one is The Last Ten Days - Academia, Dementia, and the Choice to Die. The following is from the publisher. The Last Ten Days: Academia, Dementia, and the Choice to Die is a heartrending memoir of love, scholarship, dignity, courage, and the choices one is forced to make when given the devastating diagnosis of a terminal illness.  Spanning sixty years, this extraordinary book recounts the love story of Martha Risberg Brosio and her hus...
Source: blog.bioethics.net - July 29, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Virginia Board of Health Promulgates Medical Futility Regulations
Last week, the Virginia Board of Health promulgated regulations that update the rules for the licensure of hospitals. The regulations were required to conform to last year's amendments to the Virginia medical futility statute. Here is the relevant text: Each hospital that is equipped to provide life-sustaining treatment shall develop a policy to determine the medical or ethical appropriateness of proposed medical care, which shall include: 1. A process for obtaining a second opinion regarding the medical and ethical appropriateness of proposed medical care in cases in which a physician has determined proposed care to be me...
Source: blog.bioethics.net - July 28, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Other Stuff: A child ’s right to an education
Some NYC ultra-Orthodox yeshivas provide little or no secular education to their boys, who leave school illiterate in English and with third-grade math skills.  They have never heard of the American Revolution, written an essay, or entered a science fair.  They cannot pass the GED and are virtually unemployable outside of their community.  Some of … Continue reading Other Stuff: A child’s right to an education (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - July 27, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: denasdavis Tags: Health Care syndicated Uncategorized Source Type: blogs

Parental Treatment Refusals: What Your Responsibilities Are When Mom and Dad Decline Cancer Treatment for a Child
In my latest Law and Ethics in Oncology column for the ASCO Post, I address "Parental Treatment Refusals: What Your Responsibilities Are When Mom and Dad Decline Cancer Treatment for a Child."  This is the opposite of a medical futility conflict.... (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - July 27, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Avoiding Dementia, Causing Moral Distress
In “Avoiding Deep Dementia,” an essay in the September/October 2018 issue of the Hastings Center Report, legal scholar Norman Cantor explains why he has an advance directive that calls  for voluntary stopping of eating and drinking as a means of ending his life if he develops dementia and reaches a particular state of decline. Cantor’s essay and three … Continue reading Avoiding Dementia, Causing Moral Distress (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - July 26, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: denasdavis Tags: Health Care syndicated Uncategorized Source Type: blogs

Oregon Expands Medical Aid in Dying Access
This week, Oregon Governor Kate Brown signed legislation to amend the Oregon Death with Dignity Act that allows doctors to waive the waiting period requirements for medical aid in dying if the patient is not expected to live long enough to complete them. The Act allows mentally capable, terminally ill adults with six months or less to live to have the option to request a doctor’s prescription for medication they can decide to take if their suffering becomes unbearable, and die peacefully in their sleep. The amendment, Senate Bill 579, was approved by the Senate in May and the House of Representatives last week a...
Source: blog.bioethics.net - July 26, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Promoting vaccination with a not-too-heavy hand
This week’s Nature has a worthwhile read, “Mandate Vaccination with Care.”    The recent rise in the number of cases of measles is well-documented in the general press, and there is a strong argument that it is a social good that sufficient numbers of children be vaccinated for a range of infectious diseases.  Your correspondent considers … Continue reading "Promoting vaccination with a not-too-heavy hand" (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - July 26, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Jon Holmlund Tags: Health Care Allocation / Access / Public Health Consent / Research Health Care Practice syndicated Source Type: blogs

Thaddeus Pope – Research Agenda 2019-2020
This is a summary of the research and writing projects that I have planned for 2019-2020. (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - July 25, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Puberty-Blocking Drugs: The Difficulties of Conducting Ethical Research
The ethics of research trials for young people with gender dysphoria are complicated. Billion Photos/Shutterstock Dominic Wilkinson, University of Oxford and Julian Savulescu, University of Oxford A recent Newsnight programme reported that a major UK puberty-blocking trial is under investigation. Doctors at a London clinic provided drugs to block the development of puberty in young […] (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - July 25, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Dominic Wilkinson Tags: Decision making Health Care Research Ethics bioethics Children and Families Dominic Wilkinson's Posts Julian Savulescu's Posts medical ethics syndicated Source Type: blogs

Medical Decision-Making for Unrepresented Patients – California Appeals Court Clarifies Procedures
This week, the California Court of Appeal published a 73-page decision on how nursing homes must make treatment decisions for unrepresented residents. The decades-old California Health and Safety Code § 1418.8 establishes an interdisciplinary team (IDT) procedure for nursing home residents who lack capacity to make their own health care decisions. But, in 2016, pursuant to a petition from California Advocates for Nursing Home Reform (CANHR), the Alameda County Superior Court held the statute unconstitutional for failing to offer due process protections such as notice to the resident.  The Court of ...
Source: blog.bioethics.net - July 25, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

New Patient Rights Bill Does Not Do Right by Patients
by Craig Klugman, Ph.D. One of the cornerstones of modern bioethics, at least in the area of death and dying, is the notion of autonomy, that people are able to make decisions about medical care at the end of life. One way that they can exercise autonomy is by completing advance directives—directives to physicians and families (i.e. living wills), powers of attorney for health care, and POLSTs. A new federal bill proposed by 3 Republicans (Cramer, Daines, and Blackburn) in the Senate might cut off federal funding for most hospitals that followed patient orders to withdraw and withhold medical care for the purposes of...
Source: blog.bioethics.net - July 24, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Craig Klugman Tags: End of Life Care Featured Posts Health Regulation & Law Politics Reproductive Ethics Source Type: blogs

Improving the Evidence Base for Autism Support and Assistive Technologies
by Leah McClimans, Ph.D. The Autism CARES (Collaboration, Accountability, Research, Education and Support) Act is currently up for reauthorization before Congress. Autism CARES is the main source of federal funding for ASD Spectrum Disorder (ASD) research, services, training and monitoring. A version of this Act was signed into law in 2006, and since then over $3.1 billion has been dedicated to ASD research and training. It’s a crucial piece of legislation in part because it aims to help us understand better what interventions and assistive technologies work to support people with ASD and their families.… (Sou...
Source: blog.bioethics.net - July 24, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Leah McClimans Tags: Clinical Ethics Featured Posts Health Care Health Regulation & Law Institutions, Centers, Funding Neuroethics Pediatrics Public Health autism Source Type: blogs

Mind Your Loved Ones – the App
Mind Your Loved Ones (MYLO) is a mobile App that gives individuals the ability to store their own and their loved ones’ critical medical information, healthcare directives, and other related data on their Apple or Android phones, iPads or tablets.  Users can send this information directly to healthcare providers or to their family members and trusted friends. Information can be sent via email, fax, text, or print. Here is a description from the July-August ABA Journal. (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - July 24, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Writing “The Presentation on Egypt,” An interview with author Camille Bordas by Sebastian Galbo
[read more] (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - July 23, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: GalN Tags: Health Care Literature Arts and Medicine Blog syndicated The Author Speaks Source Type: blogs

Constitutional Challenge to Uniform Determination of Death Act – Appeals Court Wants More Briefing
Last week, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit asked for more briefing in Fonseca v. Smith. This case challenges the constitutionality of the California Uniform Determination of Death Act. While oral argument was six months ago, in January, the court just now issued an order asking the parties to brief: 1.  Whether Appellant Jonee Fonseca’s claims are moot in light of counsel’s admission that an amended death certificate may not affect her likelihood of receiving government benefits or additional insurance coverage. 2.  Whether the court should alternatively affirm on t...
Source: blog.bioethics.net - July 23, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Partnership with Amazon Alexa and NHS Further Deflates Privacy Protections
by Craig Klugman, Ph.D. Last week, Amazon announced a new partnership with the UK’s National Health Service(NHS). In this arrangement, when patients ask their Alexa personal digital assistant health questions, the answers will come from the NHS’s website. Instead of scrolling through pages of web results that include some good sources and some not-so-good-sources, people in the UK will find their answers coming from the nation’s health care provider. The project could be an important step in helping people with access needs.… (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - July 23, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Craig Klugman Tags: Decision making Education Featured Posts Privacy Social Justice Technology Alexa NHS Source Type: blogs

Medical Photos, CPR Dolls, and Car Crash Dummies: When Women Aren ’t Represented in Research we Fail Women’s Health
by Keisha Ray, Ph.D.   In May a twitter user posted a picture depicting the muscular system of a female that included milk ducts. It quickly went viral as people realized that in their various health science and anatomy and physiology courses they had never seen a picture of a female muscular system, only a picture of a male muscular system. After thinking back to my own health and anatomy and physiology courses I took during high school and college, I myself was taken aback by the realization that I had never seen a picture like this before.… (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - July 22, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Keisha Ray Tags: Education Ethics Featured Posts Gender Disparities Health Disparities Justice Public Health Research Ethics Uncategorized Source Type: blogs

What I Learned from Dan Callahan About Bioethics, Writing, and Leadership
I will say it: Dan Callahan is the most important person in Bioethics. For his ideas; for his role in creating and nurturing The Hastings Center; and for his ability to spot, encourage, and motivate talent. Dan is credited as author or editor of 47 books and many hundreds of articles, chapters and the like.… Read more The post What I Learned from Dan Callahan About Bioethics, Writing, and Leadership appeared first on The Hastings Center. (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - July 22, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Marnie Klein Tags: Health Care bioethics syndicated Uncategorized Source Type: blogs

High fives and sobs greet UnitedHealthcare ’s reversal of denials for gene therapy
Two young children will receive a novel drug to treat spinal muscular atrophy thanks to UnitedHealthcare’s reversal of denials for gene therapy: https://www.washingtonpost.com/business/economy/high-fives-and-sobs-greet-unitedhealthcares-reversal-of-denials-for-child-gene-therapy/2019/07/18/8ddeb3ae-a974-11e9-9214-246e594de5d5_story.html … (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - July 22, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Sophie Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: blogs

Medical Futility / Therapeutic Obstinacy Case in Madrid – Maria Teresa Blanco
Until a few days ago, Spain was grappling with a medical futility case. But the conflict may now be moot, since the patient recovered and was discharged. THE PATIENT54-year-old Maria Teresa Blanco suffers from a neuro-degenerative ataxia that keeps her speechless and barely moving. Over the past three years, she has been admitted more than 20 times to Hospital Universitario Principe de Asturias. In early July 2019, she was admitted with sepsis. THE HOSPITALClinicians soon determined that "advanced techniques of resuscitation" which are "aggressive and invasive" should not be used&quo...
Source: blog.bioethics.net - July 22, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Kaiser Permanente National Bioethics Symposium
The third biennial Kaiser Permanente National Bioethics Symposium will be October 3-5, 2019 in Portland, Oregon. There is a wide range of great speakers, including Bob McCauley, Denise Dudzinski, and Paula Goodman-Crews. There is a keynote by Sharon Kaufman, "Ordinary Medicine – Ethical Rationality in an Aging Society." There is a second keynote by Tod Chambers, "Ritual in Medical Ethics." (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - July 21, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

National Clinicians Conference on Medical Aid in Dying
The National Clinicians Conference on Medical Aid in Dying has announced a call for proposals from potential speakers. Please see the tentative curriculum for guidance. This is intended as a guide only. The organizers encourage you to propose addition... (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - July 20, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Daniel Callahan – A Remembrance
There is a strange but charming tradition in the world of classical music of citing musical pedigrees. It’s not unlike the familiar parlor game Six Degrees of Kevin Bacon, but carried out with far greater seriousness. For instance, the renowned American pianist and conductor Leon Fleisher, still performing in his 90s, was a student of… Read more The post Daniel Callahan – A Remembrance appeared first on The Hastings Center. (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - July 20, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Susan Gilbert Tags: Health Care Hastings Bioethics Forum syndicated Source Type: blogs

Legal Requirements May Conflict With Clinicians ’ Ethical Obligations
The June 2019 issue of Medical Ethics Advisor includes interviews with me and others on how to navigate conflicts between ethical and legal obligations.  (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - July 19, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

“Safe” gene editing
The New England Journal of Medicine carries a brief article about “Controlling CRISPR-Cas9 Gene Editing” (subscription required).  The upshot: RNA used as a medicine, as in the case of “CRISPR” to edit genes, can hang around well after administration, and alter genes other than the ones intended to be altered.  These “off-target” effects could lead … Continue reading "“Safe” gene editing" (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - July 19, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Jon Holmlund Tags: Genetics Health Care bioethics biotechnology syndicated Source Type: blogs