Causes of Death Coding in COVID-19 Pandemic
Reporting causes of death is an important function in our society, and involves a number of people in completing each death certificate: Pronouncer of death – may be a physician Certifier of death – usually a physician; assigns cause of death Funeral director – completes the demographic information, next of kin, and burial information portions … Continue reading "Causes of Death Coding in COVID-19 Pandemic" (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - May 3, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: D. Joy Riley Tags: Health Care Allocation / Access / Public Health bioethics Cause of Death COVID-19 Death Certificates Health Care Practice syndicated Vital Statistics WHO Source Type: blogs

‘Immunity passports’ could be doomed by false-positive antibody tests (Washington Post)
Antibody testing has accelerated in the United States in recent weeks: In one prominent study, for example, involving some 3,000 New Yorkers, roughly 14 percent of state residents were found to have been exposed to the virus — and 1 in 5 in New York City. Some proponents of such tests believe they could pave […] The post ‘Immunity passports’ could be doomed by false-positive antibody tests (Washington Post) appeared first on Peter Ubel. (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - May 1, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: peter Tags: Health Care Behavioral Economics and Public Policy Peter Ubel syndicated Source Type: blogs

Community Perspective on Potentially Inappropriate Treatment
The ethics and critical care folks at UCLA have yet another article (in the Annals of the ATS) in their growing series exploring the causes and solutions to conflicts over potentially inappropriate treatment. The authors note that although lay-people are acknowledged as important stakeholders, their perceptions and understanding of the terms “potentially inappropriate” or “futile” treatment have received little formal evaluation. So, they convened focus group discussions. The authors found that community members found the concepts “futile" and “inappropriate” treatme...
Source: blog.bioethics.net - May 1, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Ethical Responsibility in Publishing Research Results on Covid-19 Treatments
There is little doubt about the urgent need for Covid-19 treatment. But premature publication of definitive recommendations based on inappropriate conclusions grounded in scant, hastily-acquired data serve only at best to confuse and at worst mislead at a time when tensions are high and need for help is great. The post Ethical Responsibility in Publishing Research Results on Covid-19 Treatments appeared first on The Hastings Center. (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - April 30, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Susan Gilbert Tags: Ethics Health Care Clinical Trials and Human Subjects Research COVID-19 evidence Hastings Bioethics Forum scientific publishing syndicated Source Type: blogs

Reinstate the Patient Self Determination Act
In light of a renewed emphasis on advance care planning during the COVID-19 pandemic, it seems odd that USDHHS has waived healthcare facility duties under the Patient Self Determination Act. Normally, the Patient Self-Determination Act requires healthcare facilities:To inform patients of their legal right to accept or refuse medical treatment. To advise patients of their rights under state law to document their end-of-life care preferences in an advance directive, if they can no longer speak for themselves. To share their written policies respecting the implementation of such rights. In response, Compassion & Choices h...
Source: blog.bioethics.net - April 30, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Clinical Trials vs. Right to Try: Ethical Use of Chloroquine for Covid-19
Double-blind randomized clinical trials are the gold standard for answering the scientific question of whether a drug produces any effect, positive or negative, in Covid-19 patients. But is rational for a patient to choose to try a drug such as chloroquine for Covid-19 outside of a trial? Some patients may correctly hold that they have little to lose. The post Clinical Trials vs. Right to Try: Ethical Use of Chloroquine for Covid-19 appeared first on The Hastings Center. (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - April 29, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Susan Gilbert Tags: Health Care Research Ethics chloroquine Clinical Trials and Human Subjects Research COVID-19 equipoise Hastings Bioethics Forum hydroxychloroquine right to try syndicated Source Type: blogs

No ventilator, not for me!
  We are all obsessed with ventilators.  The Covid-19 pandemic has created an extraordinary focus on the availability of ventilators.  Ventilators seem to feature in every one of New York State Governor Cuomo’s daily briefings.  The Governor of California kindly shipped some ventilators to New York, but faced backlash among some of his own constituents, … Continue reading No ventilator, not for me! (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - April 29, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: denasdavis Tags: Health Care syndicated Uncategorized Source Type: blogs

Happy 90th Birthday Derek Humphry
The journalist, author, and right-to-die campaigner Derek Humphry was born in Bath, England on this day (April 29) in 1930. Happy 90th birthday. (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - April 29, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Brain Death – RUDDA Is Only Part of the Solution
Today, clinical ethicists Bryan Kibbe and Jordan Potter published a letter to the editor, commenting on our recent proposal for a Revised Uniform Determination of Death Act (RUDDA). (See also our shorter version in Annals Internal Med.) Kibbe and... (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - April 29, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

When to Reopen the Nation is an Ethics Question —Not Only a Scientific One
As the world reels from the Covid-19 pandemic, two things have become very clear: the health impacts of the disease are devastating, but the aggressive social distancing policies currently being used to flatten the curve also have serious costs. As a result, the question of when and how to reopen the nation is on everyone’s mind. Do we open quickly in an effort to kick-start the economy? Or do we remain under lockdown as long as possible to stop the spread of the virus? The post When to Reopen the Nation is an Ethics Question—Not Only a Scientific One appeared first on The Hastings Center. (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - April 28, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Susan Gilbert Tags: Ethics Health Care COVID-19 Hastings Bioethics Forum reopening the economy syndicated Source Type: blogs

Video Series: Do Health and Social Care Workers Have a Moral Obligation to Keep Working if they Lack Protective Equipment?
This interview is now also available as a video on YouTube: (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - April 28, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Katrien Devolder Tags: Health Care professional ethics Coronavirus; Pandemic; Ethics; Public Health Katrien Devolder Interview Pandemic Ethics syndicated Video Series Youtube interview Source Type: blogs

Medically Vulnerable Clinicians and Unnecessary Risk during the COVID-19 pandemic
by Annie Janvier, MD, PhD and John D. Lantos MD The COVID-19 crisis has been compared to war. Providers are being drafted. Around the globe, retired clinicians are volunteering. Decisions about who should serve require complex moral choices. Older males are at highest risk. When high-risk providers get seriously ill, they too need hospital beds and/or ventilators. Some high-risk providers insist that the only virtuous thing to do is to serve on the “COVID-front”; that is a misreading of what virtue requires.… (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - April 27, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: John Lantos Tags: Editorial-AJOB Featured Posts Medical Humanities professional ethics Professionalism Public Health #covid19 #diaryofaplagueyear COVID-19 Source Type: blogs

Thaddeus Mason Pope Receives Fulbright U.S. Scholar Award to Canada for Comparative End-of-Life Law and Policy Research
Here is a press release on my recent Fulbright award. Between January and May 2021, I will serve as the Fulbright Canada Research Chair in Health Law, Policy and Ethics at the University of Ottawa. (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - April 27, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Religion During the Coronavirus Pandemic: Islamic Bioethical Perspectives
Congregational rituals of religious communities around the world have attracted attention for their possible threat of spreading the coronavirus. Negative Media coverage has generally depicted members of religious communities as more or less “reckless” groups whose “fanatic” convictions can make them harm others from inside or outside their religious traditions. However, what hasn’t been discussed is how this issue should be approached as a complex bioethical issue that concerns people worldwide. With the beginning of Ramadan, paying attention to the nuances and complexities of this issue beco...
Source: blog.bioethics.net - April 27, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Susan Gilbert Tags: Health Care COVID-19 global health Hastings Bioethics Forum Islam pandemic religious perspectives syndicated Source Type: blogs

Interview Series: Do Health and Social Care Workers Have a Moral Obligation to Keep Working if they Lack Protective Equipment?
    Philosopher Udo Schüklenk argues that it is morally permissible for doctors, nurses and other care workers to stop working if they lack PPE (personal protective equipment).  To listen to the interview, follow this link to the podcast: https://podcasts.apple.com/gb/podcast/is-it-morally-permissible-for-healthcare-workers-to/id1509190881?i=1000472576406   (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - April 27, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Katrien Devolder Tags: Health Care Audio Files coronavirus COVID-19 Katrien Devolder Interview Pandemic Ethics podcasts syndicated thinking out loud Uncategorized Source Type: blogs

New York Expands Organ Donor Law to International Reciprocity
In late April 2020, New York enacted an amendment (S.6941) to its organ donation statute that expands what counts as a "document of gift." Traditionally, "document of gift" has included: Organ donor card Whole body donor card Driver's license author... (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - April 26, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

End-of-Life Dreams & Visions – A Conversation with Christopher Kerr, MD, PhD, and Carine Mardorossian, PhD, on Death is But a Dream: Finding Hope and Meaning at Life ’ s End Interview by Sebastian C. Galbo
[read more] (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - April 24, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: GalN Tags: Health Care A Different Take syndicated Source Type: blogs

How Should Healthcare Leaders Respond to Coronavirus Lockdown Protests?
by Daniel W. Tigard, Ph.D. In recent days, an increasing number of individuals have disobeyed policies restricting mass gatherings to rally in support of government officials reopening the state and the country. Such protests have been fueled by conspiracy theorists like Alex Jones and other public figures who claim that the lockdowns, which are intended to decrease the spread of COVID-19, are schemes aimed at disrupting the economy and undermining Trump’s presidency. Notably, Trump too has voiced support for easing the lockdown restrictions, particularly in states led by Democratic governors.… (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - April 24, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Daniel Tigard Tags: Featured Posts Professionalism Public Health #covid19 #diaryofaplagueyear activism COVID-19 Source Type: blogs

Pandemic Ethics: Extreme Altruism in a Pandemic
Written by Julian Savulescu and Dominic Wilkinson Cross-posted with the Journal of Medical Ethics blog Altruism is one person sacrificing or risking his or her own interests for another’s interests. Humans, like other animals, have a tendency towards altruism. This is usually directed to members of their own group. An example is donating a kidney […] (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - April 24, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Julian Savulescu Tags: Health Care Research Ethics Dominic Wilkinson's Posts Julian Savulescu's Posts Pandemic Ethics regulation syndicated Source Type: blogs

UK Court of Protection Authorizes " Ceiling of Care " over Mother ’ s Objections
In late March, the UK Court of Protection granted a "medical futility" declaration sought by University Hospitals Bristol NHS Foundation Trust. The patient is "ED," an incapacitated 35-year-old woman. The declaration was opposed by ED's moth... (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - April 24, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

“The Science” and Moral Judgments
Some common mislocutions are simply insufferable.  One is, “It’s in my/our DNA,” implying that a commitment or habit or practiced behavior is genetically hard-wired.  No, it isn’t. Another is, “I/we will follow the science” to make judgments.  If by this is meant, “I will face facts rather than engage in wishful thinking,” then hear, hear.  … Continue reading "“The Science” and Moral Judgments" (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - April 24, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Jon Holmlund Tags: Health Care Allocation / Access / Public Health syndicated Source Type: blogs

Immigrants, Health Inequities, and Social Citizenship in Covid-19 Response and Recovery
The novel coronavirus pandemic has starkly revealed the vulnerabilities of low-wage immigrants, immigrant-led households, and immigrant communities to coronavirus infection, severe Covid-19 illness, and economic fallout from pandemic. This public health emergency compounds pre-existing social inequalities and resulting health inequities associated with immigrant status and immigration policy priorities. Structural barriers to health care access and… Read more The post Immigrants, Health Inequities, and Social Citizenship in Covid-19 Response and Recovery appeared first on The Hastings Center. (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - April 23, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Susan Gilbert Tags: Health Care COVID-19 Hastings Bioethics Forum immigrant health social citizenship syndicated Undocumented Patients Source Type: blogs

MAID and Religiously Affiliated Providers
I am delighted to in the first video interview from the newly-formed American Clinicians Academy on Medical Aid in Dying (ACAMAID).I speak with physicians Barbara Morris and Lonny Shavelson. This interview focuses on the significance of a re... (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - April 23, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

The Value and Ethics of Using Technology to Contain the COVID-19 Epidemic
by Alex Dubov, Ph.D. and Steven Shoptaw, Ph.D. Introduction As the world grapples with COVID-19, experts are calling for better identification and isolation of new cases. In this paper, we argue that these tasks can be scaled up with the use of technology. Digital contact tracing can accelerate identifying newly diagnosed patients, instantly informing past contacts about their risk of infection, and supporting social distancing efforts. Geolocation data can be used to enforce quarantine measures. Social media data can be used to predict outbreak clusters and trace the spread of misinformation online.… (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - April 23, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Blog Editor Tags: Featured Posts Informed Consent Privacy Public Health Technology #covid19 #diaryofaplagueyear contact tracing COVID-19 Source Type: blogs

On Being a Doctor and a Human in the Pandemic: Connection and Vulnerability
By Amy Blair With each passing 24 hours, my roles of physician and physician educator and mother (and human of the planet Earth) have been taxed in complex ways. The problem-solving demands are intense and the solutions often feeble, weakened by uncertainty, if not paralyzed. It feels as if the rug were pulled out from […] (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - April 23, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: reflectivemeded Tags: Health Care syndicated Uncategorized Source Type: blogs

The Covid Threat No One Is Talking About: Wearing Scrubs in Public
The Covid-19 outbreak has forced health care providers, administrative officials, and the general public to each play their part in doing no harm to others. It may come as a surprise to many people, but health care workers may unknowingly spread Covid-19 in their communities simply by wearing scrubs in public. The post The Covid Threat No One Is Talking About: Wearing Scrubs in Public appeared first on The Hastings Center. (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - April 22, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Susan Gilbert Tags: Health Care COVID-19 Hastings Bioethics Forum Health and Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Life, Liberty and the Pursuit of Ventilators
by Craig Klugman, Ph.D. We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable Rights, that among these are Life, Liberty and the pursuit of Ventilators. In the last few months, the public airwaves, social media, and the internet have been buzzing about having enough ventilators to support COVID-19 patients. Bioethicists and physicians have worked alongside administrators and elected officials to craft hospital and regional allocation policies in case there are not enough ventilators going around.… (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - April 22, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Craig Klugman Tags: End of Life Care Featured Posts Health Disparities Health Regulation & Law Politics Public Health #covid19 #diaryofaplagueyear COVID-19 ventilators Source Type: blogs

Supreme Court Approves Advance Requests for Euthanasia
The Supreme Court of the Netherlands has approved an advance request for euthanasia. BACKGROUND FACTS In 2015, a 70-year-old Dutch woman completed an advance directive requesting euthanasia when her dementia advanced. She had seen others (including h... (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - April 22, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Key Workers Have a Stronger Claim to Compensation and Hazard Pay for Working During The COVID-19 Pandemic Than The Armed Forces Do When on Deployment
By Doug McConnell and Dominic Wilkinson Post originally appeared on the Journal of Medical Ethics Blog   While the general public enjoy the relative safety of social distancing, key workers are at a higher risk of both contracting COVID-19 and transmitting it to their families. This is especially the case for ‘frontline’ workers who are […] (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - April 22, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Doug McConnell Tags: Health Care professional ethics Public Health Armed Forces compensation COVID-19 Dominic Wilkinson's Posts Doug McConnell's Posts hazard pay NHS no-fault compensation Pandemic Ethics syndicated Source Type: blogs

Pandemic Ethics: Why lock down of the elderly is not ageist and why levelling down equality is wrong
By Julian Savulescu and James Cameron Cross-posted with the Journal of Medical Ethics Blog   Countries all around the world struggle to develop policies on how to exit the COVID-19 lockdown to restore liberty and prevent economic collapse, while also protecting public health from a resurgence of the pandemic. Hopefully, an effective vaccine or treatment […] (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - April 22, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Julian Savulescu Tags: Health Care Julian Savulescu's Posts Pandemic Ethics syndicated Source Type: blogs

Denying Ventilators to Covid-19 Patients with Prior DNR Orders is Unethical
Previously-stated DNR status would seem irrelevant to ventilator allocation, and yet some existing and proposed guidelines for triage during a public health emergency list DNR status in the list of criteria for excluding patients from getting ventilators or other life-saving health care. This approach is in direct opposition to the generally agreed-upon goal of maximizing the number of survivors, and could result in confusion and public mistrust of the health care system. The post Denying Ventilators to Covid-19 Patients with Prior DNR Orders is Unethical appeared first on The Hastings Center. (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - April 21, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Susan Gilbert Tags: Ethics Health Care COVID-19 DNR orders Hastings Bioethics Forum Health and Health Care syndicated ventilator allocation Source Type: blogs

Altruistic Living Wills – Save Other Souls (SOS) Directives
Increasingly, individuals are completing pandemic-specific advance directives.The scarcity of resources is a new condition that affects their treatment preferences. These individuals might not decline interventions like mechanical ventilation solely o... (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - April 21, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Guest Post: Pandemic Ethics. Social Justice Demands Mass Surveillance: Social Distancing, Contact Tracing and COVID-19
Written by: Bryce Goodman The spread of COVID-19 presents a number of ethical dilemmas. Should ventilators only be used to treat those who are most likely to recover from infection? How should violators of quarantine be punished? What is the right balance between protecting individual privacy and reducing the virus’ spread? Most of the mitigation […] (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - April 21, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Practical Ethics Tags: Health Care Public Health artificial intelligence Guest Post Invited Guest posts Pandemic Ethics regulation syndicated Source Type: blogs

Negative QALY Scores and Voluntary Euthanasia
I am all about saving money. I also enjoy reading the bioethical insights of Wesley Smith. His recent commentary in National Review entitled “Bioethicists: Euthanasia Will Save Money and Facilitate Organ Donations” naturally caught my eye. This blog has discussed the ethical problems with euthanasia and organ donation previously (see HERE and HERE). The focus … Continue reading "Negative QALY Scores and Voluntary Euthanasia" (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - April 21, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Mark McQuain Tags: Health Care Allocation / Access / Public Health bioethics end of life Health Care Practice human dignity syndicated Source Type: blogs

Psychological Distress, Mental Disorder, and Assessment of Decisionmaking Capacity Under U.S. Medical Aid in Dying Statutes
Lois A. Weithorn at U.C. Hastings Law has just published "Psychological Distress, Mental Disorder, and Assessment of Decisionmaking Capacity Under U.S. Medical Aid in Dying Statutes." This Article examines concepts of treatment decisionmaking capacity relevant to medical aid in dying as it is currently authorized in the United States. In order to be eligible for medical aid in dying in one of the ten jurisdictions now allowing such assistance, patients must be capable of making an informed health care decision. Under many of the governing statutes, special attention is given to whether a patient is “sufferi...
Source: blog.bioethics.net - April 20, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

My Experiences with Hydroxychloroquine Urge Caution and Ethical Research into COVID19 Therapies
by Keisha Ray, Ph.D. I take the drug hydroxychloroquine, brand name Plaquenil, for an autoimmune disease. Hydroxychloroquine was once used to treat malaria and is now commonly used to treat a range of inflammatory disorders like lupus and rheumatoid arthritis. If this drug sounds familiar it is likely because it has frequently been in the news as a potential therapy for COVID19. During multiple press conferences the president has touted this drug as a potential cure for COVID19. Medical professionals like Dr.… (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - April 20, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Keisha Ray Tags: Ethics Featured Posts Health Care Health Policy & Insurance Human Subjects Research & IRBs Informed Consent Pharmaceuticals Politics Public Health #covid19 #diaryofaplagueyear COVID-19 Source Type: blogs

Structural Racism, White Fragility, and Ventilator Rationing Policies
It’s been painful to watch health leaders twist themselves into moral knots denying that recently created ventilator rationing guidance will differentially affect Blacks, Latinx, and other people of color. On television, in newspapers, and on listservs, when the predicted disproportionate impacts of these policies are raised, some bioethicists-often white, stonewall. Or repeat a policy’s assertions that race, ethnicity, disability, etc. are irrelevant to care decisions. Or default to the intent of the policymakers. The post Structural Racism, White Fragility, and Ventilator Rationing Policies appeared first on...
Source: blog.bioethics.net - April 20, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Susan Gilbert Tags: Health Care bioethics COVID-19 Hastings Bioethics Forum racism syndicated ventilator allocation Source Type: blogs