Video Series: (Un)fair Access to Covid-19 Treatment in Mexico?
Widespread corruption and racism in Mexico created extra hurdles for the development of Mexico’s recently published federal guidelines for deciding who gets to access scarce medical resources (e.g. ventilators in the case of Covid-19). Dr César Palacios-González (Oxford), who helped develop these guidelines,  talks about these challenges. (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - June 4, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Katrien Devolder Tags: Health Care Coronavirus; Pandemic; Ethics; Public Health healthcare rationing Katrien Devolder Interview medical ethics Pandemic Ethics Rationing/ Resource Allocation syndicated Video Series Youtube interview Source Type: blogs

Overcoming the Pandemic: Social distancing, “Stay at Home” and Solidarity Works
by Father Marcin Ferdynus The COVID-19 pandemic is unprecedented in scope and beyond anything we have ever experienced. A global plague of unparalleled proportions resulting in health, economic, social and religious consequences, the pandemic has revealed deficiencies in global and domestic health institutions and systems. Countries around the world have faced the difficult task of caring for the health of citizens and securing their basic needs. Many European Union countries as well as public health institutions failed in the first phase of the pandemic.… (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - June 3, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Blog Editor Tags: Cultural Ethics Featured Posts Global Ethics Health Care Public Health #covid19 #diaryofaplagueyear #reportsfromaroundtheworld COVID-19 religion religion and medical ethics Social Distancing Source Type: blogs

Bioethics and Black Lives: A Call for Bioethics to Speak Against Racial Injustice
George Floyd could not breathe while his neck was trapped under the knee of a police officer for nearly nine minutes. Yet despite the impressive scholarship of bioethics on ventilation and other technologies that prolong human breathing capabilities, it is largely silent on the suffocating effects of racism. Bioethics must speak out against racial injustice. The post Bioethics and Black Lives: A Call for Bioethics to Speak Against Racial Injustice appeared first on The Hastings Center. (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - June 3, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Susan Gilbert Tags: Health Care activism bioethics Eric Garner Freddie Gray George Floyd Hastings Bioethics Forum policy brutality racial injustice syndicated Source Type: blogs

The Meaning of Care and Ethics to Mitigate the Harshness of Triage in Second-Wave Scenario Planning During the Covid-19 Pandemic
by Mathias Wirth, Ph.D.; Laurèl Rauschenbach, MD; Brian Hurwitz, MA, MSc, MD, FRCP, FRCGP; Heinz-Peter Schmiedebach, MD; Jennifer A. Herdt, Ph.D Although the number of severely ill people is declining in some epicenters, there is a risk of a second wave of COVID-19 infection with a large number of patients who are likely to require ventilation or other forms of intensive care. In the current state of the pandemic, second-wave scenario planning should give consideration to alternatives to triage. The shortage of ventilators showed that despite the existence of triage guidelines, moral questions remain. … ...
Source: blog.bioethics.net - June 3, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Blog Editor Tags: Featured Posts OPC Public Health #covid19 #diaryofaplagueyear COVID-19 Triage Source Type: blogs

No Quick Fix, But Now is the Time
by Dalia M. Feltman, MD, MA and Craig Klugman, Ph.D. Our country is polarized to a breaking point on too many issues.  Black vs. white.  Liberal vs. Conservative.  Documented vs. undocumented.  Haves vs. Have-Nots. Politics have perversely crept into all areas of life, even into matters of health and pandemic response such as wearing a mask and access to a ventilator. In public health ethics, we know that some communities have the determinants necessary to live healthy lives–safe neighborhoods and built environments, economic stability, good quality education, strong communities, and access to hea...
Source: blog.bioethics.net - June 3, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Blog Editor Tags: Featured Posts Justice Public Health Social Justice #covid19 #diaryofaplagueyear COVID-19 racism Source Type: blogs

Medical Decision-Making for Incapacitated Adult Patients Under Utah Law
A brand new multi-society statement provides guidance on how to make decisions for incapacitated patients without surrogates. This statement builds off a series of articles in which I assess the law (or lack of it) on this problem. Last week, mountain... (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - June 3, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Improving Advance Directives by Using Video Technology
Karen Wyatt interviews Fred Mirarchi at the End of Life University about improving advance directives by using video technology. Mirarchi is an emergency medicine physician and the principal investigator of the TRIAD Research Series (The Realistic Interpretation of Advance Directives). He discusses how his research has confirmed that there is a nationwide patient safety risk due to confusion surrounding living wills, DNR and POLST orders.  Wyatt and Mirarchi also discuss MIDEO, a video advance directive and physician’s medical order that improves both the quality and safety of advance care planning. I have ...
Source: blog.bioethics.net - June 2, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

COVID-19 and an Outbreak of Civil Unrest
by Anne Zimmerman, JD, candidate MS (Bioethics) At first it seemed like violence in the US had subsided during the pandemic. Outrage over police violence against unarmed black men was shelved while COVID-19 news took over the internet and cable news. The current civil outrage is evidence that violence against unarmed black men carries on concurrently with COVID-19’s economic and physical devastation that hurts the poor and the darker-skinned disproportionately. The causes are the same: The economic and physical effects of COVID-19 and police violence are caused by structural inequality.… (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - June 2, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Blog Editor Tags: Cultural Featured Posts Health Care Health Disparities Health Regulation & Law Justice Politics Social Justice #covid19 #diaryofaplagueyear #socialdeterminantsofhealth COVID-19 racism Source Type: blogs

“¿Que Vamos a Comer?”/ “What Are We Going to Eat?”: Latina Prenatal Care and Access to Food During COVID-19
By Daniela Vargas As a public health nurse, I work in reproductive justice, prenatal and postpartum care at a Federally Qualified Health Center (FQHC) in San Francisco. I am aware that my job comes with a high responsibility as I am assessing for social and structural determinants of health as women begin their prenatal care. […] (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - June 2, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: reflectivemeded Tags: Health Care syndicated Uncategorized Source Type: blogs

Brain Death Testing: Time for National Uniformity
This post appears in the June issue of the American Journal of Bioethics. by Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD It is time to revise the Uniform Determination of Death Act (UDDA) to assure a consistent nationwide approach to consent for brain death testing. Only two of 56 U.S. jurisdictions address the question in statute or regulation. Unfortunately, leaving this issue up to clinicians and the courts has led to considerable confusion and variability. We can tolerate this no longer. Certainty and clarity are of paramount importance in death determination.… (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - June 2, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Blog Editor Tags: Editorial-AJOB End of Life Care Featured Posts Source Type: blogs

The COVID-19 Pandemic and the Problem of Pseudoscience
by Kiarash Aramesh M.D., Ph.D. The COVID-19 pandemic has been accompanied by a surge of pseudoscientific claims, sometimes made or supported by political powers. Because of the magnitude of such claims, the risks and costs they inflict, and their global presence and interconnections, health organizations need to take them seriously and address them as a part of its response to such pandemics. The natural course of the COVID-19 infection, in which most of the patients survive, makes it a desirable playground for the promoters of pseudoscience because they can attribute the natural recovery of such patients – or escapi...
Source: blog.bioethics.net - June 2, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Blog Editor Tags: Clinical Trials & Studies Featured Posts Pharmaceuticals Politics #covid19 #diaryofaplagueyear COVID-19 Source Type: blogs

Essential Services
Until the pandemic, no one spent much time wondering about whether something was an “essential service”. This designation has granted necessary special exceptions to community mobility access restrictions created by government imposed “shelter-in-place“ orders instituted to slow the spread of the virus. Throughout the pandemic, determining what was and still is considered essential has been … Continue reading "Essential Services" (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - June 2, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Mark McQuain Tags: Health Care Allocation / Access / Public Health bioethics human dignity syndicated Source Type: blogs

Warp Speed Bioethics
It takes less time than ever to publish papers. But is quality sacrificed by doing bioethics at warp speed, especially during the Covid pandemic? The post Warp Speed Bioethics appeared first on The Hastings Center. (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - June 1, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Susan Gilbert Tags: Health Care bioethics COVID-19 Hastings Bioethics Forum syndicated Source Type: blogs

Massachusetts Health Committee Makes History: Approves End of Life Options Bill for 1st Time since 2011 Introduction
On Friday afternoon, the Massachusetts Joint Committee on Public Health approved legislation that would authorize medical aid in dying as an end-of-life care option. This is the first time the committee approved such legislation since it was originally introduced in 2011. The Massachusetts End of Life Options Act (H.1926 / S.1208), would give mentally capable, terminally ill individuals with a prognosis of six months or less to live the option to request, obtain and self-ingest medication to die peacefully in their sleep if their suffering becomes unbearable. “I can’t tell you how much this hist...
Source: blog.bioethics.net - June 1, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Justice & George Floyd
When I blogged last month, I thought surely that May would be an improvement over April. I was wrong. Now, with 100k deaths from COVID-19, and after several days of protests across the country in response to the death of George Floyd, I can’t possibly imagine what the summer will be like. I watched two … Continue reading "Justice & George Floyd" (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - June 1, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Neil Skjoldal Tags: Health Care Allocation / Access / Public Health bioethics Culture / Ethnicity / Gender / Disability human dignity syndicated Source Type: blogs

Is Family Presence Safe During the COVID-19 Pandemic?
by Stephen P. Wood, MS, ACNP-BC I stood facing the iPad attached to a rolling stand punching in the phone number of the young granddaughter of my intensive care unit patient. He arrived less than twenty-four hours before. I had taken the call the day before from the outside hospital emergency department and the story was grim. This was a seventy-six-year-old male who had acute myeloid leukemia, hypertension, as well as a history of congestive heart failure. He had been sick for the past two days with a fever, a cough and weakness.… (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - June 1, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Blog Editor Tags: End of Life Care Featured Posts Health Care Public Health #bioethicsontheground #covid19 #diaryofaplagueyear COVID-19 Source Type: blogs

Explaining pandemic triage: When a picture is worth 3000 words
by Leah R. Eisenberg, Joan M. Henriksen, Felicia G. Cohn, Anita J. Tarzian, Theresa S. Drought, Heather Fitzgerald. Art by Cathy Leamy Art by Cathy Leamy Ethics and its implications for healthcare delivery under constraints of scarcity are not simple concepts, even for those working within the healthcare system.  It’s time for ethicists to make a concerted effort to communicate these concepts to a broader public audience. Pandemic triage protocols call for transparency, because it leads to understanding and in this way increases the trust patients and families have in the healthcare system This commitment to tr...
Source: blog.bioethics.net - June 1, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Blog Editor Tags: Featured Posts #covid19 #diaryofaplagueyear #graphicmedicine COVID-19 Source Type: blogs

Podcast and Event Summary: New St Cross Special Ethics Seminar: Medically Assisted Dying in Canada: from where we ’ve come; to where we’re heading, presented by Professor Arthur Schafer (Centre for Professional and Applied Ethics, University of Manitoba)
Written by: Dr Amna Whiston In this seminar (available on podcast), Professor Arthur Schafer discussed the ethical challenges involved in the Canadian euthanasia debate at the New St Cross Special Ethics Seminar (online). Professor Schafer, who has written extensively over the last thirty years about a range of topics that includes professional and bio-medical ethics, […] (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - June 1, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Practical Ethics Tags: Ethics Health Care Amna Whiston's Posts Audio Files Euthanasia and Assisted Suicide Event Summary syndicated Source Type: blogs

Ethics of Immortality
Graphic by Sidney Harris  from American ScientistIn these current days of a world-wide pandemic of the deadly COVID-19 virus infectionand as of the origination of this blog thread there is concern as to how long testing for aneffective vaccine wil... (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - May 30, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Maurice Bernstein, M.D. Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Explaining pandemic triage: When a picture is worth 3000 words
by Leah R. Eisenberg, Joan M. Henriksen, Felicia G. Cohn, Anita J. Tarzian, Theresa S. Drought, Heather Fitzgerald. Art by Cathy Leamy Art by Cathy Leamy Ethics and its implications for healthcare delivery under constraints of scarcity are not simple concepts, even for those working within the healthcare system.  It’s time for ethicists to make a concerted effort to communicate these concepts to a broader public audience. Pandemic triage protocols call for transparency, because it leads to understanding and in this way increases the trust patients and families have in the healthcare system This commitment to tr...
Source: blog.bioethics.net - May 30, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Blog Editor Tags: Featured Posts #covid19 #diaryofaplagueyear #graphicmedicine COVID-19 Source Type: blogs

Every State Determines Brain Death Differently. Really.
What does it mean to be dead? You’d think the answer to that question is binary. You are, or you are not dead. But the fact is every state in the United States determines death differently. And when it comes to brain death specifically, the subtle differences can have major consequences for doctors, patients, and their families.  This was a challenge before COVID-19. The pandemic has underscored the already urgent need to reconcile these differences as soon as possible. I joined Jeff Segal, MD, JD on the Medical Liability Minute, to discuss brain death. (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - May 30, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Memories of the Spanish Flu by Jerome Lowenstein, MD, Professor of Medicine, NYU Grossman School of Medicine
[read more] (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - May 29, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: GalN Tags: Health Care A Different Take syndicated Source Type: blogs

A Framework for Rationing Ventilators and Critical Care Beds During the COVID-19 Pandemic: A Response
by B. Corbett Walsh, MD, MBE; Anna Nolan, MD, MSc As intensivists practicing in New York City at the epicenter of the COVID-19 pandemic, there was a palpable concern that there may not be enough ventilators for every patient that required it. If rationing were to occur, it should utilize a principled morally sound algorithm to aid physicians’ resource allocation decisions. While there has been much written about this timely topic, we would like to focus on a recent manuscript: Drs.… (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - May 29, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Blog Editor Tags: Decision making Featured Posts Public Health #bioethicsontheground #covid19 #diaryofaplagueyear COVID-19 Source Type: blogs

The Moderna Vaccine Story is a Cautionary Tale for Coronavirus Reporting
by Jamie Webb MA, MSci  ‘An experimental vaccine against the coronavirus showed encouraging results in very early testing, triggering hoped-for immune responses in eight healthy, middle-aged volunteers, its maker announced Monday.’ Readers of the Associated Press’s lead paragraph on Moderna’s vaccine candidate for COVID-19 could be forgiven for getting excited. However, the same article ends with this caveat, “The results have not been published and are only from the first of three stages of testing that vaccines and drugs normally undergo.” Rather than published data, the...
Source: blog.bioethics.net - May 29, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Blog Editor Tags: Clinical Trials & Studies Featured Posts Media #covid19 #diaryofaplagueyear COVID-19 Source Type: blogs

Model Hospital Policy for Fair Allocation of Medications to Treat COVID-19
To assist hospitals and health systems to implement a transparent and fair approach to allocate scarce medications to treat patients with COVID-19, the University of Pittsburgh Department of Critical Care Medicine has created a model hospital policy and allocation framework.  Hospitals and health systems are welcome to adapt the policy for their specific needs. Click here to download a PDF version of the Model Hospital Policy for Fair Allocation of Medications to Treat COVID-19. Since March 2020, the number of clinical trials to assess the efficacy of medications to treat COVID-19 has expanded rapidly...
Source: blog.bioethics.net - May 29, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Clinicians Have a Moral Duty to Care for All Patients –Including Lockdown Protesters
Protesters questioning the ongoing need for lockdown measures aimed at controlling Covid19 are marching to make their concerns known, in some cases with arms and other military paraphernalia. Some ethicists think these protectors should sign a pledge to forego scarce medical care in the name of their political ideas. We disagree. The post Clinicians Have a Moral Duty to Care for All Patients–Including Lockdown Protesters appeared first on The Hastings Center. (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - May 28, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Susan Gilbert Tags: Health Care professional ethics COVID-19 duty to treat Hastings Bioethics Forum lockdown protesters syndicated Source Type: blogs

Lessons Learned and Ignored In a Pandemic
by Craig Klugman, Ph.D. In 2009, after an outbreak of H1N1 flu, the Institutes of Medicine (IOM) issued a letter that encouraged all states to begin planning for a pandemic flu. Three years later the IOM expanded their call and asked states to develop crisis standards of care plans. Having worked on the ethical frameworks for pandemic flu for the State of Texas (2010), for crisis standards of care in the state of Illinois (2015), and conducted exercises with the Borough of Brooklyn (2012), these plans considered a number of scenarios from the length of the pandemic, to availability of supplies, to the type of crisis.&helli...
Source: blog.bioethics.net - May 28, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Craig Klugman Tags: Featured Posts Health Care Health Policy & Insurance Health Regulation & Law Justice Politics Public Health #covid19 #diaryofaplagueyear COVID-19 Source Type: blogs

Lessons from Covid-19: Why Treating Sick Patients is Bad Business for Hospitals
Hospitals in the United States are losing money taking care of patients with Covid-19. The pandemic casts a harsh spotlight on the misallocation of health care resources in the U.S. The post Lessons from Covid-19: Why Treating Sick Patients is Bad Business for Hospitals appeared first on The Hastings Center. (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - May 28, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Susan Gilbert Tags: Health Care COVID-19 Hastings Bioethics Forum Health and Health Care health care reimbursement surprise billing syndicated Source Type: blogs

Mutual Self-Restraint: Social Distancing and COVID-19 in Japan
by Laura Specker Sullivan, Ph.D. and Dan Rosen, J.D. As Fairchild et al. describe in a forthcoming issue of the American Journal of Bioethics, the American debate on social distancing regulations has pitted those protesting unacceptable state limitations on individual rights versus those demanding that individual rights to protection create a government obligation. That the debate over social distancing in the United States is playing out in the space of rights is not surprising; as commentators have noted, recent American social and political discourse is grounded in a tradition of individualism that frequently finds itse...
Source: blog.bioethics.net - May 28, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Blog Editor Tags: Cultural Decision making Ethics Featured Posts Global Ethics Health Care #covid19 #diaryofaplagueyear #reportsfromaroundtheworld Covid-19 antibody testing Social Distancing Source Type: blogs

Court Refuses to Order Treatment for Dead Pregnant Woman Khayla Reno
Several United States jurisdictions (like Nevada) mandate continued organ-sustaining treatment AFTER determination of death when the individual is pregnant and there is some chance to later deliver the baby. This is not the case in the Australian Capi... (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - May 28, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

New Hampshire Expands Authority of Healthcare Agents
The New Hampshire health care decisions act prohibits healthcare agents and surrogates from consenting to experimental therapy on behalf of an incapacitated patient. As in many states, this constraint on authority is listed with constraints on the abil... (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - May 28, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

COVID-19: The Need for “Emergency Multidisplinary Team Meetings”
by Henri-Corto Stoeklé Ph.D., Asmahane Benmaziane M.D., Philippe Beuzeboc M.D., Christian Hervé, M.D., Ph.D. In a letter published in The American Journal of Bioethics, we wrote “now really isn’t the time for ethical reflections” in the face of COVID-19. This did not mean that nothing should be done to help clinicians in this time. We believe that the development of specific multidisciplinary team meetings (MTMs), well known in oncology, could be vital.… (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - May 27, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Blog Editor Tags: Clinical Ethics Decision making Featured Posts Global Ethics Health Care Philosophy & Ethics professional ethics #covid19 #diaryofaplagueyear #reportsfromaroundtheworld COVID-19 Source Type: blogs

Video Interview: Past the Peak of the Pandemic: Which Non-Covid-19 Patients Should Get Treatment First?
In the UK we’re past the peak of the coronavirus pandemic but new ethical issues are arising: the healthcare system is now under enormous pressure – it’s working less efficiently than before (because of precautions to protect healthcare personnel), and there’s an enormous backlog of patients whose treatments have been put on hold. Which non-Covid-19 […] (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - May 27, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Katrien Devolder Tags: Health Care Coronavirus; Pandemic; Ethics; Public Health healthcare rationing Katrien Devolder Interview medical ethics Rationing/ Resource Allocation syndicated Uncategorized Video Series Youtube interview Source Type: blogs

Advance Directives During COVID-19 (podcast)
So, you’ve written an advance care directive. You’ve made it clear, you think, about the kinds of medical care you want should you get sick with Covid-19 or you’re in the midst of a medical crisis. Will your wishes be followed?  Art Caplan and I talk with Cathy Wurzer at the End in Mind Project. (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - May 27, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Dementia Advance Directives – SED by AD
Lamar Hankins has compiled both a good list of dementia directives and a good list of recommended elements of dementia directives. Many of these include provisions that direct stopping eating and drinking. In a recently completed invited book manuscri... (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - May 26, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Covid-19 Underscores Racial Disparity in Advance Directives
Older black Americans are half as likely as older whites to have advanced directives. My patient, a black man in his 70s,, first made his wishes known when he was in the hospital with Covid-19. The post Covid-19 Underscores Racial Disparity in Advance Directives appeared first on The Hastings Center. (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - May 26, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Susan Gilbert Tags: Health Care advance directives COVID-19 Disparities end of life Hastings Bioethics Forum syndicated Source Type: blogs

Balancing COVID-19 Quantity and Quality of Care via Geographic Redistribution: A Matter of Social Justice and Pragmatism for New York City
by Joyeeta G Dastidar, MD   In New York City, the epicenter of the COVID-19 pandemic in the country with a quarter of the nation’s cases, hospitals prepared for ventilator shortages. This included the development of ventilator allocation guidelines and, in some institutions, appointments of triage allocation committees to help determine who would get a ventilator if there was an inadequate supply of ventilators. While there was much debate and discussion over triage guidelines, ultimately in New York City, due to a lack of supportive legislation at the state or federal levels, resource allocation guidelines and ...
Source: blog.bioethics.net - May 26, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Keisha Ray Tags: Decision making End of Life Care Ethics Featured Posts Health Care Health Regulation & Law Justice Public Health Social Justice Technology #covid19 #diaryofaplagueyear COVID-19 Source Type: blogs

New 2020 Publications from Professor Thaddeus Pope
I am delighted to have recently delivered complete manuscripts for a number of invited and planned publications. In addition, I list my articles and books that have already been published in 2020. My key objective for June is completing "From Informed Consent to Shared Decision Making: Improving Patient Safety and Reducing Medical Liability Risk with Patient Decision Aids." FORTHCOMING IN 2020 Is There a Right to Delay Determination of Death by Neurologic Criteria? JAMA NEUROLOGY (forthcoming 2020) (with Ariane Lewis, and Richard J. Bonnie). Brain Death: Status Shift and Implications, AMA JOURNAL OF ETHICS (forth...
Source: blog.bioethics.net - May 26, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

COVID-19: Think First, Act Better Later
by Fernando Hellmann, Ph.D.,  Silvia Cardoso Bittencourt, Ph.D., Fabíola Stolf Brzozowski, Ph.D., Mirelle Finkler, Ph.D.,  Marta Verdi, Sandra Caponi, Ph.D. In times of crisis, like the current pandemic of COVID-19, the perception that ethical standards can be relaxed due to the urgent need for solutions is growing, according to Stoeklé and Hervé. For them, “Ethics is only useful if you have the time, and right now, time is exactly what we do not have.” It is a misperception without any doubts.… (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - May 25, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Keisha Ray Tags: Decision making Ethics Featured Posts Global Ethics Health Care #covid19 #diaryofaplagueyear COVID-19 Source Type: blogs

Oklahoma Limits Guardian Authority for DNR
Last Monday, the Governor of Oklahoma signed H.B 2588, which limits the power of guardians to authorize DNR orders without specific court approval.  In response to the high profile debacle of guardian Rebecca Fierle, Florida enacted similar legis... (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - May 25, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Texas Physician Sued for Withdrawing Life Support without Following TADA Procedures
Scores of legislative bills and a dozen lawsuits have questioned whether the Texas Advance Directives Act affords adequate procedural due process. One such case is now pending before the Texas Court of Appeal.  But a new lawsuit alleges that a p... (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - May 24, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Strong and Faithful Healthcare Agents Advocate for the Patient
I have written a lot about "bad" surrogates, those who make treatment decisions for incapacitated patients that those patients would not have made for themselves. Therefore, it was a delight to see this movie scene depicting a strong and faithful heal... (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - May 23, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Report from Sub-Saharan Africa: “When the Health Fundamentals are Weak, Covid Will Expose You.”
The cries of millions of people in Sub-Saharan Africa and in low- and middle-income countries elsewhere who are struggling to stay alive because of Covid-19 and the lockdowns call for us to revisit the conceptual framework of the human right to health. The post Report from Sub-Saharan Africa: “When the Health Fundamentals are Weak, Covid Will Expose You.” appeared first on The Hastings Center. (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - May 22, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Susan Gilbert Tags: Health Care COVID-19 global health Hastings Bioethics Forum human rights syndicated World Health Organization Source Type: blogs

Brain Death Testing – Consent or No Consent?
I have a guest editorial in the June 2020 American Journal of Bioethics. Fifteen articles discuss whether clinicians should get consent for brain death testing.  Brain Death Testing: Time for National UniformityThaddeus Mason Pope Legal and Ethical Considerations for Requiring Consent for Apnea Testing in Brain Death DeterminationIvor Berkowitz & Jeremy R. Garrett Beyond the Apnea Test: An Argument to Broaden the Requirement for Consent to the Entire Brain Death EvaluationErin Paquette, Joel Frader, Seema Shah, Robert C. Tasker & Robert Truog The Case Against Solicitation of Consent for Apnea TestingDhristie B...
Source: blog.bioethics.net - May 22, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs