Build Your Own Coffin – Miriam ’ s Dead Good Adventure
I just discovered a  tremendous show on BBC Two called "Miriam's Dead Good Adventure." Inimitable actress Miriam Margolyes is on a mission to confront her fear of ageing and death and tackle our greatest taboo - our own mortality. Miria... (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - September 21, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Can Bioethics Light Up the Vaping Issue?
by Craig Klugman, Ph.D. Over 530 (as of 9/17) users of e-cigarettes have been stricken with a vaping-related lung illness and 8 people have diedfrom this new affliction.  The reports span 38 states and the U.S. Virgin Isles. The FDA and CDC have begun investigationsinto these lung illnesses resulting in a September 10 letter to Juul—a large manufacturer of e-cigarettes and cartridges—that they violated federal law by stating their product is “safer” than other forms of tobacco.… (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - September 21, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Craig Klugman Tags: Clinical Trials & Studies Cultural Featured Posts Health Regulation & Law Public Health vaping Source Type: blogs

Celebrar é Mi Muerte – Theater Production with Physician Hourmann Explaining Why He Gave Lethal Injection
Marcos Ariel Hourmann is the first and only doctor to be convicted for practicing euthanasia in Spain. “I Will Celebrate My Death” is a documentary theater production (tickets here) with Hourmann himself about why (in 2005) he have a lethal injection to an 82-year-old woman named Carmen. Hourmann is staging his own trial — on a stage. Eight audience members sit on the spartan stage as the doctor recounts his story. The performance ends with the “jury members” writing down their verdict on a piece of paper. Responses have been overwhelmingly “not guilty,” but there have be...
Source: blog.bioethics.net - September 20, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

“Velvet Eugenics”
Human Flourishing in an Age of Gene Editing is a new collection of essays, edited by Erik Parens and Josephine Johnson.  In the introduction, the editors explain they are concerned with “nonphysical harms” of human gene editing.  That is, these harms would not affect bodily systems, but harm “people’s psyches…[their] experiences of being persons,” and … Continue reading "“Velvet Eugenics”" (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - September 20, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Jon Holmlund Tags: Genetics Health Care abortion bioethics biotechnology Culture / Ethnicity / Gender / Disability enhancement human dignity reproduction syndicated Source Type: blogs

Lies
Written by Stephen Rainey.   I’ve been thinking, lately, about lying. Not doing it, just puzzling over what it means. We all know lying can be morally wrong. But sometimes it can also be a kindness, when the truth might serve no good. Within the constraints of a job, lying might be a professional obligation, […] (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - September 19, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Stephen Rainey Tags: Ethics Health Care deceit language Lies lying Reflections Stephen Rainey's Posts syndicated Source Type: blogs

Can You Marry the Dead?
We have had a long debate in the United States about who can marry whom. But can you marry the dead? In 1967, the U.S. Supreme Court struck down all state laws banning interracial marriage (Loving v. Virginia). In 2015, the court ruled that the fundam... (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - September 19, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

A Tribute to William Meadow, MD, PhD, 1948-2019
by John Lantos, MD Dr. William L. Meadow, MD, PhD, died at the age of 70 on Saturday, September 14, after battling leukemia for four years.  Meadow was a pioneer in the development of neonatal bioethics. We worked closely on a series of articles and a book about the complex set of medical and personal calculations that guide decision making for the parents, physicians and nurses who care for critically ill infants.  The tough decisions generally occur when infants are born at the borderline of viability or those with significant congenital problems or infections.… (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - September 19, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: John Lantos Tags: Featured Posts In Memoriam Pediatrics Source Type: blogs

Top 20 Death & Dying Legal Developments from 2019
There are so many new updates to The Right to Die: The Law of End-of-Life Decisionmaking (Wolters Kluwer 2020). Here are some of them:Idaho’s first reported judicial decision on end-of-life decision making, finding the Idaho advance directive statute constitutional as it applies to pregnant women. An appellate ruling in California upholding most of the interdisciplinary team approach to medical decision making for unbefriended patients in long-term care facilities.  Promulgation of federal regulations that expand and protect statutory conscience rights in health care, including with respect to advance direc...
Source: blog.bioethics.net - September 18, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Behavioral Economic Interventions – It’s Not a Choice Between Nudges and Shoves
The field of behavioral economics has brought attention to promising ways of motivating people to make better life choices. Many behavioral economic-inspired interventions are relatively hands off — they nudge people to make wiser decisions without in any way restricting their … Continue reading → The post Behavioral Economic Interventions – It’s Not a Choice Between Nudges and Shoves appeared first on PeterUbel.com. (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - September 17, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: PeterUbel.com Tags: Health Care Behavioral Economics and Public Policy Peter Ubel syndicated Source Type: blogs

No More Clitting Around: Let ’s Talk about Clitoris Transplants
Quality of life transplantations (e.g. hand, face, etc.), in contrast to life-saving transplantations (e.g. heart, lungs, etc.), have become increasingly popular and have gained more acceptance in the medical and lay communities. In the last two decades transplants for sexual and reproductive organs—specifically allogenic transplantations of the uterus, ovary, and penis—have emerged as yet another type of quality of life transplants. The purpose of uterus transplantations is to allow cisgender women with absolute uterine factor infertility to experience pregnancy. Although the first uterus transplantation took ...
Source: blog.bioethics.net - September 17, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Bioethics Today Tags: Health Care assisted reproduction feminist ethics reproductive medicine Sex and Sexuality surgical ethics syndicated transplantation Women's Reproductive Rights Source Type: blogs

Stem Cell Rx No Longer For Sale on Google
Perhaps once a week, I will be asked by a patient about the potential benefits of stem cells for reversing the normal affects of age, particularly with respect to arthritis of the knee joints, hip joints or the degenerative discs in the lumbar spine. I believe one of the reasons for this interest has come … Continue reading "Stem Cell Rx No Longer For Sale on Google" (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - September 17, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Mark McQuain Tags: Health Care Stem Cells Allocation / Access / Public Health bioethics biotechnology Consent / Research Health Care Practice human dignity syndicated Source Type: blogs

O, Let Me Not Get Alzheimer ’ s, Sweet Heaven!
Coming out next month is yet another book on how to avoid living with late-stage dementia. The title says it all: "O, Let Me Not Get Alzheimer's, Sweet Heaven!" This demand motivates much of my research on VSED. Hardly a day goes by without some newspaper story, personal memoir or medical report referring to Alzheimer’s Disease, arousing personal fears or memories of relatives and friends whose lives have been changed permanently by this condition. Grim as it is to suffer the ravages of this disease, many people are as concerned about the last few years and months of life as an Alzheimer’s patient as ...
Source: blog.bioethics.net - September 17, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

‘ All my hurts my garden spade can heal ’ : Horticultural Therapy, Present & Future
[read more] (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - September 17, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: GalN Tags: Health Care A Different Take syndicated Source Type: blogs

Ethical and Legal Considerations in End-of-Life Care
If you are looking for an accessible primer on ethical and legal issues in a wide range of end-of-life medical interventions, check out "Ethical and Legal Considerations in End-of-Life Care" in the September 2019 issue of Primary Care: Clinics in Offic... (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - September 16, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

True to Tradition? Religion, the Secular, ​and the Future of Medicine
The annual Conference on Medicine and Religion will be at Ohio State University from March 22 to 24, 2020. Abstracts are due by September 27, 2019. (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - September 16, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Big Brother Is Watching: Mental Illness, Gun Control and a Profitable Proposal to Surveil the Public
by Craig Klugman, Ph.D.  “Mental illness and hatred pulls the trigger, not the gun” – President Trump, 4 August 2019 In 2019 (as of September 13), there have been 297 “mass shootings” (4 or more people killed or injured) in the United States resulting in 326 deaths and 1,229 injuries. The reason, according to Trump’s administration is untreated mental illness. According to many mental health specialists, lots of people with mental illness never injure another person and many of the shooters have not been diagnosed with a mental illness.… (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - September 16, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Craig Klugman Tags: Featured Posts Psychiatric Ethics Public Health Social Justice gun control guns HARPA Source Type: blogs

12th Annual Pediatric Bioethics Conference
The Florida Bioethics Network is holding its 12th Annual Pediatric Bioethics Conference on November 1, 2019. Another compelling program. Register here. From Peapods to Whole Genomes: Ethical and Policy Issues in Genetic Testing of Children Lainie... (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - September 16, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

At the End of Life: Agency, Role, and Responsibilities of the Physician/Advanced Practitioner
Here are four reasons why this two-day conference in Seattle was a real standout from most other end-of-life conferences that I attend.  1.  It was full of top experts from Randy Curtis to Tim Quill.  2. Medicine, law, and ethics were ... (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - September 15, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Blackbird – Film of Family Gathering for Medical Aid in Dying
Ann all-star cast has remade the 2014 Danish film "Silent Heart.” The new film is "Blackbird." Susan Sarandon’s Lily has ALS, which has already cost her the use of one hand and made walking a chore. Doctor husband Paul can hardly deny the inevitability with which her condition will degenerate until she’s incapable of moving, or even swallowing, on her own. (HT: Variety) That is not a juncture that Lily means to reach. Lily has set a date for her death — this Sunday — and will take a lethal dosage to die in her sleep after a final 48 hours spent with the family. &n...
Source: blog.bioethics.net - September 15, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Preserving Patient Dignity (Formerly: Patient Modesty):Volume 105
There is no doubt that those writing to this blog thread are "Speaking Up" here but to attempt to meet the goal of the preservation of patient dignity within the medical system, it is necessary for your voices to be heard by your physician and office o... (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - September 15, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Maurice Bernstein, M.D. Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Sperm, Lies, & Consumer Genetic Testing
by Nanette Elster, JD, MPH A recent article in Stat News decrying the end of donor anonymity in sperm donation due to consumergenetic testing sparked my attention. In the spirit of full disclosure, I am the parent of an adolescent through anonymous sperm donation and have written and spoken extensively on this topic for over 20 years. So, in reading the Stat News article as my curious, internet savvy teen has begun her own journey of discovery about her genetics, I could not help but think, “FINALLY.” This is something I have expected with the advent of genetics and .… (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - September 14, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Blog Editor Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: blogs

Contemporary Concerns About Brain Death Determination (CME)
The American Academy of Neurology's fall conference includes an interesting session on October 19, 2019: "Contemporary Concerns About Brain Death Determination." "Despite the fact that brain death has achieved widespread medical and legal acceptance for nearly 50 years, medical, social, and legal controversies associated with determination of death by neurologic criteria persist." "This course will review guidelines for declaration of brain death and examine contemporary challenges to brain death determination. We will also address the AAN Brain Death Working Group’s actions and rec...
Source: blog.bioethics.net - September 14, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

BioethicsTV: Legionnaires ’ Disease and the Cover-Up That Killed Flint Residents During the ‘ Flint Water Crisis ’
by Keisha Ray, Ph.D.   The story of Flint, Michigan’s water crisis, beginning in 2014 is a story that most people are familiar with. After changing how their water is supplied—Going from Detroit supplied water to water supplied from Flint river to the ultimate goal of pipelines bringing in water from Lake Huron—the water became contaminated. The yellow-ish brown, foul odor water brought in from Flint River had high levels of lead causing many people to not drink the water or use it for cooking, brushing teeth, or any other life activity that required water.… (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - September 13, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Keisha Ray Tags: Cultural Environmental Ethics Featured Posts Justice Public Health Uncategorized Source Type: blogs

High Healthcare Costs — Are Insurance Premiums a Cause or an Effect?
In 2010, the state of Rhode Island decided to tackle high healthcare costs. It did so by requiring insurers to meet affordability standards. The plan worked, but not for the reasons you probably suspect. Let’s start with what Rhode Island’s standards … Continue reading → The post High Healthcare Costs — Are Insurance Premiums a Cause or an Effect? appeared first on PeterUbel.com. (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - September 13, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: PeterUbel.com Tags: Health Care health policy Peter Ubel syndicated Source Type: blogs

Video Interview: Jesper Ryberg on Neurointerventions, Crime and Punishment
Should neurotechnologies that affect emotional regulation, empathy and moral judgment, be used to prevent offenders from reoffending? Is it morally acceptable to offer more lenient sentences to offenders in return for participation in neuroscientific treatment programs? Or would this amount too coercion? Is it possible to administer neurointerventions as a type of punishment? Is it […] (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - September 13, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Katrien Devolder Tags: Ethics Health Care Neuroethics coercion crime crime prevention Katrien Devolder Interview medical ethics Neurointerventions neuroscience punishment syndicated Video Series Youtube interview Source Type: blogs

Prenatal Decision-Making at the Limits of Viability: A Qualitative Examination of Neonatologists ’ Consultation Practices
On Friday, October 11, 2019, from 12:00pm to 1:15pm, come to University of Minnesota Moos 2-530 for "Prenatal Decision-Making at the Limits of Viability: A Qualitative Examination of Neonatologists’ Consultation Practices."  The presenter is Chris Collura, MD, MA, Neonatology, Pediatric Palliative Care, Bioethics, Mayo Clinic Children’s Center. When delivery of an extremely premature baby is anticipated at 22 to 24 weeks of gestation, the standard of care is for a specialist in Neonatology to consult with families to determine family-centered goals of care to best determine whether...
Source: blog.bioethics.net - September 13, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Two developments
A new effort at “somatic” gene editing in China is reported this week.  The key summary: “As the researchers report in the New England Journal of Medicine, they transplanted [blood stem] cells that had undergone CRISPR-based editing [of a gene that encodes for a receptor, or “docking station”] into a patient with HIV and acute lymphoblastic … Continue reading "Two developments" (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - September 13, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Jon Holmlund Tags: Genetics Health Care Stem Cells bioethics biotechnology syndicated Source Type: blogs

Death by Poison – A New American Epidemic
I’ll get right to the dismal data: Americans are dying from poison at an alarming rate. In 2005, death by poison in the U.S. occurred in about 11 of every 100,000 people over age 15. By 2016, that number had … Continue reading → The post Death by Poison – A New American Epidemic appeared first on PeterUbel.com. (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - September 12, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: PeterUbel.com Tags: Health Care Peter Ubel syndicated Uncategorized Source Type: blogs

Ontario CCB Determines " Death Is a Benefit "
Over the past week, I have blogged about some of the 2019 medical futility disputes that were resolved by the Ontario Consent & Capacity Board. Here is another one. In VB, the family of a 71-year-old patient refused consent to the proposed palliative treatment plan that included removal from ventilator. The CCB sided with the clinicians, finding that the substitute decision makers found it difficult to find that "death was a benefit for VB." The panel determined that "VB’s condition was irreversible and permanent and that she would not experience any quality of life that saw her aware of her surrou...
Source: blog.bioethics.net - September 12, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

What Christian ethics is not
About this time in the semester, after discussing some basic things about the discipline of ethics and looking at some of the main ethical theories in western philosophical ethics, I begin a discussion of Christian ethics with the students in my bioethics class. I intend this to form a foundation on which they can ground … Continue reading "What Christian ethics is not" (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - September 11, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Steve Phillips Tags: Health Care bioethics Ethical Method / Grounding syndicated Source Type: blogs

Minnesota Lawmakers Hear Medical Aid in Dying Bill
I am heading to Seattle this morning for an end-of-life conference. Unfortunately, that means I am missing a hearing in the Minnesota legislature on a medical aid in dying bill. Barbara Coombs Lee and others will testify. (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - September 11, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Press Release: Tafida Raqeeb, International Disagreement and Controversial Decisions About Life Support
by Dominic Wilkinson @Neonatalethics   This week the legal case around medical treatment for five-year old Tafida Raqeeb has begun in the High Court. She sustained severe brain damage from bleeding in the brain seven months ago. Her parents wish to take her to a hospital in Italy for further treatment, while the doctors at […] (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - September 10, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Dominic Wilkinson Tags: Decision making Health Care Critical Care Disability, Chronic Conditions and Rehabilitation Dominic Wilkinson's Posts syndicated Source Type: blogs

Ontario CCB Determines Best Interest for PVS Patient is Comfort Measures Only
Over the past week, I have blogged about some of the 2019 medical futility disputes that were resolved by the Ontario Consent & Capacity Board. Here is another one. In SH, the 75-year-old patient suffered an anoxic brain injury from a ca... (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - September 10, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs