Forgotten Communities: What Bioethics Should Learn from COVID-19
by Thomas D. Harter, PhD, Mary E. Homan, DrPH, MA, MSHCE COVID-19’s emergence in the US has once again thrust the field of bioethics in the public spotlight. While many individual ethicists have been asked to opine on a variety of pandemic related issues, the general focus of bioethics conversations and concerns relate to the direct threat the pandemic poses to overwhelm the capacity of scarce, life-saving resources in acute care settings. Of primary concern is the possibility that shortages, and subsequently rationing, will occur, causing situations in which patients may be denied life-saving resources or having res...
Source: blog.bioethics.net - June 9, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Blog Editor Tags: Clinical Ethics Decision making Featured Posts Public Health #covid19 #diaryofaplagueyear allocation COVID-19 Source Type: blogs

Prioritize Health Care Workers for Ventilators? Not So Fast
In places where Covid-19 is increasing – and in preparation for a possible second wave of the pandemic-- hospitals are preparing to triage critical resources if necessary. Some are prioritizing health care workers for ventilators. We think this is a mistake. The post Prioritize Health Care Workers for Ventilators? Not So Fast appeared first on The Hastings Center. (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - June 8, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Susan Gilbert Tags: Health Care COVID-19 Hastings Bioethics Forum health care workers syndicated ventilator allocation Source Type: blogs

Reading Arrowsmith During the 2020 Pandemic By J. Russell Teagarden
[read more] (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - June 8, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: GalN Tags: Health Care A Different Take syndicated Source Type: blogs

Costs and values: what can we learn from the COVID-19 pandemic?
by Carlo Alfredo Clerici, MD, Tullio Proserpio, PhD, Costanza Raimondi, PhD candidate The COVID pandemic has exposed us to our own fragility and has forced the entire world to confront a condition with no cure. We have all been forced to use ancient practices, such as isolation and quarantine, waiting for better, clearer solutions , while demonstrating renewed solidarity within communities. This in and of itself would be a great lesson for us all, but we must also look at how healthcare structures have responded to the crisis to see what experiences can be carried over as we go back to rebuilding our wounded soci...
Source: blog.bioethics.net - June 8, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Blog Editor Tags: Featured Posts Health Policy & Insurance Health Regulation & Law Institutions, Centers, Funding #covid19 #diaryofaplagueyear #reportsfromaroundtheworld COVID-19 Source Type: blogs

Guardian ad Litem Cannot Sign Pediatric POLST
In early June 2020, the Alabama Court of Civil Appeals held that a guardian ad litem cannot sign a pediatric POLST for a child suffering from Batten Disease and toxic epidermal necrolysis. Custody of the child had been temporarily awarded to the ... (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - June 8, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Incidence of Brain Death in the United States
A new study in the August 2020 issue of Clinical Neurology and Neurosurgery measures the incidence of brain death in the United States at 16,000 per year. That is 2% of hospital deaths and 0.5% of all deaths. The study makes some interesting findings,... (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - June 7, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Nursing Homes and Rights in New York
During a pandemic, some rights may be set aside for a time. Is that what happened to nursing home residents in New York? Residents of nursing homes (NH) in the state of New York have specific rights spelled out on the NY Department of Health website. Regarding “Clinical Care and Treatment,” thirteen rights are listed. … Continue reading "Nursing Homes and Rights in New York" (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - June 7, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: D. Joy Riley Tags: Health Care bioethics syndicated Source Type: blogs

Exit Plan – The Movie
A new Danish film opens on June 12, 2020: "Exit Plan." Insurance claims investigator Max follows the clues of a mysterious death to the remote Hotel Aurora, a unique and secretive facility that specializes in assisted suicide.  His investigation... (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - June 6, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

TOOLKIT: Bioethics and Race #BlackBioethics
The #BlackBioethics Toolkit serves as a resource on articles about bioethics and race, specifically about African-Americans and Blacks in the U.S. General Resources Campaign Zero – “analysis of policing practices across the country, research to identify effective solutions to end police violence, technical assistance to organizers leading police accountability campaigns and the development of model legislation and advocacy to end police violence nationwide” #8CantWait – Ideas to reduce police violence Bioethics.net David Magnus. 2020. A Statement on Police Brutality from American Journal of Bioe...
Source: blog.bioethics.net - June 5, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Blog Editor Tags: Featured Posts #BioethicsSoBlack #BlackBioethics #racism Source Type: blogs

Time for Action is Now
by David Magnus, Ph.D. The past three months have witnessed this country (and the world) go through the most serious pandemic since 1918; the greatest economic collapse since the great depression; and the murder of George Floyd has set off a protest movement across the country that has arguably not been seen since 1968. All three of these events have something in common. They all expose a hard truth in a fashion too compelling to deny: the underlying racism of our country.  … (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - June 5, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: David Magnus Tags: Cultural Ethics Featured Posts Health Care Health Disparities Health Policy & Insurance Justice Politics Public Health #blackbioethics Police brutality protests race racism Source Type: blogs

Local Bioethicists Respond to the Pandemic: The Birth of the COVID-19 Chicago Bioethics Coalition (CBC)
by Craig Klugman, PhD, Kelly Michelson, MD, MPH, Kayhan Parsi, JD, PhD In response to the COVID-19 pandemic, groups of regional ethicists have organized to better foster collaboration and dialogue in their cities and states.  Here in the Chicago metropolitan area, the COVID-19 Chicago Bioethics Coalition (CBC) was created on March 20, 2020, the same day Governor J.B. Pritzker announced the “shelter at home” order for the state of Illinois.  One of the authors (KM) organized the coalition to discuss the bioethical challenges of the current pandemic. … (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - June 5, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Blog Editor Tags: Featured Posts Health Care Institutions, Centers, Funding Public Health #bioethicsontheground #covid19 #diaryofaplagueyear COVID-19 Source Type: blogs

Invalid Advance Directives Can Still Be Cogent Evidence
On June 3, 2020, the UK Court of Protection authorized the withdrawal of artificial nutrition and hydration from MSP, a 34-year-old man with severe gastrointestinal problems. Remarkable is the extent to which the court relied upon MSP's advance direct... (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - June 5, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Where Have All the Bioethicists Gone?
by Craig Klugman, Ph.D. “What can bioethics do to help with the racial injustice” is a refrain that I wish I heard more in bioethics. When COVID-19 entered the stage, bioethicists—myself included—tripped over each to put out special journal issues, write OpEds, work with the media, set up webinars, and advise governments at all levels. The response from the George Floyd killing and protests against racial injustice have been quieter. Racism is a health issue. Racism is an ethics issue. Narrative ethics seeks to understand the stories of a case.… (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - June 5, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Craig Klugman Tags: Featured Posts Health Disparities Justice Philosophy & Ethics Politics Social Justice #feministbioethics #narrativeethics racism Source Type: blogs

Suppressed Voices in Inter-Professional Conflicts
by Asma Fazal, M.B.B.S, MRCPI, MHSc   To care for children in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) and the pediatric intensive care unit (PICU) is not easy because in addition to having an emotionally charged environment with high morbidity and mortality, it has a patient population who is not autonomous. Caring for these children in a highly tense environment requires difficult decision-making, which can be ethically challenging at times. These ethical challenges may arise, and vary from lack of interprofessional collaboration, conflicts in values regarding what is the right thing to do in the clinical contex...
Source: blog.bioethics.net - June 4, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Blog Editor Tags: Clinical Ethics Decision making Education Featured Posts Global Ethics Health Care Pediatrics Interprofessional collaboration Interprofessional Conflicts Source Type: blogs

Death Law
"Death Law" is the captivating title for a course that just finished at the University of Sydney. Here is the description: "Western attitudes toward death have undergone a remarkable transformation in the last century. For many, death now takes place ... (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - June 4, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Video Series: (Un)fair Access to Covid-19 Treatment in Mexico?
Widespread corruption and racism in Mexico created extra hurdles for the development of Mexico’s recently published federal guidelines for deciding who gets to access scarce medical resources (e.g. ventilators in the case of Covid-19). Dr César Palacios-González (Oxford), who helped develop these guidelines,  talks about these challenges. (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - June 4, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Katrien Devolder Tags: Health Care Coronavirus; Pandemic; Ethics; Public Health healthcare rationing Katrien Devolder Interview medical ethics Pandemic Ethics Rationing/ Resource Allocation syndicated Video Series Youtube interview Source Type: blogs

Overcoming the Pandemic: Social distancing, “Stay at Home” and Solidarity Works
by Father Marcin Ferdynus The COVID-19 pandemic is unprecedented in scope and beyond anything we have ever experienced. A global plague of unparalleled proportions resulting in health, economic, social and religious consequences, the pandemic has revealed deficiencies in global and domestic health institutions and systems. Countries around the world have faced the difficult task of caring for the health of citizens and securing their basic needs. Many European Union countries as well as public health institutions failed in the first phase of the pandemic.… (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - June 3, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Blog Editor Tags: Cultural Ethics Featured Posts Global Ethics Health Care Public Health #covid19 #diaryofaplagueyear #reportsfromaroundtheworld COVID-19 religion religion and medical ethics Social Distancing Source Type: blogs

Bioethics and Black Lives: A Call for Bioethics to Speak Against Racial Injustice
George Floyd could not breathe while his neck was trapped under the knee of a police officer for nearly nine minutes. Yet despite the impressive scholarship of bioethics on ventilation and other technologies that prolong human breathing capabilities, it is largely silent on the suffocating effects of racism. Bioethics must speak out against racial injustice. The post Bioethics and Black Lives: A Call for Bioethics to Speak Against Racial Injustice appeared first on The Hastings Center. (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - June 3, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Susan Gilbert Tags: Health Care activism bioethics Eric Garner Freddie Gray George Floyd Hastings Bioethics Forum policy brutality racial injustice syndicated Source Type: blogs

The Meaning of Care and Ethics to Mitigate the Harshness of Triage in Second-Wave Scenario Planning During the Covid-19 Pandemic
by Mathias Wirth, Ph.D.; Laurèl Rauschenbach, MD; Brian Hurwitz, MA, MSc, MD, FRCP, FRCGP; Heinz-Peter Schmiedebach, MD; Jennifer A. Herdt, Ph.D Although the number of severely ill people is declining in some epicenters, there is a risk of a second wave of COVID-19 infection with a large number of patients who are likely to require ventilation or other forms of intensive care. In the current state of the pandemic, second-wave scenario planning should give consideration to alternatives to triage. The shortage of ventilators showed that despite the existence of triage guidelines, moral questions remain. … ...
Source: blog.bioethics.net - June 3, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Blog Editor Tags: Featured Posts OPC Public Health #covid19 #diaryofaplagueyear COVID-19 Triage Source Type: blogs

No Quick Fix, But Now is the Time
by Dalia M. Feltman, MD, MA and Craig Klugman, Ph.D. Our country is polarized to a breaking point on too many issues.  Black vs. white.  Liberal vs. Conservative.  Documented vs. undocumented.  Haves vs. Have-Nots. Politics have perversely crept into all areas of life, even into matters of health and pandemic response such as wearing a mask and access to a ventilator. In public health ethics, we know that some communities have the determinants necessary to live healthy lives–safe neighborhoods and built environments, economic stability, good quality education, strong communities, and access to hea...
Source: blog.bioethics.net - June 3, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Blog Editor Tags: Featured Posts Justice Public Health Social Justice #covid19 #diaryofaplagueyear COVID-19 racism Source Type: blogs

Medical Decision-Making for Incapacitated Adult Patients Under Utah Law
A brand new multi-society statement provides guidance on how to make decisions for incapacitated patients without surrogates. This statement builds off a series of articles in which I assess the law (or lack of it) on this problem. Last week, mountain... (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - June 3, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Improving Advance Directives by Using Video Technology
Karen Wyatt interviews Fred Mirarchi at the End of Life University about improving advance directives by using video technology. Mirarchi is an emergency medicine physician and the principal investigator of the TRIAD Research Series (The Realistic Interpretation of Advance Directives). He discusses how his research has confirmed that there is a nationwide patient safety risk due to confusion surrounding living wills, DNR and POLST orders.  Wyatt and Mirarchi also discuss MIDEO, a video advance directive and physician’s medical order that improves both the quality and safety of advance care planning. I have ...
Source: blog.bioethics.net - June 2, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

COVID-19 and an Outbreak of Civil Unrest
by Anne Zimmerman, JD, candidate MS (Bioethics) At first it seemed like violence in the US had subsided during the pandemic. Outrage over police violence against unarmed black men was shelved while COVID-19 news took over the internet and cable news. The current civil outrage is evidence that violence against unarmed black men carries on concurrently with COVID-19’s economic and physical devastation that hurts the poor and the darker-skinned disproportionately. The causes are the same: The economic and physical effects of COVID-19 and police violence are caused by structural inequality.… (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - June 2, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Blog Editor Tags: Cultural Featured Posts Health Care Health Disparities Health Regulation & Law Justice Politics Social Justice #covid19 #diaryofaplagueyear #socialdeterminantsofhealth COVID-19 racism Source Type: blogs

“¿Que Vamos a Comer?”/ “What Are We Going to Eat?”: Latina Prenatal Care and Access to Food During COVID-19
By Daniela Vargas As a public health nurse, I work in reproductive justice, prenatal and postpartum care at a Federally Qualified Health Center (FQHC) in San Francisco. I am aware that my job comes with a high responsibility as I am assessing for social and structural determinants of health as women begin their prenatal care. […] (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - June 2, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: reflectivemeded Tags: Health Care syndicated Uncategorized Source Type: blogs

Brain Death Testing: Time for National Uniformity
This post appears in the June issue of the American Journal of Bioethics. by Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD It is time to revise the Uniform Determination of Death Act (UDDA) to assure a consistent nationwide approach to consent for brain death testing. Only two of 56 U.S. jurisdictions address the question in statute or regulation. Unfortunately, leaving this issue up to clinicians and the courts has led to considerable confusion and variability. We can tolerate this no longer. Certainty and clarity are of paramount importance in death determination.… (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - June 2, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Blog Editor Tags: Editorial-AJOB End of Life Care Featured Posts Source Type: blogs

The COVID-19 Pandemic and the Problem of Pseudoscience
by Kiarash Aramesh M.D., Ph.D. The COVID-19 pandemic has been accompanied by a surge of pseudoscientific claims, sometimes made or supported by political powers. Because of the magnitude of such claims, the risks and costs they inflict, and their global presence and interconnections, health organizations need to take them seriously and address them as a part of its response to such pandemics. The natural course of the COVID-19 infection, in which most of the patients survive, makes it a desirable playground for the promoters of pseudoscience because they can attribute the natural recovery of such patients – or escapi...
Source: blog.bioethics.net - June 2, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Blog Editor Tags: Clinical Trials & Studies Featured Posts Pharmaceuticals Politics #covid19 #diaryofaplagueyear COVID-19 Source Type: blogs

Essential Services
Until the pandemic, no one spent much time wondering about whether something was an “essential service”. This designation has granted necessary special exceptions to community mobility access restrictions created by government imposed “shelter-in-place“ orders instituted to slow the spread of the virus. Throughout the pandemic, determining what was and still is considered essential has been … Continue reading "Essential Services" (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - June 2, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Mark McQuain Tags: Health Care Allocation / Access / Public Health bioethics human dignity syndicated Source Type: blogs

Warp Speed Bioethics
It takes less time than ever to publish papers. But is quality sacrificed by doing bioethics at warp speed, especially during the Covid pandemic? The post Warp Speed Bioethics appeared first on The Hastings Center. (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - June 1, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Susan Gilbert Tags: Health Care bioethics COVID-19 Hastings Bioethics Forum syndicated Source Type: blogs

Massachusetts Health Committee Makes History: Approves End of Life Options Bill for 1st Time since 2011 Introduction
On Friday afternoon, the Massachusetts Joint Committee on Public Health approved legislation that would authorize medical aid in dying as an end-of-life care option. This is the first time the committee approved such legislation since it was originally introduced in 2011. The Massachusetts End of Life Options Act (H.1926 / S.1208), would give mentally capable, terminally ill individuals with a prognosis of six months or less to live the option to request, obtain and self-ingest medication to die peacefully in their sleep if their suffering becomes unbearable. “I can’t tell you how much this hist...
Source: blog.bioethics.net - June 1, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Justice & George Floyd
When I blogged last month, I thought surely that May would be an improvement over April. I was wrong. Now, with 100k deaths from COVID-19, and after several days of protests across the country in response to the death of George Floyd, I can’t possibly imagine what the summer will be like. I watched two … Continue reading "Justice & George Floyd" (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - June 1, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Neil Skjoldal Tags: Health Care Allocation / Access / Public Health bioethics Culture / Ethnicity / Gender / Disability human dignity syndicated Source Type: blogs

Is Family Presence Safe During the COVID-19 Pandemic?
by Stephen P. Wood, MS, ACNP-BC I stood facing the iPad attached to a rolling stand punching in the phone number of the young granddaughter of my intensive care unit patient. He arrived less than twenty-four hours before. I had taken the call the day before from the outside hospital emergency department and the story was grim. This was a seventy-six-year-old male who had acute myeloid leukemia, hypertension, as well as a history of congestive heart failure. He had been sick for the past two days with a fever, a cough and weakness.… (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - June 1, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Blog Editor Tags: End of Life Care Featured Posts Health Care Public Health #bioethicsontheground #covid19 #diaryofaplagueyear COVID-19 Source Type: blogs

Explaining pandemic triage: When a picture is worth 3000 words
by Leah R. Eisenberg, Joan M. Henriksen, Felicia G. Cohn, Anita J. Tarzian, Theresa S. Drought, Heather Fitzgerald. Art by Cathy Leamy Art by Cathy Leamy Ethics and its implications for healthcare delivery under constraints of scarcity are not simple concepts, even for those working within the healthcare system.  It’s time for ethicists to make a concerted effort to communicate these concepts to a broader public audience. Pandemic triage protocols call for transparency, because it leads to understanding and in this way increases the trust patients and families have in the healthcare system This commitment to tr...
Source: blog.bioethics.net - June 1, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Blog Editor Tags: Featured Posts #covid19 #diaryofaplagueyear #graphicmedicine COVID-19 Source Type: blogs

Podcast and Event Summary: New St Cross Special Ethics Seminar: Medically Assisted Dying in Canada: from where we ’ve come; to where we’re heading, presented by Professor Arthur Schafer (Centre for Professional and Applied Ethics, University of Manitoba)
Written by: Dr Amna Whiston In this seminar (available on podcast), Professor Arthur Schafer discussed the ethical challenges involved in the Canadian euthanasia debate at the New St Cross Special Ethics Seminar (online). Professor Schafer, who has written extensively over the last thirty years about a range of topics that includes professional and bio-medical ethics, […] (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - June 1, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Practical Ethics Tags: Ethics Health Care Amna Whiston's Posts Audio Files Euthanasia and Assisted Suicide Event Summary syndicated Source Type: blogs

Ethics of Immortality
Graphic by Sidney Harris  from American ScientistIn these current days of a world-wide pandemic of the deadly COVID-19 virus infectionand as of the origination of this blog thread there is concern as to how long testing for aneffective vaccine wil... (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - May 30, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Maurice Bernstein, M.D. Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Explaining pandemic triage: When a picture is worth 3000 words
by Leah R. Eisenberg, Joan M. Henriksen, Felicia G. Cohn, Anita J. Tarzian, Theresa S. Drought, Heather Fitzgerald. Art by Cathy Leamy Art by Cathy Leamy Ethics and its implications for healthcare delivery under constraints of scarcity are not simple concepts, even for those working within the healthcare system.  It’s time for ethicists to make a concerted effort to communicate these concepts to a broader public audience. Pandemic triage protocols call for transparency, because it leads to understanding and in this way increases the trust patients and families have in the healthcare system This commitment to tr...
Source: blog.bioethics.net - May 30, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Blog Editor Tags: Featured Posts #covid19 #diaryofaplagueyear #graphicmedicine COVID-19 Source Type: blogs

Every State Determines Brain Death Differently. Really.
What does it mean to be dead? You’d think the answer to that question is binary. You are, or you are not dead. But the fact is every state in the United States determines death differently. And when it comes to brain death specifically, the subtle differences can have major consequences for doctors, patients, and their families.  This was a challenge before COVID-19. The pandemic has underscored the already urgent need to reconcile these differences as soon as possible. I joined Jeff Segal, MD, JD on the Medical Liability Minute, to discuss brain death. (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - May 30, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Memories of the Spanish Flu by Jerome Lowenstein, MD, Professor of Medicine, NYU Grossman School of Medicine
[read more] (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - May 29, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: GalN Tags: Health Care A Different Take syndicated Source Type: blogs

A Framework for Rationing Ventilators and Critical Care Beds During the COVID-19 Pandemic: A Response
by B. Corbett Walsh, MD, MBE; Anna Nolan, MD, MSc As intensivists practicing in New York City at the epicenter of the COVID-19 pandemic, there was a palpable concern that there may not be enough ventilators for every patient that required it. If rationing were to occur, it should utilize a principled morally sound algorithm to aid physicians’ resource allocation decisions. While there has been much written about this timely topic, we would like to focus on a recent manuscript: Drs.… (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - May 29, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Blog Editor Tags: Decision making Featured Posts Public Health #bioethicsontheground #covid19 #diaryofaplagueyear COVID-19 Source Type: blogs

The Moderna Vaccine Story is a Cautionary Tale for Coronavirus Reporting
by Jamie Webb MA, MSci  ‘An experimental vaccine against the coronavirus showed encouraging results in very early testing, triggering hoped-for immune responses in eight healthy, middle-aged volunteers, its maker announced Monday.’ Readers of the Associated Press’s lead paragraph on Moderna’s vaccine candidate for COVID-19 could be forgiven for getting excited. However, the same article ends with this caveat, “The results have not been published and are only from the first of three stages of testing that vaccines and drugs normally undergo.” Rather than published data, the...
Source: blog.bioethics.net - May 29, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Blog Editor Tags: Clinical Trials & Studies Featured Posts Media #covid19 #diaryofaplagueyear COVID-19 Source Type: blogs