Interview Series: Do Health and Social Care Workers Have a Moral Obligation to Keep Working if they Lack Protective Equipment?
    Philosopher Udo Schüklenk argues that it is morally permissible for doctors, nurses and other care workers to stop working if they lack PPE (personal protective equipment).  To listen to the interview, follow this link to the podcast: https://podcasts.apple.com/gb/podcast/is-it-morally-permissible-for-healthcare-workers-to/id1509190881?i=1000472576406   (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - April 27, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Katrien Devolder Tags: Health Care Audio Files coronavirus COVID-19 Katrien Devolder Interview Pandemic Ethics podcasts syndicated thinking out loud Uncategorized Source Type: blogs

New York Expands Organ Donor Law to International Reciprocity
In late April 2020, New York enacted an amendment (S.6941) to its organ donation statute that expands what counts as a "document of gift." Traditionally, "document of gift" has included: Organ donor card Whole body donor card Driver's license author... (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - April 26, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

End-of-Life Dreams & Visions – A Conversation with Christopher Kerr, MD, PhD, and Carine Mardorossian, PhD, on Death is But a Dream: Finding Hope and Meaning at Life ’ s End Interview by Sebastian C. Galbo
[read more] (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - April 24, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: GalN Tags: Health Care A Different Take syndicated Source Type: blogs

How Should Healthcare Leaders Respond to Coronavirus Lockdown Protests?
by Daniel W. Tigard, Ph.D. In recent days, an increasing number of individuals have disobeyed policies restricting mass gatherings to rally in support of government officials reopening the state and the country. Such protests have been fueled by conspiracy theorists like Alex Jones and other public figures who claim that the lockdowns, which are intended to decrease the spread of COVID-19, are schemes aimed at disrupting the economy and undermining Trump’s presidency. Notably, Trump too has voiced support for easing the lockdown restrictions, particularly in states led by Democratic governors.… (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - April 24, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Daniel Tigard Tags: Featured Posts Professionalism Public Health #covid19 #diaryofaplagueyear activism COVID-19 Source Type: blogs

Pandemic Ethics: Extreme Altruism in a Pandemic
Written by Julian Savulescu and Dominic Wilkinson Cross-posted with the Journal of Medical Ethics blog Altruism is one person sacrificing or risking his or her own interests for another’s interests. Humans, like other animals, have a tendency towards altruism. This is usually directed to members of their own group. An example is donating a kidney […] (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - April 24, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Julian Savulescu Tags: Health Care Research Ethics Dominic Wilkinson's Posts Julian Savulescu's Posts Pandemic Ethics regulation syndicated Source Type: blogs

UK Court of Protection Authorizes " Ceiling of Care " over Mother ’ s Objections
In late March, the UK Court of Protection granted a "medical futility" declaration sought by University Hospitals Bristol NHS Foundation Trust. The patient is "ED," an incapacitated 35-year-old woman. The declaration was opposed by ED's moth... (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - April 24, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

“The Science” and Moral Judgments
Some common mislocutions are simply insufferable.  One is, “It’s in my/our DNA,” implying that a commitment or habit or practiced behavior is genetically hard-wired.  No, it isn’t. Another is, “I/we will follow the science” to make judgments.  If by this is meant, “I will face facts rather than engage in wishful thinking,” then hear, hear.  … Continue reading "“The Science” and Moral Judgments" (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - April 24, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Jon Holmlund Tags: Health Care Allocation / Access / Public Health syndicated Source Type: blogs

Immigrants, Health Inequities, and Social Citizenship in Covid-19 Response and Recovery
The novel coronavirus pandemic has starkly revealed the vulnerabilities of low-wage immigrants, immigrant-led households, and immigrant communities to coronavirus infection, severe Covid-19 illness, and economic fallout from pandemic. This public health emergency compounds pre-existing social inequalities and resulting health inequities associated with immigrant status and immigration policy priorities. Structural barriers to health care access and… Read more The post Immigrants, Health Inequities, and Social Citizenship in Covid-19 Response and Recovery appeared first on The Hastings Center. (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - April 23, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Susan Gilbert Tags: Health Care COVID-19 Hastings Bioethics Forum immigrant health social citizenship syndicated Undocumented Patients Source Type: blogs

MAID and Religiously Affiliated Providers
I am delighted to in the first video interview from the newly-formed American Clinicians Academy on Medical Aid in Dying (ACAMAID).I speak with physicians Barbara Morris and Lonny Shavelson. This interview focuses on the significance of a re... (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - April 23, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

The Value and Ethics of Using Technology to Contain the COVID-19 Epidemic
by Alex Dubov, Ph.D. and Steven Shoptaw, Ph.D. Introduction As the world grapples with COVID-19, experts are calling for better identification and isolation of new cases. In this paper, we argue that these tasks can be scaled up with the use of technology. Digital contact tracing can accelerate identifying newly diagnosed patients, instantly informing past contacts about their risk of infection, and supporting social distancing efforts. Geolocation data can be used to enforce quarantine measures. Social media data can be used to predict outbreak clusters and trace the spread of misinformation online.… (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - April 23, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Blog Editor Tags: Featured Posts Informed Consent Privacy Public Health Technology #covid19 #diaryofaplagueyear contact tracing COVID-19 Source Type: blogs

On Being a Doctor and a Human in the Pandemic: Connection and Vulnerability
By Amy Blair With each passing 24 hours, my roles of physician and physician educator and mother (and human of the planet Earth) have been taxed in complex ways. The problem-solving demands are intense and the solutions often feeble, weakened by uncertainty, if not paralyzed. It feels as if the rug were pulled out from […] (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - April 23, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: reflectivemeded Tags: Health Care syndicated Uncategorized Source Type: blogs

The Covid Threat No One Is Talking About: Wearing Scrubs in Public
The Covid-19 outbreak has forced health care providers, administrative officials, and the general public to each play their part in doing no harm to others. It may come as a surprise to many people, but health care workers may unknowingly spread Covid-19 in their communities simply by wearing scrubs in public. The post The Covid Threat No One Is Talking About: Wearing Scrubs in Public appeared first on The Hastings Center. (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - April 22, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Susan Gilbert Tags: Health Care COVID-19 Hastings Bioethics Forum Health and Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Life, Liberty and the Pursuit of Ventilators
by Craig Klugman, Ph.D. We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable Rights, that among these are Life, Liberty and the pursuit of Ventilators. In the last few months, the public airwaves, social media, and the internet have been buzzing about having enough ventilators to support COVID-19 patients. Bioethicists and physicians have worked alongside administrators and elected officials to craft hospital and regional allocation policies in case there are not enough ventilators going around.… (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - April 22, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Craig Klugman Tags: End of Life Care Featured Posts Health Disparities Health Regulation & Law Politics Public Health #covid19 #diaryofaplagueyear COVID-19 ventilators Source Type: blogs

Supreme Court Approves Advance Requests for Euthanasia
The Supreme Court of the Netherlands has approved an advance request for euthanasia. BACKGROUND FACTS In 2015, a 70-year-old Dutch woman completed an advance directive requesting euthanasia when her dementia advanced. She had seen others (including h... (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - April 22, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Key Workers Have a Stronger Claim to Compensation and Hazard Pay for Working During The COVID-19 Pandemic Than The Armed Forces Do When on Deployment
By Doug McConnell and Dominic Wilkinson Post originally appeared on the Journal of Medical Ethics Blog   While the general public enjoy the relative safety of social distancing, key workers are at a higher risk of both contracting COVID-19 and transmitting it to their families. This is especially the case for ‘frontline’ workers who are […] (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - April 22, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Doug McConnell Tags: Health Care professional ethics Public Health Armed Forces compensation COVID-19 Dominic Wilkinson's Posts Doug McConnell's Posts hazard pay NHS no-fault compensation Pandemic Ethics syndicated Source Type: blogs

Pandemic Ethics: Why lock down of the elderly is not ageist and why levelling down equality is wrong
By Julian Savulescu and James Cameron Cross-posted with the Journal of Medical Ethics Blog   Countries all around the world struggle to develop policies on how to exit the COVID-19 lockdown to restore liberty and prevent economic collapse, while also protecting public health from a resurgence of the pandemic. Hopefully, an effective vaccine or treatment […] (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - April 22, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Julian Savulescu Tags: Health Care Julian Savulescu's Posts Pandemic Ethics syndicated Source Type: blogs

Denying Ventilators to Covid-19 Patients with Prior DNR Orders is Unethical
Previously-stated DNR status would seem irrelevant to ventilator allocation, and yet some existing and proposed guidelines for triage during a public health emergency list DNR status in the list of criteria for excluding patients from getting ventilators or other life-saving health care. This approach is in direct opposition to the generally agreed-upon goal of maximizing the number of survivors, and could result in confusion and public mistrust of the health care system. The post Denying Ventilators to Covid-19 Patients with Prior DNR Orders is Unethical appeared first on The Hastings Center. (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - April 21, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Susan Gilbert Tags: Ethics Health Care COVID-19 DNR orders Hastings Bioethics Forum Health and Health Care syndicated ventilator allocation Source Type: blogs

Altruistic Living Wills – Save Other Souls (SOS) Directives
Increasingly, individuals are completing pandemic-specific advance directives.The scarcity of resources is a new condition that affects their treatment preferences. These individuals might not decline interventions like mechanical ventilation solely o... (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - April 21, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Guest Post: Pandemic Ethics. Social Justice Demands Mass Surveillance: Social Distancing, Contact Tracing and COVID-19
Written by: Bryce Goodman The spread of COVID-19 presents a number of ethical dilemmas. Should ventilators only be used to treat those who are most likely to recover from infection? How should violators of quarantine be punished? What is the right balance between protecting individual privacy and reducing the virus’ spread? Most of the mitigation […] (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - April 21, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Practical Ethics Tags: Health Care Public Health artificial intelligence Guest Post Invited Guest posts Pandemic Ethics regulation syndicated Source Type: blogs

Negative QALY Scores and Voluntary Euthanasia
I am all about saving money. I also enjoy reading the bioethical insights of Wesley Smith. His recent commentary in National Review entitled “Bioethicists: Euthanasia Will Save Money and Facilitate Organ Donations” naturally caught my eye. This blog has discussed the ethical problems with euthanasia and organ donation previously (see HERE and HERE). The focus … Continue reading "Negative QALY Scores and Voluntary Euthanasia" (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - April 21, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Mark McQuain Tags: Health Care Allocation / Access / Public Health bioethics end of life Health Care Practice human dignity syndicated Source Type: blogs

Psychological Distress, Mental Disorder, and Assessment of Decisionmaking Capacity Under U.S. Medical Aid in Dying Statutes
Lois A. Weithorn at U.C. Hastings Law has just published "Psychological Distress, Mental Disorder, and Assessment of Decisionmaking Capacity Under U.S. Medical Aid in Dying Statutes." This Article examines concepts of treatment decisionmaking capacity relevant to medical aid in dying as it is currently authorized in the United States. In order to be eligible for medical aid in dying in one of the ten jurisdictions now allowing such assistance, patients must be capable of making an informed health care decision. Under many of the governing statutes, special attention is given to whether a patient is “sufferi...
Source: blog.bioethics.net - April 20, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

My Experiences with Hydroxychloroquine Urge Caution and Ethical Research into COVID19 Therapies
by Keisha Ray, Ph.D. I take the drug hydroxychloroquine, brand name Plaquenil, for an autoimmune disease. Hydroxychloroquine was once used to treat malaria and is now commonly used to treat a range of inflammatory disorders like lupus and rheumatoid arthritis. If this drug sounds familiar it is likely because it has frequently been in the news as a potential therapy for COVID19. During multiple press conferences the president has touted this drug as a potential cure for COVID19. Medical professionals like Dr.… (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - April 20, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Keisha Ray Tags: Ethics Featured Posts Health Care Health Policy & Insurance Human Subjects Research & IRBs Informed Consent Pharmaceuticals Politics Public Health #covid19 #diaryofaplagueyear COVID-19 Source Type: blogs

Structural Racism, White Fragility, and Ventilator Rationing Policies
It’s been painful to watch health leaders twist themselves into moral knots denying that recently created ventilator rationing guidance will differentially affect Blacks, Latinx, and other people of color. On television, in newspapers, and on listservs, when the predicted disproportionate impacts of these policies are raised, some bioethicists-often white, stonewall. Or repeat a policy’s assertions that race, ethnicity, disability, etc. are irrelevant to care decisions. Or default to the intent of the policymakers. The post Structural Racism, White Fragility, and Ventilator Rationing Policies appeared first on...
Source: blog.bioethics.net - April 20, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Susan Gilbert Tags: Health Care bioethics COVID-19 Hastings Bioethics Forum racism syndicated ventilator allocation Source Type: blogs

Voluntarily Stopping Eating and Drinking: A Lesser Known, Readily Available Option for Hastening Death
Voluntarily stopping eating and drinking, also known by its acronym VSED, is a practice whereby a currently or prospectively seriously ill patient makes a fully intentional decision to hasten her own death by completely stopping the intake of all fluid... (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - April 19, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Look for the Helpers
by Justin Triemstra “When I was a boy and I would see scary things in the news, my mother would say to me, ‘Look for the helpers. You will always find people who are helping.’”                                         […] (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - April 17, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: reflectivemeded Tags: Health Care humanism syndicated Source Type: blogs

Consent for Brain Death Testing – Required or Not?
A growing number of articles debate whether clinicians should obtain family consent before performing brain death testing. See for example, the April 2020 issue of Pediatrics. I have also addressed this question in a number of recent a... (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - April 17, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

National Ethics Framework For Use in Acute Paediatric Settings During COVID-19 Pandemic
Oxford Uehiro Centre’s Director of Medical Ethics, Professor Dominic Wilkinson, has led a UK ethical framework for treatment decisions in acute paediatric settings during the Covid-19 Pandemic. Professor Wilkinson produced the framework along with RCPCH Clinical Lead, Dr Mike Linney, Chair of RCPCH Ethics and Law Committee. This ethical framework is a modification of guidance […] (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - April 17, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Practical Ethics Tags: Ethics Health Care children Coronavirus; Pandemic; Ethics; Public Health COVID-19 Cross Post Dominic Wilkinson's Posts effective charity medical ethics syndicated Source Type: blogs

Video Series: Is the Coronavirus Pandemic Worse for Women?
Dr Agomoni Ganguli Mitra talks about how pandemics increase existing inequalities in societies, and how this may result in even more victims than those from the disease itself. She urges governments and others to take social justice considerations much... (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - April 17, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Katrien Devolder Tags: Health Care Public Health Social Justice Coronavirus; Pandemic; Ethics; Public Health gender inequality Katrien Devolder Interview Pandemic Ethics syndicated Uncategorized Video Series Youtube interview Source Type: blogs

Boy George Questions Unilateral DNR on His Mother
Culture Club singer Boy George has asked his fans to pray for his "beautiful mother" after she was hospitalized and doctors said they "won't resuscitate if things go wrong."  Boy George questions the DNR order saying how can doctors know tha... (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - April 16, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Please Don ’t (Need to) Use My Work
I helped develop guidelines for the ethical allocation of scarce resources during a public health emergency, such as a pandemic..I hope my contributions have an impact. I especially hope to see my work used since it emphasizes the perspectives of minority and underserved communities, who tend to have less voice in health policy. But now I find myself dreading the use of my work. The post Please Don’t (Need to) Use My Work appeared first on The Hastings Center. (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - April 16, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Susan Gilbert Tags: Ethics Health Care COVID-19 end of life Hastings Bioethics Forum Pandemic Planning public health emergency resource allocation syndicated Source Type: blogs

National Healthcare Decisions Day
Today is the 12th annual National Healthcare Decisions Day. It is likely to be the most successful one yet, as the COVID-19 pandemic vividly illuminates the need for and importance of advance care planning. (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - April 16, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Who Gets Care? (podcast)
Be sure to listen to Doug White and Sam Bagenstos on Tradeoffs, a high-quality podcast produced at Penn’s Annenberg Studio that tackles controversies in health care. The 15-minute episode addresses the growing debate around triage guidelines for ventilators and ICU beds, with a particular focus on questions related to whether existing guidelines are unfair to persons with disabilities. (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - April 15, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Ethics and Evidence in the Search for a Vaccine and Treatments for Covid-19
In the rush to find a Covid-19 vaccine and one or more drugs to treat the deadly disease, concerns are being raised that ethical standards for conducting human clinical trials and the evidentiary standards for determining whether interventions are safe and effective, might be loosened. The post Ethics and Evidence in the Search for a Vaccine and Treatments for Covid-19 appeared first on The Hastings Center. (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - April 15, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Susan Gilbert Tags: Health Care Public Health Research Ethics clinical trials COVID-19 evidence Hastings Bioethics Forum syndicated Source Type: blogs

“Will They Take My Vent?”: Ethical Considerations with Personal Ventilator Reallocation During COVID-19
by Laura Guidry-Grimes, PhD and Katie Savin, MSW   The COVID-19 pandemic has led to intense conversations about ventilator allocation and reallocation during a crisis standard of care (CSC). The possibility of reallocating ventilators through a triage process is a source of profound concern for people who rely on personal ventilators (PVs) in their everyday life. Alice Wong, a disability activist and PV user, explains this concern: “Were I to contract coronavirus, I imagine a doctor might read my chart, look at me, and think I’m a waste of their efforts and precious resources that never should have been in...
Source: blog.bioethics.net - April 15, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Keisha Ray Tags: Clinical Ethics Decision making Featured Posts Health Care Health Policy & Insurance Justice Public Health Social Justice #covid19 #diaryofaplagueyear resource allocation Source Type: blogs

Post 3: “Not Who, But What Professional Bioethicists Should Prioritize When Responding to the COVID-19 Pandemic”
by Joseph Stramondo, PhD Recently, I have argued that there doesn’t seem to be any set of rationing criteria that can entirely avoid ableist bias, but there are worse and better options for distributing scarce resources during the COVID-19 pandemic. However, by narrowly focusing on triage protocols as the most morally salient problem that we face during this unprecedented era, perhaps we are not even advancing the most important conversation.  In fact, feminist philosopher of disability, Shelley Tremain, argues that bioethicists should shift the focus of the conversation altogether because targeting these protoc...
Source: blog.bioethics.net - April 15, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Joseph Stramondo Tags: Featured Posts #covid19 #diaryofaplagueyear ableism COVID-19 Source Type: blogs

U.S. and Canada: Being Good Neighbors in the Pandemic
Canada has a fraction of the number of cases of Covid-19 as the U.S. Canadians feel vulnerable. But Canadians and Americans need to find ways to build and maintain trust within and across our borders. The post U.S. and Canada: Being Good Neighbors in the Pandemic appeared first on The Hastings Center. (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - April 14, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Susan Gilbert Tags: Health Care Public Health COVID-19 global health Hastings Bioethics Forum syndicated Source Type: blogs

COVID-19 and the refutation of normality
by Richard B. Gibson, MA The COVID-19 pandemic has upended daily life and forced many people on the planet to alter their behaviour to combat the spread of the virus. For many, this has come at personal cost, be it their freedom of movement, their finances, and even their health and lives. This has led governments also to feel the pressure to act, resulting in enforced restrictions on individual movements which, in turn, have impacted global economies and ground productivity in numerous sectors to a halt.… (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - April 14, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Blog Editor Tags: Environmental Ethics Featured Posts Public Health #covid19 #diaryofaplagueyear COVID-19 Source Type: blogs

Maximising Ventilators: Some Ethical Complications
Written by Joshua Parker and Ben Davies One of the impending tragedies of the COVID-19 pandemic is a grave mismatch between the supply of ventilators and the numbers needing them. This situation, as seen in Italy, is predicted to be mirrored here in the UK. Coronavirus can cause acute respiratory distress syndrome for which the […] (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - April 14, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Ben Davies Tags: Decision making Ethics Health Care Public Health coronavirus COVID-19 Current Affairs medical ethics pandemic syndicated ventilators Source Type: blogs

When the Medical Director Abuses the Residents Under his Charge
by Craig Klugman, Ph.D. In a news item reported in Rolling Stone, NPR, and The Houston Chronicle, the medical director of a coastal Texas nursing home used his political connections to get enough hydroxychloroquine to begin his own “observational” trials—minus a control group, minus informed consent, minus informing anyone. The rehab facility holds 135 residents and 42% (56) of them were COVID positive, as well as an additional 31 staff members. Robin Armstrong, physician and medical director called the Lt.… (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - April 14, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Craig Klugman Tags: Clinical Trials & Studies Conflict of Interest Decision making Featured Posts Health Regulation & Law Informed Consent Social Justice #covid19 #diaryofaplagueyear COVID-19 Source Type: blogs