Making the Call Podcast Tackles Medical Aid in Dying
Dr. Zeke Emanuel ("the architect of the Affordable Care Act”) and Dr. Jonathan Moreno (“the quietly most interesting bioethicist of our time”) talk to Peg Sandeen about medical aid in dying in their latest MAKING THE CALL podcast. (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - July 11, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Before We Turn to Digital Contract Tracing for Covid, Remember Surveillance in the Sixties
Is it unrealistic to believe that phone apps for digital Covid contact tracing can be designed and regulated in ways that prevent the information they collect from being misused? It's worth remembering surveillance of Vietnam War protesters and Martin Luther King Jr. The post Before We Turn to Digital Contract Tracing for Covid, Remember Surveillance in the Sixties appeared first on The Hastings Center. (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - July 10, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Susan Gilbert Tags: Health Care Privacy COVID-19 digital contact tracing Hastings Bioethics Forum phone apps Science and Society surveillance syndicated Source Type: blogs

Tinslee Lewis v. Cook Children ’ s Hospital (Tex. App. 2020)
We are still waiting for the decision and opinion from the Texas Second Court of Appeals in Tinslee Lewis v. Cook Children's Hospital. The case challenges the constitutionality of the dispute resolution provisions in the Texas Advance Directives A... (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - July 10, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

A new cautionary tale for heritable genome editing
A fundamental concern about applying gene editing to human embryos is how to limit the risk of errors, or “off-target” effects.  One makes an edit to change a bad gene’s defect, and presumably prevent the disease the defective gene would cause.  But the current methods to do that, although apparently highly selective, might still make … Continue reading "A new cautionary tale for heritable genome editing" (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - July 10, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Jon Holmlund Tags: Genetics Health Care bioethics biotechnology enhancement human dignity reproduction syndicated Source Type: blogs

Covid-19 Makes Clear that Bioethics Must Confront Health Disparities
With some reluctance, I’ve come to the sad realization the COVID-19 pandemic has been a stress test for bioethics, a field of study that intersects medicine, law, the humanities and the social sciences. As both a physician and medical ethicist, I arrived at this conclusion after spending months at what was once the epicenter of the pandemic: New York City. I was overseeing a 24/7 bioethics consultation service. The post Covid-19 Makes Clear that Bioethics Must Confront Health Disparities appeared first on The Hastings Center. (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - July 9, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Susan Gilbert Tags: Health Care Health Disparities bioethics COVID-19 hospitals New York City syndicated Source Type: blogs

Coronavirus Contact Tracing
For three years during the 1960s, I worked for various organizations, all of us trying to end the War in Vietnam.  At one point, I was employed by the Fifth Avenue Peace Parade Committee, while my boyfriend worked for the Student Mobilization to End the War in Vietnam (affectionately known as “The Mobe”).  Both of … Continue reading Coronavirus Contact Tracing (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - July 9, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: denasdavis Tags: Health Care syndicated Uncategorized Source Type: blogs

Exploitation of Homeless Populations in Phase One Drug Trials
STUDENT VOICES | CHYNN PRIZE SECOND-PLACE WINNERBy Elizabeth Wood Last semester I read Carl Elliott’s “The Best-Selling, Billion Dollar Pills Tested on Homeless People.” He introduces a concerning ethical dilemma, namely, the use of homeless populations as participants in phase 1 drug trials. Learning about this practice made me very uncomfortable. As a student at […] (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - July 9, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Ethics and Society Tags: Ethics Health Care Research Ethics Belmont Principles Belmont Report Center for Ethics Education clinical trial clinical trials exploitation Fordham University Center for Ethics Education Fordham University Student Voices Homelessnes Source Type: blogs

Policy Statements on Health Care Policy, Ethics, and End-of-Life Care
It has been professionally rewarding to co-author three policy statements on health care policy, ethics, and end-of-life care with the American Thoracic Society. All of these are available for free here. Making Medical Treatment Decisions for Unrepres... (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - July 9, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Culture, Coma, and the Media – Online Course
Check out this course at Cardiff University. It explores how (un)consciousness, coma and the vegetative state are represented in the media.  This course allows you to engage with debates about the portrayal of patients and reporting of  ‘miracle’ recoveries, court cases and scientific breakthroughs. It addresses implications for family and public understandings. This course will help develop your understanding of ‘coma’ and your skills in writing for the media or being a critical media consumer or researcher, or supporting patients and their families. I like this page which includes interv...
Source: blog.bioethics.net - July 8, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Ethicists as a Force for Institutional Change and Policies to Promote Equality
In his recent JAMA article, Donald Berwick eloquently describes what he termed the “moral determinants of health,” by which he meant a strong sense of social solidarity in which people in the United States would “depend on each other for securing the basic circumstances of healthy lives,” reflecting a “moral law within.” Berwick’s work should serve as a call to action for bioethicists and clinical ethicists to consider what they can do to be forces of broad moral change in their institutions. The post Ethicists as a Force for Institutional Change and Policies to Promote Equality a...
Source: blog.bioethics.net - July 8, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Susan Gilbert Tags: Health Care activism bioethics COVID-19 George Floyd Hastings Bioethics Forum Health and Health Care inequality moral determinants of health racism social determinants of health syndicated Source Type: blogs

Public Service Announcement or a Step Too Far
by Craig Klugman, Ph.D. Tommye Austin is senior vice president and chief nursing officer at University Hospital in San Antonio. Like most Texas hospitals, UH has been hard hit by the pandemic in recent weeks and PPE is in short supply. Nurse Austin created a crafty N95 replacement mask that uses cloth fabric and air conditioning filters. She is passionate about masks and people protecting themselves from COVID-19. She regularly posts on social media and has spoken to the media about face coverings.… (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - July 8, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Craig Klugman Tags: Featured Posts Media professional ethics Professionalism Public Health #covid19 #diaryofaplagueyear COVID-19 Source Type: blogs

Fanon is French
I’m re-reading Black Skin, White Masks as part of a “remember your critical theory so that you can defend it or critique it from a place of knowledge rather than memory” sort of process. I’m alternating between the 2020 best sellers and the critical canon. Between the World and Me was first, now Fanon (going [...] (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - July 8, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Kyle Munkittrick Tags: Health Care bioethics syndicated Source Type: blogs

Patient Consent for COVID-19 REGISTRY JAPAN and the Favipiravir Observational Study
by Kei Mukohara, MD, Ph.D., Tsunetoshi Mogi, MD COVID-19 REGISRY JAPAN(COVIREGI-JP, its official website [In Japanese])is an ongoing government-funded national registry study conducted principally at the National Center for Global Health and Medicine in collaboration with Fujita Health University, Hokkaido University, National Institute of Infectious Diseases and pharmaceutical companies. To create a national registry, it is requesting participating institutions to provide clinical data on hospitalized patients with COVID-19. The study is enrolling patients retrospectively and prospectively from January 1, 2020 to Janu...
Source: blog.bioethics.net - July 7, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Blog Editor Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: blogs

Society for Post-Acute and Long-Term Care Medicine (AMDA) Endorses National POLST Form
This month, the Society for Post-Acute and Long-Term Care Medicine (AMDA) became the first national organization to formally endorse and support the adoption of a national POLST form. The national form was created because a single form—as opposed to just state-to-state form reciprocity—will make it easier, among other things:For providers to recognize a POLST form and  correctly interpret and follow POLST form orders, thereby enabling them to honor patient treatment preferences To conduct research and quality assurance activities, creating shared data for generalizable knowledge and ability to improve POLS...
Source: blog.bioethics.net - July 7, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Using the Pandemic as an Excuse to Limit Abortion
Several states, including Ohio, Alabama, Arkansas, Texas, Iowa, and Oklahoma, declared abortion a nonessential service at some point during the pandemic, meaning that it was effectively banned until the crisis passed. Supporters of the policies maintain that abortion is an elective procedure whose medical resources are better off used in the fight against the pandemic. But abortion opponents have been taking advantage of the current circumstances to limit abortion access. The post Using the Pandemic as an Excuse to Limit Abortion appeared first on The Hastings Center. (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - July 6, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Susan Gilbert Tags: Health Care abortion COVID-19 Hastings Bioethics Forum nonessential service syndicated Source Type: blogs

Shared Decision Making with Pediatric Medications
by Amy C. Reese, Pharm.D. My pharmacy received a prescription for prednisolone solution written for a 5-year-old patient. We only had the manufacturer of prednisolone with 5% alcohol in it as a solvent. I did not want to deny the child medication, but I was hesitant about giving medication with alcohol to a child because some people are strictly opposed to the practice of giving children alcohol. When the mother arrived at the pharmacy, I explained the situation to her and told her what her options were.… (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - July 6, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Blog Editor Tags: Featured Posts Informed Consent Pediatrics Pharmaceuticals professional ethics Professionalism pharmacist pharmacy Source Type: blogs

Quadriplegic Michael Hickson ’s Death Spotlights Questions of Disability, Race and Family
The Washington Post has compelling coverage  of the Austin, Texas case in which clinicians withdrew life-sustaining treatment from Michael Hickson over the objections of his wife and apparently on the basis of his unrelated disabilities. Yet, per... (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - July 6, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Iowa Enacts Strongest Simon ’ s Law in the World – Parents May Demand Futile Treatment
A growing number of states have enacted Simon's Law over the past four years (e.g. AZ, KS, MO). They take different forms. Some require only that parents be informed that clinicians plan to write a DNR order for a child. Others prohibit writing the ord... (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - July 5, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Surreal Times
Happy Independence Day to all our readers!  Vacation time for our family means spending some time at a cottage in a northern state, and often includes early July, which is the case this year.  It occasions a simpler life, punctuated with small town activities.  One of those activities has been the 4th of July parade.  … Continue reading "Surreal Times" (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - July 4, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: D. Joy Riley Tags: Health Care bioethics COVID-19 Independence Day New York syndicated Source Type: blogs

Final Exit Network – Hastening Death with Inert Gas
Here is a terrific video that explains how Final Exit Network works to provide a non-medical end-of-life last resort exit option. FEN is an end-of-life organization that was founded in 2004. Their core service is screening and advising clients on how ... (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - July 4, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Avoiding Ineffective End-of-Life Treatment: A Lesson from Triage
Stephen Latham has a brief insightful commentary in the May/June 2020 Hastings Center Report noting that the recent focus on hospital triage issues dramatically highlights the extent to which we are still doing end-of-life medicine badly. Latham observes that typical triage policy "has teeth—saves resources and lives—only if the regular practice of hospitals outside pandemic emergency is to offer intensive and invasive treatment to patients who, in the judgment of their treating physicians, will not survive that treatment." And "it is the practice of hospitals to offer su...
Source: blog.bioethics.net - July 3, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Last Rights: The Case for Assisted Dying
Sarah Wootton and Lloyd Riley of the campaign group Dignity in Dying have just published Last Rights: The Case for Assisted Dying.  They argue that our laws and culture governing death and dying need radical reform and present a vision of what dy... (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - July 2, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Social-Change Games Can Help Us Understand the Public Health Choices We Face
Before there was the Covid-19 pandemic, there was Pandemic. This tabletop game, in which players collaborate to fight disease outbreaks, debuted in 2007. Expansions feature weaponized pathogens, historic pandemics, zoonotic diseases, and vaccine development races. Game mechanics modelled on pandemic vectors provide multiple narratives: battle, quest, detection, discovery. There is satisfaction in playing “against” disease–and winning. Real pandemic is not as tidy as a game. But can games support understanding about the societal challenges we now face? Yes. The post Social-Change Games Can Help Us Understa...
Source: blog.bioethics.net - July 1, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Susan Gilbert Tags: Ethics Health Care Public Health COVID-19 Hastings Bioethics Forum Pandemic game Pandemic Planning social-change games syndicated Source Type: blogs

618 Californians Get End of Life Option Act Prescriptions in 2019
A new report from the California Department of Public Health shows that physicians wrote 618 prescriptions under the End of Life Option Act in 2019. 405 died after ingesting the drugs.   The demographic features of these terminally ill, adul... (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - July 1, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

North Carolina Hospital Sued for Unilateral DNR Order
Before undergoing a procedure at Alamance Regional Medical Center in central North Carolina, Henry Wyer was “full code/CPR.” But in a new lawsuit his family alleges that the hospital directed a DNR for Wyer without “adequate signed paperwork.” (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - July 1, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

The Urge to Destroy is Also a Creative Urge
Written by Neil Levy Statues are the latest front in our ongoing culture wars.  Symbolism (as all sides agree) is not the be all and end all of politics, but it does matter. Those who want the statues to fall argue that they are harmful, because they commemorate racists (and worse) and thereby contribute to […] (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - June 30, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Neil Levy Tags: Health Care Neil Levy's Posts syndicated Source Type: blogs

Support missouri medicaid expansion
Register by July 8 to Cast Your Vote on August 4 BallotOn Tuesday, August 4th, voters in Missouri will have the opportunity to vote on a ballot measure called Amendment 2, which amends the Missouri Constitution to “adopt Medicaid Expansion for persons 19 to 64 years old with an income level at or below 133% of the federal poverty level.” Your vote is critical.The referendum prohibits making eligibility requirements more strict for the expanded group than what the more limited group faces. It requires state agencies to maximize funding received from the federal government for expanding Medicaid in Missouri, maki...
Source: blog.bioethics.net - June 29, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Practical Bioethics Tags: Health Care #YesOn2 syndicated yes on 2 Source Type: blogs

Accepting the Challenge: Covid Vaccine Challenge Trials Can Be Ethically Justified
The Covid-19 pandemic is unlikely to end until there is a safe, effective, and widely distributed vaccine. How soon can researchers achieve this goal? The answer largely depends on which strategies researchers are willing to adopt. One potential strategy is to conduct human challenge studies, in which researchers give an experimental vaccine to healthy volunteers and then test—or “challenge”—the vaccine by purposely exposing volunteers to the virus. Although a growing number of voices are calling on researchers to employ this strategy, the proposal is generating a heated debate about the ethics of s...
Source: blog.bioethics.net - June 29, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Susan Gilbert Tags: Health Care Research Ethics COVID-19 global health Hastings Bioethics Forum human challenge trials risk syndicated Source Type: blogs

Rhodes Must Fall: Oxford ’s Institutional Response
Written by Ben Davies I recently watched an excellent panel discussion, ‘Statues, Slavery and the Struggle for Equality’ with Labour MP Dawn Butler, historian David Olusoga, philosopher Susan Neiman, chaired by writer Yassmin Abdel-Magied. The discussion was wide-ranging but, as the title suggests, included a focus on the recent resurgence of demands to remove various […] (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - June 29, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Ben Davies Tags: Ethics Health Care Current Affairs syndicated Source Type: blogs

It Should Scare Us That Tuition Is A Tiny Amount Of Medical School Revenue
The contribution of tuition towards medical school revenue is a tiny fraction of what it once was. How this harms the academic mission of medical schools, especially during the pandemic. The post It Should Scare Us That Tuition Is A Tiny Amount Of Medi... (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - June 29, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Peter Ubel Tags: Health Care health policy Peter Ubel syndicated Source Type: blogs

Unwanted Life-Sustaining Treatment Lawsuit – California Appeals Court Briefed
Patricia Melton directed clinicians at Hollywood Presbyterian Hospital and its affiliated long-term care facility (CHA Health Systems) to stop ventilatory support for her critically ill husband actor Dennis Lipscomb. But the facility delayed complying ... (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - June 29, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Running to Tarshish
The New York Times corroborated something I have long thought to be true: no one who has suffered from the novel coronavirus in America has been denied a respirator due to scarcity.  That being said, why has so much energy and rhetoric been spent on the topic of ventilator triage?  Ventilator scarcity and the looming … Continue reading Running to Tarshish (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - June 28, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: denasdavis Tags: Health Care syndicated Uncategorized Source Type: blogs

ASBH 22nd Annual Conference
The American Society for Bioethics and Humanities will hold its 22nd Annual Conference virtually rather than in Baltimore, from October 12-18, 2020. Join me (and Art Derse, Paul Lombardo, and Valerie Gutmann, Koch) for our annual Top 10 Legal Develop... (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - June 28, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Medical Aid in Dying – for Dementia
Many individuals want to avoid living in late stage dementia. But medical aid in dying (MAID) is not an exit option that can help in the United States. Every U.S. MAID jurisdiction requires that to make a MAID request the individual must both (1) have ... (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - June 27, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs