Defunding the Police is a Bioethical Issue
by Nicole Martinez-Martin, JD, PhD Many organizations that are working to end police brutality (the #BlackBioethics Toolkit provides a list of many relevant resources) advise that just reforming police policy is insufficient to address police violence– there need to be sustained efforts for cities to restructure and reprioritize how social services and crime are addressed. ‘Defunding the police’ is a proposal focused on reallocating police funding towards people and services in marginalized communities. While the idea of “defunding police” can seem radical to some, many people have also been s...
Source: blog.bioethics.net - June 12, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Blog Editor Tags: Featured Posts Justice Psychiatric Ethics Social Justice #blackbioethics #defundthepolice #mentalhealth racism Source Type: blogs

Smoking Cigarettes (My Circumstances Made Me Do It)
Rates of cigarette smoking have dropped substantially in the US over the past few decades. But lots of Americans still smoke, and the burden of tobacco-related illness does not fall evenly across our population. That is tragic under normal circumstances, with tobacco use leading to heart attacks, strokes, cancers, and emphysema, to name but a […] The post Smoking Cigarettes (My Circumstances Made Me Do It) appeared first on Peter Ubel. (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - June 12, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Peter Ubel Tags: Health Care Public Health Health & Well-being Peter Ubel syndicated Source Type: blogs

The Case for Medical Aid in Dying in New York
On Tuesday, June 16, 2020, at 4:00 CDT, five panelists will discuss the Medical Aid in Dying Act being considered by the New York legislature. Notably, the panelists offer  their perspectives as a (1) doctor, (2) lawyer, (3) legislator, (4) p... (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - June 12, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Medical Aid in Dying: Dancing with Prognostic Dilemmas
The American Clinicians Academy on Medical Aid in Dying has released the third in its series of video interviews on topics of interest to aid-in-dying clinicians. This interview focuses on the common dilemma of difficult prognoses when evaluating pati... (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - June 12, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Committing to Fight Racism
We have reached a very sad, painful moment in the United States. It feels like a cascade of calamities, one compounding the next. An infectious disease pandemic that we cannot yet cure has precipitated an economic crisis. An episode of police brutality against a black man has added the name George Floyd to a long list of victims of unfair policing practices in black communities. Bioethicists have not been doing enough in our professional capacities to actively denounce or address the persistent problems of structural racism. We invite our fellow bioethics colleagues to join us in candid, uncomfortable conversations about w...
Source: blog.bioethics.net - June 11, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Susan Gilbert Tags: Health Care bioethics COVID-19 George Floyd Hastings Bioethics Forum Police brutality racism structural racism syndicated Source Type: blogs

From Ventilators to Vaccines: Reframing the Ethics of Resource Allocation
by R. Thomas Day, Bradley S. Guidry, Brian C. Drolet, Ellen W. Clayton The United States has never experienced the grim realities of a resource-limited healthcare environment like that brought by Covid-19. Dire projections of overwhelmed ICUs introduced the public to novel concepts such as flattening the curve, triaging, and resource allocation. In response, hospitals and states moved quickly to update resource scarcity protocols to preserve ventilators and personal protective equipment. Fortunately, massive public health efforts were able to slow viral spreading enough that medical systems were only overwhelmed in a...
Source: blog.bioethics.net - June 11, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Blog Editor Tags: Decision making Featured Posts Public Health #covid19 #diaryofaplagueyear COVID-19 Source Type: blogs

Decisions Made for Incapacitated Patients Often Not What Families Want
Researchers from the Regenstrief Institute and Indiana University report in JAMA Open that nearly half of the time medical treatments and orders received for incapacitated patients were not compatible with goals of care requested by their surrogate decision makers. The most common disagreement involved a “full-code” medical order prepared for patients whose surrogates had indicated preference for less aggressive care options. Discord between orders and surrogate directions is not always cause for alarm. Because surrogates are often poor representatives of patient wishes, I have argued that they should sometimes...
Source: blog.bioethics.net - June 11, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

The Utilitarian Truth-Seeker
Written by Stefan Schubert Utilitarianism is often associated with two psychological features. First, acceptance of instrumental harm for the greater good. The utilitarian is famously willing to kill one to save five in the trolley problem. Second, impartial beneficence. The utilitarian is equally concerned with everyone’s well-being, irrespective of their gender, nationality, or species. And […] (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - June 11, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Stefan Schubert Tags: Ethics Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Measure Twice and Cut Once: The Value of Health Care Ethicists in the Pandemic
The major success story of health care ethicists in the pandemic has been their role in establishing ventilator triage policies. But they have more to offer the C-suite of health care institutions. The post Measure Twice and Cut Once: The Value of Health Care Ethicists in the Pandemic appeared first on The Hastings Center. (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - June 10, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Susan Gilbert Tags: Health Care clinical ethicists COVID-19 Hastings Bioethics Forum health care ethics health care institutions Pandemic Planning syndicated Triage Source Type: blogs

Racial justice and being created in the image of God
I have a friend who teaches public health. We share a common faith and a common commitment to living out that faith. However, we have different priorities. In medicine he focuses on the overall health of populations, while I tend to focus more on the needs of individual people and the relationship between the patient … Continue reading "Racial justice and being created in the image of God" (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - June 10, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Steve Phillips Tags: Health Care Culture / Ethnicity / Gender / Disability human dignity syndicated Source Type: blogs

World Elder Abuse Awareness Day 2020
June 15 is World Elder Abuse Awareness Day (WEAAD).  Elder abuse is defined in state law, and the definitions vary from state to state. The American Bar Association Commission on Law and Aging (ABA COLA) has updated its resource of state elder abuse definitions to help lawyers understand elder abuse in their state. In addition, ABA COLA has updated their mandatory and permissive reporting chart, as well as the power of attorney chart. The statutory charts look at selected issues in the law and the citations chart helps you find the complete text of elder abuse and long-term care ombudsmen laws in every stat...
Source: blog.bioethics.net - June 10, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Our Response to Racism Should Not Be More Unpaid Work for Black Faculty, Part I
This essay is part of a 2-part series on the burdens placed on black faculty in academic bioethics. The second part, by Keisha Ray, Ph.D. can be read by clicking here. by Craig Klugman, Ph.D. During the beginning of the #METOO movement, female academics named those who had harassed them, universities created (or expanded) reporting structures and formed committees to help improve conditions for women on campus, and movements were made to try new ways of working such as restorative justice.… (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - June 10, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Craig Klugman Tags: Education Featured Posts professional ethics #blackbioethics ally Source Type: blogs

Our Response to Racism Should Not Be More Unpaid Work for Black Faculty, Part II
This essay is part of a 2-part series on the burdens placed on black faculty in academic bioethics. The second part, by Craig Klugman, Ph.D. can be read by clicking here. by Keisha Ray, Ph.D. Since the killing of George Floyd and the protests that ensued, the amount of free labor requested of me has been seemingly endless; everyday a new request comes in. I consistently have to balance my normal duties to my university, my students, the bioethics profession, and my research, along with new requests to perform free labor for the general public.… (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - June 10, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Keisha Ray Tags: Featured Posts professional ethics #blackbioethics Source Type: blogs

Individual Freedom or Public Health? A False Choice in the Covid Era
When scientists first suggested population-wide social distancing as the only feasible way to suppress Covid-19, they were the first to admit it may not work in a free society. We are now months into placing mass restrictions on human behavior to suppress a virus that lacks an effective vaccine or treatment. Now is the time to ask: is this the authoritarian nightmare many feared, or will freedom and democracy survive Covid-19? The post Individual Freedom or Public Health? A False Choice in the Covid Era appeared first on The Hastings Center. (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - June 9, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Susan Gilbert Tags: Health Care Public Health authoritarianism COVID-19 Hastings Bioethics Forum safety net Social Distancing syndicated Source Type: blogs

Too Much Safety? Safeguards and Equal Access in the Context of Medical Aid in Dying Legislation
Rosalind McDougall and Bridget Pratt have a new article in BMC Medical Ethics titled "Too Much Safety? Safeguards and Equal Access in the Context of Medical Aid in Dying Legislation." They focus on the now one-year-old Victorian Voluntary Assisted Dyi... (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - June 9, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Forgotten Communities: What Bioethics Should Learn from COVID-19
by Thomas D. Harter, PhD, Mary E. Homan, DrPH, MA, MSHCE COVID-19’s emergence in the US has once again thrust the field of bioethics in the public spotlight. While many individual ethicists have been asked to opine on a variety of pandemic related issues, the general focus of bioethics conversations and concerns relate to the direct threat the pandemic poses to overwhelm the capacity of scarce, life-saving resources in acute care settings. Of primary concern is the possibility that shortages, and subsequently rationing, will occur, causing situations in which patients may be denied life-saving resources or having res...
Source: blog.bioethics.net - June 9, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Blog Editor Tags: Clinical Ethics Decision making Featured Posts Public Health #covid19 #diaryofaplagueyear allocation COVID-19 Source Type: blogs

Prioritize Health Care Workers for Ventilators? Not So Fast
In places where Covid-19 is increasing – and in preparation for a possible second wave of the pandemic-- hospitals are preparing to triage critical resources if necessary. Some are prioritizing health care workers for ventilators. We think this is a mistake. The post Prioritize Health Care Workers for Ventilators? Not So Fast appeared first on The Hastings Center. (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - June 8, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Susan Gilbert Tags: Health Care COVID-19 Hastings Bioethics Forum health care workers syndicated ventilator allocation Source Type: blogs

Reading Arrowsmith During the 2020 Pandemic By J. Russell Teagarden
[read more] (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - June 8, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: GalN Tags: Health Care A Different Take syndicated Source Type: blogs

Costs and values: what can we learn from the COVID-19 pandemic?
by Carlo Alfredo Clerici, MD, Tullio Proserpio, PhD, Costanza Raimondi, PhD candidate The COVID pandemic has exposed us to our own fragility and has forced the entire world to confront a condition with no cure. We have all been forced to use ancient practices, such as isolation and quarantine, waiting for better, clearer solutions , while demonstrating renewed solidarity within communities. This in and of itself would be a great lesson for us all, but we must also look at how healthcare structures have responded to the crisis to see what experiences can be carried over as we go back to rebuilding our wounded soci...
Source: blog.bioethics.net - June 8, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Blog Editor Tags: Featured Posts Health Policy & Insurance Health Regulation & Law Institutions, Centers, Funding #covid19 #diaryofaplagueyear #reportsfromaroundtheworld COVID-19 Source Type: blogs

Guardian ad Litem Cannot Sign Pediatric POLST
In early June 2020, the Alabama Court of Civil Appeals held that a guardian ad litem cannot sign a pediatric POLST for a child suffering from Batten Disease and toxic epidermal necrolysis. Custody of the child had been temporarily awarded to the ... (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - June 8, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Incidence of Brain Death in the United States
A new study in the August 2020 issue of Clinical Neurology and Neurosurgery measures the incidence of brain death in the United States at 16,000 per year. That is 2% of hospital deaths and 0.5% of all deaths. The study makes some interesting findings,... (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - June 7, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Nursing Homes and Rights in New York
During a pandemic, some rights may be set aside for a time. Is that what happened to nursing home residents in New York? Residents of nursing homes (NH) in the state of New York have specific rights spelled out on the NY Department of Health website. Regarding “Clinical Care and Treatment,” thirteen rights are listed. … Continue reading "Nursing Homes and Rights in New York" (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - June 7, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: D. Joy Riley Tags: Health Care bioethics syndicated Source Type: blogs

Exit Plan – The Movie
A new Danish film opens on June 12, 2020: "Exit Plan." Insurance claims investigator Max follows the clues of a mysterious death to the remote Hotel Aurora, a unique and secretive facility that specializes in assisted suicide.  His investigation... (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - June 6, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

TOOLKIT: Bioethics and Race #BlackBioethics
The #BlackBioethics Toolkit serves as a resource on articles about bioethics and race, specifically about African-Americans and Blacks in the U.S. General Resources Campaign Zero – “analysis of policing practices across the country, research to identify effective solutions to end police violence, technical assistance to organizers leading police accountability campaigns and the development of model legislation and advocacy to end police violence nationwide” #8CantWait – Ideas to reduce police violence Bioethics.net David Magnus. 2020. A Statement on Police Brutality from American Journal of Bioe...
Source: blog.bioethics.net - June 5, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Blog Editor Tags: Featured Posts #BioethicsSoBlack #BlackBioethics #racism Source Type: blogs

Time for Action is Now
by David Magnus, Ph.D. The past three months have witnessed this country (and the world) go through the most serious pandemic since 1918; the greatest economic collapse since the great depression; and the murder of George Floyd has set off a protest movement across the country that has arguably not been seen since 1968. All three of these events have something in common. They all expose a hard truth in a fashion too compelling to deny: the underlying racism of our country.  … (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - June 5, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: David Magnus Tags: Cultural Ethics Featured Posts Health Care Health Disparities Health Policy & Insurance Justice Politics Public Health #blackbioethics Police brutality protests race racism Source Type: blogs

Local Bioethicists Respond to the Pandemic: The Birth of the COVID-19 Chicago Bioethics Coalition (CBC)
by Craig Klugman, PhD, Kelly Michelson, MD, MPH, Kayhan Parsi, JD, PhD In response to the COVID-19 pandemic, groups of regional ethicists have organized to better foster collaboration and dialogue in their cities and states.  Here in the Chicago metropolitan area, the COVID-19 Chicago Bioethics Coalition (CBC) was created on March 20, 2020, the same day Governor J.B. Pritzker announced the “shelter at home” order for the state of Illinois.  One of the authors (KM) organized the coalition to discuss the bioethical challenges of the current pandemic. … (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - June 5, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Blog Editor Tags: Featured Posts Health Care Institutions, Centers, Funding Public Health #bioethicsontheground #covid19 #diaryofaplagueyear COVID-19 Source Type: blogs

Invalid Advance Directives Can Still Be Cogent Evidence
On June 3, 2020, the UK Court of Protection authorized the withdrawal of artificial nutrition and hydration from MSP, a 34-year-old man with severe gastrointestinal problems. Remarkable is the extent to which the court relied upon MSP's advance direct... (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - June 5, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Where Have All the Bioethicists Gone?
by Craig Klugman, Ph.D. “What can bioethics do to help with the racial injustice” is a refrain that I wish I heard more in bioethics. When COVID-19 entered the stage, bioethicists—myself included—tripped over each to put out special journal issues, write OpEds, work with the media, set up webinars, and advise governments at all levels. The response from the George Floyd killing and protests against racial injustice have been quieter. Racism is a health issue. Racism is an ethics issue. Narrative ethics seeks to understand the stories of a case.… (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - June 5, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Craig Klugman Tags: Featured Posts Health Disparities Justice Philosophy & Ethics Politics Social Justice #feministbioethics #narrativeethics racism Source Type: blogs

Suppressed Voices in Inter-Professional Conflicts
by Asma Fazal, M.B.B.S, MRCPI, MHSc   To care for children in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) and the pediatric intensive care unit (PICU) is not easy because in addition to having an emotionally charged environment with high morbidity and mortality, it has a patient population who is not autonomous. Caring for these children in a highly tense environment requires difficult decision-making, which can be ethically challenging at times. These ethical challenges may arise, and vary from lack of interprofessional collaboration, conflicts in values regarding what is the right thing to do in the clinical contex...
Source: blog.bioethics.net - June 4, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Blog Editor Tags: Clinical Ethics Decision making Education Featured Posts Global Ethics Health Care Pediatrics Interprofessional collaboration Interprofessional Conflicts Source Type: blogs

Death Law
"Death Law" is the captivating title for a course that just finished at the University of Sydney. Here is the description: "Western attitudes toward death have undergone a remarkable transformation in the last century. For many, death now takes place ... (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - June 4, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Video Series: (Un)fair Access to Covid-19 Treatment in Mexico?
Widespread corruption and racism in Mexico created extra hurdles for the development of Mexico’s recently published federal guidelines for deciding who gets to access scarce medical resources (e.g. ventilators in the case of Covid-19). Dr César Palacios-González (Oxford), who helped develop these guidelines,  talks about these challenges. (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - June 4, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Katrien Devolder Tags: Health Care Coronavirus; Pandemic; Ethics; Public Health healthcare rationing Katrien Devolder Interview medical ethics Pandemic Ethics Rationing/ Resource Allocation syndicated Video Series Youtube interview Source Type: blogs

Overcoming the Pandemic: Social distancing, “Stay at Home” and Solidarity Works
by Father Marcin Ferdynus The COVID-19 pandemic is unprecedented in scope and beyond anything we have ever experienced. A global plague of unparalleled proportions resulting in health, economic, social and religious consequences, the pandemic has revealed deficiencies in global and domestic health institutions and systems. Countries around the world have faced the difficult task of caring for the health of citizens and securing their basic needs. Many European Union countries as well as public health institutions failed in the first phase of the pandemic.… (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - June 3, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Blog Editor Tags: Cultural Ethics Featured Posts Global Ethics Health Care Public Health #covid19 #diaryofaplagueyear #reportsfromaroundtheworld COVID-19 religion religion and medical ethics Social Distancing Source Type: blogs

Bioethics and Black Lives: A Call for Bioethics to Speak Against Racial Injustice
George Floyd could not breathe while his neck was trapped under the knee of a police officer for nearly nine minutes. Yet despite the impressive scholarship of bioethics on ventilation and other technologies that prolong human breathing capabilities, it is largely silent on the suffocating effects of racism. Bioethics must speak out against racial injustice. The post Bioethics and Black Lives: A Call for Bioethics to Speak Against Racial Injustice appeared first on The Hastings Center. (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - June 3, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Susan Gilbert Tags: Health Care activism bioethics Eric Garner Freddie Gray George Floyd Hastings Bioethics Forum policy brutality racial injustice syndicated Source Type: blogs

The Meaning of Care and Ethics to Mitigate the Harshness of Triage in Second-Wave Scenario Planning During the Covid-19 Pandemic
by Mathias Wirth, Ph.D.; Laurèl Rauschenbach, MD; Brian Hurwitz, MA, MSc, MD, FRCP, FRCGP; Heinz-Peter Schmiedebach, MD; Jennifer A. Herdt, Ph.D Although the number of severely ill people is declining in some epicenters, there is a risk of a second wave of COVID-19 infection with a large number of patients who are likely to require ventilation or other forms of intensive care. In the current state of the pandemic, second-wave scenario planning should give consideration to alternatives to triage. The shortage of ventilators showed that despite the existence of triage guidelines, moral questions remain. … ...
Source: blog.bioethics.net - June 3, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Blog Editor Tags: Featured Posts OPC Public Health #covid19 #diaryofaplagueyear COVID-19 Triage Source Type: blogs

No Quick Fix, But Now is the Time
by Dalia M. Feltman, MD, MA and Craig Klugman, Ph.D. Our country is polarized to a breaking point on too many issues.  Black vs. white.  Liberal vs. Conservative.  Documented vs. undocumented.  Haves vs. Have-Nots. Politics have perversely crept into all areas of life, even into matters of health and pandemic response such as wearing a mask and access to a ventilator. In public health ethics, we know that some communities have the determinants necessary to live healthy lives–safe neighborhoods and built environments, economic stability, good quality education, strong communities, and access to hea...
Source: blog.bioethics.net - June 3, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Blog Editor Tags: Featured Posts Justice Public Health Social Justice #covid19 #diaryofaplagueyear COVID-19 racism Source Type: blogs

Medical Decision-Making for Incapacitated Adult Patients Under Utah Law
A brand new multi-society statement provides guidance on how to make decisions for incapacitated patients without surrogates. This statement builds off a series of articles in which I assess the law (or lack of it) on this problem. Last week, mountain... (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - June 3, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Improving Advance Directives by Using Video Technology
Karen Wyatt interviews Fred Mirarchi at the End of Life University about improving advance directives by using video technology. Mirarchi is an emergency medicine physician and the principal investigator of the TRIAD Research Series (The Realistic Interpretation of Advance Directives). He discusses how his research has confirmed that there is a nationwide patient safety risk due to confusion surrounding living wills, DNR and POLST orders.  Wyatt and Mirarchi also discuss MIDEO, a video advance directive and physician’s medical order that improves both the quality and safety of advance care planning. I have ...
Source: blog.bioethics.net - June 2, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

COVID-19 and an Outbreak of Civil Unrest
by Anne Zimmerman, JD, candidate MS (Bioethics) At first it seemed like violence in the US had subsided during the pandemic. Outrage over police violence against unarmed black men was shelved while COVID-19 news took over the internet and cable news. The current civil outrage is evidence that violence against unarmed black men carries on concurrently with COVID-19’s economic and physical devastation that hurts the poor and the darker-skinned disproportionately. The causes are the same: The economic and physical effects of COVID-19 and police violence are caused by structural inequality.… (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - June 2, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Blog Editor Tags: Cultural Featured Posts Health Care Health Disparities Health Regulation & Law Justice Politics Social Justice #covid19 #diaryofaplagueyear #socialdeterminantsofhealth COVID-19 racism Source Type: blogs

“¿Que Vamos a Comer?”/ “What Are We Going to Eat?”: Latina Prenatal Care and Access to Food During COVID-19
By Daniela Vargas As a public health nurse, I work in reproductive justice, prenatal and postpartum care at a Federally Qualified Health Center (FQHC) in San Francisco. I am aware that my job comes with a high responsibility as I am assessing for social and structural determinants of health as women begin their prenatal care. […] (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - June 2, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: reflectivemeded Tags: Health Care syndicated Uncategorized Source Type: blogs

Brain Death Testing: Time for National Uniformity
This post appears in the June issue of the American Journal of Bioethics. by Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD It is time to revise the Uniform Determination of Death Act (UDDA) to assure a consistent nationwide approach to consent for brain death testing. Only two of 56 U.S. jurisdictions address the question in statute or regulation. Unfortunately, leaving this issue up to clinicians and the courts has led to considerable confusion and variability. We can tolerate this no longer. Certainty and clarity are of paramount importance in death determination.… (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - June 2, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Blog Editor Tags: Editorial-AJOB End of Life Care Featured Posts Source Type: blogs

The COVID-19 Pandemic and the Problem of Pseudoscience
by Kiarash Aramesh M.D., Ph.D. The COVID-19 pandemic has been accompanied by a surge of pseudoscientific claims, sometimes made or supported by political powers. Because of the magnitude of such claims, the risks and costs they inflict, and their global presence and interconnections, health organizations need to take them seriously and address them as a part of its response to such pandemics. The natural course of the COVID-19 infection, in which most of the patients survive, makes it a desirable playground for the promoters of pseudoscience because they can attribute the natural recovery of such patients – or escapi...
Source: blog.bioethics.net - June 2, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Blog Editor Tags: Clinical Trials & Studies Featured Posts Pharmaceuticals Politics #covid19 #diaryofaplagueyear COVID-19 Source Type: blogs