Assisted Suicide and Disability
On October 9th, the National Council on Disability (NCD) released a report on the dangers of assisted suicide laws as they relate to persons with disabilities. The report provides a nice background on the history and justification of the Council’s position against assisted suicide as far back as 1997. The present report, available here, provides … Continue reading "Assisted Suicide and Disability" (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - November 19, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Mark McQuain Tags: Health Care Allocation / Access / Public Health bioethics Culture / Ethnicity / Gender / Disability human dignity syndicated Source Type: blogs

Pub Bores and Politics
Written by Stephen Rainey Pub bet: I bet you can’t button your coat up. You smell a rat, but go along with it, fastening you coat to see what’s up. I claim a victorious pint of plum porter because you close your coat starting with the top button and moving down. You didn’t button your […] (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - November 19, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Stephen Rainey Tags: Health Care Politics discourse Elizabeth Anderson inclusion Political Philosophy pub bet Stephen Rainey's Posts syndicated Uehiro Lectures; Elizabeth Anderson; Political Communication. polarization Source Type: blogs

Death Is Permanent – You Can Only Die Once
The media often sow seeds of confusion, doubt, and mistrust about brain death. There are too many headlines like "Brain dead Woman Kept Alive on Life Support." But now even cardiac death is getting misrepresented. A Fox News story this week reports th... (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - November 19, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Film Review – FOR SAMA Bioethics, Humanitarian Law and Withdrawal of Medical Mission
by September Williams, MD FOR SAMA is a documentary film by International Emmy Award winning journalist and film director, Waad Al-Kateab. The project was brought to fruition with co-director Edward Watts. Director Waad Al-Kateab made this film while she fell in love, got married, was pregnant, and breastfeeding in a war zone rife with humanitarian violations. She did it while her husband, Dr. Hamid Al-Kateab, used every available hand to manage war trauma, first in the remains of bombed hospitals, then in any shelters left standing.… (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - November 19, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: September Williams, MD Tags: Bioethics Films Featured Posts Global Ethics Media Medical Humanities Civil War Conflict Journalism human rights Humanitarian Law Medical Relief Work MSF PBS/Frontline The Rights of Women/Children War Trauma Source Type: blogs

Compassion & Choices Annual Report
Compassion & Choices has released its 2018-2019 annual report.   Here are a few excerpts: Compassion & Choices realized transformational progress in 2018-2019. We passed medical aid in dying in New Jersey, cheered a second victory in Maine and advanced legislation in dozens more states." "We took on the reality that current medical aid-in-dying laws are in fact too restrictive — placing too many needless hurdles in front of eligible, profoundly anguished patients." "We expanded efforts to address disparities in end-of-life care within communities of color, promoting the awar...
Source: blog.bioethics.net - November 17, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Robert Latimer Still Believes He Was Right to Kill His Daughter
In 1993, Robert Latimer killed his severely disabled daughter, Tracy,  by pumping exhaust fumes into the cab of his truck. He was subsequently sentenced to life in prison, and paroled in 2010. In a recent challenge to his sentence, Latimer a... (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - November 16, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Advance Health Care Directives: Drafting and Dispute Resolution Strategies
Join me next Friday morning for this CLE program "Advance Health Care Directives: Drafting and Dispute Resolution Strategies." (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - November 15, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

New Zealand Parliament Approves Medical Aid in Dying
This week, New Zealand MPs voted 69-51 to approve David Seymour's End of Life Choice bill, sending the issue to a public referendum next year. End of Life Choice Bill - Third Reading - Video 1 from New Zealand Parliament on Vimeo. (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - November 14, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

You Only Die Once and You Do Not Die When Your Heart Stops – Benjamin Schreiber
In this famous scene from Sesame Street, the characters explain to Big Bird that "when people die, they don't come back." This seems simple enough. Nevertheless, people commonly refer to cardiac arrest as "death." This is wrong. Death requires more than the cessation of circulatory and respiratory functions. It requires the "irreversible" cessation of circulatory and respiratory functions. This common error was recently colorfully illustrated by Benjamin Schreiber, an Iowa inmate. Schreiber claimed that he served his "life" sentence when he "died" during surgery. He as...
Source: blog.bioethics.net - November 13, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

“ I Shall Be Released. ” Restorative Justice Techniques Can Address Healthcare Burnout & Attrition
by Jay Behel Burnout, provider dissatisfaction, and attrition remain at near-epidemic proportions among healthcare providers. A 2017 survey found that 39% of physicians reported significant burnout, and nearly a third of physicians were contemplating leaving practice in a 2012 survey.  Nurses seemed to be faring better in a survey released earlier this year with only […] (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - November 12, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: reflectivemeded Tags: Health Care syndicated Uncategorized Source Type: blogs

The Good Place, the Bad Place, and the Ugly Consequences
written by Gabriel De Marco I recently started to watch The Good Place again, a sitcom by NBC which takes place in the realm of the supernatural. The show has taken us to the good place (somewhat like heaven, where good people go after they have shuffled off their mortal coil), the bad place (the […] (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - November 12, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Gabriel De Marco Tags: Ethics Health Care Gabriel De Marco's posts syndicated television Source Type: blogs

Bad Ads And Stereotypes
Written by Rebecca Brown In June this year, the Advertising Standards Authority (ASA) brought into effect a ban on harmful gender stereotypes in advertising. In response to public outcry about adverts such as the 2015 ‘Are you beach body ready?’ campaign by Protein World, and growing discomfort with outdated depictions of gender roles in the […] (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - November 12, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Rebecca Brown Tags: Ethics Health Care Political Philosophy public discourse Rebecca Brown's Posts regulation syndicated Source Type: blogs

25th Anniversary of the Oregon Death with Dignity Act
25 years ago, on November 12, 1994, Oregon voters passed the ballot initiative that enacted the Oregon Death with Dignity Act. (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - November 12, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

The Male Pill: Will It Help Advance Gender Equality?
Last month, I was honored to be named one of the BBC 100 Women of 2019, which is a list they compile each year of inspiring and influential women. The list includes women from around the world of all ages (from teenagers to nonagenarians) and various professions. People from around the world will be familiar with the names of some of the women, such as Alexandria of Ocasio-Cortez, Megan Rapinoe, and Greta Thunberg, while other women will be new to the world stage. This year’s theme was the female future and some of the 100 Women were invited to London or Delhi to answer the question, “What would the future loo...
Source: blog.bioethics.net - November 11, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Bioethics Today Tags: Health Care Pharmaceuticals Author: Campo-Engelstein feminist ethics reproductive medicine reproductive rights Research and Development Sex and Sexuality syndicated Women's Reproductive Rights Source Type: blogs

Texas " 10 Day Rule " for Medical Futility Conflicts – Tinslee Lewis
Texas Right to Life is using the Tinslee Lewis case to jump start its judicial and legislative attacks on the dispute resolution provisions in the Texas Advance Directives Act. (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - November 11, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Quality-Adjusted Life Years and the Devaluation of Life with a Disability
The National Council on Disability has released the fourth report in its Bioethics and Disability Report Series: "Quality-Adjusted Life Years and the Devaluation of Life with a Disability." QALYs are a number that is used to represent the degree ... (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - November 11, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Dying to Die – The Janet Adkins Story
In 1990, Dr. Jack Kevorkian was just beginning his work in the death with dignity movement. Janet Adkins, who made a choice to die after being diagnosed with early Alzheimer’s disease, was his first assisted suicide patient. This week, Susan Clevenger publishes Dying to Die – The Janet Adkins Story. (Amazon) Clevenger interviewed and recorded stories from Janet’s family and closest friends, transcribed TV videos and read countless magazine and news stories. Her source material included Janet’s personal journals and letters from family and friends that the family had saved over the years. (Sourc...
Source: blog.bioethics.net - November 11, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Brain Death Under Attack: More Statutory & Constitutional Challenges to the UDDA
Several weeks ago, the family of Titus Cromer obtained a state court injunction against Beaumont Health, requiring the hospital to continue organ-sustaining treatment despite Titus' death. But, on Thursday, the state court ruled that the injunction wou... (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - November 9, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

BioethicsTV (November 4-9, 2019): #TheGoodDoctor, #TheResident, #ChicagoMed, #GreysAnatomy
The Good Doctor (Season 3; Episode 6):Risky Choices; The Resident (Season 3; Episode 5): Reporting a drunk pilot; Leaving AMA; Chicago Med (Season 5; Episode 7): Subverted capacity; Confidentiality with a military experiment subject; Greys Anatomy (Season 16; Episode 7): When personal feelings interfere with medical judgement; The Good Doctor (Season 3; Episode 6): Risky Choices A pregnant woman has an abdominal tumor and is in the hospital to have it removed. Once in the OR, the surgeons find that the tumor is wrapped around the uterine arteries.… (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - November 9, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Craig Klugman Tags: BioethicsTV Featured Posts Uncategorized Source Type: blogs

Federal Judge Rejects Motion to Dismiss Lawsuit Challenging Constitutionality of Idaho Law Voiding Pregnant Women ’s Living Wills
A federal court today rejected a motion by State of Idaho defendants to dismiss a lawsuit challenging the constitutionality of a state statute that invalidates a person’s advance directive if they have been diagnosed as pregnant.  The Court determined that the Plaintiffs may proceed with their lawsuit challenging the constitutionality of the statute.  The lawsuit, Almerico et al. v. State of Idaho et al, was filed in May 2018 by Compassion & Choices and Legal Voice on behalf of four Idaho women.  The outcome of the suit could have repercussions for similar laws in nine states: Alabama, Indiana, Kan...
Source: blog.bioethics.net - November 9, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

More on Physicians ’ Conscience Rights
Yesterday’s post to this blog addressed physicians’ conscience rights.  The standard shape of arguments about preserving individual physicians’ conscience rights goes, broadly, like this:  certain actions now sanctioned by society (e.g., abortion, assisted suicide) have been embraced by the medical profession as standard medical care which all physicians should be willing to perform, but this … Continue reading "More on Physicians’ Conscience Rights" (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - November 8, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Jon Holmlund Tags: Health Care bioethics syndicated Source Type: blogs

Not-So-Golden Years for NIH ’s Retired Chimpanzees
The National Institutes of Health recently announced that it will retire-in-place the remaining 44 chimpanzees at the Alamogordo Primate Facility in Alamogordo, New Mexico, rather than transfer them to a sanctuary as originally planned. NIH’s decision is disappointing for those who believe that the chimpanzees—many of whom have spent decades in research—should experience the freedom and quality of life a sanctuary would provide. The post Not-So-Golden Years for NIH’s Retired Chimpanzees appeared first on The Hastings Center. (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - November 7, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Susan Gilbert Tags: Health Care animal welfare cihmpanzees Hastings Bioethics Forum National Institutes of Health research syndicated Source Type: blogs

BioethicsTV (October 27-November 1, 2019): #NewAmsterdam; #ChicagoMed
by Craig Klugman, Ph.D. New Amsterdam (Season 2: Episode 6): Lying; Inherent bias; Chicago Med (Season 5; Episode 6): Excusing battery; Jehovah’s Witness and blood transfusion; Be yourself or maintain health New Amsterdam (Season 2: Episode 6): Lying; Inherent bias A girls trip to New York ends up in the ED with the women injured in accident. The organizer of the trip, we learn, caused the accident deliberately because she took out the supplemental car insurance. The woman in the group all have health problems and lack the money to get the medical care they need.… (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - November 7, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Craig Klugman Tags: BioethicsTV Professionalism Reproductive Ethics blood Jehovah's Witness lying trans health Source Type: blogs

California Hospital Fails to Afford Reasonable Accommodation After Brain Death
Nebane Abienwi, 37, a father of six who fled his embattled country this summer, died in October, after suffering a "medical emergency" while being detained at the U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) Otay Mesa Detention Center facil... (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - November 7, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Clinicians DO NOT Need Consent to Withdraw Organ Sustaining Treatment after Death
Nearly two weeks ago, 21-year-old Damaire Gordon Friday died at Erie County Medical Center. He did not have a healthcare agent and his parents disagreed about how to proceed. So, the matter went to court. But why? There is no decision to be made. H... (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - November 6, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Do You Believe in Miracles? Your Patients Do. You Sexy Thing.
Alexia Torke and colleagues recently published a study that found 59 percent of surrogate decision makers believed a miracle might save the patient. The authors concluded: "Few religious variables are associated with end-of-life preferences ... (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - November 6, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Rights of conscience and the distinction between needed and desired treatment
Rights of conscience, the moral concept that physicians or other medical providers should be able to choose not to provide or participate in medical treatments which they believe to be morally wrong, continues to be widely debated in our society. A recent article in Vox titled “He needed a gender-affirming procedure. The hospital said no.” … Continue reading "Rights of conscience and the distinction between needed and desired treatment" (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - November 6, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Steve Phillips Tags: Health Care bioethics Health Care Practice Medical Decision Making syndicated Source Type: blogs

Laboring in Bioethics: Why Do We Work So Much?
by Craig Klugman, Ph.D. A few weeks ago, I received an email from a colleague around 7pm on a Friday evening. We are serving on the same committee, which I chair, and he had a question. This led to a series of back and forth email that extended until nearly 11pm. I laughed heartily and asked myself, “When did we become expected to work on Friday night?” My observation was supported when the same thing happened with a colleague at another university on Sunday night.… (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - November 5, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Craig Klugman Tags: Featured Posts professional ethics Professionalism work-life balance Source Type: blogs

The End-of-Life Experience: A Community Conversation (Mankato, MN)
This Thursday, November 7, 2019, Minnesota State University in Mankato will host "The End-of-Life Experience: A Community Conversation." The program runs from 8:30 AM - 3:30 PM. Guest speakers include Jessica Zitter. (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - November 5, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Parents Sue State for Withdrawing Life-Sustaining Treatment Without Consent
Andrew Lamorie is not a sympathetic plaintiff.  He and his wife are jailed in Arizona on murder and child abuse charges after the death of their 2-year-old Gabriella Lamorie. Lamorie has filed a civil lawsuit from jail, arguing that the state violated his parental rights by taking his daughter off life support without notifying him. He claims that his “parental rights were never severed through any form of due process.” Therefore, CPS’s actions were illegal. Lamorie may have a case. Even though one might question the motives and best interest judgments of parents arrested for child abuse, many states...
Source: blog.bioethics.net - November 5, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

“Why did you make me this way?!”
Recently, Jon Holmlund brought us up to date on an effort in Russia to proceed with CRISPR gene editing aimed at eliminating deafness. Coincidently, a recent MedPage article was posted regarding the ethics of using pre-implantation genetic diagnosis and IVF to purposefully select FOR an embryo with genetic deafness for a couple, both of whom … Continue reading "“Why did you make me this way?!”" (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - November 5, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Mark McQuain Tags: Health Care bioethics biotechnology Consent / Research enhancement human dignity reproduction syndicated Source Type: blogs

Incapacitated Refusal
  Sometimes patients who lack decision-making capacity refuse treatment that would be in their best interests. Imagine, for example, a patient suffering from acute schizophrenia who adamantly and persistently refuses to take antipsychotic medication that would relieve his symptoms. And suppose, further, that this patient poses no danger to himself or others, but that his mental illness prevents him from understanding his diagnosis as well as his likely prognosis with and without the treatment. Should a provider treat such a patient over his objections?   My reflections begin with the observation that in most cas...
Source: blog.bioethics.net - November 4, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Bioethics Today Tags: Health Care autonomy beneficence capacity syndicated Source Type: blogs

Racial Bias in Algorithms?
Can algorithms show racial bias?   That is the conclusion of a recent article published in Science by Obermeyer, et al., entitled, “Dissecting racial bias in an algorithm used to manage the health of populations.”   According to Science, the algorithm’s goal is “to predict complex health needs for the purpose of targeting an intervention that manages those … Continue reading "Racial Bias in Algorithms?" (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - November 4, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Neil Skjoldal Tags: Health Care Justice bioethics health care practice; allocation/access/public health syndicated Source Type: blogs

VSED – Growing Understanding & Acceptance
When Rosemary Bowen hastened her death by VSED, her daughter documented the process, day by day, in a 16-minute film shown yesterday at an End of Life Expo in Washington, DC. A Washington Post story on the event reports that VSED is "gradually en... (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - November 4, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Interview with Julian Savulescu on Genetic Selection and Enhancement
Should we use genetic testing to choose what type of children to bring into the world, and if so, how should we choose? Is it acceptable to choose a deaf child? Should we choose our children on the basis of non-disease traits such as intelligence if that were possible ? Does genetic selection put too […] (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - November 4, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Katrien Devolder Tags: Genetics Health Care Audio Files cognitive enhancement disab disability genetic selection human enhancement Katrien Devolder Interview medical ethics PGD procreative beneficence syndicated Video Series Youtube interview Source Type: blogs

Panpsychism and Moral Status
Panpsychism is the view that sentience is ubiquitous in the world. Some people find it attractive because it sidesteps the challenge for dualists of explaining why there are two radically different types of things in the world, physical things and mental things.  And panpsychism seems to avoid some of of the challenges that face physicalist […] (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - November 3, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Adam Shriver Tags: Animal Ethics Health Care Adam Shriver's Posts consciousness moral status pain pain for ethicists panpsychism syndicated Source Type: blogs

Israeli Medical Association – New Position Paper on Medical Futility
The Israeli Medical Association recently issued a new position paper titled "Medical Ethics and the Treatment of Patients with Incurable Diseases and Useless Treatments." (Note that this is my translation.) The ethics committee decided on nine guiding principles:The physician and the patient in an incurable disease will discuss the patient's aspirations and expectations from the treatment, against realistic medical capabilities and set the treatment goals. The physician will consider and decide on the most appropriate clarification and treatment for the patient, according to up-to-date guidelines in medical ...
Source: blog.bioethics.net - November 3, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs