Exercise for autism - the home mini-CrossFit program
A few weeks ago I posted about amandated 300 calorie a day weight stabilization program for #1. I also mentioned there ' s a different program for #2. There ' s no mandate for his program -- it ' s something he and I put together. He dislikes exercise but feels it his duty to do it.The program has 3 events each week that we do together:- Depending on season either a 1h singletrack mountain bike ride or a 1hMN Special Hockey event.- A few miles of walking or (depending on season) 2h family road bike ride or 1h outdoor ice skating loop*.- Home mini-CrossFitThe home mini-CrossFit is a highly scaled version of a standard Cross...
Source: Be the Best You can Be - October 27, 2021 Category: Disability Tags: adult Asperger ' autism exercise health Source Type: blogs

Metabolic syndrome and cognitive disability - 300 calories a day with Zwift and a Schwinn IC-4
Short versionA cognitively limited adult with early metabolic syndrome (hyperlipidemia, elevated glucose, elevated blood pressure, obesity) has halted weight gain over 9 months with a 300 calorie a day exercise program and some compliance with dietary guidelines.IngredientsSchwinn IC-4 trainer ($900 to $1000 depending on demand and supply chain). This is one of the few quality cycle trainers on the market that doesn ' t require a subscriptionZwift exercise service on iPad ($15/month - we could put this on his ABLE account but Ihate his ABLE account)Zwift Companion on iPhone to monitor activity (free)iMessage to send screen...
Source: Be the Best You can Be - August 7, 2021 Category: Disability Tags: cognitive impairment exercise Source Type: blogs

Special Needs CrossFit
It ' s been two years since #1 started working with a personal trainer I knew from her CrossFit coaching, maybe one year since he started going to my regular CrossFit classes.#1 is 23 now. He can read at about a third grade level, most of his writing is text messaging to Emily or I. He ' s impulsive, but has generally done well with listening to coaches and workplace supervisors. Putting it all together I thought CrossFit was a bridge too far. Trying it was his idea, not mine.I was wrong about that. He can now do up to 2/3 of a workout with some minor guidance. Sometimes he does less, but over time he ' s getting better. H...
Source: Be the Best You can Be - August 2, 2020 Category: Disability Tags: ADHD adult athletics cognitive impairment exercise Explosive Child sport therapy Twin Cities Source Type: blogs

ABLE (529A) plans -- what's a good one and who has it
Wikipedia has a succinct description of the529A (ABLE) plan:ABLE programs are similar to tax-advantaged 529 plans for college savings.[8] In addition, a 529 plan can be rolled over into an ABLE account for a qualified beneficiary.An ABLE account can be opened by a disabled individual who became disabled before 26 years of age.[8] An ABLE account can receive after-tax cash contributions from any person, including its owner.[1] Contributions in a year are limited to the federal gift tax exclusion [9] for that year — $15,000 in 2018.[10] If the beneficiary works and does not contribute to a 401(a), 401(k), 403(b), or 457 pl...
Source: Be the Best You can Be - April 12, 2020 Category: Disability Source Type: blogs

Thanksgiving 2019 - update
Continuing in the vein of "how does the story end" (Jan 2019) #1 and #2 continue to mature and achieve. It would have been a great comfort 17 years ago to see #1 vault the 36 " box jump at our family CrossFit Box. I didn ' t think he could jump that high. Wrong.I guess I gave away the story there. After about a year of working with a personal trainer who is also a CrossFit coach #1 joinedmy box. He has done better than my fondest hope. Not least because coaches have hit just the right tone ... friendly, supportive, but also treating him much like every other adult. Same for our athletes. The power of expectations is hard t...
Source: Be the Best You can Be - November 23, 2019 Category: Disability Tags: adult autism cognitive impairment Explosive Child Source Type: blogs

Twin Cities facility for special needs strength and fitness training
(I copiedthis over from my shares feed as it fits better here).My #1 is doing their special Olympics strength training atBuilt on Bravery, located at the Mendota Height MN Lions United Fitness Center (map):Lions United is a new kind of training center, designed specifically to prepare people with disabilities for exceptional performance in individual competitions, team sports and life, especially people with autism, down syndrome and cerebral palsy. We ’re dedicated to Special Olympics’ Project UNIFY and Unified Sports®, which means we bring people of all abilities together to strengthen individuals, relatio...
Source: Be the Best You can Be - November 23, 2019 Category: Disability Tags: athletics cognitive impairment exercise Explosive Child health Twin Cities Source Type: blogs

A (very) inclusive CrossFit gym - in Reno Nevada
Fitness is a problem for many people, not least special needs teens and adults. Diabetes and obesity are common in our population.Diet is a factor — it takes a lot of cognitive work to outrun the American junk food industry. The special needs population is vulnerable to deceptive advertising implying health benefits of " sports drinks " .Exercise is also a problem. Special Olympics and Special Hockey programs are low volume — typically once a week. Group classes may be intimidating or unwelcoming. Incomes are low and gyms can be costly [1]. Workout music may be intolerable. The feel and odor of sweat may be unusually b...
Source: Be the Best You can Be - March 13, 2019 Category: Disability Tags: adult Asperger ' autism community exercise Source Type: blogs

How did the story end?
Istarted writing this particular blog in September of 2004. At that time Explorer #1 was 7 and #2 was 5. They are adults now.The early years before this blog are a blur now. I think by the time I started writing we had developed a reasonably effective approach and seen some progress. The years between 2000 and 2004 were harder.We aged a lot in those years.Now this blog is infrequently updated. That ’s partly because of myrelated book project, partly because adult Explorer challenges are personal, and partly because the complex educational and financial (SSD, etc) challenges we deal with now are managed by my wife — and...
Source: Be the Best You can Be - January 27, 2019 Category: Disability Tags: adult Asperger ' autism cognitive impairment Explosive Child Source Type: blogs

On autistic meltdown and exhaustion
Via Twitter I ’m reminded of two autism blogs that have passed on - Musings of an Aspie (ended Jan 2015) andEveryday Aspie (2017)/Everyday Aspergers (2016).@mxmackpoet called out 3 in particular [1]:From the Inside Out: An Autistic Shutdown – Everyday Aspie Feb 2017Where I Go When I Shutdown | Musings of an Aspie   Oct 2012Autistic Regression and Fluid Adaptation | Musings of an Aspie Dec 2013. This concept oftransient autistic regression does not appear in the medical literature. Which speaks volumes about themiserable state of modern clinical research into autism in general, and post-pubertal autism in parti...
Source: Be the Best You can Be - October 20, 2018 Category: Disability Tags: adolescence adult Asperger ' autism brain and mind cognition neurodiversity support Source Type: blogs

ABLE Plans and Special Needs Trusts
#1 is now on either SSI or SSDI or both. Yeah, we ’re not sure. Might even have changed. This is a lot weirder than I expected.There is, with one or the other, apparently a peculiar incentive for caregivers to retire at 62 rather than, say, 67 (something to do with family Social Security caps and spouses).  There’s also something in there about Medicare with MA Backup after two years on SSDI, claims that it’s best to do at least one year of SSI before SSDI, 9 month income averages, retroactive payments that can be clawed back and so on.The accounting is interesting — trying to stay below income and asset caps.With...
Source: Be the Best You can Be - July 26, 2018 Category: Disability Tags: adult finance support Source Type: blogs

Catch 22: Special needs students in transition programs can't take community college classes in Minnesota
We ’ve discovered  an interesting “Catch-22. It applies to Minnesota but may be common elsewhere.In MN a student entering a state funded transition program cannot do courses at a community college — even if they pay for them directly and even if they were doing them while in High School through Minnesota’s PSEO program.The reason is that Community Colleges require a High School diploma, but transition programs require that a studentnot have a High School diploma [1]. While in High School students may attend Community Colleges for advanced courses through programs like PSEO (MN), but not after finishing High School...
Source: Be the Best You can Be - May 19, 2018 Category: Disability Tags: autism college education transition Source Type: blogs

Catch 22: Special needs students in transition programs can't take community college classes in Minnesota
We ’ve discovered  an interesting “Catch-22. It applies to Minnesota but may be common elsewhere.In MN a student entering a state funded transition program cannot do courses at a community college — even if they pay for them directly and even if they were doing them while in High School through Minnesota’s PSEO program.The reason is that Community Colleges require a High School diploma, but transition programs require that a studentnot have a High School diploma [1]. While in High School students may attend Community Colleges for advanced courses through programs like PSEO (MN), but not after finishing High School...
Source: Be the Best You can Be - May 19, 2018 Category: Disability Tags: autism college education transition Source Type: blogs