Antibodies triggered by avian influenza virus vaccine illuminate a new path toward a universal flu vaccine
(The Mount Sinai Hospital / Mount Sinai School of Medicine) Diverse antibodies induced in humans by vaccination with an avian influenza virus vaccine may offer broader, more durable protection against multiple strains of influenza than today's vaccines typically provide. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - June 8, 2016 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

EMA Panel Backs Pandemic Avian Influenza VaccineEMA Panel Backs Pandemic Avian Influenza Vaccine
The European Medicines Agency's Committee for Medicinal Products for Human Use has recommended granting marketing authorization for the Pandemic Live Attenuated Influenza Vaccine. International Approvals (Source: Medscape Infectious Diseases Headlines)
Source: Medscape Infectious Diseases Headlines - April 1, 2016 Category: Infectious Diseases Tags: Infectious Diseases News Alert Source Type: news

A69/22
Pandemic influenza preparedness: sharing of influenza viruses and access to vaccines and other benefits (Source: WHO Governing Body Documentation)
Source: WHO Governing Body Documentation - April 1, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

A69/22Add.1
Pandemic influenza preparedness: sharing of influenza viruses and access to vaccines and other benefits Report of the Special Session of the Pandemic Influenza Preparedness Framework Advisory Group (Source: WHO Governing Body Documentation)
Source: WHO Governing Body Documentation - April 1, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Pandemic influenza vaccine receives positive CHMP opinion
AstraZeneca and its global biologics research and development arm, MedImmune, today announced that the Committee for Medicinal Products for Human Use (CHMP) of the European Medicines Agency (EMA) has issued a positive opinion recommending the conditional approval of Pandemic Live Attenuated Influenza Vaccine (P/LAIV). (Source: World Pharma News)
Source: World Pharma News - April 1, 2016 Category: Pharmaceuticals Tags: Featured AstraZeneca Business and Industry Source Type: news

The Dark Side of World-Changing Technologies
This is the third installment of a five-part WorldPost series on the world beyond 2050. The series is adapted from the Nierenberg Prize Lecture by Lord Martin Rees in La Jolla, Calif. Part one is available here. Part two is here. Part four will be published next week. There are numerous novel technologies that will change society and empower individuals -- but they have a dark side that's all too frequently overlooked. Our world increasingly depends on elaborate networks: electric power grids, air traffic control, international finance, globally dispersed manufacturing and so forth. Unless these networks are highly r...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - February 15, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

What the rise of Zika (and other viruses) might tell us about our planet
Follow me at @JohnRossMD Zika virus, a pathogen that was almost unknown a few months ago, is now rampant in Central and South America and the Caribbean. In Brazil, it has already infected about 1.5 million people and caused nearly 4,000 cases of microcephaly, a severe birth defect. It is almost certain to spread to every country in the Americas, except Canada and Chile, which lack the Aedes mosquitoes that spread Zika. Zika is not the only virus that has come from the tropics to menace the United States. Dengue, an unpleasant and potentially fatal viral infection, has broken out in Texas, Florida and Hawaii in the past 10 ...
Source: New Harvard Health Information - February 3, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: John Ross, MD, FIDSA Tags: Health Infectious diseases Prevention Safety Source Type: news

What you need to know about Zika virus
Follow me at @JohnRossMD Last week, the government of El Salvador gave what might be the strangest public health advice of all time: don’t get pregnant for the next two years. Officials in Colombia, Ecuador, and Jamaica have also warned women to avoid pregnancy, although only for the next several months. The reason for these unusual recommendations? An outbreak of Zika virus, currently raging in 21 countries in the Americas and the Caribbean, as well as the U.S. Virgin Islands, the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, Samoa, and Cape Verde. Until recently, Zika was an obscure virus, confined to equatorial Africa and Asia, and kn...
Source: New Harvard Health Information - February 1, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: John Ross, MD, FIDSA Tags: Children's Health Family Planning and Pregnancy Infectious diseases Prevention Safety Source Type: news

Why Are We Seeing an Explosion of New Viruses Like Zika?
Zika virus, Ebola, Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS) coronavirus, Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) coronavirus, Nipah virus, Hendra virus, bird flu, swine flu -- these viruses have all grabbed international attention in recent years. In the past few decades the world has witnessed an alarming surge in emerging infectious diseases (EIDs). Since 1980, new pathogens have emerged in the human population at a rate of about three each year. Why are we seeing such a surge in new pathogens? One could argue that some of the pathogens may not be new at all; they could have circulated among humans for centuries and ar...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - February 1, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Canine Flu Has Dog Owners Wondering if Fido Needs a Vaccine
A vaccine is conditionally approved for H3N2, which showed up in 25 states. But veterinarians are not recommending the vaccine for every dog. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - December 12, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: JAN HOFFMAN Tags: Avian Influenza Veterinary Medicine Dogs Vaccination and Immunization Source Type: news

Dog Owners Wondering if Fido Needs a Flu Shot
A vaccine is conditionally approved for H3N2 canine flu, seen in 25 states. But veterinarians are not recommending the shot for every dog. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - December 12, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: JAN HOFFMAN Tags: Avian Influenza Veterinary Medicine Dogs Vaccination and Immunization Source Type: news

Scientists Hope Tracking Winter Flu Will Help Close Pandemic Knowledge Gap
ImageContent(562e45c2e4b0aac0b8fd7c69,562e42a91900002e00b94dab,Image,HectorAssetUrl(562e42a91900002e00b94dab,Some(),Some(jpeg)),ViktorCap via Getty Images,) Anyone who goes down with flu in Europe this winter could be asked to enroll in a randomized clinical trial in which they will either be given a drug, which may or may not work, or standard advice to take bed rest and paracetamol. Those who agree could be helping the world prepare for the next potentially deadly disease pandemic as well as helping scientists who are now desperate to plug gaps in knowledge left by previous missed opportunities. Scientists are largely in...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - October 26, 2015 Category: Science Source Type: news

USDA awards first manufacturing contracts for bird flu vaccine stockpile
CHICAGO (Reuters) - The U.S. Department of Agriculture on Tuesday said it has awarded contracts to two drug companies to manufacture doses of avian influenza vaccine for poultry, in preparation for the potential return of the fast-spreading avian influenza virus later this year. (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - October 13, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news

Bird Flu Vaccine Conditionally Approved, but Still Can’t Be Sold
The Agriculture Department gave Harrisvaccines a conditional license for a drug to protect chickens from a flu that killed 48 million birds this year. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - September 21, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: STEPHANIE STROM Tags: Agriculture Department Avian Influenza Harrisvaccines Inc Vaccination and Immunization Source Type: news

Get the flu vaccine, reduce your risk of death
Last year was a lousy year for the flu vaccine. Hospitalizations for flu hit a nine-year high, and the vaccine prevented flu in only 23% of all recipients, compared with 50% to 60% of recipients in prior years. Why does the flu vaccine work well in some winters and not others? The flu vaccine primes the immune system to attack two proteins on the surface of the influenza A virus, hemagglutinin (H) and neuraminidase (N). Different flu strains have different combinations of these proteins — for example, the strains targeted by recent flu vaccines are H3N2 and H1N1. Unfortunately, the influenza virus is microbiology’s ans...
Source: New Harvard Health Information - September 15, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: John Ross, MD, FIDSA Tags: Cold and Flu Vaccines Flu Shot flu vaccine Source Type: news