Engineering treatments for the opioid epidemic
(Washington University in St. Louis) A biomedical engineer at Washington University in St. Louis is developing a therapeutic option that would prevent opiates from crossing the blood-brain barrier, preventing the high abusers seek. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - March 14, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

UTSA BRAVe program grows research pipeline to help active and military vets
(University of Texas at San Antonio) The University of Texas at San Antonio (UTSA) will launch a new program aimed at boosting student engagement and retention. The Biomedical Engineering Research for Active military and Veterans (BRAVe) program will target undergraduate students, including those at two-year colleges or who haven't declared majors, and place them in a 10-week summer research lab program to work on projects including: regeneration of damaged tissue, non-invasive tissue recovery, and/or treating soldiers in the battlefield. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - March 12, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

In small groups, people follow high-performing leaders
(NYU Tandon School of Engineering) Researchers at the NYU Tandon School of Engineering have cracked the code on how leaders arise from small groups of people over time. The work is detailed in a study, 'Social information and Spontaneous Emergence of Leaders in Human Groups,' published in The Royal Society Interface. The team included Maurizio Porfiri, professor of mechanical and aerospace engineering and of biomedical engineering at NYU Tandon and Shinnosuke Nakayama, postdoctoral researcher at NYU Tandon. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - February 21, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Leadership in biomedical engineering
(University of Delaware) Dawn Elliott, chair of the Department of Biomedical Engineering at the University of Delaware, has been recognized as the inaugural recipient of the Orthopaedic Research Society's Adele L. Boskey, PhD Award. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 21, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Research immerses HBCU undergrads in biomedical engineering
Center for Biomechanical & Rehabilitation Engineering lab inspires STEM careers by focusing students on helping the elderly Full story at https://www.nsf.gov/news/special_reports/science_nation/engineeringdiversity.jsp?WT.mc_id=USNSF_51 This is an NSF News item. (Source: NSF News)
Source: NSF News - February 11, 2019 Category: Science Source Type: news

Here ’s Why You Always Feel Sicker at Night
Whether you’re dealing with the common cold, the flu or a stomach bug, you’ve probably noticed that your symptoms feel worse at night. You’re not imagining things. Research suggests that your body’s circadian rhythms—as well as some other factors—can exacerbate your symptoms after sundown. Along with regulating your sleep, your body’s circadian clocks help manage your immune system, says Michael Smolensky, a biological rhythm researcher and adjunct professor of biomedical engineering at the University of Texas. “When the immune system is activated”—like when you&r...
Source: TIME: Health - February 6, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Markham Heid Tags: Uncategorized Research Source Type: news

A New Way to Model the Heart Valve
The mitral valve repair space just got a little less complicated due to research from a team of engineers from The University of Texas at Austin. The group has developed a new noninvasive technique for simulating repairs to the mitral valve, which they say has levels of accuracy reliable enough for use in a clinical setting. The approach involves the use of computational modeling technology that could allow surgeons to provide patient-specific treatments. The engineers outlined their computational modeling technique for imaging mitral valve leaflets in recent issues of the International Journal for Numerical Methods in Bio...
Source: MDDI - February 1, 2019 Category: Medical Devices Authors: MDDI Staff Tags: Cardiovascular Source Type: news

New Imaging Tool Gives Greater View of Capillaries
A research team from Northwestern University team has developed a new tool that can image blood flow through capillaries. The 3D imaging process, called spectral contrast optical coherence tomography angiography (SC-OCTA), can help lead to the early diagnosis of disease. Research regarding the imaging technique was recently published in the journal Light: Science and Applications. A panel titled Fostering Innovation with Medical Robotics will be held at MD&M West on Feb. 5 in Anaheim, CA.  "There has been a progressive push to image smaller and smaller blood vessels and provide more comprehensive, func...
Source: MDDI - January 28, 2019 Category: Medical Devices Authors: MDDI Staff Tags: Imaging Cardiovascular Source Type: news

2019 Bernard M. Gordon Prize awarded to Georgia Tech and Emory University educators
(National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine) The National Academy of Engineering announced today that the 2019 Bernard M. Gordon Prize for Innovation in Engineering and Technology Education will be awarded to Wendy Newstetter, Joseph Le Doux, and Paul Benkeser from the Wallace H. Coulter Department of Biomedical Engineering at Georgia Institute of Technology and Emory University, " for fusing problem-driven engineering education with learning-science principles to create a pioneering program that develops leaders in biomedical engineering. " (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - January 9, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

2019 Bernard M. Gordon Prize for Innovation in Engineering and Technology Education Awarded to Georgia Tech and Emory University Educators
The National Academy of Engineering announced today that the 2019 Bernard M. Gordon Prize for Innovation in Engineering and Technology Education will be awarded to Wendy Newstetter, Joseph Le Doux, and Paul Benkeser from the Wallace H. Coulter Department of Biomedical Engineering at Georgia Institute of Technology and Emory University"for fusing problem-driven engineering education with learning-science principles to create a pioneering program that develops leaders in biomedical engineering." The $500,000 annual award recognizes new methods and concepts in education aimed at developing engineering leaders. Read ...
Source: News from the National Academies - January 8, 2019 Category: Science Source Type: news

Stanford Researchers Create a Wireless, Battery-Free, Biodegradable Blood Flow Sensor
A new device developed by Stanford University researchers could make it easier for doctors to monitor the success of blood vessel surgery. The sensor, detailed in a paper published Jan. 8 in Nature Biomedical Engineering, monitors the flow of blood through an artery. It is biodegradable, battery-free and wireless, so it is compact and doesn't need to be removed and it can warn a patient's doctor if there is a blockage. (Source: eHealth News EU)
Source: eHealth News EU - January 8, 2019 Category: Information Technology Tags: Featured Research Research and Development Source Type: news

Artificial Intelligence Can Detect, Classify Acute Brain Bleeds
THURSDAY, Jan. 3, 2019 -- An artificial intelligence system can diagnose and classify intracranial hemorrhage (ICH), according to a study published online Dec. 17 in Nature Biomedical Engineering. Hyunkwang Lee, from Massachusetts General Hospital... (Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News)
Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News - January 3, 2019 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Medtronic founder Earl Bakken knew how to inspire his employees
Medtronic founder Earl Bakken loved teaching and meeting patients. He died in October 2018. Earl Bakken made history when he invented the battery-powered, wearable cardiac pacemaker in a Minneapolis garage in 1957. But three years later, the company he co-founded was floundering and desperately needed cash. To show the board of directors that the $200,000 they had raised would be put to good use, Bakken wrote a mission statement for the company. Nearly 60 years later, that mission statement continues to guide Medtronic and inspire its 86,000 employees. Each receives a medallion that encapsulates the mission state...
Source: Mass Device - December 21, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Nancy Crotti Tags: Bioelectronic Medicine Blog Business/Financial News Cardiac Assist Devices News Well Medtronic universityofminnesota Source Type: news

Elegant trick improves single-cell RNA sequencing
(Cornell University) Researchers at Cornell -- led by Iwijn De Vlaminck, assistant professor in the Meinig School of Biomedical Engineering -- have come up with an elegant, low-cost method that solves that problem. And not only does it push single-cell genomics forward, it may allow for new avenues for studies of infection and immune biology. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - December 20, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Edging closer to personalized medicine for patients with irregular heartbeat
(Washington University in St. Louis) Biomedical engineer Jon Silva led an international team that determined which patients would benefit the most from a commonly used drug treatment. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - December 19, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

GW professor elected to National Academy of Inventors
(George Washington University) Igor Efimov, the Alisann and Terry Collins Professor of Biomedical Engineering at the George Washington University, will be inducted into the National Academy of Inventors next spring, a prestigious distinction for leaders in academic innovation. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - December 13, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

How One Engineer & #039;s Blood Disorder Enabled the Development of an Anemia Detection App
Every month from the time he was six months old, Rob Mannino has had to go into a clinic to receive a blood transfusion. Mannino has an inherited blood disorder known as beta-thalassemia, which is caused by a mutation in the beta-globin gene. “My doctors would test my hemoglobin levels more if they could, but it’s a hassle for me to get to the hospital in between transfusions to receive this blood test. Instead, my doctors currently have to just estimate when I’m going to need a transfusion, based on my hemoglobin level trends," Mannino said. For his biomedical eng...
Source: MDDI - December 12, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Amanda Pedersen Tags: Digital Health Source Type: news

Neurodegenerative disease research at UT gets financial boost thanks to Facebook founder
(University of Texas at Austin) UT Austin Biomedical Engineer Jenny Jiang has been awarded a $2.5 million grant from the Chan Zuckerberg Initiative. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - December 6, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Investigative Report Casts a Troubling Light on the Medical Device Industry
The consumer media has not been kind to the medical device industry this year. A consortium of journalists released an investigative report on the industry over the weekend that blames poorly regulated medical devices for millions of patient injuries and thousands of deaths. The report, which is based on a year-long investigation by the International Consortium of Investigative Journalists (ICIJ), is the latest in a series of scathing reviews that have highlighted the darker side of medtech. According to the ICIJ report, more than 1.7 million injuries and nearly 83,000 deaths linked to medical devices have been...
Source: MDDI - November 27, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Amanda Pedersen Tags: Business Regulatory and Compliance Source Type: news

FDA Eyes Changes to 510(k) Program
FDA wants to modernize the 510(k) clearance pathway, which was adopted in 1976 and now accounts for the majority of medical devices the agency reviews. The agency said it is pursuing changes to the program in an effort to help keep pace with the increasing complexities of evolving medical technology. It's important to note that the Center for Devices and Radiological Health (CDRH) cleared 3,173 medical devices through the 510(k) pathway in 2017, representing 82% of the total devices cleared or approved by FDA. "The new technology that we’re seeing holds tremendous public health promise fo...
Source: MDDI - November 26, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Amanda Pedersen Tags: Regulatory and Compliance Business Source Type: news

Repetitive Hits May Predispose Athletes to Concussion
TUESDAY, Nov. 13, 2018 -- Repetitive head impact exposure appears to be a predisposing factor for the onset of concussion, according to a study published online Oct. 22 in the Annals of Biomedical Engineering. Brian D. Stemper, Ph.D., from the... (Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News)
Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News - November 13, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Understanding congenital heart defects to prevent them
(University of Houston) Cardiovascular failures are the leading cause of birth defect-related deaths in infants. To understand why congenital heart defects form, a University of Houston biomedical engineer is watching hearts develop with optical equipment. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 13, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

How Are Engineers Actually Using VR for Human Factors Review?
We've been hearing for some time now that virtual and augmented reality technologies are poised to revolutionize medtech, but can a VR system actually help R&D teams develop a medical device? It absolutely can, according to engineers at Cincinnati, OH-based Kaleidoscope Innovation. "When we've got a team that's maybe across the country or across the world, we can get in here and actually be in the same room virtually around the same product," Ben Ko, a biomedical engineer at Kaleidoscope, told MD&M Minneapolis attendees on Wednesday. Ko's colleague Jerry Sch...
Source: MDDI - October 31, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Amanda Pedersen Tags: MD & M Minneapolis R Source Type: news

Two-cells-in-one combo could be platform to bolster leukemia treatment
Researchers led by a UCLA bioengineer have developed a therapy — based on two types of cells joined into a single unit — that could help strengthen existing treatments for acute myeloid leukemia. One of the cells is a blood platelet that carries a drug that attacks cancer cells; the other is a stem cell that guides the platelet into bone marrow, the spongy tissue inside bone where new blood cells are made and where leukemia begins. The researchers found that when injected into mice that had acute myeloid leukemia, the combination therapy halted the disease from developing any further. Of the mice that rece...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - October 29, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Medtech Mourns the Loss of Earl Bakken: Visionary, Humanist, Pioneer
Thousands of patients, clinicians, and medtech colleagues took to Twitter on Monday to honor the legacy of Earl Bakken. The co-founder of Medtronic and inventor of the first wearable external pacemaker, Bakken died Sunday in Hawaii at age 94. “All of us at Medtronic are saddened today by the news of Earl’s passing,” said Omar Ishrak, chairman and CEO of Medtronic. “Earl was a true pioneer in healthcare and his vision of using technology to help people still inspires us today. We are privileged to continue the work that he started over 60 ye...
Source: MDDI - October 23, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Amanda Pedersen Tags: Business Source Type: news

This 13-Year-Old ’s Tool Could Change Pancreatic Cancer Treatment
An Oregon teenager’s innovation could change the way doctors treat pancreatic cancer, a deadly form of the disease that has just a 7% five-year survival rate. Rishab Jain, a 13-year-old from Stoller Middle School in Portland, on Tuesday won the Discovery Education 3M Young Scientist Challenge with an algorithm that uses machine learning to help doctors zero in on the pancreas during cancer treatment. Doing so can be difficult, since the pancreas is often obscured by other organs, and since breathing and other bodily processes can cause it to move around the abdominal area. As a result, doctors sometimes need to deplo...
Source: TIME: Health - October 19, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized Cancer healthytime onetime Source Type: news

The fine print
(University of Utah) University of Utah biomedical engineering assistant professor Robby Bowles and his team have developed a method to 3D print cells to produce human tissue such as ligaments and tendons to greatly improve a patient's recovery. A person with a badly damaged ligament, tendon, or ruptured disc could simply have new replacement tissue printed and ultimately implanted in the damaged area. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - October 10, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Latest research hints at predicting autism risk for pregnant mothers
(Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute) Researchers at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute--led by Juergen Hahn, professor and head of biomedical engineering--are continuing to make remarkable progress with their research focused on autism spectrum disorder (ASD). (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 21, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Trimedx picks up Aramark ’ s healthcare technologies business
Aramark (NYSE: ARMK) is quitting the healthcare technologies business, announcing today that it has agreed to sell that part of its business for $300 million to clinical engineering and asset management company Trimedx. Best known for its food service, uniform and facilities businesses, Aramark bought the Charlotte, N.C.-based healthcare business in 2001. It has been in operation for over 45 years and employs more than 1,500 technicians, engineers and program staff. Trimedx provides management programs for for maintenance and refurbishment of clinical equipment at more than 500 hospitals and healthcare facilities. “T...
Source: Mass Device - September 17, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Nancy Crotti Tags: Blog Business/Financial News Wall Street Beat aramark trimedx Source Type: news

Watching an embryo's neural tube close
(University of Houston) A University of Houston biomedical engineer is tackling birth defects by creating new technology to peer into the neural tube of developing embryos, to solve the mystery of why some tubes close and others -- destined for trouble -- don't. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 4, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Artificial cells are tiny bacteria fighters
(University of California - Davis) Artificial cells that can kill bacteria have been created by researchers at the UC Davis Department of Biomedical Engineering. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - August 31, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Here & #039;s What MD+DI Readers Said About The Bleeding Edge
As part of MD+DI's coverage last week of the Netflix documentary, The Bleeding Edge, we asked readers for feedback on the film and its assessment of the medical device industry. A total of 62 respondents took the three-question survey.  1. The Bleeding Edge claims that FDA's 510(k) process, reportedly the most popular way medical devices reach the U.S. market, doesn’t require the submission of as much safety data as does the premarket approval (PMA) process. Do you believe this is a fair depiction? Of the 62 respondents who answered this question, 48 (77.42%) said yes, and just 14 ...
Source: MDDI - August 27, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: MDDI Staff Tags: Regulatory and Compliance Source Type: news

Assistive surgical devices shine in DEBUT biomedical engineering design competition
NIH and VentureWell award five undergraduate teams for innovative devices that improve medical procedures. (Source: National Institutes of Health (NIH) News Releases)
Source: National Institutes of Health (NIH) News Releases - August 24, 2018 Category: American Health Source Type: news

Stool proteins to predict inflammatory bowel disease
(University of Houston) A University of Houston biomedical engineer is looking for new biomarkers to predict and monitor inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). With $347,490 from the Crohn's& Colitis Foundation of America, Chandra Mohan says protein biomarkers that show up in stools could indicate the disease and make examination and treatment quicker and less invasive. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - August 20, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Lessons learned: How Jeff Karp stays at the forefront of innovation
Serial entrepreneur Jeff Karp has a philosophy for his laboratory: find important problems and get solutions to people quickly. To learn about the exciting technologies emerging from Karp’s lab, join us at DeviceTalks Boston on Oct. 8-10. After Jeff finished his PhD in chemical and biomedical engineering at the University of Toronto, he knew he wanted to work with Robert Langer. “He’s the intergalactic translational superstar,” Karp said. Langer, a professor at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and one of the most cited engineers of all time, receives thousands of applications per year ...
Source: Mass Device - August 16, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Sarah Faulkner Tags: Drug-Device Combinations Pharmaceuticals Research & Development DeviceTalks Boston Frequency Therapeutics Source Type: news

New Thinking Informs Soft-Material 3D Printing
As 3D printing evolves, researchers have gone beyond mere fabrication processes to developing techniques for optimizing how particular materials can be printed. To that end, researchers at Carnegie Mellon University’s College of Engineering have developed a new approach to optimizing the 3D printing of soft materials. This approach combines expert judgment with an algorithm designed to search parameter combinations relevant for 3D printing, they said. Images of 3D prints made using a new method developed by researchers at Carnegie Mellon. Their approach combines expertise with an algorithm an...
Source: MDDI - August 8, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Tags: Design News Source Type: news

Tackling drug delivery challenges with TissueGen ’s implantable fibers
TissueGen‘s chief scientist and co-founder, Kevin Nelson, told Drug Delivery Business News the story behind the company he founded in 2000 and its drug delivery technology, the Elute fiber.  DDBN: How did TissueGen get its start? Nelson: In 1996, while faculty in biomedical engineering at The University of Texas at Arlington, I was working with Dr. Robert Eberhart at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas.  Together, we collaborated with a team to develop a biodegradable vascular stent that had the potential to deliver a live virus to the arterial wall. Simultaneously, I was working w...
Source: Mass Device - August 2, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Sarah Faulkner Tags: Drug-Device Combinations Implants Pharmaceuticals TissueGen Source Type: news

Women and lupus -- Tackling the debilitating connection
(University of Houston) The chronic inflammatory disease, lupus, is about nine times more common in women than men, and now one of the leading lupus researchers in the world, UH biomedical engineering professor Chandra Mohan, has been awarded $2 million to find out why. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 31, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Enrico Gratton to receive 2019 BPS Avanti Award in Lipids
(Biophysical Society) The Biophysical Society (BPS) has named Enrico Gratton, Professor, Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of California, Irvine, as its 2019 Avanti Award in Lipids winner. Gratton will be honored at the Society's 63rd Annual Meeting at the Baltimore Convention Center on March 5, 2019, during the annual Awards Symposium. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - July 30, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

This engineered heart ventricle helps with studying arrhythmia and cardiomyopathy
[Luke MacQueen and Michael Rosnach/Harvard University]While engineered heart tissues can replicate muscle contraction and electrical activity in a dish, many aspects of heart disease can only adequately be captured in 3D. In a report published online yesterday by Nature Biomedical Engineering, researchers describe a scale model of a heart ventricle, built to replicate the chamber’s architecture, physiology and contractions. Cardiac researchers at Boston Children’s Hospital think it could help them find treatments for congenital heart diseases. Building a 3D engineered heart ventricle Collaborators from the Harv...
Source: Mass Device - July 26, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Danielle Kirsh Tags: Blog Vector Blog Source Type: news

Leading experts in diabetes, metabolism and biomedical engineering discuss precision medicine
(Helmholtz Zentrum M ü nchen - German Research Center for Environmental Health) New technologies enable deeper insights into the causes of major diseases such as diabetes, obesity or cancer and open the way to a new generation of diagnostics and therapies. For the first time, the new Helmholtz Pioneer Campus (HPC) at Helmholtz Zentrum M ü nchen and the German Center for Diabetes Research (DZD) have invited bioengineers, diabetes researchers and scientists from related therapeutic areas to the International Conference on Engineering Biomedical Breakthroughs on the island of San Servolo in the Venice Lagoon. (Sourc...
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 12, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Breast implant makers Polytech, G & G ink stock-swap merger pact
Silicone breast-implant makers Polytech Health & Aesthetics and G&G Biotechnology are getting together in a stock-swap merger. G&G designed the world’s first lightweight breast implant, the B-Lite, to reduce the impact of gravity on the reconstructed or augmented breast using technology developed by NASA to make its implants up to 30% lighter. The company sells its products in more than 30 countries, not including the U.S. Plastic surgeon Dr. Jacky Govrin and his brother, biomedical engineer Dael Govreen-Segal, founded G&G in Haifa in 2005. Polytech, which makes 2,000 varieties...
Source: Mass Device - July 9, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Nancy Crotti Tags: Blog Business/Financial News Implants Mergers & Acquisitions G&G Biotechnology Polytech Health & Aesthetics Source Type: news

The NHS needs a new breed of innovator for the information age | Kevin Fong
Technology is never going to replace doctors - or make healthcare cheaper. But data and artificial intelligence are the futureFrom vaccines and antibiotics tomemory metal stents that widen narrowed arteries and algorithms that process radiological images and let us see the earliest signs of disease,innovation has been saving lives since the inception of theNational Health Service 70 years ago. It is this blend of new molecules, materials science and biomedical engineering, in partnership with digital systems, that will continue to transform our expectations of life and survival in the 21st century.While the digital revolut...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - July 6, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Kevin Fong Tags: NHS Technology Health Medical research Science Society UK news Source Type: news

Abbott launches program to offset employee student loan debt
Abbott (NYSE:ABT) said today it is launching a program to aid its employees with paying off their student loans. The new program, labeled the Freedom 2 Save program, will allow certain employees to receive matched deposits into savings program to match contributions meant to offset student loan debt. “We see our young professionals coming to us with a problem: Student loan debt payments keep them from setting aside the money they’d like to put in savings for retirement. With every decade you wait to start saving for retirement, the amount you need to save roughly doubles. This plan will give participa...
Source: Mass Device - June 26, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Fink Densford Tags: Business/Financial News Abbott Source Type: news

Texas A & M research opens doors to expanded DNA studies
(Texas A&M University) Dr. Wonmuk Hwang, associate professor in the Department of Biomedical Engineering at Texas A&M University, is researching the mechanics of DNA, the blueprint of the human body. Hwang and his former doctoral student, Dr. Xiaojing Teng, zoomed into the question: if the genetic information is the same in all cells, as it should be, why do muscle cells look and act differently than skin cells? (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - June 26, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

The seed that could bring clean water to millions
(College of Engineering, Carnegie Mellon University) Carnegie Mellon University's Biomedical Engineering and Chemical Engineering Professors Bob Tilton and Todd Przybycien recently co-authored a paper with Ph.D. students Brittany Nordmark and Toni Bechtel, and alumnus John Riley, further refining a process that could soon help provide clean water to many in water-scarce regions. The process, created by Tilton's former student and co-author Stephanie Velegol, uses sand and plant materials readily available in many developing nations. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 20, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

UH scientist working toward a glaucoma cure
(University of Houston) With $765,000 from the National Institutes of Health, University of Houston College of Optometry biomedical engineer Vijaykrishna Raghunathan is working towards a pharmaceutical cure for the irreversible disease Glaucoma. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 19, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Have Johns Hopkins Biomedical Engineering Students Solved The Nuisance Of Nasal Congestion?
A team of five biomedical engineering undergraduates at John Hopkins University (JHU) plan to manufacture and sell a device that they say would achieve the same effect as nasal reconstructive surgery for sufferers of chronic nasal obstruction - a condition that affects tens of millions of Americans. (Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News)
Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News - June 19, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Robin Seaton Jefferson, Contributor Source Type: news

Researchers deliver cardiac stem cell therapy in preclinical trial using refillable patch
Researchers have developed a small device designed to halt the effects of a heart attack by delivering a stem cell therapy directly to damaged cardiac tissue. In a study published in Nature Biomedical Engineering, researchers from Harvard University, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, the National University of Ireland Galway and Trinity College Dublin reported that the device improved heart function in rats that received multiple doses of the stem cell therapy over the course of four weeks. Get the full story at our sister site, Drug Delivery Business News. The post Researchers deliver cardiac stem cell thera...
Source: Mass Device - June 11, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Sarah Faulkner Tags: Cardiovascular Drug-Device Combinations Pharmaceuticals Research & Development Harvard University Massachusetts Institute of Technology Source Type: news

Biomedical optics engineer Jesse Wilson named a Boettcher Investigator
(Colorado State University) Mitochondrial diseases are devastating illnesses caused by defects in cellular organelles called mitochondria. Their cells starved of energy, most stricken children die by age 12. There is no cure, and diagnosis can take months.Colorado State University biomedical engineer Jesse Wilson wants to change all of that. The assistant professor of electrical and computer engineering is proposing a radical new imaging technology that could diagnose mitochondrial defects in an instant. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 7, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news