Lensless on-chip microscopy platform shows slides in full view
(University of Connecticut) Guoan Zheng, a University of Connecticut professor of biomedical engineering, recently published his findings on a successful demonstration of a lensless on-chip microscopy platform that eliminates several of the most common problems with conventional optical microscopy and provides a low-cost option for the diagnosis of disease. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 19, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Best Bargain Schools for Biomedical Engineering
(Source: MDDI)
Source: MDDI - February 14, 2020 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Amanda Pedersen Tags: R & D Source Type: news

Laura E. Niklason elected to the National Academy of Engineering
Niklason, the Nicholas Greene Professor of Anesthesiology and professor of biomedical engineering, is among 87 new members elected to the academy. (Source: Yale Science and Health News)
Source: Yale Science and Health News - February 13, 2020 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

UConn biomedical engineer creates 'smart' bandages to heal chronic wounds
(University of Connecticut) A new 'smart bandage' developed at UConn could help improve clinical care for people with chronic wounds. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 13, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Blood glucose levels may be managed using smart insulin patch
According to a study published inNature Biomedical Engineering, a smart insulin patch that monitors blood glucose levels may be able to effectively deliver insulin to people with diabetes.Medical Dialogues (Source: Society for Endocrinology)
Source: Society for Endocrinology - February 6, 2020 Category: Endocrinology Source Type: news

Researchers successfully test coin-sized smart insulin patch, potential diabetes treatment
(University of North Carolina Health Care) The study, published in Nature Biomedical Engineering, describes research conducted on mice and pigs. The research team, led by Zhen Gu, Ph.D., professor of bioengineering at the UCLA Samueli School of Engineering, is applying for FDA approval of clinical trials in humans. Gu and colleagues conducted the initial successful tests of the smart insulin patch in mice in 2015 as part of the UNC/NC State Joint Department of Biomedical Engineering. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 4, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Research Security: Scientists Arrested as Government Increases Efforts to Protect US Security Interests
Concerns about and oversight of foreign influence on research and espionage have been rising since 2018. In an August 2018 letter to more than 10,000 research institutions, NIH urged grant applicants and awardees to properly disclose all forms of support and financial interests and launched investigations into NIH-funded investigators who failed to properly disclose foreign financial support. Following this, an April 2019 editorial in BioScience alerted readers that investigations into foreign ties of researchers will likely spread to other agencies and need to be taken seriously. Lawmakers have also made enquiries about t...
Source: Public Policy Reports - February 4, 2020 Category: Biology Authors: AIBS Source Type: news

Meet the Brilliant Minds Behind the First ICD
Mirowski: From WWII to Sinai Hospital The story of how Mieczyslaw "Michel" Mirowski ended up in America where he conceived the idea of an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) is almost as incredible as the invention itself, if not more so. Mirowski was born in Warsaw, Poland in 1924. He grew up among the large Jewish population of Warsaw at that time, but when the Nazis invaded Poland in 1939, 15-year-old Mirowski left his family and fled to Russia with a friend. He would be the only member of his family to survive World War II, according to a 2010Â&nb...
Source: MDDI - February 3, 2020 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Amanda Pedersen Tags: Implants Source Type: news

Study provides the first data on concussion risk in youth football
(Virginia Tech) 'These are the first biomechanical data characterizing concussion risk in kids,' said Steve Rowson, an associate professor of biomedical engineering and mechanics and the director of the Virginia Tech Helmet Lab. 'Children aren't just scaled-down adults: Differences in anatomy and physiology, like head-neck proportions and brain development, contribute to differences in tolerance to head impact. These results can lead to data-driven interventions to reduce risk in youth sports.' (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - January 21, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Improving accessibility for people with disabilities: a case study on inclusive beach tourism - Mayordomo-Martinez D, Sanchez-Aarnoutse JC, Merzoukid K, Garcia-Hernandez M, Carrillo-de-Gea JM, Garcia-Berna JA, Fernandez-Aleman JL, Idri A, Garcia-Mateos G.
Disability is an important area in biomedical engineering. But research on disability should not only focus on the healthcare aspects, but also on the integration of people with disabilities in the cultural and social contexts, such as the existence of arc... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - January 20, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Ergonomics, Human Factors, Anthropometrics, Physiology Source Type: news

Blood stem cell research
(University of Delaware) A nanoparticle carrier system that could eliminate the need for bone marrow transplants, which are both expensive and difficult for patients to undergo. The University of Delaware's Emily Day, an assistant professor of biomedical engineering, is developing a platform that could treat stem cells directly without the need to remove them from the body. Her work has been recognized with an award from the University City Science Center. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 15, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Google ’s AI Bested Doctors in Detecting Breast Cancer in Mammograms
While there has been controversy over when and how often women should be screened for breast cancer using mammograms, studies consistently show that screening can lead to earlier detection of the disease, when it’s more treatable. So improving how effectively mammograms can detect abnormal growths that could be cancerous is a priority in the field. AI could play a role in accomplishing that—computer-based machine learning might help doctors to read mammograms more accurately. In a study published Jan. 1 in Nature, researchers from Google Health, and from universities in the U.S. and U.K., report on an AI model ...
Source: TIME: Health - January 1, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alice Park Tags: Uncategorized Artifical Intelligence Breast Cancer embargoed study MSFTAI2019 Source Type: news

Real-time photoacoustic thermometry of tumors during HIFU treatment in living subjects
(Pohang University of Science& Technology (POSTECH)) The research team led by Professor Chulhong Kim of POSTECH(Pohang University of Science and Technology) developed a photoacoustic thermometry system combined with a clinical ultrasound imaging platform to effectively guide the high intensity focused ultrasound treatment. Their research is published in IEEE Transactions on Biomedical Engineering and selected as a feature article and the front cover of the issue. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - December 11, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Scientists show thin metal mesh loaded with T cells shrinks solid tumors
(Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center) Within weeks, CAR T cells targeting ovarian cancer cleared tumors in 70% of treated mice, shows study in Nature Biomedical Engineering. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - December 9, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Dartmouth Engineering professor named NAI Fellow
(Thayer School of Engineering at Dartmouth) Keith Paulsen, the Robert A. Pritzker Professor of Biomedical Engineering at Dartmouth College, has been named a fellow of the National Academy of Inventors (NAI). (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - December 3, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Cancer research that's out-of-this-world
(University of Technology Sydney) University of Technology (UTS) researcher Dr. Joshua Chou is looking to replicate the promising results of experiments he has carried out on cancer cells in the zero gravity chamber built by his team in the UTS School of Biomedical Engineering. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - November 26, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

How an AI Solution can Design New Tuberculosis Drug Regimens
With a shortage of new tuberculosis drugs in the pipeline, a software tool from the University of Michigan can predict how current drugs - including unlikely candidates - can be combined in new ways to create more effective treatments. "This could replace our traditional trial-and-error system for drug development that is comparatively slow and expensive," said Sriram Chandrasekaran, U-M assistant professor of biomedical engineering, who leads the research. (Source: eHealth News EU)
Source: eHealth News EU - November 25, 2019 Category: Information Technology Tags: Featured Research Research and Development Source Type: news

New blood for healthcare technology innovation
The potential for new advances drawing on medical physics and biomedical engineering is vast. Cross-disciplinary expertise is needed to unlock it for the benefit of society and industry, say the partners in an EU-funded network that is helping 15 young researchers to hone the required skills. (Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre)
Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre - November 25, 2019 Category: Research Source Type: news

Nanotechnology could be the answer for condition which affects 10 million women
(University of South Australia) University of South Australia biomedical engineer Dr Marnie Winter has been awarded US$100,000 from the world's largest private foundation to help better understand and tackle a condition which kills 76,000 women and 500,000 babies each year. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - November 24, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Personalities of Pittsburgh: Dr. Srinivas Murali, Allegheny Health Network
Murali is the system director and medical director of the Allegheny Health Network Cardiovascular Institute, and he's also a professor of medicine at Drexel University College of Medicine and the Lewis Katz School of Medicine at Temple University, and an adjunct professor of biomedical engineering at Carnegie Mellon University. (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - November 18, 2019 Category: Biotechnology Authors: Paul J. Gough Source Type: news

NJIT biomedical engineer Tara Alvarez is a fellow of the American Academy of Optometry
(New Jersey Institute of Technology) Tara Alvarez, a professor of biomedical engineering who studies the links between visual disorders and the brain and develops novel devices to identify and treat them, has been named a fellow of the American Academy of Optometry (AAO). (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 13, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Carbon dots make calcium easier to track
(Chinese Academy of Sciences Headquarters) Prof. DONG Wenfei's research group from the Suzhou Institute of Biomedical Engineering and Technology (SIBET) has developed a new type of fluorescent carbon dot that can effectively detect calcium levels in cells. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - November 12, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

12 Innovations That Will Change Health Care and Medicine in the 2020s
Pocket-size ultrasound devices that cost 50 times less than the machines in hospitals (and connect to your phone). Virtual reality that speeds healing in rehab. Artificial intelligence that’s better than medical experts at spotting lung tumors. These are just some of the innovations now transforming medicine at a remarkable pace. No one can predict the future, but it can at least be glimpsed in the dozen inventions and concepts below. Like the people behind them, they stand at the vanguard of health care. Neither exhaustive nor exclusive, the list is, rather, representative of the recasting of public health and medic...
Source: TIME: Health - October 25, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: TIME Staff Tags: Uncategorized HealthSummit19 technology Source Type: news

Rochester Researchers Receive $12 Million Award to Visualize the Immune System in Action
Experts in immunology, vaccine biology, biomedical engineering, optics and physics will use cutting-edge imaging technologies to watch the immune system work in real time and explore ways to better fight infections like the flu. (Source: University of Rochester Medical Center Press Releases)
Source: University of Rochester Medical Center Press Releases - October 17, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Authors: University of Rochester Medical Center Source Type: news

IEEE International Conference on e-Health and Bioengineering EHB 2019
21 - 23 November 2019, Iasi, Romania. The 7-th edition of the International Conference on e-Health and Bioengineering (EHB 2019) will take place in the city of Iasi, Romania. This year the conference motto is "Smarter technology for a better health" while the sub-domains and topics of medical bioengineering and biomedical engineering represent fundamental pillars for the reinforcement of medical research and of health care. (Source: eHealth News EU)
Source: eHealth News EU - September 30, 2019 Category: Information Technology Tags: Featured Events Source Type: news

Soft, Stretchable Health Monitor Eyed for Long-Term Use
One of the key challenges researchers aim to overcome with wearable technology to is to make it more comfortable for the user while still being able to perform and transmit data effectively. A team at the Georgia Institute of Technology (Georgia Tech) has made strides in this area with the development of a wireless, stretchable device they said allows for long-term health monitoring without creating discomfort for users, particularly allergic reactions or injuries that are associated with conventional adhesive sensors that use conductive gels. A wireless, wearable monitor built with stretchable electronics could allow com...
Source: MDDI - September 5, 2019 Category: Medical Devices Tags: Design News Source Type: news

Machine Learning and VR Are Driving Prosthetics Research
Fitting a patient for a prosthetic limb is normally a painstaking and time-consuming process. In some cases, trying to determine how capable a patient may be of operating a prosthetic limb even before fitting one has also been a problem. However, using virtual reality and reinforcement learning, researchers in North Carolina and Arizona are revealing new technologies and techniques to make prosthetic fitting more convenient for both patients and clinicians: In Charlotte, surgeons at OrthoCarolina used VR to demonstrate that patients born without hands had inborn abilities to control prosthetic hands without prerequisite ta...
Source: MDDI - September 3, 2019 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Greg Goth Tags: Digital Health Source Type: news

Improved intubation tool wins top prize in undergraduate biomedical engineering design competition
NIH and VentureWell award teams who develop real solutions to real problems. (Source: National Institutes of Health (NIH) News Releases)
Source: National Institutes of Health (NIH) News Releases - August 27, 2019 Category: American Health Source Type: news

Is Software the & #039;Weak Link & #039; in Medical Device Safety?
Software is a weak link for medical devices, according to Stericycle Expert Solutions' second-quarter recall index. The report found software issues to be the top cause of medical device recalls for the 13th straight quarter . "As we become increasingly reliant on AI and data collection, software becomes an even bigger vulnerability for patients, physicians, and wrongdoers," said Chris Harvey, director of recall solutions at Stericycle. "If the software that is used to operate a device is inadequate, how can we be sure that it is protected from cybersecurity vulnerabilities? Add to th...
Source: MDDI - August 14, 2019 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Amanda Pedersen Tags: Regulatory and Compliance Source Type: news

Nanocapsule reaches cancer that has spread to central nervous system in mice
FINDINGSCancer that has spread to the central nervous system is notoriously difficult to treat. Now, UCLA researchers have developed a drug delivery system that breaks through the blood-brain barrier in order to reach and treat cancer that has spread to the central nervous system.In research conducted in mice, a single dose of cancer drugs in a nanoscale capsule developed by the scientists eliminated all B-cell lymphoma that had metastasized to the animals ’ central nervous system.BACKGROUNDAbout 15% to 40% of all cancers spread to the nervous system, but there are few treatment options and they only work in a small ...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - August 14, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Tiny Implant Can Control Neural Circuits in the Brain via Smartphone
A tiny implant developed by researchers in the U.S. and Korea can control neural circuits in the brain. Researchers from the Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST) and the University of Washington in Seattle, publishing in Nature Biomedical Engineering, said they believe the device, which is controlled by a smartphone can speed up efforts to uncover brain diseases such as Parkinson's, Alzheimer's, addiction, depression, and pain. The device, using Lego-like replaceable drug cartridges and powerful Bluetooth low-energy, can target specific neurons of interest using drug and light for prolonged periods. &...
Source: MDDI - August 8, 2019 Category: Medical Devices Authors: MDDI Staff Tags: Implants R & D Source Type: news

The Future of (Digital) Surgery
Conclusion At first glance, the future prospects for the hospital industry’s surgery business look promising. Profit margins for most procedure lines remain solid, and an aging population will fuel growth in a broad array of surgical interventions. However, demographic trends are not the sole driver of surgery volumes—technological and competitive forces will also exert a significant influence on the future course of surgery. On the technology front, advances in biomedical engineering will create new surgical interventions while rendering existing surgical procedures obsolete. Technologi...
Source: MDDI - August 2, 2019 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Partha S. Anbil, Michael T. Ricci, and Stephanie Sarofian Tags: Digital Health Source Type: news

UMass Amherst scientist awarded American Cancer Society Grant for immunotherapy study
(University of Massachusetts at Amherst) Biomedical engineer Ashish Kulkarni, assistant professor of chemical engineering at the University of Massachusetts Amherst, has been awarded a 4-year, $792,000 grant from the American Cancer Society to advance his interdisciplinary lab's promising cancer immunotherapy research. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - July 15, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Why Cybersecurity Threats in Medtech are Really Scary
Due to cybersecurity vulnerabilities identified in Medtronic's MiniMed 508 and MiniMed Paradigm insulin pumps, a hacker could potentially connect wirelessly to a nearby device and change the pump's settings, FDA said on Friday. This could allow a person to over deliver insulin to the patient, leading to low blood sugar, or to stop insulin delivery, leading to high blood sugar and a buildup of acids in the blood. To be clear, there have not been any confirmed reports of patient harm related to these risks, but it's scary to think about the possible fallout if a hacker were to take advantage of this vulnerability...
Source: MDDI - July 1, 2019 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Amanda Pedersen Tags: Software Regulatory and Compliance Source Type: news

Are You Ready to Start Your Own Startup?
Experts on medtech startups will share their experiences during MD&M East’s Career Zone in the panel discussion, “How to Start Your Own Startup,” Thursday, June 13 at 10:00 am. Hear from these entrepreneurs: John Crombie, CEO at Centaur Sports Medical Roddi Simpson, Founder & CEO at Viozel Inc. Vivek A. Kumar, Ph.D., assistant professor in the biomedical engineering and chemical & materials engineering departments at the New Jersey Institute of Technology (NJIT) and assistant professor of dentistry at RSDM; speaking about SAPHTx Inc., a seed stage company&Ac...
Source: MDDI - June 11, 2019 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Daphne Allen Tags: Business Source Type: news

Research moves closer to brain-machine interface autonomy
(University of Houston) A University of Houston biomedical engineer reports in eNeuro that a brain-computer interface, a form of artificial intelligence, can sense when its user is expecting a reward by examining the interactions between single-neuron activities and the information flowing to these neurons. The work represents a significant step forward for prosthetics that perform more naturally. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 11, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

OHSU's Mr. Gray goes to Washington to champion foreign collaboration in science
Joe Gray, chair of Biomedical Engineering, said while there have been instances of espionage and theft, the U.S. government shouldn't overreact. (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - June 6, 2019 Category: Biotechnology Authors: Elizabeth Hayes Source Type: news

Expert in dynamical systems elected a fellow of American Society of Mechanical Engineers
(NYU Tandon School of Engineering) Maurizio Porfiri, a professor of mechanical and aerospace engineering and biomedical engineering known for his research in dynamical systems, has been selected as a fellow by the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME). Porfiri, who directs the Dynamical Systems Laboratory at NYU Tandon, is recognized for a decade of research contributions spanning several areas, including biomimetic robotics, collective behavior, multiphysics modeling, and complex systems. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 31, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

How Some Generic Drugs Could Do More Harm Than Good
For the 16 years that Dr. Brian Westerberg, a Canadian surgeon, worked volunteer missions at the Mulago National Referral Hospital in Kampala, Uganda, scarcity was the norm. The patients usually exceeded the 1,500 allotted beds. Running water was once cut off when the debt-ridden hospital was unable to pay its bills. On some of his early trips, Westerberg even brought over drugs from Canada in order to treat patients. But as low-cost generics made in India and China became widely available through Uganda’s government and international aid agencies in the early 2000s, it seemed at first like the supply issue had been ...
Source: TIME: Health - May 17, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Katherine Eban Tags: Uncategorized generic drugs medication medicine Source Type: news

Paul Sajda awarded DoD's Vannevar Bush Fellowship
(Columbia University School of Engineering and Applied Science) Paul Sajda, professor of biomedical engineering, electrical engineering, and radiology, has won the 2019 Vannevar Bush Faculty Fellowship. This honor is the US DoD's most prestigious single-investigator award and supports basic research with the potential for transformative impact. The 5-year, $3M fellowship will support Sajda's research in cognitive neuroscience. 'This fellowship will support any of my 'blue sky' research ideas,' Sajda says, 'and will really help me pursue some research directions that are very risky.' (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 3, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Chemotherapy or not?
Case Western Reserve University researchers and partners, including a collaborator at Cleveland Clinic, are pushing the boundaries of how "smart" diagnostic-imaging machines identify cancers - and uncovering clues outside the tumor to tell whether a patient will respond well to chemotherapy. The recent findings in breast and lung cancer research build off work pioneered by biomedical engineering professor Anant Madabhushi, founder of the Center for Computational Imaging and Personalized Diagnostics. (Source: World Pharma News)
Source: World Pharma News - April 24, 2019 Category: Pharmaceuticals Tags: Featured Research Research and Development Source Type: news

Engineers craft the basic building block for electrospun nanofibers
(Michigan Technological University) Imagine wounds that heal without scars. It's possible with electrospun nanofibers. A team from Michigan Tech streamlined the tissue scaffold production process, cutting out time spent removing toxic solvents and chemicals. Using a unique blend of polymers, they hope to speed up biomedical engineering prototyping using identical materials for a range of tests. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - March 27, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

NYU Tandon professor inducted into biomedical engineering elite
(NYU Tandon School of Engineering) The American Institute for Medical and Biological Engineering has inducted Jin Kim Montclare, a professor of chemical and biomolecular engineering at the NYU Tandon School of Engineering, to its College of Fellows. AIMBE cited her 'outstanding contributions to biomaterials and biocatalyst design via synthetic biology and protein engineering.'She has developed protein-lipid macromolecule systems that can deliver genes, nanoparticles, and drugs for potential treatment of multi-drug resistant cancer cells, diabetes, and other conditions. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - March 26, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Homeland Security Warns of Cybersecurity Flaws Affecting Medtronic ICDs
The Department of Homeland Security and FDA alerted healthcare providers and patients last week about cybersecurity vulnerabilities identified in a wireless telemetry technology used for communication between Medtronic’s implantable defibrillators, clinical programmers, and home monitors. FDA said healthcare providers and patients should continue to use these devices as intended and follow device labeling. The agency said the system's overall design features help safeguard patients, and that the company is developing updates to further mitigate t...
Source: MDDI - March 22, 2019 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Amanda Pedersen Tags: Software Regulatory and Compliance Source Type: news

Lian receives ENGINE grant for stem-cell-based diabetes therapy
(Penn State) Xiaojun 'Lance' Lian, assistant professor of biomedical engineering, was one of three recipients of the College of Engineering's ENGineering for Innovation& Entrepreneurship (ENGINE) grant for 'Small Molecule-Based Definitive Endoderm Kit and Pancreatic Progenitor Kit for Stem Cell Research and Therapy.' The project focuses on differentiating stem cells into pancreatic beta cells to be used for therapies to treat Type 1 diabetes. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - March 21, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Engineering treatments for the opioid epidemic
(Washington University in St. Louis) A biomedical engineer at Washington University in St. Louis is developing a therapeutic option that would prevent opiates from crossing the blood-brain barrier, preventing the high abusers seek. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - March 14, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

UTSA BRAVe program grows research pipeline to help active and military vets
(University of Texas at San Antonio) The University of Texas at San Antonio (UTSA) will launch a new program aimed at boosting student engagement and retention. The Biomedical Engineering Research for Active military and Veterans (BRAVe) program will target undergraduate students, including those at two-year colleges or who haven't declared majors, and place them in a 10-week summer research lab program to work on projects including: regeneration of damaged tissue, non-invasive tissue recovery, and/or treating soldiers in the battlefield. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - March 12, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

In small groups, people follow high-performing leaders
(NYU Tandon School of Engineering) Researchers at the NYU Tandon School of Engineering have cracked the code on how leaders arise from small groups of people over time. The work is detailed in a study, 'Social information and Spontaneous Emergence of Leaders in Human Groups,' published in The Royal Society Interface. The team included Maurizio Porfiri, professor of mechanical and aerospace engineering and of biomedical engineering at NYU Tandon and Shinnosuke Nakayama, postdoctoral researcher at NYU Tandon. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - February 21, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Leadership in biomedical engineering
(University of Delaware) Dawn Elliott, chair of the Department of Biomedical Engineering at the University of Delaware, has been recognized as the inaugural recipient of the Orthopaedic Research Society's Adele L. Boskey, PhD Award. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 21, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Research immerses HBCU undergrads in biomedical engineering
Center for Biomechanical & Rehabilitation Engineering lab inspires STEM careers by focusing students on helping the elderly Full story at https://www.nsf.gov/news/special_reports/science_nation/engineeringdiversity.jsp?WT.mc_id=USNSF_51 This is an NSF News item. (Source: NSF News)
Source: NSF News - February 11, 2019 Category: Science Source Type: news