NSF recognizes 3 scientists with the Alan T. Waterman Award
The U.S. National Science Foundation has named its awardees for this year's Alan T. Waterman Award, the nation's highest honor for early-career scientists and engineers: Jessica E. Tierney, a University of Arizona geoscientist; Lara A. Thompson, a University of the District of Columbia biomedical engineer; and Daniel B. Larremore, a computer scientist from the University of Colorado Boulder. This is the first year NSF has chosen to honor three researchers with the award, which ... More at https://www.nsf.gov/news/news_summ.jsp?cntn_id=304930&WT.mc_id=USNSF_51&WT.mc_ev=click This is an NSF News item. (Source: NSF News)
Source: NSF News - April 21, 2022 Category: Science Source Type: news

Engineered Bacteria Could Protect Gut from Antibiotics: Study
Researchers at Harvard University and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology have created a type of bacteria that could potentially protect humans from the harmful side effects of antibiotics, according to a new study published in the journal Nature Biomedical Engineering. (Source: WebMD Health)
Source: WebMD Health - April 13, 2022 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

The Human Genome Is Finally Fully Sequenced
The first human genome was mapped in 2001 as part of the Human Genome Project, but researchers knew it was neither complete nor completely accurate. Now, scientists have produced the most completely sequenced human genome to date, filling in gaps and correcting mistakes in the previous version. The sequence is the most complete reference genome for any mammal so far. The findings from six new papers describing the genome, which were published in Science, should lead to a deeper understanding of human evolution and potentially reveal new targets for addressing a host of diseases. A more precise human genome [time-brightcove...
Source: TIME: Science - March 31, 2022 Category: Science Authors: Alice Park Tags: Uncategorized Genetics healthscienceclimate Source Type: news

Implant may treat nerve pain resistant to drugs, researchers say
A new implantable device appears to reduce nerve pain that does not respond to drug treatment, a study published Thursday by the journal Nature Biomedical Engineering found. (Source: Health News - UPI.com)
Source: Health News - UPI.com - March 31, 2022 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Moderna co-founder Robert Langer: ‘I wanted to use my chemical engineering to help people’
The celebrated US scientist and inventor on not being in it for the money, why diversity improves problem-solving, and his dedication to exercisingThe chemical engineer Robert Langer co-founded Covid-19 vaccine makerModerna, and his innovations have helped create more than 100 products from artificial skin to messenger RNA (mRNA) vaccines. The 73-year-old has a mountain of research papers and patents to his name, on top of which he has started more than 40 companies and won more than 200 awards, including the Queen Elizabeth prize, which has been called the “Nobel for engineering”. Langer’s biomedical engineering lab...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - March 12, 2022 Category: Science Authors: Zo ë Corbyn Tags: Vaccines and immunisation Coronavirus Health Infectious diseases Medical research Microbiology Science Society World news Source Type: news

20 People to Know in Engineering: Sossena Wood, assistant professor in biomedical engineering, Carnegie Mellon University College of Engineering
Sossena Wood started as a researching assistant professor at Carnegie Mellon University in January. (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines - February 16, 2022 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Ethan Lott Source Type: news

Mayo Clinic, Carnegie Mellon University to collaborate on transplant innovation
JACKSONVILLE, Fla. ― Mayo Clinic and Carnegie Mellon University (CMU) announced today a research agreement to transform organ transplantation. The institutions will bioengineer innovative approaches to address barriers in organ transplantation. "This relationship with the esteemed CMU Biomedical Engineering team is a very important step in Mayo Clinic's Transforming Transplant strategic initiative," says Burcin Taner, M.D., chair of the Transplant Center at Mayo Clinic in Florida. "Research and innovation breakthroughs resulting from this initiative will… (Source: Mayo Clinic Arizona News)
Source: Mayo Clinic Arizona News - February 9, 2022 Category: Hospital Management Source Type: news

Personalities of Pittsburgh: Dr. Kathryn Whitehead is on the cutting edge of vaccine development
Dr. Kathryn Whitehead is an associate professor in the Department of Chemical and Biomedical Engineering at Carnegie Mellon University, specializing in a field that has become incredibly important over the past two years: mRNA therapeutics and vaccines. (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - January 30, 2022 Category: Biotechnology Authors: Paul J. Gough Source Type: news

Tasso, Maker Of Home Blood-Draw Kits, Raises $100 Million Led By RA Capital
Seattle-based Tasso, founded by two biomedical engineering Ph.D.s, raises $100 million to ramp up production of its home blood-draw kits. (Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News)
Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News - December 16, 2021 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Amy Feldman, Forbes Staff Tags: Manufacturing /manufacturing Business /business Innovation /innovation Healthcare /healthcare Science /science Venture Capital /venture-capital Editors' Pick editors-pick Source Type: news

Children in Low and Middle Income Countries: What do we really know?
Learning and Individual Differences, Volume 46, pages 1-70 (Publication: February 2016) Edited by Elena Grigorenko (Source: Elsevier Updates: Engineering)
Source: Elsevier Updates: Engineering - November 10, 2021 Category: Biomedical Engineering Source Type: news

OHSU spinout gets $4.3M in grants for cancer research
PDX Pharmaceuticals, an Oregon Health& Science startup, was awarded two grants totaling $4.3 million from the National Cancer Institute. The awards were given to the biotech company to advance two therapeutic candidates, which are immuno-nanotherapeutics for advanced cancers, said Wassana Yantasee, president and CEO of PDX Pharmaceuticals and a professor of biomedical engineering at OHSU. Yantasee founded the company out of the OH SU Department of Biomedical Engineering. PDX Pharma has received… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care News Headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care News Headlines - September 21, 2021 Category: Health Management Authors: Elizabeth Hayes Source Type: news

OHSU spinout gets $4.3M in grants for cancer research
PDX Pharmaceuticals, an Oregon Health& Science startup, was awarded two grants totaling $4.3 million from the National Cancer Institute. The awards were given to the biotech company to advance two therapeutic candidates, which are immuno-nanotherapeutics for advanced cancers, said Wassana Yantasee, president and CEO of PDX Pharmaceuticals and a professor of biomedical engineering at OHSU. Yantasee founded the company out of the OH SU Department of Biomedical Engineering. PDX Pharma has received… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - September 21, 2021 Category: Biotechnology Authors: Elizabeth Hayes Source Type: news

UCLA receives $13 million contract to expand COVID-19 testing
A new $13.3 million contract from the National Institutes of Health ’s Rapid Acceleration of Diagnostics initiative, or RADx, will enable theDavid Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA to expand its capacity to process COVID-19 tests.UCLA ’s diagnostic laboratory will be able to process up to 150,000 COVID-19 tests per day usingSwabSeq, a sequencing technology developed at UCLA. The technology pools thousands of saliva samples and returns individual test results in less than 24 hours.“UCLA developed SwabSeq and brought the technology to market in only six months — a process that normally takes years,” saidEleaza...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - September 20, 2021 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Inspired by barnacles, medical glue stops bleeding in seconds
ROCHESTER, Minn. ― Mayo Clinic researchers and colleagues at Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) have developed a rapid-sealing paste that can stop bleeding organs independent of clotting. The details are published in Nature Biomedical Engineering. The inspiration for this paste? Barnacles. Barnacles are t hose sea animals that adhere to rocks, the bottom of ships and large fish with the aim of staying in place despite wet conditions and variable surfaces. They're successful because they exude… (Source: News from Mayo Clinic)
Source: News from Mayo Clinic - August 9, 2021 Category: Databases & Libraries Source Type: news

How Will Empty Stands Affect Olympic Athletes in Tokyo?
The Opening Ceremony provided the first taste of what an Olympics without fans is like—devoid of the normal buzz of excitement and roar of the appreciative crowd, it was more solemn than celebratory. But it’s one thing to miss the noise for Opening Ceremony, quite another when it’s gone from the competitive events. Not every sport will be as affected by the loss of spectators at the Tokyo Games. Athletes competing in events like archery, which requires concentration and quiet, for example, might actually appreciate the respite. But team-based sports and events like swimming races might seem, well, a littl...
Source: TIME: Health - July 25, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alice Park Tags: Uncategorized olympics Tokyo Olympics Source Type: news