Latest research hints at predicting autism risk for pregnant mothers
(Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute) Researchers at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute--led by Juergen Hahn, professor and head of biomedical engineering--are continuing to make remarkable progress with their research focused on autism spectrum disorder (ASD). (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 21, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Trimedx picks up Aramark ’ s healthcare technologies business
Aramark (NYSE: ARMK) is quitting the healthcare technologies business, announcing today that it has agreed to sell that part of its business for $300 million to clinical engineering and asset management company Trimedx. Best known for its food service, uniform and facilities businesses, Aramark bought the Charlotte, N.C.-based healthcare business in 2001. It has been in operation for over 45 years and employs more than 1,500 technicians, engineers and program staff. Trimedx provides management programs for for maintenance and refurbishment of clinical equipment at more than 500 hospitals and healthcare facilities. “T...
Source: Mass Device - September 17, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Nancy Crotti Tags: Blog Business/Financial News Wall Street Beat aramark trimedx Source Type: news

Watching an embryo's neural tube close
(University of Houston) A University of Houston biomedical engineer is tackling birth defects by creating new technology to peer into the neural tube of developing embryos, to solve the mystery of why some tubes close and others -- destined for trouble -- don't. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 4, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Artificial cells are tiny bacteria fighters
(University of California - Davis) Artificial cells that can kill bacteria have been created by researchers at the UC Davis Department of Biomedical Engineering. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - August 31, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Here & #039;s What MD+DI Readers Said About The Bleeding Edge
As part of MD+DI's coverage last week of the Netflix documentary, The Bleeding Edge, we asked readers for feedback on the film and its assessment of the medical device industry. A total of 62 respondents took the three-question survey.  1. The Bleeding Edge claims that FDA's 510(k) process, reportedly the most popular way medical devices reach the U.S. market, doesn’t require the submission of as much safety data as does the premarket approval (PMA) process. Do you believe this is a fair depiction? Of the 62 respondents who answered this question, 48 (77.42%) said yes, and just 14 ...
Source: MDDI - August 27, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: MDDI Staff Tags: Regulatory and Compliance Source Type: news

Assistive surgical devices shine in DEBUT biomedical engineering design competition
NIH and VentureWell award five undergraduate teams for innovative devices that improve medical procedures. (Source: National Institutes of Health (NIH) News Releases)
Source: National Institutes of Health (NIH) News Releases - August 24, 2018 Category: American Health Source Type: news

Stool proteins to predict inflammatory bowel disease
(University of Houston) A University of Houston biomedical engineer is looking for new biomarkers to predict and monitor inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). With $347,490 from the Crohn's& Colitis Foundation of America, Chandra Mohan says protein biomarkers that show up in stools could indicate the disease and make examination and treatment quicker and less invasive. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - August 20, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Lessons learned: How Jeff Karp stays at the forefront of innovation
Serial entrepreneur Jeff Karp has a philosophy for his laboratory: find important problems and get solutions to people quickly. To learn about the exciting technologies emerging from Karp’s lab, join us at DeviceTalks Boston on Oct. 8-10. After Jeff finished his PhD in chemical and biomedical engineering at the University of Toronto, he knew he wanted to work with Robert Langer. “He’s the intergalactic translational superstar,” Karp said. Langer, a professor at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and one of the most cited engineers of all time, receives thousands of applications per year ...
Source: Mass Device - August 16, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Sarah Faulkner Tags: Drug-Device Combinations Pharmaceuticals Research & Development DeviceTalks Boston Frequency Therapeutics Source Type: news

New Thinking Informs Soft-Material 3D Printing
As 3D printing evolves, researchers have gone beyond mere fabrication processes to developing techniques for optimizing how particular materials can be printed. To that end, researchers at Carnegie Mellon University’s College of Engineering have developed a new approach to optimizing the 3D printing of soft materials. This approach combines expert judgment with an algorithm designed to search parameter combinations relevant for 3D printing, they said. Images of 3D prints made using a new method developed by researchers at Carnegie Mellon. Their approach combines expertise with an algorithm an...
Source: MDDI - August 8, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Tags: Design News Source Type: news

Tackling drug delivery challenges with TissueGen ’s implantable fibers
TissueGen‘s chief scientist and co-founder, Kevin Nelson, told Drug Delivery Business News the story behind the company he founded in 2000 and its drug delivery technology, the Elute fiber.  DDBN: How did TissueGen get its start? Nelson: In 1996, while faculty in biomedical engineering at The University of Texas at Arlington, I was working with Dr. Robert Eberhart at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas.  Together, we collaborated with a team to develop a biodegradable vascular stent that had the potential to deliver a live virus to the arterial wall. Simultaneously, I was working w...
Source: Mass Device - August 2, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Sarah Faulkner Tags: Drug-Device Combinations Implants Pharmaceuticals TissueGen Source Type: news

Women and lupus -- Tackling the debilitating connection
(University of Houston) The chronic inflammatory disease, lupus, is about nine times more common in women than men, and now one of the leading lupus researchers in the world, UH biomedical engineering professor Chandra Mohan, has been awarded $2 million to find out why. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 31, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Enrico Gratton to receive 2019 BPS Avanti Award in Lipids
(Biophysical Society) The Biophysical Society (BPS) has named Enrico Gratton, Professor, Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of California, Irvine, as its 2019 Avanti Award in Lipids winner. Gratton will be honored at the Society's 63rd Annual Meeting at the Baltimore Convention Center on March 5, 2019, during the annual Awards Symposium. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - July 30, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

This engineered heart ventricle helps with studying arrhythmia and cardiomyopathy
[Luke MacQueen and Michael Rosnach/Harvard University]While engineered heart tissues can replicate muscle contraction and electrical activity in a dish, many aspects of heart disease can only adequately be captured in 3D. In a report published online yesterday by Nature Biomedical Engineering, researchers describe a scale model of a heart ventricle, built to replicate the chamber’s architecture, physiology and contractions. Cardiac researchers at Boston Children’s Hospital think it could help them find treatments for congenital heart diseases. Building a 3D engineered heart ventricle Collaborators from the Harv...
Source: Mass Device - July 26, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Danielle Kirsh Tags: Blog Vector Blog Source Type: news

Leading experts in diabetes, metabolism and biomedical engineering discuss precision medicine
(Helmholtz Zentrum M ü nchen - German Research Center for Environmental Health) New technologies enable deeper insights into the causes of major diseases such as diabetes, obesity or cancer and open the way to a new generation of diagnostics and therapies. For the first time, the new Helmholtz Pioneer Campus (HPC) at Helmholtz Zentrum M ü nchen and the German Center for Diabetes Research (DZD) have invited bioengineers, diabetes researchers and scientists from related therapeutic areas to the International Conference on Engineering Biomedical Breakthroughs on the island of San Servolo in the Venice Lagoon. (Sourc...
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 12, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Breast implant makers Polytech, G & G ink stock-swap merger pact
Silicone breast-implant makers Polytech Health & Aesthetics and G&G Biotechnology are getting together in a stock-swap merger. G&G designed the world’s first lightweight breast implant, the B-Lite, to reduce the impact of gravity on the reconstructed or augmented breast using technology developed by NASA to make its implants up to 30% lighter. The company sells its products in more than 30 countries, not including the U.S. Plastic surgeon Dr. Jacky Govrin and his brother, biomedical engineer Dael Govreen-Segal, founded G&G in Haifa in 2005. Polytech, which makes 2,000 varieties...
Source: Mass Device - July 9, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Nancy Crotti Tags: Blog Business/Financial News Implants Mergers & Acquisitions G&G Biotechnology Polytech Health & Aesthetics Source Type: news

The NHS needs a new breed of innovator for the information age | Kevin Fong
Technology is never going to replace doctors - or make healthcare cheaper. But data and artificial intelligence are the futureFrom vaccines and antibiotics tomemory metal stents that widen narrowed arteries and algorithms that process radiological images and let us see the earliest signs of disease,innovation has been saving lives since the inception of theNational Health Service 70 years ago. It is this blend of new molecules, materials science and biomedical engineering, in partnership with digital systems, that will continue to transform our expectations of life and survival in the 21st century.While the digital revolut...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - July 6, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Kevin Fong Tags: NHS Technology Health Medical research Science Society UK news Source Type: news

Abbott launches program to offset employee student loan debt
Abbott (NYSE:ABT) said today it is launching a program to aid its employees with paying off their student loans. The new program, labeled the Freedom 2 Save program, will allow certain employees to receive matched deposits into savings program to match contributions meant to offset student loan debt. “We see our young professionals coming to us with a problem: Student loan debt payments keep them from setting aside the money they’d like to put in savings for retirement. With every decade you wait to start saving for retirement, the amount you need to save roughly doubles. This plan will give participa...
Source: Mass Device - June 26, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Fink Densford Tags: Business/Financial News Abbott Source Type: news

Texas A & M research opens doors to expanded DNA studies
(Texas A&M University) Dr. Wonmuk Hwang, associate professor in the Department of Biomedical Engineering at Texas A&M University, is researching the mechanics of DNA, the blueprint of the human body. Hwang and his former doctoral student, Dr. Xiaojing Teng, zoomed into the question: if the genetic information is the same in all cells, as it should be, why do muscle cells look and act differently than skin cells? (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - June 26, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

The seed that could bring clean water to millions
(College of Engineering, Carnegie Mellon University) Carnegie Mellon University's Biomedical Engineering and Chemical Engineering Professors Bob Tilton and Todd Przybycien recently co-authored a paper with Ph.D. students Brittany Nordmark and Toni Bechtel, and alumnus John Riley, further refining a process that could soon help provide clean water to many in water-scarce regions. The process, created by Tilton's former student and co-author Stephanie Velegol, uses sand and plant materials readily available in many developing nations. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 20, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

UH scientist working toward a glaucoma cure
(University of Houston) With $765,000 from the National Institutes of Health, University of Houston College of Optometry biomedical engineer Vijaykrishna Raghunathan is working towards a pharmaceutical cure for the irreversible disease Glaucoma. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 19, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Have Johns Hopkins Biomedical Engineering Students Solved The Nuisance Of Nasal Congestion?
A team of five biomedical engineering undergraduates at John Hopkins University (JHU) plan to manufacture and sell a device that they say would achieve the same effect as nasal reconstructive surgery for sufferers of chronic nasal obstruction - a condition that affects tens of millions of Americans. (Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News)
Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News - June 19, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Robin Seaton Jefferson, Contributor Source Type: news

Researchers deliver cardiac stem cell therapy in preclinical trial using refillable patch
Researchers have developed a small device designed to halt the effects of a heart attack by delivering a stem cell therapy directly to damaged cardiac tissue. In a study published in Nature Biomedical Engineering, researchers from Harvard University, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, the National University of Ireland Galway and Trinity College Dublin reported that the device improved heart function in rats that received multiple doses of the stem cell therapy over the course of four weeks. Get the full story at our sister site, Drug Delivery Business News. The post Researchers deliver cardiac stem cell thera...
Source: Mass Device - June 11, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Sarah Faulkner Tags: Cardiovascular Drug-Device Combinations Pharmaceuticals Research & Development Harvard University Massachusetts Institute of Technology Source Type: news

Biomedical optics engineer Jesse Wilson named a Boettcher Investigator
(Colorado State University) Mitochondrial diseases are devastating illnesses caused by defects in cellular organelles called mitochondria. Their cells starved of energy, most stricken children die by age 12. There is no cure, and diagnosis can take months.Colorado State University biomedical engineer Jesse Wilson wants to change all of that. The assistant professor of electrical and computer engineering is proposing a radical new imaging technology that could diagnose mitochondrial defects in an instant. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 7, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

End-to-end blood testing device shows capacity to draw sample and provide diagnostic results
(World Scientific) Recent research published in a paper by the Biomedical Engineering Department of Rutgers University have developed an end-to-end blood testing device that integrates robotic phlebotomy with downstream sample processing. This platform device performs blood draws and provides diagnostic results in a fully automated fashion and has the potential to expedite hospital work-flow, allowing practitioners to devote more time to treating patients. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 6, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

3D printed sugar offers sweet solution for tissue engineering, device manufacturing
(University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign) University of Illinois engineers built a 3D printer that offers a sweet solution to making detailed structures that commercial 3D printers can't: Rather than a layer-upon-layer solid shell, it produces a delicate network of thin ribbons of hardened isomalt, the type of sugar alcohol used to make throat lozenges. The water-soluble, biodegradable glassy sugar structures have multiple applications in biomedical engineering, cancer research and device manufacturing. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - May 23, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Using virtual biopsies to improve melanoma detection
(Colorado State University) Jesse Wilson, an associate professor in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering and in the School of Biomedical Engineering, is one of 15 researchers selected for a Young Investigator Award from the Melanoma Research Alliance.The award will allow Wilson and his team to go a step further in their research to make early detection of melanoma faster and cheaper, without the need for a biopsy. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - May 18, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Metastasis enablers: Findings could unlock new ovarian cancer treatments
(University of Wisconsin-Madison) New research from the lab of Pamela Kreeger, a University of Wisconsin-Madison biomedical engineering professor, has identified one way ovarian cancer cells appear to successfully spread. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - May 8, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Fibroblast Compression and Tumor Cells Migration
Role of Compression in MetastasisOurHuman Pancreatic Fibroblasts play a key role in this study.Pancreatic fibroblasts are continuously gaining ground as an important component of tumor microenvironment that dynamically interact with cancer cells to promote tumor progression. In addition, these tumor-infiltrated fibroblasts can acquire an activated phenotype and produce excessive amounts of extracellu lar matrix creating a highly dense stroma, a situation known as desmoplasia. Maria Kalli, Panagiotis Papageorgis, Vasiliki Gkretsi, Triantafyllos Stylianopoulos. (2018).Solid Stress Facilitates Fibroblasts Activation to Pro...
Source: Neuromics - May 1, 2018 Category: Neuroscience Tags: Cancer Associated Fibroblasts Desmoplasia Human Pancreatic Fibroblasts metastasis Source Type: news

UChicago researchers lay out how to control biology with light -- without genetics
(University of Chicago) Over the past five years, University of Chicago chemist Bozhi Tian has been figuring out how to control biology with light. In a paper published April 30 in Nature Biomedical Engineering, Tian's team laid out a system of design principles for working with silicon to control biology at three levels -- from individual organelles inside cells to tissues to entire limbs. The group has demonstrated each in cells or mice models, including the first time anyone has used light to control behavior without genetic modification. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - April 30, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

New breath and urine tests detect early breast cancer more accurately
(American Associates, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev) " Breast cancer survival is strongly tied to the sensitivity of tumor detection; accurate methods for detecting smaller, earlier tumors remains a priority, " says Prof. Yehuda Zeiri, a member of Ben-Gurion University's Department of Biomedical Engineering. " Our new approach utilizing urine and exhaled breath samples, analyzed with inexpensive, commercially available processes, is non-invasive, accessible and may be easily implemented in a variety of settings. " (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - April 25, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

New cell therapy aids heart recovery -- without implanting cells
(Columbia University School of Engineering and Applied Science) A team led by Columbia University Biomedical Engineering Professor Gordana Vunjak-Novakovic has designed a creative new approach to help injured hearts regenerate by applying extracellular vesicles secreted by cardiomyocytes rather than implanting the cells. The study shows that the cardiomyocytes derived from human pluripotent stem cells (derived in turn from a small sample of blood) could be a powerful, untapped source of therapeutic microvesicles that could lead to safe and effective treatments of damaged hearts. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 23, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

UNC scientists create better laboratory tools to study cancer's spread
(UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center) In the journal Nature Biomedical Engineering, UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center's Andrew Wang, MD, and colleagues report they have developed tissue-engineered models for cancer metastases that reflect the microenvironment around tumors that promotes their growth. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - April 23, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

International team led by NUS scientist won Human Frontiers Science Program Research Grant
(National University of Singapore) An international team of scientists led by Professor Lim Chwee Teck, Principal Investigator at the Mechanobiology Institute and Department of Biomedical Engineering at the National University of Singapore, has been awarded the prestigious Human Frontiers Science Program Research Grant. The team will receive up to $1.2 million in grants for their novel, multidisciplinary research investigating the collective migration of cells on curved surfaces such as those found on the skin or in the intestinal microvilli. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - April 18, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Biomedical Engineering Ph.D. student receives NSF Graduate Research Fellowship
(University of Akron) Sharon Truesdell has been awarded a NSF Graduate Research Fellowship, a highly regarded initiative designed to recruit high potential, early-career scientists and engineers and support their graduate research training in STEM fields. Truesdell's work in biomedical engineering at The University of Akron focuses on the development of a microfluidic lab-on-a-chip device capable of mechanically stimulating, characterizing and quantifying the activity of bone cells. Her findings may present new insight into such bone diseases as osteoporosis. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 10, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Katie O ’ Callaghan- A biomedical engineer by training, is the Assistant Director of Strategic Programs in the office of the Center Director, overseeing a number of strategic partnership and regulatory science programs... #WomensHistoryMonth
Katie O’ Callaghan- A biomedical engineer by training, is the Assistant Director of Strategic Programs in the office of the Center Director, overseeing a number of strategic partnership and regulatory science programs... #WomensHistoryMonth (Source: Food and Drug Adminstration (FDA): CDRHNew)
Source: Food and Drug Adminstration (FDA): CDRHNew - March 29, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: ( at FDADeviceInfo) Source Type: news

NUS scientists develop novel chip for fast and accurate disease detection at low cost
(National University of Singapore) A novel invention by a team of researchers from the National University of Singapore holds promise for a faster and cheaper way to diagnose diseases with high accuracy. Professor Zhang Yong from the Department of Biomedical Engineering at the NUS Faculty of Engineering and his team have developed a tiny microfluidic chip that could effectively detect minute amounts of biomolecules without the need for complex lab equipment. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - March 29, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Biomedical Engineer Says Her New Smart Socks Can Save The Lives And Limbs Of Diabetics
A biomedical engineer has created a pair of socks that can monitor diabetic feet and prevent amputation. (Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News)
Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News - March 28, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Robin Seaton Jefferson, Contributor Source Type: news

Will Your Next Doctor Be a Physicianeer?
All too often in the medical device field, a product that looks really cool ends up failing because it doesn't actually address an unmet need or because the developers didn't do enough collaboration with physicians to make the technology adoptable. The ever-growing need to have cross-functional teams in medtech led to an interesting panel discussion this week at the South by Southwest conference in Austin, TX. "As things get more complex you just can't have engineers that don't talk to physicians or don't understand anatomical challenges," said Joseph Frassica, MD, head of Philips Research, Americas and the ...
Source: MDDI - March 15, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Amanda Pedersen Tags: R & D Source Type: news

Humacyte closes $75m Series C round
Humacyte said today that it raised $75 million in a Series C preferred stock financing, led by a group of existing private investors and new investors. The Research Triangle Park, N.C.-based company expects to use its newly-acquired funds to support an on-going Phase III pivotal study evaluating its human acellular vessel, Humacyl, as a conduit for hemodialysis in patients with end-stage renal disease who cannot have fistula placement. Humacyte finished enrolling participants in the 350-patient trial last September and anticipates 12-month post-implantation data to be available in the third quarter of 2018. The company als...
Source: Mass Device - March 12, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Sarah Faulkner Tags: Clinical Trials Funding Roundup Vascular Humacyte Inc. Source Type: news

Retinal images can be used to predict cardiovascular risk
A study inNature Biomedical Engineering reports that using pictures of the retina can be useful to predict cardiovascular risk factors.Healio (Source: Society for Endocrinology)
Source: Society for Endocrinology - February 21, 2018 Category: Endocrinology Source Type: news

Deconstructing lupus -- could some of its makeup be part of its cure?
(University of Houston) University of Houston biomedical engineer Chandra Mohan is examining the protein ALCALM to find a cure for lupus and its complications. ALCALM appears in patients that have kidney disease and lupus. Mohan says it's like finding a suspect at the scene of different crimes. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 20, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Student research team accelerates snow melt with 'Melt Mat'
(Virginia Tech) 'The idea for a thermal absorptive blanket is novel, but also very practical,' said Jonathan Boreyko, an assistant professor of biomedical engineering and mechanics and the team's faculty advisor. 'For novelty's sake, the team really needed to go for a journal publication. For practicality's sake, we went for a patent.' (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 15, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Device that measures cell strength could help identify drugs for asthma, hypertension and muscular dystrophy
Engineers, doctors and scientists at UCLA and Rutgers University have developed a tool that measures the physical strength of individual cells 100 times faster than current technologies.The new device could make it easier and faster to test and evaluate new drugs for diseases associated with abnormal levels of cell strength, including hypertension, asthma and muscular dystrophy. It could also open new avenues for biological research into cell force. It is the first high-throughput tool that can measure the strength of thousands of individual cells at a time.“Our tool tracks how much force individual cells exert over ...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - February 9, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

This Tiny Implant Can Deliver Medicine to Your Brain With the Push of a Button
(WASHINGTON) — Scientists have created a hair-thin implant that can drip medications deep into the brain by remote control and with pinpoint precision. Tested only in animals so far, if the device pans out it could mark a new approach to treating brain diseases — potentially reducing side effects by targeting only the hard-to-reach circuits that need care. “You could deliver things right to where you want, no matter the disease,” said Robert Langer, a professor at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology whose biomedical engineering team reported the research Wednesday. Stronger and safer treatment...
Source: TIME: Health - January 25, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Lauren Neergaard / AP Tags: Uncategorized APH healthytime medicine onetime Source Type: news

This Tiny Implant Can Deliver Medicine to Your Brain With the Push of a Button
(WASHINGTON) — Scientists have created a hair-thin implant that can drip medications deep into the brain by remote control and with pinpoint precision. Tested only in animals so far, if the device pans out it could mark a new approach to treating brain diseases — potentially reducing side effects by targeting only the hard-to-reach circuits that need care. “You could deliver things right to where you want, no matter the disease,” said Robert Langer, a professor at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology whose biomedical engineering team reported the research Wednesday. Stronger and safer treatment...
Source: TIME: Science - January 25, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Lauren Neergaard / AP Tags: Uncategorized APH healthytime medicine onetime Source Type: news

With these special bacteria, a broccoli a day can keep the cancer doctor away
(National University of Singapore, Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine) NUS Medicine researchers have engineered bacteria that specifically targets colorectal cancer cells and converts a substance in some vegetables into an anticancer agent. The system reduced the number of tumors by 75 percent and shrank the remaining tumors by threefold in a mouse model of colorectal cancer. Published in Nature Biomedical Engineering, the study suggests that the probiotics taken together with a diet rich in cruciferous vegetables could help prevent colorectal cancer and its recurrence. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - January 10, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Uncovering the power of glial cells
(University of Pittsburgh) Implanted devices send targeted electrical stimulation to the nervous system to interfere with abnormal brain activity, and it is commonly assumed that neurons are the only important brain cells that need to be stimulated by these devices. However, research published in Nature Biomedical Engineering reveals that it may also be important to target the supportive glial cells surrounding the neurons. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - January 8, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Scientists are using light for faster, more accurate cancer detection
(Natural News) Researchers from the Rutgers University-New Brunswick have created a very powerful technique to identify tiny tumors and track their growth using light-radiating nanoparticles. This can lead to earlier cancer detection and more targeted treatment, which can ultimately enhance cure rates and survival times of patients. The study, which was published in Nature Biomedical Engineering, demonstrates that the new strategy is better than magnetic... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - January 3, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Making heart transplants obsolete with small removable pump
(University of Houston) On this 50th anniversary of the first heart transplant, which occurred in December 1967, a University of Houston biomedical engineer is creating a next-generation heart pump for patients suffering with heart failure. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - December 18, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news