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Developing highly specific computer models to better diagnose concussions in real time
(Worcester Polytechnic Institute) As fall sports seasons get under way and concerns related to concussions in contact sports continue to grow, a Worcester Polytechnic Institute biomedical engineering professor is developing better tools to understand the mechanics of traumatic brain injuries in athletes. With two grants from the National Institutes of Health, Songbai Ji is using advanced neuroimaging to develop highly specific computer models of the head and brain to better diagnose concussions in real time. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 13, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Electrical nerve-block research aims at asthma, heart failure
(Case Western Reserve University) Biomedical engineering researchers at Case Western Reserve University in Cleveland, Ohio, are refining more than 15 years of work on an electrical nerve-block implant, focusing their next step on new applications related to treating asthma and heart failure. The research builds on applications already in use for pain management and was bolstered recently by a four-year, $2 million National Institutes of Health grant. The research will be conducted in collaboration with teams at UCLA and Johns Hopkins University. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - August 29, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

UAB receives $4.8 million biomedical engineering grant
The University of Alabama at Birmingham aims to make headway in cardiovascular research this fall when $4.8 million in grants arrive from the National Institutes of Health. The grants will be awarded to biomedical engineering research that plans to attack two aspects of cardiovascular disease - heart failure after heart attacks and resistant high blood pressure. Two UAB investigators will be dividing the grant - Jiyani Zhang and Gangjian Qin. Zhang, who is the chair and professor of the biomedical… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines - August 25, 2017 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Tyler Patchen Source Type: news

Disease diagnostics take top honors of DEBUT biomedical engineering design competition
NIH and VentureWell support undergraduate biomedical engineering challenge seeking innovative devices to improve health globally. (Source: National Institutes of Health (NIH) News Releases)
Source: National Institutes of Health (NIH) News Releases - August 25, 2017 Category: American Health Source Type: news

New biomedical engineering grants aim at heart failure and resistant high blood pressure
(University of Alabama at Birmingham) Biomedical engineering researchers will attack two banes of cardiovascular disease -- heart failure after heart attacks and the scourge of resistant high blood pressure -- with $4.8 million in National Institutes of Health grants that begin this fall. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - August 24, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

SPM in Real Life: Summer ‘17
NEW MEMBERS: Summer ‘17 Welcome new member, Geoffrey Milos! Geoffrey writes that he has a great interest in electronic health records (EHR) and how they enable individuals to more fully participate in the management of their own health care. Patient access to their respective, complete EHR is key to this empowerment. Individuals seem to be making progress on this front, slowly but surely. Geoffrey is interested in active innovators in the personal health care application space, specifically applications that can accept provider-sourced EHR inputs and other organizations that actively promote individual acce...
Source: Society for Participatory Medicine - August 18, 2017 Category: General Medicine Authors: Nanette Mattox Tags: Newsletter Community Members New Members Summer '17 Source Type: news

So Youve Been Mistaken as a White Nationalist
Biomedical engineer Kyle Quinn fends off a frenzied Internet mob after being wrongly identified as a Charlottesville protester. (Source: The Scientist)
Source: The Scientist - August 18, 2017 Category: Science Tags: Daily News Source Type: news

UCLA researchers demonstrate new material that could aid body ’s cellular repair process
A research team led by UCLA biomolecular engineers and doctors has demonstrated a therapeutic material that could one day promote better tissue regeneration following a wound or a stroke.During the body ’s typical healing process, when tissues like skin are damaged the body grows replacement cells. Integrins are class of proteins that are important in the cellular processes critical to creating new tissue. One of the processes is cell adhesion, when new cells “stick” to the materials between cells, called the extracellular matrix. Another is cell migration, where at the cell’s surface, integrins hel...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - August 15, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Liposomes triggered by ultrasound enable targeted pain-relief
Researchers at Boston Children’s Hospital have developed a technology to non-invasively trigger the release of nerve-blocking agents, helping to provide targeted pain-relief to patients as an alternative to addictive opioids. The team’s work was published yesterday in Nature Biomedical Engineering. Get the full story at our sister site, Drug Delivery Business News. The post Liposomes triggered by ultrasound enable targeted pain-relief appeared first on MassDevice. (Source: Mass Device)
Source: Mass Device - August 10, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Sarah Faulkner Tags: Drug-Device Combinations Pain Management Pharmaceuticals Research & Development Ultrasound Boston Children's Hospital Source Type: news

A sodium surprise
(Washington University in St. Louis) Irregular heartbeat -- or arrhythmia -- can have sudden and often fatal consequences. A biomedical engineering team at Washington University in St. Louis examining molecular behavior in cardiac tissue recently made a surprising discovery that could someday impact treatment of the life-threatening condition. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - July 20, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Antibiotic-eluting polymer could help treat prosthetic joint infections
Researchers from Massachusetts General Hospital have developed an antibiotic-eluting polymer that could be used to treat infections in orthopedic implants, according to a report published in Nature Biomedical Engineering. Traditionally, treating a prosthetic joint infection involves removing an implant and replacing it with a temporary spacer made from antibiotic-releasing bone cement for at least six weeks. Then, a second surgery is needed to give the patient a new prosthesis. Get the full story at our sister site, Drug Delivery Business News. The post Antibiotic-eluting polymer could help treat prosthetic joint infection...
Source: Mass Device - July 19, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Sarah Faulkner Tags: Drug-Device Combinations Implants Pharmaceuticals Prosthetics Research & Development Surgical Massachusetts General Hospital Source Type: news

A heart attack in a petri dish
(New Jersey Institute of Technology) In her laboratory at NJIT, biomedical engineer Alice Lee develops tiny proto-hearts from stem cells that she subjects to 'attacks' to observe in real-time how the heart repairs itself. With National Science Foundation funding, she aims to advance cell-based therapies, unsuccessful as yet in part due to limited knowledge of the biological mechanisms of the transplanted stem cells. To date, researchers have focused on mimicking healthy hearts with the goal of providing living surgical replacements. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 17, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Advance furthers stem cells for use in drug discovery, cell therapy
(University of Wisconsin-Madison) Using an automated screening test that they devised, William Murphy, a professor of biomedical engineering, and colleagues Eric Nguyen and William Daly have invented an all-chemical replacement for the confusing, even dangerous materials, now used to grow stem cells. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 14, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Pulse rate monitoring before a C-section can improve maternal health
(Springer) Doctors often prescribe preventative drugs to women who are to receive spinal blocks while giving birth via a Caesarean section. Such preventative treatment against hypotension, however, can have side-effects. In a study in Springer's journal Annals of Biomedical Engineering, Augusto Navarro of the Miguel Servet University Hospital in Spain and collaborators investigate how clinicians can use aspects of pulse rate to decide whether blood pressure medication should be provided. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 11, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Zimmer Biomet launches X-PSI customized total knee replacement
Zimmer Biomet (NYSE:ZBH) said on Thursday it launched its X-PSI knee system, an X-ray-based, patient-specific surgical planning system designed for patient specific implant positioning using X-ray tech. The X-PSI system is designed for use with all of the Warsaw, Ind.-based company’s total knee brands, and allows surgeons to use X-ray images to generate 3D anatomical models. The system is then used to view the patients’ anatomy and develop a customized 3D surgical plan, the company said. “The use of innovative preoperative planning to enable patient-specific customization has the potential to become ...
Source: Mass Device - June 29, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Fink Densford Tags: Business/Financial News Orthopedics zimmerbiomet Source Type: news

Biomedical engineering professor Barclay Morrison awarded $2 million grant to study concussion
(Columbia University School of Engineering and Applied Science) Barclay Morrison has won a $2 million five-year grant from the Paul G. Allen Family Foundation to study the underlying mechanisms of concussion. His award is part of a $9.25M multi-center research grant given to the lead organization, the University of Pennsylvania, for research on the cellular mechanisms of concussion and potential clinical interventions that could improve recovery. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 15, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

3-D-printed patch helps guide growing blood vessels
(Boston University College of Engineering) A research team led by Boston University Biomedical Engineering Professor Christopher Chen is pioneering an infused 3-D-printed patch that guides the growth of new blood vessels, avoiding some of the problems with other approaches to treating ischemia. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 13, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Biopolymer tested as long-acting glucose control therapy
Researchers from Duke University have developed a biopolymer that could provide weeks of glucose control for patients with diabetes – in a single injection. The controlled-release treatment lasted for weeks in primates, according to a study published in Nature Biomedical Engineering. The biomedical engineers suggested that this new, injectable solution could replace daily or weekly insulin shots for people with Type II diabetes. Get the full story at our sister site, Drug Delivery Business News. The post Biopolymer tested as long-acting glucose control therapy appeared first on MassDevice. (Source: Mass Device)
Source: Mass Device - June 6, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Sarah Faulkner Tags: Diabetes Drug-Device Combinations Pharmaceuticals Research & Development Duke University Source Type: news

Duke joins concussion research funded by Microsoft co-founder's foundation
Duke University has joined a team led by the University of Pennsylvania along with Columbia University on new concussion research funded by a $9.25 million grant from The Paul G. Allen Family Foundation. Paul Allen co-founded Microsoft with Bill Gates. Researchers from Duke include Cameron R. “Dale” Bass, associate research professor of biomedical engineering, and Mohammed Abou Donia, professor of pharmacology and cancer biology and neurobiology, according to the university. “There is a surprising… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - May 23, 2017 Category: Biotechnology Authors: Jennifer Henderson Source Type: news

Titan Medical CEO wants to up the game in robotic surgery: Here ’s how
[Image courtesy of Titan Medical]Titan Medical – the young, upstart Canadian robotic surgery company – is making a comeback this year. Just today, the company announced the completion of initial formative human factors studies for its Sport single port robotic surgical system. The Sport system boasts the ability for a variety of surgical instruments on snake-like arms to be deployed through a single 25 mm incision for a minimally invasive surgery. Surgeons get to work at a mobile, ergonomically designed workstation with a 3D high-definition endoscopic view inside the patient. Completing the human factors s...
Source: Mass Device - May 17, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Chris Newmarker Tags: Business/Financial News News Well Robot-Assisted Surgery Robotics Surgical Robotic Surgery surgical robotics Titan Medical Inc. Source Type: news

Bathroom scales will inform about life threatening conditions
(Kaunas University of Technology) Weighing oneself has become one of the most common morning rituals. However, your weight is not the only message that can be delivered by your bathroom scales: the team of researchers at Kaunas University of Technology (KTU) Institute of Biomedical Engineering are developing the multifunctional scales, which can monitor your health and inform about potentially dangerous life conditions, such as arteriosclerosis or cardiac arrhythmia. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 16, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Pig model to help research on human knee growth, injury treatment
Medical and biomedical engineering researchers have published research on how the knees of pigs compare to human knees at various stages of maturity -- a finding that will advance research by this group and others on injury treatment in young people. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - May 15, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

Experimental technology monitors and maintains drug levels in the body
A study published inNature Biomedical Engineering reports that researchers have developed a drug delivery tool that regulates the level of drugs needed in the body in real time, which could lead to improvements in diabetes care.Medical News Today (Source: Society for Endocrinology)
Source: Society for Endocrinology - May 15, 2017 Category: Endocrinology Source Type: news

Pig model to help research on human knee growth, injury treatment
(North Carolina State University) Medical and biomedical engineering researchers have published research on how the knees of pigs compare to human knees at various stages of maturity -- a finding that will advance research by this group and others on injury treatment in young people. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 15, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

NAE Elects Treasurer and Four Councillors
The National Academy of Engineering has re-elected Martin B. Sherwin, retired vice president of W.R. Grace, to serve a four-year term as the NAE's treasurer. Re-elected to second terms as councillors are Frances S. Ligler, Lampe Distinguished Professor of Biomedical Engineering in the joint department of biomedical engineering at the North Carolina State University College of Engineering and the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill School of Medicine, and H. Vincent Poor, Michael Henry Strater University Professor at Princeton University. And newly elected councillors are Katharine G. Frase, retired vice president of e...
Source: News from the National Academies - April 21, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

3-D-printed patch can help mend a 'broken' heart
(University of Minnesota) A team of biomedical engineering researchers, led by the University of Minnesota, has created a revolutionary 3-D-bioprinted patch that can help heal scarred heart tissue after a heart attack. The discovery is a major step forward in treating patients with tissue damage after a heart attack. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 14, 2017 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

[This Week in Science] Nanoparticles for drug delivery in lungs
Author: Philip Yeagle (Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - April 7, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Philip Yeagle Tags: Biomedical Engineering Source Type: news

Can thought-control technology be used to overcome physical paralysis?
A man paralysed from the shoulders down can now raise his arm to eat, thanks to neuroprosthetic implants – and there is hope that the technology will help many others in the futureIs it possible to overcome paralysis by harnessing thoughts?A man who was paralysed from the shoulders down after a bicycle accident in which he ploughed into the back of a mail truck is now able tomove his arm for the first time in eight years, thanks to thought-control technology, also known as neuroprosthetics.“He can now think about moving his arm, and his arm moves,” said Robert Kirsch, a professor of biomedical engineering...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - April 1, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Nicola Davis Tags: World news Neuroscience Technology Medical research Source Type: news

Penn State EMT Program Teaches Through Hands-on Experience
College is a place to explore known interests and discover hidden passions that may lead to future hobbies or, in some cases, careers. This holds true for Penn State biomedical engineering junior Molly Basilio, who enrolled in the four- credit Emergency Medical Technician training course as a first- Read More at State College (Source: JEMS: Journal of Emergency Medical Services News)
Source: JEMS: Journal of Emergency Medical Services News - March 30, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Training News Source Type: news

WPI Scientists Developing Patch For Diseased Hearts Using Spinach Leaves
WORCESTER(CBS) – Biomedical engineers at Worcester Polytechnic Institute are working on a patch for diseased hearts that uses spinach leaves. When mixed with human stem cells, the veins in spinach could become heart muscle that pumps blood when the original organ is infected or damaged. “And so we haven’t actually put blood in there we put dye in there and we put small particles that represent blood cells and those flow right through the leaves,” said biomedical engineering professor Glenn Gaudette. During the process, the green of the spinach is removed, leaving just the cellulose structure. Spinac...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - March 24, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Health Local News Syndicated Local Watch Listen Glenn Gaudette Lana Jones Spinach Worcester Worcester Polytechnic Institute Source Type: news

Scientists Invented A Headband That Could Help Us Better Understand Each Other
This reporting is brought to you by HuffPost’s health and science platform, The Scope. Like us on Facebook and Twitter and tell us your story: scopestories@huffingtonpost.com.   Sarah DiGiulio is The Huffington Post’s sleep reporter. You can contact her at sarah.digiulio@huffingtonpost.com.  -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website. (Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post)
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - March 24, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Scientists Invented A Headband That Could Help Us Better Understand Each Other
This reporting is brought to you by HuffPost’s health and science platform, The Scope. Like us on Facebook and Twitter and tell us your story: scopestories@huffingtonpost.com.   Sarah DiGiulio is The Huffington Post’s sleep reporter. You can contact her at sarah.digiulio@huffingtonpost.com.  -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website. (Source: Science - The Huffington Post)
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - March 24, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

Professor, researcher in brain machine interfaces to speak at Louisiana Tech
(Louisiana Tech University) Louisiana Tech University's Center for Biomedical Engineering and Rehabilitation Science (CBERS) and its Consortium on Neuronal Networks in Epilepsy and Memory (NeuroNEM) will host a presentation by Dr. Jose C. Principe, Distinguished Professor of Electrical and Biomedical Engineering at the University of Florida, as part of the Seminar Series on Probing and Understanding the Brain. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - March 13, 2017 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Paper pumps power portable microfluidics, biomedical devices
Biomedical engineering researchers have developed inexpensive paper pumps that use capillary action to power portable microfluidic devices, opening the door to a range of biomedical tools. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - March 8, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

Here ’s how you heat up cold hearts—for transplantation
[Photo courtesy University of Minnesota]A University of Minnesota–led research team has successfully warmed large-scale animal heart valves and blood vessels that were previously preserved at low temperatures. The discovery of this rewarming process is pivotal for organs and tissues that are left in storage for transplantation for extended periods. “This is the first time that anyone has been able to scale up to a larger biological system and demonstrate successful, fast, and uniform warming hundreds of degrees Celsius per minute of preserved tissue without damaging the tissue,” said John Bischof, a Unive...
Source: Mass Device - March 8, 2017 Category: Medical Equipment Authors: Danielle Kirsh Tags: Biotech Transplants Cryogenics MedTech organ donation University of Minnesota Source Type: news

Paper pumps power portable microfluidics, biomedical devices
(North Carolina State University) Biomedical engineering researchers have developed inexpensive paper pumps that use capillary action to power portable microfluidic devices, opening the door to a range of biomedical tools. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - March 8, 2017 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Call for Papers: EHB 2017 - IEEE International Conference on e-Health and Bioengineering
22 - 24 June 2017, Sinaia, Romania. The 6-th edition of the International Conference on e-Health and Bioengineering, EHB 2017, will take place in the city of Sinaia, Romania. This year the conference motto is "Developing technologies for a better tomorrow", the sub-domains and topics of medical bioengineering and biomedical engineering represent fundamental pillars for the reinforcement of medical research and of health care. (Source: eHealth News EU)
Source: eHealth News EU - March 6, 2017 Category: Information Technology Tags: Featured Conferences and Events Source Type: news

New method rescues donor organs to save lives
(Columbia University School of Engineering and Applied Science) Researchers from Columbia Engineering and Columbia University Medical Center have -- for the first time -- maintained a fully functional lung outside the body for several days. They designed the cross-circulation platform that maintained the viability and function of the donor lung and the stability of the recipient over 36-56 hours, used the advanced support system to fully recover the functionality of lungs injured by ischemia and made them suitable for transplant. (Nature Biomedical Engineering 3/6) (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - March 6, 2017 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Biomedical Engineering hosts national conference on STEM education for underserved students
(University of Akron) The University of Akron hosts a national conference aimed at ensuring underserved students have access to opportunities in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM). Taking place March 8-10, 2017, the conference is expected to draw 200 K-12 teachers and academics from across the nation. Through workshops and speakers, attendees explore why participation lags among underrepresented racial, ethnic and socioeconomic students. The LeBron James Family Foundation, NASA Glenn Research Center, and Facing History will be presenters. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - March 3, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

4 Key Insights When Raising Money for Your Medtech Startup: Interview with Bruce Shook, CEO of Intact Vascular
Welcome to the Medsider interview series, a regular feature at MassDevice. All interviews are conducted by Scott Nelson, Founder of Medsider and Group Director for WCG. We hope you enjoy them! Bruce Shook joined Intact Vascular in 2014 as President and CEO. A highly-experienced, medical device executive with more than 30 years of industry experience, Bruce was previously Co-founder, Director, President, and CEO of Neuronetics, which is a privately held medical device company that markets a non-invasive brain stimulation technology for the treatment of depression. Previously, Shook was Co-founder, Director, P...
Source: Mass Device - February 27, 2017 Category: Medical Equipment Authors: Danielle Kirsh Tags: Blog medsider Source Type: news

EEG-based driver fatigue detection using hybrid deep generic model - San PP, Ling SH, Chai R, Tran Y, Craig A, Nguyen H, Phyo Phyo San, Sai Ho Ling, Rifai Chai, Tran Y, Craig A, Hung Nguyen, Craig A, Ling SH, Nguyen H, San PP, Tran Y, Chai R.
Classification of electroencephalography (EEG)-based application is one of the important process for biomedical engineering. Driver fatigue is a major case of traffic accidents worldwide and considered as a significant problem in recent decades. In this pa... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - February 27, 2017 Category: Global & Universal Tags: Distraction, Fatigue, Chronobiology, Vigilance, Workload Source Type: news

DNA computer brings 'intelligent drugs' a step closer
Researchers at Eindhoven University of Technology (TU/e) present a new method that should enable controlled drug delivery into the bloodstream using DNA computers. In the journal Nature Communications the team, led by biomedical engineer Maarten Merkx, describes how it has developed the first DNA computer capable of detecting several antibodies in the blood and performing subsequent calculations based on this input. (Source: World Pharma News)
Source: World Pharma News - February 17, 2017 Category: Pharmaceuticals Tags: Featured Research Research and Development Source Type: news

DNA computer brings 'intelligent drugs' a step closer
(Eindhoven University of Technology) Researchers at Eindhoven University of Technology present a new method that should enable controlled drug delivery into the bloodstream using DNA computers. Led by biomedical engineer Maarten Merkx the team developed the first DNA computer capable of detecting several antibodies in the blood and performing subsequent calculations based on this input. This is an important step towards the development of smart, 'intelligent' drugs that may allow better control of medication with fewer side-effects and at lower cost. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 17, 2017 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Biocompatible 3-D tracking system has potential to improve robot-assisted surgery
(Children's National Health System) The cutting-edge biocompatible near-infrared 3-D tracking system used to guide the suturing in the first smart tissue autonomous robot (STAR) surgery has the potential to improve manual and robot-assisted surgery and interventions through unobstructed 3-D visibility and enhanced accuracy, according to a study published in the March 2017 issue of IEEE Transactions on Biomedical Engineering. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 17, 2017 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Researchers develop device that emulates human kidney function
(Binghamton University) Instead of running tests on live kidneys, researchers at Binghamton, University State University of New York have developed a model kidney for working out the kinks in medicines and treatments.Developed by Assistant Professor Gretchen Mahler and Binghamton biomedical engineering alumna Courtney Sakolish Ph.D. '16, the reusable, multi-layered and microfluidic device incorporates a porous growth substrate, with a physiological fluid flow, and the passive filtration of the capillaries around the end of a kidney, called the glomerulus, where waste is filtered from blood. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 9, 2017 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

The Dish: Katie Button
Growing up in New Jersey, Katie Button was a serious student, going on to earn a master's degree in biomedical engineering and entering a PhD program. But she soon discovered her heart was in the kitchen. She was chosen for an internship at Spain's famous "El Bulli." She went on to open "Curate" and "Nightbell" in Asheville, North Carolina. Button joins "CBS This Morning: Saturday" to share her culinary journey and signature dishes. (Source: Health News: CBSNews.com)
Source: Health News: CBSNews.com - February 4, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

How to go from idea to commercialization: Interview with Dr. Marie Johnson, Founder of AUM Cardiovascular
Welcome to the Medsider interview series, a regular feature at MassDevice. All interviews are conducted by Scott Nelson, Founder of Medsider and Group Director for WCG. We hope you enjoy them! More than a decade ago, AUM Cardiovascular founder Dr. Marie Johnson was a doctoral student when tragedy struck her and her family. Her husband, Rob, passed away suddenly at the age of 41. He had blockages in his coronary arteries including a ruptured plaque in the left anterior descending artery supplying a large part of the heart muscle. At that time, Dr. Johnson had been working on a prototype device to listen to he...
Source: Mass Device - February 2, 2017 Category: Medical Equipment Authors: Danielle Kirsh Tags: Blog johnson medsider Source Type: news

Media registration now open for 'Bio in Beer-Sheva, Israel: The Murray Fromson Journalism Fellowship'
(American Associates, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev) This year, the Fromson Fellowship cohort will offer up to 10 selected science, health and medical journalists the opportunity to report on the myriad biomedical research projects and innovations that are being developed at or in partnership with BGU. Meetings will be held with top researchers and business leaders in the fields of biomedical engineering, robotics, nanomedicine, infectious diseases, sleep and nutrition, who will present new and soon-to-be-published research. Click here for the detailed preliminary itinerary. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - January 26, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

The beating heart of solar energy
(Springer) Using solar cells placed under the skin to continuously recharge implanted electronic medical devices is a viable one. Swiss researchers have done the math, and found that a 3.6 square centimeter solar cell is all that is needed to generate enough power during winter and summer to power a typical pacemaker. The study, led by Lukas Bereuter of Bern University Hospital and the University of Bern, is published in Springer's journal Annals of Biomedical Engineering. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 3, 2017 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Researchers develop nanosensor to differentiate cancer cells and healthy cells in surgery
Researchers from the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center have developed a threshold nanosensor that can differentiate between cancerous cells and healthy tissue during surgery. The team’s work was published in Nature Biomedical Engineering.  “We synthesized an imaging probe that stays dark in normal tissues but switches on like a light bulb when it reaches solid tumors. The purpose is to allow surgeons to see tumors better during surgery,” co-senior author Jinming Gao said in prepared remarks. Get the full story at our sister site, Drug Delivery Business News. The post Researche...
Source: Mass Device - December 21, 2016 Category: Medical Equipment Authors: Sarah Faulkner Tags: Diagnostics Oncology Research & Development Surgical University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center Source Type: news