Rapid lateral flow immunoassay developed for fluorescence detection of SARS-CoV-2 RNA
(Chinese Academy of Sciences Headquarters) Scientists from the Suzhou Institute of Biomedical Engineering and Technology have developed a novel amplification-free rapid SARS-CoV-2 nucleic acid detection platform based on hybrid capture fluorescence immunoassay (HC-FIA). (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - December 10, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Mayo Clinic innovator helps patients, is inducted as fellow in National Academy of Inventors
ROCHESTER, Minn. -- Samuel Asirvatham, M.D., was inducted as a fellow into the National Academy of Inventors, the highest professional distinction accorded solely to academic inventors. Dr. Asirvatham is a Mayo Clinic cardiologist and electrophysiologist, with joint appointments in Pediatric Cardiology, Physiology and Biomedical Engineering, and Anatomy. He is a professor of medicine and pediatrics [...] (Source: News from Mayo Clinic)
Source: News from Mayo Clinic - December 8, 2020 Category: Databases & Libraries Source Type: news

U of M biomedical engineering professor lands $1.3M from Dept. of Defense
This year, Amber Jennings ’ research on chitosan-based biomaterials has yielded two U.S. Department of Defense awards related to healing technologies. (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care News Headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care News Headlines - November 30, 2020 Category: Health Management Authors: Jason Bolton Source Type: news

U of M biomedical engineering professor lands $1.3M from Dept. of Defense
This year, Amber Jennings ’ research on chitosan-based biomaterials has yielded two U.S. Department of Defense awards related to healing technologies. (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - November 30, 2020 Category: Biotechnology Authors: Jason Bolton Source Type: news

Proving viability of injection-free microneedle for single-administration of vaccines
(University of Connecticut) A single-use, self-administered microneedle technology developed by UConn faculty to provide immunization against infectious diseases has recently been validated by preclinical research trials.Recently published in Nature Biomedical Engineering, the development and preclinical testing of the microneedle patches was reported by UConn researchers in the lab of Thanh Nguyen, assistant professor in the Departments of Mechanical Engineering and Biomedical Engineering. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - November 23, 2020 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Frugal science--a low-cost way to decontaminate PPE equipment
(University of Delaware) In the age of COVID-19, being able to MacGyver a solution to reliably decontaminate masks and other PPE equipment could make a real impact. University of Delaware researchers, led by biomedical engineer Jason Gleghorn, have devised a system for decontaminating N95 masks using off-the-shelf materials that can be purchased at a hardware store for about $50, combined with ultraviolet type C (UV-C) lights found in academic research and industrial facilities. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - November 10, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

University of Sydney research could lead to customised cochlear implants
(University of Sydney) A School of Biomedical Engineering researcher has analysed the accuracy of predictions for cochlear implant outcomes, with a view to further improve their performance in noisy environments. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - October 19, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New method uses noise to make spectrometers more accurate
(University of California - Davis) Optical spectrometers are instruments with a wide variety of uses. By measuring the intensity of light across different wavelengths, they can be used to image tissues or measure the chemical composition of everything from a distant galaxy to a leaf. Now researchers at the UC Davis Department of Biomedical Engineering have come up a with a new, rapid method for characterizing and calibrating spectrometers, based on how they respond to " noise. " (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - October 13, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Oak Ridge National Laboratory, UT's Tony Schmitz elected to ASPE College of Fellows
(DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory) Tony Schmitz, joint faculty researcher in machining and machine tools at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and mechanical, aerospace and biomedical engineering professor at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, has been elected to the College of Fellows of the American Society for Precision Engineering. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - October 9, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Drugmakers now have something to chew on in the future – medicated gum
(Natural News) Conventional drugs can be taken orally in different forms—from liquid syrups, gelatin capsules, and compressed tablets to soft-gel formulations. However, researchers from the University of Bristol in the U.K. have proposed a new method of orally administering drugs: by adding them in chewing gum. The researchers’ study, published in IEEE Transactions on Biomedical Engineering, involved the use... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - October 5, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

The Presidential Debate Was the Kind of COVID-19 Risk Experts Have Been Warning Us About
For months, experts have hammered home this message: The riskiest place to be during the COVID-19 pandemic is a poorly-ventilated indoor environment with lots of other people, particularly if those people are unmasked. If even one person in such circumstances is infected, an innocent gathering can quickly turn into a super-spreading event. In a worst-case scenario, Tuesday’s presidential debate could turn into just such a catastrophe, following news of President Donald Trump’s coronavirus diagnosis. “This incident here with the President is illustrative of what can happen,” says David Edwards, a bio...
Source: TIME: Health - October 2, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 UnitedWeRise20Disaster Source Type: news

Consumers may be able to test for Covid-19 with devices they already own, Hopkins finds
A group of Johns Hopkins researchers are developing a new low-cost Covid-19 testing method, drawing inspiration from a device that millions of people already have in their homes. A research team led by Netz Arroyo, assistant professor of pharmacology and molecular sciences, Jamie Spangler, assistant professor of biomedical engineering, and Taekjip Ha, a professor of biophysics and biomedical engineering at Johns Hopkins, is aiming to develop a test for the coronavirus that could be distributed… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines - September 29, 2020 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Morgan Eichensehr Source Type: news

After developing CRISPR test, UConn researchers validate clinical feasibility for COVID-19 testing
(University of Connecticut) In March, researchers in the Department of Biomedical Engineering-- a shared department in the schools of Dental Medicine, Medicine, and Engineering--began to develop a new, low-cost, CRISPR-based diagnostic platform to detect infectious diseases, including HIV virus, the novel coronavirus (SARS-CoV-2). Today, the method is one step closer to being a cutting-edge diagnostics technology for rapid detection of infectious diseases. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - September 18, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Fighting breast cancer with nanotech, immunotherapy  
(Case Western Reserve University) Scientists led by a   researcher at the Case Western Reserve University   School of Medicine   are making strides to fight deadly metastatic breast cancer by combining nanotechnology with immunotherapy. Efstathios " Stathis " Karathanasis,   an associate professor of biomedical engineering,   is directing the novel technique--sending nanoparticles into the body to wake up " cold " tumors so they can be located and neutralized by immune cells. The team also includes researchers from Cleveland Clinic and Duke University. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 14, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Powerful push for AI for cancer immunotherapy
(Case Western Reserve University) The companies will provide biomedical engineer Anant Madabhushi and collaborators at NYU with chest CT scan and/or digital pathology images from completed clinical trials in which their specific immunotherapy drugs were tested on lung cancer patients. Madabhushi's lab's computational-imaging tools have shown " potential to predict an individual cancer patient's response to immunotherapy, " so the collaboration can help validate research and " advance efforts to get the right treatment to the patients who will benefit the most. " (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 10, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

A window into adolescence
(University of Delaware) Why do some adolescents take more risks than others? Research from University of Delaware Biomedical Engineer Curtis Johnson and graduate student Grace McIlvain suggests that two centers in the brain, one which makes adolescents want to take risks and the other which prevents them from acting on these impulses, physically mature at different rates and that adolescents with large differences in the rate of development between these two brain regions are more likely to be risk-takers. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - September 9, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Using tattoo ink to find cancer
(University of Southern California) The humble ink in a tattoo artist's needle could be the key to improving the detection of cancer. Cristina Zavaleta and her team at the USC Viterbi Department of Biomedical Engineering and USC Michelson Center for Bioscience recently developed new imaging contrast agents using common dyes such as tattoo ink and food dyes. When these dyes are attached to nanoparticles, they can illuminate cancers, allowing medical professionals to better differentiate between cancer cells and normal adjacent cells. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - September 2, 2020 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Researcher receives NIH grant to study noninvasive treatment for metastatic breast tumors
(Virginia Tech) Eli Vlaisavljevich, an assistant professor of biomedical engineering and mechanics at Virginia Tech, received a Trailblazer Award from the National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering of the National Institutes of Health to research possible treatments for metastatic breast cancer. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - August 28, 2020 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

South Africa: Simple Tech Solution Is an Ear Saver
[UCT] University of Cape Town (UCT) MSc student in biomedical engineering Lara Timm calls her ear saver solution the UCT Hearo. It's a neat and practical design that improves the comfort and fit of face masks with ear loops, typically worn by frontline medical staff working long shifts to contain COVID-19. (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - August 14, 2020 Category: African Health Source Type: news

Arguments Against Aerosol Transmission Don't Hold Water Arguments Against Aerosol Transmission Don't Hold Water
WebMD chief medical officer John Whyte talks with biomedical engineer Dr Yaakov (Koby) Nahmias about how SARS-CoV-2 attacks the lungs and what drugs may help combat COVID-19.Medscape Internal Medicine (Source: Medscape Internal Medicine Headlines)
Source: Medscape Internal Medicine Headlines - July 30, 2020 Category: Internal Medicine Tags: Internal Medicine Commentary Source Type: news

Researchers find increase in comorbidities among hospitalized patients with heart failure
(University of North Carolina Health Care) Melissa Caughey, PhD, instructor in the UNC/NC State Joint Department of Biomedical Engineering, is the senior author of a recently published study that shows an increase in comorbidities and mortality risk among hospitalized patients with acute decompensated HFpEF and HFrEF. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 30, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Rena Bizios to receive the BioMedSA Award for Innovation in Healthcare and Bioscience
(University of Texas at San Antonio) BioMedSA, the non-profit corporation founded in 2005 to promote and grow San Antonio's leading industry, healthcare and bioscience, will present its 2020 BioMedSA Award for Innovation in Healthcare and Bioscience to Dr. Rena Bizios, the Lutcher Brown Endowed Chair in the UTSA Department of Biomedical Engineering. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - July 30, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Can Cholesterol Drugs and Antihistamines Fight COVID-19? Can Cholesterol Drugs and Antihistamines Fight COVID-19?
WebMD chief medical officer   John   Whyte   talks with biomedical engineer Dr Yaakov (Koby) Nahmias about how SARS-CoV-2 attacks the lungs and what drugs may help combat COVID-19.WebMD (Source: Medscape Today Headlines)
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - July 29, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Public Health & Prevention Expert Interview Source Type: news

Researcher receives $5M grant to further cancer studies
(Texas A&M University) On May 20, Dr. Tanmay Lele, professor in the Department of Biomedical Engineering at Texas A&M University, received a $5 million Recruitment of Established Investigators grant from the Cancer Prevention and Research Institute of Texas (CPRIT) to further knowledge about cancer and how it progresses. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - July 22, 2020 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Johnson & Johnson Announces Winners of 2020 Women in STEM2D Scholars Award
(New Brunswick, N.J. – June 18) – Johnson & Johnson today announced the six winners of the third annual Johnson & Johnson Women in STEM2D (WiSTEM2D) Scholars Award. Each recipient, representing each of the STEM2D disciplines: Science, Technology, Engineering, Math, Manufacturing and Design, will receive a grant of $150,000 and three years of mentorship. Launched in June 2017, the Johnson & Johnson WiSTEM2D Scholars Award seeks to fuel development of future female STEM2D leaders and feed the STEM2D talent pipeline by awarding and sponsoring women at critical points in their careers. The goal is to su...
Source: Johnson and Johnson - June 18, 2020 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Heart attack in a dish: a 3D model
(Medical University of South Carolina) Researchers in the Medical University of South Carolina Clemson Bioengineering program report in Nature Biomedical Engineering that they have developed human cardiac organoids that model what happens in a heart attack in a microtissue less than 1 millimeter in diameter. This is the first model that accurately recapitulates the complex tissue dysfunction after a heart attack with multiple human cell types in one organoid. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 12, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Texas A & M researchers light cells using nanosheets for cancer treatment
(Texas A&M University) Scientists in the Department of Biomedical Engineering at Texas A&M University are developing new ways to advance the field of regenerative medicine and cancer treatment. They are developing a 2D nanosheet that is 1,000 times smaller than a strand of hair. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - June 10, 2020 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Mount Sinai receives Microsoft AI for health grant to support COVID informatics center
(The Mount Sinai Hospital / Mount Sinai School of Medicine) New York, NY (June 08, 2020) The Mount Sinai Health System has received an award from Microsoft AI for Health to support the work of a new data science center dedicated to COVID-19 research. The Mount Sinai COVID Informatics Center (MSCIC) brings together leaders from entities across Mount Sinai, including the Hasso Plattner Institute for Digital Health, the Department of Genetics and Genomic Sciences, and the BioMedical Engineering and Imaging Institute. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 8, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Researchers find new way to detect blood clots
(Texas A&M University) Researchers in the Department of Biomedical Engineering at Texas A&M University are working on an entirely new way to detect blood clots, especially in pediatric patients. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 3, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

A remote control for neurons
(College of Engineering, Carnegie Mellon University) A team led by researchers at Carnegie Mellon University has created a new technology that enhances scientists' ability to communicate with neural cells using light. Tzahi Cohen-Karni, associate professor of biomedical engineering and materials science and engineering, led a team that synthesized three-dimensional fuzzy graphene on a nanowire template to create a superior material for photothermally stimulating cells. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 1, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

National Academy of Medicine announces 10 emerging leaders in health and medicine
(National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine) The National Academy of Medicine (NAM) today announced the 2020 Emerging Leaders in Health and Medicine Scholars. These individuals are early- to mid-career professionals from a wide range of health-related fields, from emergency medicine and health economics to biomedical engineering and research and public health policy. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 5, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Does cannabis use amplify the effect of prenatal alcohol exposure and vice versa?
(University of Houston) University of Houston professor of biomedical engineering, Kirill Larin, received a $2.5 million grant from the National Institutes of Health to find out if the combined ingestion of marijuana and alcohol by pregnant mothers will, as hypothesized, result in increased neurogenic and neurovascular deficits in exposed offspring. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 28, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

CAS team develops quick detection system for COVID-19 cases
(Chinese Academy of Sciences Headquarters) A new on-site nucleic acid detection system for quick identification of the SARS-CoV-2 that causes COVID-19 was recently developed by a research team at the Suzhou Institute of Biomedical Engineering and Technology (SIBET) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - April 24, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

High density EEG produces dynamic image of brain signal source
(College of Engineering, Carnegie Mellon University) Marking a major milestone on the path to meeting the objectives of the NIH BRAIN initiative, research by Carnegie Mellon's Biomedical Engineering Department Head Bin He advances high-density electroencephalography (EEG) as the future paradigm for dynamic functional neuroimaging. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 23, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Stabilizing Brain-Computer Interfaces
Researchers from Carnegie Mellon University (CMU) and the University of Pittsburgh (Pitt) have published research in Nature Biomedical Engineering that will drastically improve brain-computer interfaces and their ability to remain stabilized during use, greatly reducing or potentially eliminating the need to recalibrate these devices during or between experiments. (Source: eHealth News EU)
Source: eHealth News EU - April 21, 2020 Category: Information Technology Tags: Featured Research Research and Development Source Type: news

Mind over body: The search for stronger brain-computer interfaces
(University of Pittsburgh) Researchers at the University of Pittsburgh and Carnegie Mellon University are working on understanding how the brain works when learning tasks with the help of brain-computer interface technology. In a set of papers, the second of which was published in Nature Biomedical Engineering, the team is moving the needle forward on brain-computer interface technology intended to help improve the lives of amputee patients who use neural prosthetics. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 20, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Stabilizing brain-computer interfaces
(College of Engineering, Carnegie Mellon University) Researchers from Carnegie Mellon University (CMU) and the University of Pittsburgh (Pitt) have published research in Nature Biomedical Engineering that will drastically improve brain-computer interfaces and their ability to remain stabilized during use, greatly reducing or potentially eliminating the need to recalibrate these devices during or between experiments. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 20, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Researchers develop synthetic scaffolds to heal injured tendons and ligaments
(University of Sydney) Top biomedical engineering researcher develops synthetic scaffolds for tendon and ligament regeneration. Previous synthetic tendon grafts have led to poor outcomes and implant rejection. Australia has one of the highest rates of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries in the world -- and up to 25 percent of surgeries require revision. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 14, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Mucus and the coronavirus
(University of Utah) University of Utah biomedical engineering assistant professor Jessica R. Kramer has received a National Science Foundation grant to study how mucus, the slimy substance in human tissue, plays a role in spreading coronaviruses like COVID-19. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - March 31, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Finnish researchers join forces to investigate the airborne transmission of coronavirus
(Aalto University) The project includes fluid dynamics physicists, virologists and biomedical engineering specialists. The researchers are using a supercomputer to carry out 3D modelling and believe that the first results will be obtained in the next few weeks. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - March 25, 2020 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

UD's Jason Gleghorn receives NSF career award
(University of Delaware) The University of Delaware's Jason Gleghorn, an assistant professor in biomedical engineering with a joint appointment in biological sciences, has received a National Science Foundation (NSF) Faculty Early Career Development Award to understand how the body's adaptive immune system activates. He said that he will use the five-year, $550,000 grant to develop a new class of microfluidic devices to culture an entire lymph node outside the body and study the cells' behavior in real time. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - March 25, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Virginia Boy 3D Prints Mask for Sick Uncle and Others
At a time when people all across the globe are frightened and dismayed, it is uplifting to see kindness and compassion trending. And on Twitter, of all places. Renee Randolph, a culinary arts and sciences instructor in Arlington, VA, is going viral on Twitter this weekend after she tweeted about her son using a 3D printer to make a face mask for his high-risk uncle who is at home waiting for a heart transplant. Best of all, he is printing more masks to donate. Randolph's tweet had been liked by nearly 25,000 people and about 4,000 people had retweeted it as of Saturday afternoon. Scree...
Source: MDDI - March 22, 2020 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Amanda Pedersen Tags: 3-D Printing Source Type: news

12 Open Topic Professorships for Artificial Intelligence in Biomedical Engineering
Location: Erlangen, Nürnberg, Germany Job Type: Full-Time Employer: Friedrich-Alexander-Universität (FAU) Within the framework of the Hightech Agenda Bavaria, Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg (FAU) invites applications for up to 12 Open Topic Professorships for Artificial Intelligence in Biomedical Engineering at the new Department of Artificial Intelligence in Biomedical Engineering at the Faculty of Engineering. (Source: eHealth News EU)
Source: eHealth News EU - March 19, 2020 Category: Information Technology Tags: Featured Jobs Source Type: news

Muscle stem cells compiled in 'atlas'
(Cornell University) A team of Cornell researchers led by Ben Cosgrove, assistant professor in the Meinig School of Biomedical Engineering, used a new cellular profiling technology to probe and catalog the activity of almost every kind of cell involved in muscle repair. They compiled their findings into a 'cell atlas' of muscle regeneration that is one of the largest datasets of its kind. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - March 10, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Handheld 3D Printer Could Be Game Changer in Burn and Trauma Care
A new handheld 3D printer that looks sort of like a packing tape dispenser can apply sheets of skin to cover large burn wounds, and its “bio ink” can accelerate the healing process, according to researchers from University of Toronto Engineering and Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre in Toronto. The handheld 3D printer can apply sheets of skin to cover large burn wounds. It could be seen in a clinical setting within the next five years, according to researchers. Image courtesy Daria Perevezentsev/University of Toronto Engineering News. The device covers wounds with a uniform sheet of bio...
Source: MDDI - March 8, 2020 Category: Medical Devices Tags: Plastics Today Source Type: news

New imaging technique enables the study of 3D printed brain tumors
(Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute) In research published in Science Advances, Xavier Intes, a professor of biomedical engineering at Rensselaer, joined a multidisciplinary team from Northeastern University and the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai to demonstrate a methodology that combines the bioprinting and imaging of glioblastoma cells in a cost-effective way that more closely models what happens inside the human body. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - March 6, 2020 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Robot research honored
(University of Delaware) The National Science Foundation has recognized Fabrizio Sergi, assistant professor of biomedical engineering at the University of Delaware, with its CAREER award to support fundamental research in motor control. His work is seeking to help those with movement disorders and identify robot-based interventions. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 28, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Lensless on-chip microscopy platform shows slides in full view
(University of Connecticut) Guoan Zheng, a University of Connecticut professor of biomedical engineering, recently published his findings on a successful demonstration of a lensless on-chip microscopy platform that eliminates several of the most common problems with conventional optical microscopy and provides a low-cost option for the diagnosis of disease. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 19, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Best Bargain Schools for Biomedical Engineering
(Source: MDDI)
Source: MDDI - February 14, 2020 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Amanda Pedersen Tags: R & D Source Type: news