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Medtec Europe 2018 Expands Industry Association Partners to Become Most Connected and Innovative Medtec Event to Date
17 - 19 April 2018, Stuttgart, Germany. UBM is delighted to announce the addition of industry association VDE DGBMT (German Society for Biomedical Engineering) as a key event partner for Medtec Europe 2018, alongside a strengthened partnership with Fraunhofer IPA and Landesmesse Stuttgart to deliver the second Medical Device Manufacturing Conference. These, along with its existing partnerships, will help ensure that Medtec Europe 2018 continues to lead as a hub of medical technology trends. (Source: eHealth News EU)
Source: eHealth News EU - December 12, 2017 Category: Information Technology Tags: Featured Events Conferences and Events Source Type: news

Three Duke biomedical engineers join National Academy of Inventors
(Duke University) The National Academy of Inventors (NAI) has elected three faculty members from Duke University's department of biomedical engineering to its 2017 class of Fellows: Joseph Izatt, the Michael J. Fitzpatrick Professor of Engineering; Nimmi Ramanujam, the Robert W. Carr, Jr. Professor of Biomedical Engineering and the director of the Global Women's Health Technologies Center; and Tuan Vo-Dinh, the Goodson Professor of Biomedical Engineering, professor of chemistry and the director of the Fitzpatrick Institute for Photonics. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - December 12, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

3D-printed mask saves puppy after she fractured her skull
The Exo-K9 exoskeleton is a 3D printed mask for dogs with injuries to their jaw. It was developed by veterinarians and biomedical engineering students at the University of California, Davis. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - December 6, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Tufts University engineer wins Air Force grant for ultra-high-resolution bio-imaging
(Tufts University) Xiaocheng Jiang, assistant professor of biomedical engineering in the School of Engineering at Tufts University, has been awarded an early-career award from the Air Force Office of Scientific Research (AFOSR) for his work developing graphene-based microfluidics for ultra-high-resolution, dynamic bio-imaging. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - November 28, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Is the First Bioprinted Heart Just Around the Corner?
A Chicago bioprinting startup that seeks to 3-D print human hearts for transplantation has added to its scientific advisory board of heavy hitters. But its CEO won’t say how close the company is to producing its first viable heart. Biolife4D just announced it has added regenerative biomaterials expert Adam  Feinberg, PhD to lead its scientific advisory team. Feinberg is associate professor of materials science & engineering and biomedical engineering at Carnegie Mellon University and principal investigator of the regenerative biomaterials and therapeutics group. Feinberg uses materials-based engine...
Source: MDDI - November 17, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Nancy Crotti Tags: Cardiovascular Implants Source Type: news

Grand Challenges Explorations grant for Strathclyde
(University of Strathclyde) The University of Strathclyde has announced that it is a Grand Challenges Explorations winner, an initiative funded by the Bill& Melinda Gates Foundation. Professor Patricia Connolly, of Strathclyde's Department of Biomedical Engineering, will pursue an innovative global health and development research project, which offers a way to monitor premature and at-risk babies without the need for blood samples. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - November 16, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Africa:Africa Needs to Start Creating Its Own Medical Technology. Here's How
[The Conversation Africa] Biomedical engineering can save lives. It draws on and integrates knowledge from disciplines like engineering, computer science, biomedical sciences, and public health as well as clinical practice. This knowledge is combined to improve health - often through the design of medical devices for diagnosis, treatment and rehabilitation. (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - November 9, 2017 Category: African Health Source Type: news

Rivanna tackles epidural failure rates with its hand-held imaging device
When they were students in the biomedical engineering department at the University of Virginia, Will Mauldin and Kevin Owen found a problem that needed solving – anesthesiologists often fail to successfully place an epidural on their first try. It’s a problem that costs the medical system more than $1.5 billion each year, according to Rivanna Medical. “The failure rates are between 30 – 80% depending on the type of patient and the user’s skill. So, that sounded very high,” Mauldin told Drug Delivery Business News. “Meanwhile, ultrasound had basically taken over in the ane...
Source: Mass Device - November 7, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Sarah Faulkner Tags: Drug-Device Combinations Hospital Care Imaging Pain Management Pharmaceuticals Spinal Rivanna Medical Source Type: news

World Conference & Expo on Biomedical Engineering
July 16-17, 2018; Miami, FL. (Source: HSR Information Central)
Source: HSR Information Central - November 7, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Could a saliva test be next for lupus?
(University of Houston) Chandra Mohan, a University of Houston professor of biomedical engineering, is proposing a simple lupus test that just uses saliva. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 6, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

BU researchers create tool to measure, control protein aggregation
(Boston University College of Engineering) In the cover article in the current issue of Cell, BU Biomedical Engineer Ahmad S. Khalil along with colleagues from MIT and the Whitehead Institute for Biomedical Research, among others, describe the synthetic genetic tool they built to quantitatively sense, measure and manipulate protein aggregation in live cells. This may open the door to greater understanding and treatment of a range of maladies from Alzheimer's to type II diabetes. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - October 20, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Georgia International Awards: International Education Program Finalists
Students travel to that country and fit more than 7,000 amputees with prosthetic legs, invented and patented by Mercer biomedical engineering professor Ha Van Vo, at no cost. (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - October 15, 2017 Category: Biotechnology Source Type: news

Georgia International Awards: International Education Program Finalists
Students travel to that country and fit more than 7,000 amputees with prosthetic legs, invented and patented by Mercer biomedical engineering professor Ha Van Vo, at no cost. (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines - October 14, 2017 Category: American Health Source Type: news

Lehigh to present research out of newly-launched Bioengineering Dept. at BMES
(Lehigh University) Lehigh University's newly established Department of Bioengineering is presenting in 18 poster and panel sessions at the annual meeting of the Biomedical Engineering Society (BMES) in Phoenix, Arizona from October 12-14, 2017. Additionally, Anand Jagota, professor and founding chair of the department, and Stephen DeWeerth, professor and dean of Rossin College, will formally kick off the international search for a permanent department chair. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - October 12, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

New functions of hippocampus unveiled
(The University of Hong Kong) A research team led by Lam Woo Professor of Biomedical Engineering Ed X. Wu of the Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering at the University of Hong Kong has made major breakthrough in unveiling the mysteries of the brain to reveal functions of an important region, hippocampus, not known to scientists before. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 29, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

The feds just tapped this George Mason University spinout to identify the next virus outbreak
From the Ebola to chikungunya to the Zika virus, more outbreaks that used to be confined to tropical climates are making their way to U.S. soil. Now a George Mason University spinout is being tapped to help find a better way to identify future threats. Ceres Nanosciences and George Mason University will join Seattle-based biomedical engineering company Tasso Inc. to develop a universal surveillance platform for infectious disease outbreak s. The $11.7 million program, which is being led by the U.S.… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines - September 28, 2017 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Tina Reed Source Type: news

UTSA receives $350,000 grant for prostate cancer research
(University of Texas at San Antonio) Jing Yong Ye, professor of biomedical engineering at The University of Texas at San Antonio (UTSA), has received a two-year, $354,617 grant from the National Institutes of Health's National Cancer Institute to support the development of his noninvasive method of detecting prostate cancer. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 25, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Developing highly specific computer models to better diagnose concussions in real time
(Worcester Polytechnic Institute) As fall sports seasons get under way and concerns related to concussions in contact sports continue to grow, a Worcester Polytechnic Institute biomedical engineering professor is developing better tools to understand the mechanics of traumatic brain injuries in athletes. With two grants from the National Institutes of Health, Songbai Ji is using advanced neuroimaging to develop highly specific computer models of the head and brain to better diagnose concussions in real time. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 13, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Electrical nerve-block research aims at asthma, heart failure
(Case Western Reserve University) Biomedical engineering researchers at Case Western Reserve University in Cleveland, Ohio, are refining more than 15 years of work on an electrical nerve-block implant, focusing their next step on new applications related to treating asthma and heart failure. The research builds on applications already in use for pain management and was bolstered recently by a four-year, $2 million National Institutes of Health grant. The research will be conducted in collaboration with teams at UCLA and Johns Hopkins University. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - August 29, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

UAB receives $4.8 million biomedical engineering grant
The University of Alabama at Birmingham aims to make headway in cardiovascular research this fall when $4.8 million in grants arrive from the National Institutes of Health. The grants will be awarded to biomedical engineering research that plans to attack two aspects of cardiovascular disease - heart failure after heart attacks and resistant high blood pressure. Two UAB investigators will be dividing the grant - Jiyani Zhang and Gangjian Qin. Zhang, who is the chair and professor of the biomedical… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines - August 25, 2017 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Tyler Patchen Source Type: news

Disease diagnostics take top honors of DEBUT biomedical engineering design competition
NIH and VentureWell support undergraduate biomedical engineering challenge seeking innovative devices to improve health globally. (Source: National Institutes of Health (NIH) News Releases)
Source: National Institutes of Health (NIH) News Releases - August 25, 2017 Category: American Health Source Type: news

New biomedical engineering grants aim at heart failure and resistant high blood pressure
(University of Alabama at Birmingham) Biomedical engineering researchers will attack two banes of cardiovascular disease -- heart failure after heart attacks and the scourge of resistant high blood pressure -- with $4.8 million in National Institutes of Health grants that begin this fall. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - August 24, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

SPM in Real Life: Summer ‘17
NEW MEMBERS: Summer ‘17 Welcome new member, Geoffrey Milos! Geoffrey writes that he has a great interest in electronic health records (EHR) and how they enable individuals to more fully participate in the management of their own health care. Patient access to their respective, complete EHR is key to this empowerment. Individuals seem to be making progress on this front, slowly but surely. Geoffrey is interested in active innovators in the personal health care application space, specifically applications that can accept provider-sourced EHR inputs and other organizations that actively promote individual acce...
Source: Society for Participatory Medicine - August 18, 2017 Category: General Medicine Authors: Nanette Mattox Tags: Newsletter Community Members New Members Summer '17 Source Type: news

So Youve Been Mistaken as a White Nationalist
Biomedical engineer Kyle Quinn fends off a frenzied Internet mob after being wrongly identified as a Charlottesville protester. (Source: The Scientist)
Source: The Scientist - August 18, 2017 Category: Science Tags: Daily News Source Type: news

UCLA researchers demonstrate new material that could aid body ’s cellular repair process
A research team led by UCLA biomolecular engineers and doctors has demonstrated a therapeutic material that could one day promote better tissue regeneration following a wound or a stroke.During the body ’s typical healing process, when tissues like skin are damaged the body grows replacement cells. Integrins are class of proteins that are important in the cellular processes critical to creating new tissue. One of the processes is cell adhesion, when new cells “stick” to the materials between cells, called the extracellular matrix. Another is cell migration, where at the cell’s surface, integrins hel...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - August 15, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Liposomes triggered by ultrasound enable targeted pain-relief
Researchers at Boston Children’s Hospital have developed a technology to non-invasively trigger the release of nerve-blocking agents, helping to provide targeted pain-relief to patients as an alternative to addictive opioids. The team’s work was published yesterday in Nature Biomedical Engineering. Get the full story at our sister site, Drug Delivery Business News. The post Liposomes triggered by ultrasound enable targeted pain-relief appeared first on MassDevice. (Source: Mass Device)
Source: Mass Device - August 10, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Sarah Faulkner Tags: Drug-Device Combinations Pain Management Pharmaceuticals Research & Development Ultrasound Boston Children's Hospital Source Type: news

A sodium surprise
(Washington University in St. Louis) Irregular heartbeat -- or arrhythmia -- can have sudden and often fatal consequences. A biomedical engineering team at Washington University in St. Louis examining molecular behavior in cardiac tissue recently made a surprising discovery that could someday impact treatment of the life-threatening condition. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - July 20, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Antibiotic-eluting polymer could help treat prosthetic joint infections
Researchers from Massachusetts General Hospital have developed an antibiotic-eluting polymer that could be used to treat infections in orthopedic implants, according to a report published in Nature Biomedical Engineering. Traditionally, treating a prosthetic joint infection involves removing an implant and replacing it with a temporary spacer made from antibiotic-releasing bone cement for at least six weeks. Then, a second surgery is needed to give the patient a new prosthesis. Get the full story at our sister site, Drug Delivery Business News. The post Antibiotic-eluting polymer could help treat prosthetic joint infection...
Source: Mass Device - July 19, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Sarah Faulkner Tags: Drug-Device Combinations Implants Pharmaceuticals Prosthetics Research & Development Surgical Massachusetts General Hospital Source Type: news

A heart attack in a petri dish
(New Jersey Institute of Technology) In her laboratory at NJIT, biomedical engineer Alice Lee develops tiny proto-hearts from stem cells that she subjects to 'attacks' to observe in real-time how the heart repairs itself. With National Science Foundation funding, she aims to advance cell-based therapies, unsuccessful as yet in part due to limited knowledge of the biological mechanisms of the transplanted stem cells. To date, researchers have focused on mimicking healthy hearts with the goal of providing living surgical replacements. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 17, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Advance furthers stem cells for use in drug discovery, cell therapy
(University of Wisconsin-Madison) Using an automated screening test that they devised, William Murphy, a professor of biomedical engineering, and colleagues Eric Nguyen and William Daly have invented an all-chemical replacement for the confusing, even dangerous materials, now used to grow stem cells. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 14, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Pulse rate monitoring before a C-section can improve maternal health
(Springer) Doctors often prescribe preventative drugs to women who are to receive spinal blocks while giving birth via a Caesarean section. Such preventative treatment against hypotension, however, can have side-effects. In a study in Springer's journal Annals of Biomedical Engineering, Augusto Navarro of the Miguel Servet University Hospital in Spain and collaborators investigate how clinicians can use aspects of pulse rate to decide whether blood pressure medication should be provided. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 11, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Zimmer Biomet launches X-PSI customized total knee replacement
Zimmer Biomet (NYSE:ZBH) said on Thursday it launched its X-PSI knee system, an X-ray-based, patient-specific surgical planning system designed for patient specific implant positioning using X-ray tech. The X-PSI system is designed for use with all of the Warsaw, Ind.-based company’s total knee brands, and allows surgeons to use X-ray images to generate 3D anatomical models. The system is then used to view the patients’ anatomy and develop a customized 3D surgical plan, the company said. “The use of innovative preoperative planning to enable patient-specific customization has the potential to become ...
Source: Mass Device - June 29, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Fink Densford Tags: Business/Financial News Orthopedics zimmerbiomet Source Type: news

Biomedical engineering professor Barclay Morrison awarded $2 million grant to study concussion
(Columbia University School of Engineering and Applied Science) Barclay Morrison has won a $2 million five-year grant from the Paul G. Allen Family Foundation to study the underlying mechanisms of concussion. His award is part of a $9.25M multi-center research grant given to the lead organization, the University of Pennsylvania, for research on the cellular mechanisms of concussion and potential clinical interventions that could improve recovery. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 15, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

3-D-printed patch helps guide growing blood vessels
(Boston University College of Engineering) A research team led by Boston University Biomedical Engineering Professor Christopher Chen is pioneering an infused 3-D-printed patch that guides the growth of new blood vessels, avoiding some of the problems with other approaches to treating ischemia. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 13, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Biopolymer tested as long-acting glucose control therapy
Researchers from Duke University have developed a biopolymer that could provide weeks of glucose control for patients with diabetes – in a single injection. The controlled-release treatment lasted for weeks in primates, according to a study published in Nature Biomedical Engineering. The biomedical engineers suggested that this new, injectable solution could replace daily or weekly insulin shots for people with Type II diabetes. Get the full story at our sister site, Drug Delivery Business News. The post Biopolymer tested as long-acting glucose control therapy appeared first on MassDevice. (Source: Mass Device)
Source: Mass Device - June 6, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Sarah Faulkner Tags: Diabetes Drug-Device Combinations Pharmaceuticals Research & Development Duke University Source Type: news

Duke joins concussion research funded by Microsoft co-founder's foundation
Duke University has joined a team led by the University of Pennsylvania along with Columbia University on new concussion research funded by a $9.25 million grant from The Paul G. Allen Family Foundation. Paul Allen co-founded Microsoft with Bill Gates. Researchers from Duke include Cameron R. “Dale” Bass, associate research professor of biomedical engineering, and Mohammed Abou Donia, professor of pharmacology and cancer biology and neurobiology, according to the university. “There is a surprising… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - May 23, 2017 Category: Biotechnology Authors: Jennifer Henderson Source Type: news

Titan Medical CEO wants to up the game in robotic surgery: Here ’s how
[Image courtesy of Titan Medical]Titan Medical – the young, upstart Canadian robotic surgery company – is making a comeback this year. Just today, the company announced the completion of initial formative human factors studies for its Sport single port robotic surgical system. The Sport system boasts the ability for a variety of surgical instruments on snake-like arms to be deployed through a single 25 mm incision for a minimally invasive surgery. Surgeons get to work at a mobile, ergonomically designed workstation with a 3D high-definition endoscopic view inside the patient. Completing the human factors s...
Source: Mass Device - May 17, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Chris Newmarker Tags: Business/Financial News News Well Robot-Assisted Surgery Robotics Surgical Robotic Surgery surgical robotics Titan Medical Inc. Source Type: news

Bathroom scales will inform about life threatening conditions
(Kaunas University of Technology) Weighing oneself has become one of the most common morning rituals. However, your weight is not the only message that can be delivered by your bathroom scales: the team of researchers at Kaunas University of Technology (KTU) Institute of Biomedical Engineering are developing the multifunctional scales, which can monitor your health and inform about potentially dangerous life conditions, such as arteriosclerosis or cardiac arrhythmia. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 16, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Pig model to help research on human knee growth, injury treatment
Medical and biomedical engineering researchers have published research on how the knees of pigs compare to human knees at various stages of maturity -- a finding that will advance research by this group and others on injury treatment in young people. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - May 15, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

Experimental technology monitors and maintains drug levels in the body
A study published inNature Biomedical Engineering reports that researchers have developed a drug delivery tool that regulates the level of drugs needed in the body in real time, which could lead to improvements in diabetes care.Medical News Today (Source: Society for Endocrinology)
Source: Society for Endocrinology - May 15, 2017 Category: Endocrinology Source Type: news

Pig model to help research on human knee growth, injury treatment
(North Carolina State University) Medical and biomedical engineering researchers have published research on how the knees of pigs compare to human knees at various stages of maturity -- a finding that will advance research by this group and others on injury treatment in young people. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 15, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

NAE Elects Treasurer and Four Councillors
The National Academy of Engineering has re-elected Martin B. Sherwin, retired vice president of W.R. Grace, to serve a four-year term as the NAE's treasurer. Re-elected to second terms as councillors are Frances S. Ligler, Lampe Distinguished Professor of Biomedical Engineering in the joint department of biomedical engineering at the North Carolina State University College of Engineering and the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill School of Medicine, and H. Vincent Poor, Michael Henry Strater University Professor at Princeton University. And newly elected councillors are Katharine G. Frase, retired vice president of e...
Source: News from the National Academies - April 21, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

3-D-printed patch can help mend a 'broken' heart
(University of Minnesota) A team of biomedical engineering researchers, led by the University of Minnesota, has created a revolutionary 3-D-bioprinted patch that can help heal scarred heart tissue after a heart attack. The discovery is a major step forward in treating patients with tissue damage after a heart attack. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 14, 2017 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

[This Week in Science] Nanoparticles for drug delivery in lungs
Author: Philip Yeagle (Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - April 7, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Philip Yeagle Tags: Biomedical Engineering Source Type: news

Can thought-control technology be used to overcome physical paralysis?
A man paralysed from the shoulders down can now raise his arm to eat, thanks to neuroprosthetic implants – and there is hope that the technology will help many others in the futureIs it possible to overcome paralysis by harnessing thoughts?A man who was paralysed from the shoulders down after a bicycle accident in which he ploughed into the back of a mail truck is now able tomove his arm for the first time in eight years, thanks to thought-control technology, also known as neuroprosthetics.“He can now think about moving his arm, and his arm moves,” said Robert Kirsch, a professor of biomedical engineering...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - April 1, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Nicola Davis Tags: World news Neuroscience Technology Medical research Source Type: news

Penn State EMT Program Teaches Through Hands-on Experience
College is a place to explore known interests and discover hidden passions that may lead to future hobbies or, in some cases, careers. This holds true for Penn State biomedical engineering junior Molly Basilio, who enrolled in the four- credit Emergency Medical Technician training course as a first- Read More at State College (Source: JEMS: Journal of Emergency Medical Services News)
Source: JEMS: Journal of Emergency Medical Services News - March 30, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Training News Source Type: news

WPI Scientists Developing Patch For Diseased Hearts Using Spinach Leaves
WORCESTER(CBS) – Biomedical engineers at Worcester Polytechnic Institute are working on a patch for diseased hearts that uses spinach leaves. When mixed with human stem cells, the veins in spinach could become heart muscle that pumps blood when the original organ is infected or damaged. “And so we haven’t actually put blood in there we put dye in there and we put small particles that represent blood cells and those flow right through the leaves,” said biomedical engineering professor Glenn Gaudette. During the process, the green of the spinach is removed, leaving just the cellulose structure. Spinac...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - March 24, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Health Local News Syndicated Local Watch Listen Glenn Gaudette Lana Jones Spinach Worcester Worcester Polytechnic Institute Source Type: news

Scientists Invented A Headband That Could Help Us Better Understand Each Other
This reporting is brought to you by HuffPost’s health and science platform, The Scope. Like us on Facebook and Twitter and tell us your story: scopestories@huffingtonpost.com.   Sarah DiGiulio is The Huffington Post’s sleep reporter. You can contact her at sarah.digiulio@huffingtonpost.com.  -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website. (Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post)
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - March 24, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Scientists Invented A Headband That Could Help Us Better Understand Each Other
This reporting is brought to you by HuffPost’s health and science platform, The Scope. Like us on Facebook and Twitter and tell us your story: scopestories@huffingtonpost.com.   Sarah DiGiulio is The Huffington Post’s sleep reporter. You can contact her at sarah.digiulio@huffingtonpost.com.  -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website. (Source: Science - The Huffington Post)
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - March 24, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

Professor, researcher in brain machine interfaces to speak at Louisiana Tech
(Louisiana Tech University) Louisiana Tech University's Center for Biomedical Engineering and Rehabilitation Science (CBERS) and its Consortium on Neuronal Networks in Epilepsy and Memory (NeuroNEM) will host a presentation by Dr. Jose C. Principe, Distinguished Professor of Electrical and Biomedical Engineering at the University of Florida, as part of the Seminar Series on Probing and Understanding the Brain. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - March 13, 2017 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news