Podcast: Life with Binge Eating Disorder
  At one point, Gabe weighed more than 550 pounds. Today, he and Lisa remember and discuss the extreme pain and slow healing process of living with binge-eating disorder. Gabe shares his shame in being so overweight, his intense relationship with food, the story of his gastric bypass and the difficult process of learning new coping mechanisms. How did Gabe’s bipolar and panic attacks tie in with his binge eating? And, importantly, how is he managing the illness today? Join us for an open and honest discussion on living with an eating disorder. (Transcript Available Below) Please Subscribe to Our Show: And We...
Source: World of Psychology - July 21, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Not Crazy Podcast Tags: Binge Eating Disorders Eating Disorders General Not Crazy Podcast Source Type: blogs

Midlife Eating Disorders in Quarantine
With the spread of coronavirus in the United States, our lives are changing in ways we never anticipated. Along with feeling heightened emotions like anxiety, uncertainty or even panic, many are experiencing unprecedented changes to their daily lives. Mass unemployment and job insecurity have impacted millions of Americans, and many of whom are fortunate to remain secure in their employment have adjusted to a new work-from-home lifestyle.  While such disruptions are harmful for everyone, quarantine has been particularly difficult for those who suffer from an eating disorder, such as anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa a...
Source: World of Psychology - July 6, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Laura McLain, PsyD Tags: Anorexia Binge Eating Bulimia Eating Disorders Body Image coronavirus COVID-19 diet culture Emotional Eating Isolation pandemic panic buying social distancing teletherapy Source Type: blogs

Sexual Abuse and Eating Disorders: What ’s the Connection?
What is the connection between sexual abuse and developing an eating disorder? Why does bingeing, purging, starving and chronic dieting become a “solution” for the abuse? Abuse shatters the sacred innocence of a child and often becomes a primary trigger for an eating disorder. The survivor of sexual abuse becomes plagued with confusion, guilt, shame, fear, anxiety, self-punishment, and rage. She (or he) seeks the soothing comfort, protection, and anesthesia that food offers. Food, after all, is the most available, legal, socially sanctioned, cheapest mood altering drug on the market! And emotional eating is a m...
Source: World of Psychology - June 25, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Mary Anne Cohen, LCSW Tags: Abuse Eating Disorders Trauma Anorexia Binge Eating Bulimia Sexual Abuse Source Type: blogs

Reframing the Toxic “ Quarantine 15 ”
In the midst of the COVID-19 global pandemic, there is currently a popular “Avoid the Quarantine 15” tagline making the rounds. This has apparently become the catch phrase warning to all of us quarantined individuals to be careful of possibly gaining 15 pounds. There are tools to calculate what you are predicted to gain during quarantine as well as news and social media outlets capitalizing on this notion to adopt what I would call “a more diet-centric focus into our already over-diet-focused and fat-phobic world.” I worry that this Quarantine 15 focus in its current usage is toxic and can backfire....
Source: World of Psychology - June 12, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Sandra Wartski, Psy.D. Tags: Binge Eating Eating Disorders Exercise & Fitness Stress Body Image Comfort Food coronavirus COVID-19 Diet diet culture Emotional Eating Health At Every Size Orthorexia Quarantine 15 self-soothing social distancing Source Type: blogs

What If The Gym Of The Future Is On Your Wrist Already?
Imagine this: the lockdown has just ended. The virus mysteriously disappeared (or there’s a vaccine already and you’ve got the shot), and you are heading down to the gym for the workout you’ve so desperately missed during the quarantine. Are you OK with touching the door handle? Having your temperature checked at the reception? Doing yoga in the studio?  The past months have changed our way of thinking about the gym. This has always been the place we go to do exercise, for we’ve got the motivation, the drive and, in part, the enthusiasm. The gym gave us the perfect surroundings to workout. H...
Source: The Medical Futurist - June 11, 2020 Category: Information Technology Authors: Judit Kuszkó Tags: Artificial Intelligence E-Patients Health Sensors & Trackers Healthcare Design Medical Education Portable Diagnostics Telemedicine & Smartphones data wearables Fitbit sports health data gym workout future of sports Source Type: blogs

Fears About Reentering Our Lives (FAROL): A Psychotherapist Takes You Behind the Scenes
The cicada, an insect with large clear wings, hibernates underground for 17 years. It takes almost two decades for this insect to slowly crawl out of the earth, to live, to breathe, to mate. As the United States slowly lifts quarantine and lockdowns, we find ourselves burrowing out of our own cocoons in which we have hunkered down to once again emerge to the light of day. We identify with the cicada in that this quarantine has surely felt like a full 17 years! And — coincidentally — it is this very year of 2020 that the broods of cicadas are emerging in droves. We emerge gradually, with trepidation, masks still...
Source: World of Psychology - June 8, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Mary Anne Cohen, LCSW Tags: Anxiety and Panic General Habits Happiness Alcohol Use Authenticity Career Change coronavirus COVID-19 Habit Change Marriage Personal Growth social distancing teletherapy Source Type: blogs

Emotional Eating and the Coronavirus
“Since we’ve been in quarantine,” announces Susan, a binge eating client, “I can’t stop overeating. Now that I’m in lockdown, I wish I had lockjaw!” Danny laughingly echoes the same feeling: “Now that I can’t go to work, I’m involved instead in many diverse activities at home throughout the day — there’s snacking, grazing, munching, nibbling, noshing, chowing down, and sometimes even eating meals!” Susan and Danny have it right — emotional eating struggles during this time of COVID-19 are alive and well. In truth, worry, anxiety, fear, grie...
Source: World of Psychology - May 27, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Mary Anne Cohen, LCSW Tags: Binge Eating Eating Disorders Binge Eating Disorder Compassion coronavirus COVID-19 Emotional Eating Mindfulness pandemic social distancing Source Type: blogs

Why Can ’t I Just Love My Body? 
Clients frequently come to me with negative thoughts and feelings around their body and want to work on their body image issues. They want to get to a place of loving their body and feeling good in their body. Or at the very least, they want less of the self-critical noise in their heads and more body acceptance.  Many of these folks have had eating disorders or disordered eating and have made huge progress away from restrictive eating and toward fully honoring their desires and needs to eat. They have also already tried the classic “body image builders” like trying to be grateful for what their body can d...
Source: World of Psychology - May 15, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Danielle B. Grossman, MFT Tags: Anorexia Binge Eating Bulimia Eating Disorders body acceptance Body Image dieting Self-Esteem Source Type: blogs

What My Disordered Eating Reveals about the Brain
Conclusion One positive of my experience with eating disorders is that it gave me personal experience with the brain, and it allowed me to experience first-hand what the science says about the brain. Change is hard because the brain has multiple parts competing for control, and it has pathways that control our behavior. Only “why” power can help us during those tough moments. Change is hard, but it’s not impossible, and the best time to start is today.    (Source: World of Psychology)
Source: World of Psychology - April 7, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Kevin Burciaga Tags: Binge Eating Bulimia Eating Disorders Habits Personal Binge Eating Disorder Bingeing binging Impulsive Behavior Purging Source Type: blogs

Coping with an Eating Disorder During the Coronavirus Pandemic
Eating disorders build themselves on perceived feelings of control. Yet, as we find ourselves in the midst of unprecedented and uncertain times, with the coronavirus pandemic, how do those with eating disorders manage? As an individual with an eating disorder, I struggle with the Christmas season, mostly as my ‘safe’ foods are suddenly superseded with aisles of turkeys and potatoes and normal life grinds to a halt for a day as shops close and families and friends gather at home. Coronavirus feels like this, but every single day and on a much bigger scale.  Food aisles are being stripped bare by panic ...
Source: World of Psychology - March 20, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Esther Dark Tags: Anorexia Binge Eating Bulimia Eating Disorders Motivation and Inspiration Personal coronavirus COVID-19 Isolation social distancing Source Type: blogs

Psychology Around the Net: February 29, 2020
This article discusses the concept of intuitive eating, where no food is off limits, and how it dramatically changed the life of Harriet, a woman with PCOS who has struggled with obesity since childhood. We Tell Suicidal People to Go to Therapy. So Why Are Therapists Rarely Trained in Suicide?: Suicide is the nation’s 10th leading cause of death, yet training for mental health practitioners who treat suicidal patients — psychologists, social workers, marriage and family therapists, among others — is dangerously inadequate, says the author. This article thoroughly probes this topic and explores what can be...
Source: World of Psychology - February 29, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Traci Pedersen Tags: Anorexia Binge Eating Depression Disorders Eating Disorders General Mental Health and Wellness Psychiatry Psychology Psychology Around the Net Psychotherapy Self-Help Anorexia Nervosa Binge Eating Disorder Bulimia Nervosa cor Source Type: blogs

The end of overeating?
The post The end of overeating? appeared first on Dr. William Davis. (Source: Wheat Belly Blog)
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - January 27, 2020 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr. Davis Tags: Wheat Belly Lifestyle binge eating bulimia food addictions Gliadin opiates overeating Source Type: blogs

Podcast: Sex Addiction, Hypersexuality, and Mental Illness
  Sex addict. Nympho. You’ve likely heard these words used for a person with hypersexuality, but what exactly is this condition? Is hypersexuality really a symptom of a mental disorder or is it just a super high libido? Where does one draw the line between liking (or loving) sex and being hypersexual? Is it similar to a drug addiction? Or a binge eating disorder?  Join Gabe and Jackie as they tackle this often misunderstood topic and hear Gabe’s own personal experiences with hypersexuality as a debilitating symptom of his bipolar disorder. (Transcript Available Below) SUBSCRIBE & REVIEW About T...
Source: World of Psychology - January 13, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Not Crazy Podcast Tags: Bipolar Disorders General Not Crazy Podcast Relationships Sexuality Source Type: blogs

Anorexia Stole My Childhood, and More
It was in fourth and fifth grade that I decided I didn’t want to grow up. I wanted to be the shortest in my classes, and I even walked around with bent knees to appear shorter. I remember competing with friends to see who could come closest to being able to fit our hands around our waists. I remember having a friend over and watching a Richard Simmons “Sweatin’ to the Oldies” exercise video and then having us both get on the scale to compare weights. I was just a little girl and I don’t know where this idea came from. This was way back in the mid-90s when there were few resources for children ...
Source: World of Psychology - December 12, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: K.M. Capper Tags: Anorexia Binge Eating Bulimia Eating Disorders Personal Body Image Source Type: blogs

Podcast: Holiday Coping Techniques
We all love and look forward to the holidays, but even good things can be stressful.  Listen in as our guest, PsychCentral.com’s founder, Dr. John Grohol, tells us how to avoid overindulging this year, how to handle the extra work burdens of the season, and how to deal with that annoying relative. SUBSCRIBE & REVIEW Guest information for ‘Holiday Coping’ Podcast Episode John M. Grohol, Psy.D. is a pioneer in online mental health and psychology. Recognizing the educational and social potential of the Internet in 1995, Dr. Grohol has transformed the way people could access mental health and psy...
Source: World of Psychology - December 5, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: The Psych Central Podcast Tags: Family General Holiday Coping Interview LifeHelper Podcast Relationships Stress The Psych Central Show Source Type: blogs

Looking Back: My Advice on Starting Eating Disorder Recovery
I dial the number hastily written on a post-it note that I’ve had shoved in my wallet for two weeks. Sweat starts to bead on my palms as I wait for the line to ring. “Hello,” a soft spoken woman answers. “I’d like to make an appointment,” I utter as my voice shakes. “Okay, let’s do that,” she says as she trails off into a line of questions to see what exactly I need an appointment for and whether she’s the one to help me or not. I’m in my thirties, a mother of three, with ten years of recovery under my belt. I thought all of this was behind me. But it crept ...
Source: World of Psychology - November 24, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Vanna Winters Tags: Anorexia Binge Eating Bulimia Eating Disorders Personal Treatment Source Type: blogs

Why Women in Recovery Must Combat the Diet Culture
Diet culture is insidious. We spend our lives obsessed with our bodies — always wishing for a smaller shape, scrutinizing the size of the portions on our plates, and unscrupulously comparing ourselves to thinner people. It’s damaging because it leads us to equate our worth with our appearance. For people in recovery, that is especially harmful. We experience physiological changes quickly — including weight gain — once we find recovery, and we can often leap to the assumption that we have a food addiction and reach for harmful, quick-fix solutions. But what if that weight gain is actually the inevita...
Source: World of Psychology - November 22, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Psych Central Guest Author Tags: Publishers The Fix diet culture Recovery women Source Type: blogs

Married Doesn ’ t Mean Codependent: 10 Ways to Maintain Autonomy
You can be strong on your own. If you’re wondering whether you’re codependent or believe that you’re in a codependent relationship, then it’s time to recognize why you’re doing the codependent behavior and put a stop to it. Asking yourself, “Am I codependent?” means you’ve witnessed choices or actions you made that lead you to believe you’re behaving in an unhealthy manner. And now you want to know how to stop being codependent, either to fix your relationship, feel better about yourself, or just be happier and more confident in life overall. What started out as good in...
Source: World of Psychology - September 6, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Psych Central Guest Author Tags: Marriage and Divorce Publishers YourTango Autonomy Codependence Codependent independent Relationship Self-Esteem Source Type: blogs

Podcast: Is Mental Illness a Made up Disorder?
In this episode, our hosts discuss whether or not mental illness is a real disorder or if it’s just something that medical and pharmaceutical companies made up to make a profit.  SUBSCRIBE & REVIEW “Instead of taking my psychiatric medications this morning, should I have just gone to yoga?” – Michelle Hammer Highlights from ‘Mental Illness Made Up’ Episode [2:00] Is mental illness real? [4:00] Yoga doesn’t cure all mental illnesses, just like it wouldn’t cure cancer. [16:00] Dealing with people who think mental illness is not real. [19:30] Eating disorders a...
Source: World of Psychology - August 5, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Gabe Howard Tags: A Bipolar, A Schizophrenic, and a Podcast Brain and Behavior Disorders General Source Type: blogs

5 Sleep Deprivation Signs and Cures
Conclusion In the end, just remember to put any sort of thing that stresses you out … on permanent hold, especially before bed. Whether you feel bad about dieting, a person, a television season or a book that you’re reading – whatever doesn’t bring you happiness isn’t meant for you. You want to work on it and go on – good – you should! However, before winning any battle just make sure you are in the position to do so - and it all starts with a good night's sleep!You've read 5 Sleep Deprivation Signs and Cures, originally posted on Pick the Brain | Motivation and Self Improvement. ...
Source: PickTheBrain | Motivation and Self Improvement - July 17, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Sijdah Hussain Tags: featured health and fitness meditation mental health sleep deprivation sleep paralysis Source Type: blogs

Should you Graze?
You're reading Should you Graze?, originally posted on Pick the Brain | Motivation and Self Improvement. If you're enjoying this, please visit our site for more inspirational articles. Grazed and confusedGrazing is picking at food little by little so that you're continually eating as opposed to eating only at mealtimes. Have you grazed and been confused for so long it's not true? Alright, I admit it, it may be punny but it's not very funny. The point I'm trying to make is that grazing on food can be confusing and here's why. 50 shades of graze When you graze, there are many questions you can ask yourself. For instance...
Source: PickTheBrain | Motivation and Self Improvement - June 21, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: jgrabon Tags: featured health and fitness self improvement grazing health trends pickthebrain Source Type: blogs

Gluteomorphin: The opiate in your food
Yes: there are opiates that derive from various food proteins that exert peculiar effects on the human brain. The worst? The opiates that come from the gliadin protein of wheat and related grains. Opiate receptor researchers at the National Institutes of Health originally coined the term “gluteomorphin” nearly 40 years ago when it was determined that the gliadin protein of wheat undergoes partial digestion (since humans lack the digestive enzymes to fully digest proline-rich amino acid sequences in proteins from seeds of grasses) to yield peptides that are 4- to 5-amino acids long. Some of these peptides w...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - June 11, 2019 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr. Davis Tags: Opioids addictive binge eating bulimia eating disorders Gliadin opiates wheat belly Source Type: blogs

Exploring Feeding/Swallowing Disorders Versus Eating Disorders in Children
What would you say if a graduate student or clinical fellow asked you to explain the difference between a feeding/swallowing disorder and an eating disorder for pediatric patients? As a pediatric feeding and swallowing specialists, I answer this question with, “It’s complicated.” Often, an overriding medical issue—such as gastrointestinal issues or poor oral strength and coordination due to prematurity—causes feeding and swallowing disorders. As medical issues resolve, feeding and swallowing issues can persist. And, over time, these issues could gradually change from medically based issues to...
Source: American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) Press Releases - June 3, 2019 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Authors: Jennifer WIlson Tags: Health Care Private Practice Schools Slider Speech-Language Pathology Dysphagia eating disorders Feeding Disorders Social Media Source Type: blogs

I Believe It ’ s Possible to Fully Recover from an Eating Disorder
When I first started struggling with food and body image at eight years old, I was convinced it would be a lifelong struggle. My days were spent getting on and off a scale more times than anyone could imagine and counting out my cornflakes before I’d even think of eating them. I felt that I was destined to be bound by my eating disorder forever. However, at 22 years old, I am fully recovered from anorexia. There is some controversy in the mental health world about whether full recovery from an eating disorder is possible, and I wholeheartedly believe it is (in fact, I’m living proof). Eating disorder expert Car...
Source: World of Psychology - May 5, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Psych Central Guest Author Tags: Anorexia Binge Eating Disorders Eating Disorders Mental Health America Publishers Body Image recover from eating disorder Source Type: blogs

Ten reasons to never eat wheat
How can conventional dietary advice gotten it so wrong? Rather than eating plenty of “healthy whole grains,” people on the Wheat Belly lifestyle eat absolutely no grains and enjoy spectacular weight loss and reversal of hundreds of health conditions as a result. Unfortunately, many people view this as a “gluten-free” lifestyle which is incorrect. Here are 10 reasons why no bagels, pretzels, or sandwiches made from wheat flour should ever cross human lips. Gliadin-derived opioid peptides (from partial digestion to 4- and 5-amino acid long fragments) increase appetite substantially–as do related...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - April 15, 2019 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr. Davis Tags: Wheat Belly Lifestyle Gliadin gluten Inflammation Weight Loss Source Type: blogs

Addressing weight bias in medicine
You happen to be among the two-thirds of Americans with overweight and obesity (defined as a body mass index of 25 or greater), and you are just thrilled to go to your next doctor’s appointment, right? Wrong! Unfortunately, if you have a diagnosis of overweight or obesity, you might find the doctor’s office to be the least inviting place to be. Maybe you find that there are no chairs to accommodate you in the waiting room. When the medical staff takes your blood pressure, you might find that they struggle to find the right size cuff. You might feel as though you are weighed in a disrespectful fashion. Or maybe,...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - April 3, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Fatima Cody Stanford, MD, MPH, MPA, FAAP, FACP, FTOS  Tags: Health Source Type: blogs

Finding Your Yes: A Powerful Strategy for Shifting from Negative Habits to Positive Ones
Try this short experiment and say the following statements to yourself: I want to stop eating junk food. I want to stop yelling at my kids. I want to stop worrying about things I can’t control. (Feel free to substitute behaviors that might be more relevant in your life). Notice how this feels in your body when you say these things to yourself. Do you feel tight and constricted or more open and expansive? Do you feel motivated and energized to change these habits, or do you tend to feel stuck, closed off, or perhaps even some sense of guilt or shame? Now try these statements out (and again feel free to change them t...
Source: World of Psychology - March 6, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Beth Kurland, Ph.D. Tags: Binge Eating Eating Disorders Habits Happiness Mindfulness Personal Self-Help Binge Eating Disorder Habit Change Habit Formation Negativity Optimism self-compassion Source Type: blogs

5 Things to Know Before You Start Losing Weight
“You yourself, as much as anybody in the entire universe, deserve your love and affection.” – Buddha I struggled to maintain a healthy weight for a large part of my life. Had I known these five things before my weight-loss journey, I would have had a much easier time shedding the pounds and would have realized that weight loss isn’t a magic fix-all solution to my issues. If you’re trying to lose weight, perhaps some of my lessons will be helpful to you. Here we go… 1. This Has to Be for You, Not Someone Else Growing up as a closeted gay child, I was taught that homosexuality is a sin an...
Source: World of Psychology - January 27, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Psych Central Guest Author Tags: Exercise & Fitness Friends Health-related Personal Publishers Self-Esteem Tiny Buddha Diet goals Healthy Lifestyle Healthy Weight Lose Weight positive goals Self-Talk Weight Loss well-being Source Type: blogs

Bagel Brain: What Wheat and Grains Do to the Brain
You know that raisin bagel or bowl of bran cereal you have every morning, or the plate of pasta or spaghetti you have for dinner? Each and every serving erodes the health of your brain. Some of the effects are reversible, while others are cumulative and irreversible. But understand the concepts behind living the Wheat Belly wheat/grain-free lifestyle and you are enormously empowered in regaining control over health, weight, and youthfulness. Transcript: Hi everybody, Doctor William Davis here. Why do I call this Bagel Brain? Well, a number of reasons — consumption of modern wheat and closely-related grains have a w...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - January 27, 2019 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr. Davis Tags: News & Updates adhd appetite autism autoimmune cognitive dementia Depression Gliadin gluten-free grain-free grains wheat belly Source Type: blogs

Fat: Guidelines for Therapists
A note on nomenclature: I deliberately use the term “fat” not “obese”. In groups of people who have been marginalised on the basis of race or sexual orientation, an important part of claiming agency is declaring the right to choose what members call themselves. Similarly it is the practice in the fat community to reclaim the term “fat” fr om the pool of epithets directed against us, as segments of the gay community have reclaimed “queer”. Therefore in what follows, I use “fat” rather than “obese” except when quoting or referring to research reports.I h...
Source: Jung At Heart - January 19, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: blogs

Addicted to Sugar: The Other White Powder
In that first meeting I went to for my sugar addiction, I heard others admit to doing the same things I did. Sneaking. Lying. Throwing food in the bin to halt a binge only to come back later and fish it out to eat. It was right in front of my face, but I couldn’t see it for what it was for years. Addiction is a wayward beast. God knows you can’t see much when you’re laid flat on your back, pinned down by invisible yet ferocious forces. The narrative was just so unfamiliar that I doubted it was real. Where were the used syringes, grubby spoons, and Ewan McGregor swimming in a lav to Brian Eno music? Where ...
Source: World of Psychology - January 6, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Psych Central Guest Author Tags: Addiction Eating Disorders Health-related Personal Publishers The Fix addicted to sugar Binge Eating Food Addiction Source Type: blogs

Why Therapy Didn ’t Work for Me
When I was 16 years old, I had a metabolism that was to die for. I could eat anything I wanted, whenever I wanted to, and was always hungry, which led to developing an undesirable habit of snacking at 3 a.m. My parents saw the litter of dishes and snack wrappers in my room that I had been too lazy and tired to clean up before crashing back into bed and wrongfully concluded that I was closet bingeing. Coupled with my string bean frame, they were concerned enough to book an appointment with a therapist. Unyielding in the face of my denial and protests, I soon found myself subjected to Thursday afternoons spent with Janet. Ja...
Source: World of Psychology - January 3, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Amber Nordstrom Tags: Bulimia Eating Disorders Habits Personal Psychotherapy Adolescence Anorexia Binge Eating Therapeutic Alliance Treatment Source Type: blogs

Is Junk Food Addictive?
You’re in withdrawal, experiencing everything from mood swings and anxiety to headaches and insomnia. Perhaps you’ve quit smoking or stopped your regular marijuana usage. Or maybe, just maybe, you’ve cut back on those greasy fries, burgers, and other highly processed food. A study published in the September 2018 issue of Appetite reported that people who reduced their consumption of highly processed foods experienced some of the same physical and psychological symptoms as those withdrawing from cigarettes or marijuana usage. While studies in mice have shown that reducing junk food can trigger withdrawal s...
Source: World of Psychology - November 10, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Janet Singer Tags: Binge Eating Eating Disorders Health-related Research Source Type: blogs

Top 10 Reasons to Never Eat Wheat Again
There are plenty of reasons to never allow a bagel, sandwich, or pretzels to cross your lips again. But here are the top 10 most powerful and compelling reasons to tell the USDA and other providers of dietary advice to bug off with their “healthy whole grains” nonsense. Gliadin-derived opioid peptides (from partial digestion to 4- and 5-amino acid long fragments) increase appetite substantially–as do related proteins from rye, barley, and corn. This is a big part of the reason why grains make you gain weight. Gliadin-derived opioid peptides are mind active drugs that trigger behavioral outbursts in kids ...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - November 8, 2018 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr. Davis Tags: News & Updates autoimmune blood sugar Gliadin gluten gluten-free grain-free grains Inflammation joint pain low-carb wheat belly Source Type: blogs

Podcast: How Can You Stop Emotional Overeating?
  Emotional overeating is an extremely common problem for many people, particularly among those who live with depression. Many of us have a tendency to “eat our feelings,” resorting to food to make us feel better and as an escape from the things that bother us. As one would expect, this kind of behavior leads to weight gain, which only adds to the negative feelings that we’re trying to escape from. In this episode, we’ll learn about emotional overeating, including what it is and isn’t, its relation to hunger, and how to deal with the ever-present food during holidays, work functions, a...
Source: World of Psychology - November 8, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: The Psych Central Show Tags: Binge Eating Eating Disorders General The Psych Central Show Emotional Overeating Gabe Howard Vincent M. Wales Source Type: blogs

The Wheat Belly Timeline: The First Few Weeks
With all our talk of opiate withdrawal syndromes accompanied by nausea, headache, fatigue, and depression, it can be daunting, even terrifying, to people who face the prospect of tossing all wheat and grains into the trash bin, vowing to never let a Danish, donut, or dish of pasta cross your lips again. So it may help to lay out a timeline of what and when various changes can develop in the Wheat Belly wheat- and grain-free lifestyle. You can expect different symptoms and health conditions to recede at different rates, since they are caused by a variety of different mechanisms. For instance, the direct gastrointestinal tox...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - October 26, 2018 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr. Davis Tags: Wheat Belly Lifestyle acid reflux detoxification grains IBS Inflammation joint pain opiates withdrawal Source Type: blogs

5 Steps to Find the Willpower to Reach Your Goals
Conclusion These five strategies—chunking, confidence, perception, identity, and high-level thinking—are all tools to add to your tool box to help you alleviate negative emotional triggers, increase willpower, and ensure you reach your goals. These techniques have helped me through some very tough times, but they will help you with any goal in life that requires persistence and dedication. Implement these tools in your life today and see how much they help you! Let me know how this works for you—leave a comment in the comments section below! This post is courtesy of Tiny Buddha. (Source: World of Psychology)
Source: World of Psychology - October 12, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Psych Central Guest Author Tags: Inspiration & Hope Publishers Self-Help Tiny Buddha Confidence Depression emotional triggers empowered goals high-level thinking Hopeful hopeless identity Insecurity paralysis by analysis Perception Resistance Self-Doubt Source Type: blogs

To Be Healthy Is to Be Loving
I went for a run because I had eaten a small, organic, dark chocolate cookie the day before and I felt that I had to punish myself. It was habitual for me to punish myself with strenuous, caloric compensation cardio whenever I felt guilty for enjoying life by eating tasty foods. When I placed first in a fitness competition, my fitness goals went up a notch. Winning the competition was one thing, but people complimenting me on my extra lean body pressured me to stay that way. I couldn’t allow myself to look “bigger” again, and “bigger” really meant not seeing my defined ab muscles. It was a su...
Source: World of Psychology - September 18, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Valeria Teles Tags: Anorexia Binge Eating Bulimia Eating Disorders Health-related Mental Health and Wellness Mindfulness Personal Spirituality Fitness Loving Kindness Meditation self-compassion Source Type: blogs

Does My Daughter Have an Eating Disorder?
Eating disorders can be easy to hide. Know what to look for. Often when I work with parents they say they had no idea their child’s eating disorder was going on as long as it was. Eating disorders are easy to hide so it’s important, as a parent to be aware of what signs you should look for in your child. Eating disorders are secretive and can be very easy to hide from loved ones, especially in the beginning. Sometimes, the person experiencing an eating disorder is not fully aware that what they are doing is not healthy so it makes it that much more important for parents to be fully educated on what to look fo...
Source: World of Psychology - September 13, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Danielle Swimm, MA, LCPC Tags: Anorexia Binge Eating Bulimia Caregivers Children and Teens Eating Disorders Parenting Perfectionism Personal Psychotherapy Stories Women's Issues Adolescence Body Image Cognitive Distortion Dissociation Self-Esteem Source Type: blogs

Do you have a Bagel Brain?
We can link grain consumption with causing or worsening some of the most mysterious brain disorders that have eluded the medical community for years, such as schizophrenia, epilepsy, depression, bipolar disorder, and, more recently, autism and ADHD. Are you and your kids unknowingly under the influence of opiates? Opiates come disguised in many forms.   Grains contain opiates. Not figuratively, but quite literally. These opiates are not too different from morphine or heroin. Yes, wheat and grains, cleverly disguised as a multigrain loaf of bread to make sandwiches or a hot, steamy plate of macaroni and cheese for the ...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - July 12, 2018 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr. Davis Tags: News & Updates adhd bipolar disorder brain fog concentration Depression diy health Dr. Davis epilepsy grain-free headaches Inflammation mind mood swings OCD opiates schizophrenia undoctored wheat belly Wheat Belly Tot Source Type: blogs

Healing from Addiction: Finding the Road to Recovery
Addiction — and recovery — can look differently from individual to individual. As surely as we can be addicted to alcohol, substances, or medications, we can just as easily be addicted to love, work, sex, dieting, exercise, skin picking, and food. Addiction can refer to any compulsive and unhealthy attachment or behavior that one uses as a way of artificially enhancing, numbing, or avoiding feelings.  Addictions have negative consequences and are difficult to just “stop” doing.  There are certainly different levels of medical and psychological risks associated with different kinds of addic...
Source: World of Psychology - June 29, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Julie K. Jones, Ph.D., LPC Tags: Addiction Alcoholism Habits Inspiration & Hope Mental Health and Wellness Recovery Substance Abuse Addiction Recovery Binge Eating Eating Disorders Substance Use Source Type: blogs

Dementia Care Here is the Silver Lining in Losing Your Temper
It takes the patience of a saint to deal with many of the odd, frustrating, STRESSFUL behaviors of dementia.by Paula Spencer ScottAlzheimer's Reading RoomUm, I'm no saint.I admit it: I've groused, "Dad! I just told you!" after he asked the score for the tenth time in five minutes.I've argued with my father-in-law that no, his"new bride" (imaginary) was not "coming any minute in the Buick,"even though I knew his frontotemporal dementia was behind his frequent delusions and hallucinations. I've walked out of a room when I couldn't stand any more crazy behaviors.Even as I knew better.Topic -Alzhe...
Source: Alzheimer's Reading Room, The - June 14, 2018 Category: Neurology Tags: Alzheimer's family alzheimers care anger care of dementia patients dementia care help alzheimer's help with dementia care stress temper Source Type: blogs

6 Simple Tips Will Never Let You Down in Life
Conclusion We all want to live a meaningful and joyous life, but this simple wish doesn’t come easily to most people. It takes a bit of effort and introspection to learn how to live a life of authenticity, meaning, and happiness. These 6 guides are rough outlines of some universal truths that we’re sure you’ll find useful in creating the life you want. References: http://psychcentral.com/lib/ways-of-living-an-authentic-life/ https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3471136/ ................... David Gomes completed his M.S Professional degree in California Institute of Technology. He lives in Oakland...
Source: PickTheBrain | Motivation and Self Improvement - May 31, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: DavidGomes Tags: happiness health and fitness happiness tips healthy lifestyle Source Type: blogs

“My family say they grieve for the old me” – profound personality changes after deep brain stimulation
Okun (2012).New England Journal of Medicine.Deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus inParkinson's disease (PD) has been highly successful in controlling the motor symptoms of this disorder, which include tremor, slowed movement (akinesia), and muscle stiffness or rigidity. The figure above shows the electrode implantation procedure for PD, where a stimulating electrode is placed in either thesubthalamic nucleus, (STN), a tiny collection of neurons within the basal ganglia circuit, or in the internal segment of theglobus pallidus, another structure in the basal ganglia (Okun, 2012). DBS of the STN is more co...
Source: The Neurocritic - May 13, 2018 Category: Neuroscience Authors: The Neurocritic Source Type: blogs

“My family say they grieve for the old me” – profound personality changes after deep brain stimulation
Okun (2012).New England Journal of Medicine.Deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus inParkinson's disease (PD) has been highly successful in controlling the motor symptoms of this disorder, which include tremor, slowed movement (akinesia), and muscle stiffness or rigidity. The figure above shows the electrode implantation procedure for PD, where a stimulating electrode is placed in either thesubthalamic nucleus, (STN), a tiny collection of neurons within the basal ganglia circuit, or in the internal segment of theglobus pallidus, another structure in the basal ganglia (Okun, 2012). DBS of the STN is more co...
Source: The Neurocritic - May 13, 2018 Category: Neuroscience Authors: The Neurocritic Source Type: blogs

3-Step Guide To Stop Sabotage and Make Progress On Your Health
You're reading 3-Step Guide To Stop Sabotage and Make Progress On Your Health, originally posted on Pick the Brain | Motivation and Self Improvement. If you're enjoying this, please visit our site for more inspirational articles. For the longest time, I struggled to get healthier – it seemed that I couldn’t lose weight or stick to my diet no matter what I tried. It seemed to me like I was sabotaging myself, that I had no willpower, self-control or discipline. Often, I wondered if I couldn’t even stop myself from eating a cookie, how was I going to do all the other amazing things that I wanted to accomplis...
Source: PickTheBrain | Motivation and Self Improvement - May 1, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Sai Aparajitha Khanna Tags: confidence depression diet featured happiness health and fitness motivation psychology success health hacks pickthebrain self improvement self sabotage Source Type: blogs

Ep 3: Don ’ t Discriminate Against Me. (Discussions From a Bipolar and a Schizophrenic)
Gabe Howard (Bipolar) and Michelle Hammer (Schizophrenic) talk about mental health in the current media and pop culture. Michelle talks about stigma and tells a story of Instagram insults.  Gabe talks about being accused of not being bipolar and shares his story of binge eating disorder. Both hosts disclose and discuss what it feels like to lead a public life with mental illness — and how being discriminated against feels badly. Subscribe to Our Show: And Please Share & Review! Highlights From ‘Don’t Discriminate Against Me’ “What the hell is stigma?” ~Gabe Howard...
Source: World of Psychology - April 2, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Gabe Howard Tags: A Bipolar, A Schizophrenic, and a Podcast Disorders Eating Disorders Schizophrenia Stigma Bipolar Disorder discrimination Source Type: blogs

Playing the Victim: How the Victim Mentality is Hindering Your Sobriety
Do you often feel hopeless, like you’ve failed so many times that it’s not even worth trying anymore? Do you frequently dwell on all the mistakes you’ve made and all the relationships you’ve lost? Maybe you just feel like your life will never be meaningful so there’s no use trying to be anything or do anything. If thoughts like this are controlling your life, you may be using self-victimization to cope with issues you feel unable to manage. Exploring the Victim Mentality and the Role of the Victim The victim mentality can display itself in a variety of ways. People who play the role of a victi...
Source: World of Psychology - March 20, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Kelsey Brown Tags: Addiction Binge Eating Depression Eating Disorders Personality Recovery Relationships Self-Esteem Self-Help Substance Abuse Alcoholism Blame External locus of control Irresponsibility Learned Helplessness Manipulation Passi Source Type: blogs

6 Appetite Control Secrets from Neuroscience
Conclusion The insights above list a few of the tricks designed to reduce the amount of decadent calories attempting to excite our brains’ over-eager food lockers. With all of the sensational dieting discoveries that we hear about on a regular basis, perhaps our best solution is to use common sense. That being said, it’s a fascinating fact that our insatiable brains can be ingenious when faced with the paradox of tricking ordinary brains everywhere into adopting food-healthy habits. (Source: World of Psychology)
Source: World of Psychology - March 14, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: John DiPrete Tags: Exercise & Fitness Habits Health-related Memory and Perception Mindfulness Motivation and Inspiration Self-Help Stress appetite control Binge Eating calorie intake Delboeuf Illusion dieting Eating Disorder Healthy Habits Mind Source Type: blogs

6 Ways Binge-Watching May Be Ruining Your Health
Have you ever thought that maybe that innocent Netflix habit could be wreaking havoc on your health? Turns out it might be a dangerous vice you not only want to cut back on, but maybe eliminate it entirely for a while. Read on to discover ways you might be sabotaging your health without even knowing it, as well as possible solutions if you just can’t put the remote down or get off the couch. 1. Your Appetite Watching television often goes hand in hand with mindless overeating and unhealthy snacking. Watching episode after episode can make that worse, leading you to order pizza, a no brainer. A 2012 study from the Uni...
Source: World of Psychology - March 11, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Emily Waters Tags: Aging Binge Eating Eating Disorders Habits Health-related Mindfulness Sleep Technology binge-watching Exercise Habit Change Hulu Mood Netflix Screen Time Television Source Type: blogs