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Elekta touts 21 studies at AAPM 2017
Radiation oncology vendor Elekta said its investigational Unity MR radiation...Read more on AuntMinnie.comRelated Reading: Elekta to install Bhutan's 1st linear accelerator Elekta begins installation of MR-linac system Elekta receives order from Ala. provider Elekta points to study of older lung cancer patients Elekta debuts MR-linac radiation therapy system at ESTRO (Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines)
Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines - July 31, 2017 Category: Radiology Source Type: news

Elekta Introduces Advanced Cancer Treatment to Kingdom of Bhutan
THIMPHU, Bhutan, July 24, 2017 -- (Healthcare Sales & Marketing Network) -- Elekta (EKTA-B.ST) announced today that it has been chosen to deliver the first ever radiation therapy system to the Kingdom of Bhutan. The National Referral Hospital, the largest... Devices, Oncology Elekta, Elekta Compact, linear accelerator, radiotherapy (Source: HSMN NewsFeed)
Source: HSMN NewsFeed - July 24, 2017 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Burden, pattern and causes of road traffic accidents in Bhutan, 2013-2014: a police record review - Wangdi C, Gurung MS, Duba T, Wilkinson E, Tun ZM, Tripathy JP.
Road traffic accidents (RTAs) are a major cause of death and injury globally. There was little information on the burden and causes of RTAs in Bhutan. The study estimates the burden and characteristics of RTAs and describes the victims of RTAs in Bhutan. A... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - July 14, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Pedestrians and Bicycles Source Type: news

Policy and governance to address depression and suicide in Bhutan: the national suicide-prevention strategy - Dorji G, Choki S, Jamphel K, Wangdi Y, Chogyel T, Dorji C, Nirola DK.
Suicide and mental disorders are a growing public health issue in Bhutan, due in part to a rapidly transitioning society. The burden of suicide has been recognized by the Royal Government of Bhutan and, as a result, it introduced the country's first ever n... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - June 15, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Jurisprudence, Laws, Legislation, Policies, Rules Source Type: news

Bhutan and Maldives Eliminate Measles - WHO Bhutan and Maldives Eliminate Measles - WHO
Reuters Health Information (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - June 14, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Infectious Diseases News Source Type: news

Maldives, Bhutan have eliminated measles: WHO
Bhutan and the Maldives have eliminated measles, becoming the first countries in their region to stop the highly contagious disease, the World Health Organization says. (Source: CBC | Health)
Source: CBC | Health - June 13, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: News/Health Source Type: news

WHO: Maldives, Bhutan have eliminated measles
The World Health Organization says Bhutan and the Maldives have eliminated measles, becoming the first countries in their region to stop the highly contagious disease (Source: ABC News: Health)
Source: ABC News: Health - June 13, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Health Source Type: news

Honey, I love you: our 40,000-year relationship with the humble bee
Humans have always had a special relationship with bees. And while the archaeological evidence is sparse, what does exist shows the richness of ancient human activitiesEarlier this month I received my first package of bees. A package refers to a box containing 3 pounds of bees, or roughly 12 thousandApis Melliforia. And while introducing a new species of animal to your home seems like a hugely cathartic event, there was no ceremonious exchange of insect between myself and the store from which I ordered them, which was a bit of a let down. I accepted the humming box, placed it in the hatchback of the family car, and drove h...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - May 24, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Holly Norton Tags: Science Archaeology Bees Environment Insects Source Type: news

Bhutan making its people healthier, happier by beating noncommunicable diseases
In Bhutan, protecting people from cardiovascular and lung diseases, cancers, and diabetes is a national priority. It has put in place a national plan, linking all sectors, from health to finance and education, to prevent and control these noncommunicable diseases (NCDs). (Source: WHO Feature Stories)
Source: WHO Feature Stories - May 17, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: communicable disease [subject], infectious diseases, malaria [subject], noncommunicable disease [subject], chronic diseases, Bhutan [country], Feature [doctype], South-East Asia Region [region] Source Type: news

"In our community, a friend is a psychologist": an ethnographic study of informal care in two Bhutanese refugee communities - Chase L, Sapkota RP.
The recent rise in suicide among Bhutanese refugees has been linked to the erosion of social networks and community supports in the ongoing resettlement process. This paper presents ethnographic findings on the role of informal care practiced by relatives,... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - May 9, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Community-Based Prevention Source Type: news

Autism in Bangladesh: Reducing Discrimination Through Innovation
Children's Cultural Program / Town Hall Meeting. Dec 14, 2015. Shilpakala Academy. Organized by Parents Forum for the Differently Able. A short play by nearly 30 children and youth with NDDs. Over 100 parents took part in the meeting asking a whole variety of questions and expressing their concerns related to NDDs.By Saima Wazed HossainDHAKA, Mar 30 2017 (IPS)Within the last 5 years, thanks to political support and national education, autism awareness in Bangladesh has grown immensely. Due to a lack of funds and resources, providing full comprehensive evidence based services for those in need is not yet possible, but with ...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - March 30, 2017 Category: Global & Universal Authors: Saima Wazed Hossain Tags: Development & Aid Headlines Health World Autism Awareness Day Source Type: news

New project aims to build resilience to earthquakes in the remote Himalayan Kingdom of Bhutan
A new interdisciplinary project led by researchers at the University of Bristol aims to develop resilience and research capacity in the Himalayan Kingdom of Bhutan to cope with earthquakes and their cascading effects on the country's environment, business, infrastructure, and society. (Source: University of Bristol news)
Source: University of Bristol news - January 27, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Tags: Research; Faculty of Science, Faculty of Science, School of Earth Sciences; Press Release Source Type: news

Debate Roils India Over Family Planning Method
A family in New Delhi. Given India's high infant mortality rate, one of the highest in the world, many women are not keen on sterilisation since they feel that it shuts out their option of having children later if required. Credit: Neeta Lal/IPSBy Neeta LalNEW DELHI, Nov 29 2016 (IPS)The Indian government’s decision to make injectable contraceptives available to the public for free under the national family planning programme (FPP) has stirred debate about women’s choices in the world’s largest democracy and second most populous country.The controversial contraceptive containing the drug Depot Medroxyprog...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - November 29, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Authors: Neeta Lal Tags: Asia-Pacific Headlines Health Population Women's Health Contraception Family Planning India sterilization Source Type: news

Entire Himalayan arc can produce large earthquakes
The main fault at the foot of the Himalayan mountains can likely generate destructive, major earthquakes along its entire 2,400-kilometer (1,500-mile) length, a new study finds. Combining historical documents with new geologic data, the study shows the previously unstudied portion of the fault in the country Bhutan is capable of producing a large earthquake and did so in 1714. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - October 26, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

In Bhutan, UNICEF Regional Goodwill Ambassador Aamir Khan spotlights battle against malnutrition
After a visit to Bhutan yesterday, actor and director Aamir Khan, a UNICEF Regional Goodwill Ambassador, praised the country ’ s progress to end malnutrition and recognized young mothers ’ efforts to safeguard their children ’ s health despite high levels of stunting. (Source: UN News Centre - Women, Children, Population)
Source: UN News Centre - Women, Children, Population - October 19, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Prevalence and social cultural determinants of domestic violence in Thimphu Bhutan - Wangmo K.
BACKGROUND: Domestic Violence is   a universal wide-spread phenomenon and variation in its prevalence occurs all over the world. However the societal violence  differs from country to country with various levels of socio-economic development. Bhutan is n... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - September 22, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Tags: Economics of Injury and Safety, PTSD, Injury Outcomes Source Type: news

India ranked 143 among 188 countries in health study
India's poor performance on hygiene, air pollution mortality are among factors that place it lower than countries like Bhutan, Botswana, Syria and Sri Lanka. (Source: The Economic Times)
Source: The Economic Times - September 22, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Balancing traditional beliefs and medical science: mental health care in Bhutan - Nirola DK, Durham JUC, Kraus KL.
In the Kingdom where Gross National Happiness may be its most precious commodity, there is a growing awareness of the individual and communal toll that unmet mental health needs bring to bear on Bhutanese society. Mental illness is becoming a public health... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - September 21, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Tags: Economics of Injury and Safety, PTSD, Injury Outcomes Source Type: news

Unintentional injuries among people with epilepsy in Bhutan - Sorets T, McKenzie E, Cohen J, Cash S, Leung E, Nirola D, Deki S, Tshering L, Wolper E, Mateen F.
OBJECTIVE: To analyze unintentional injuries among people with epilepsy (PWE) or suspected seizures in a resource-limited setting, including the relationship of injuries to electroencephalography (EEG), seizure frequency, and quality of life. BACKG... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - August 12, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Tags: Economics of Injury and Safety, PTSD, Injury Outcomes Source Type: news

Nuns schooled on sexual and reproductive health in Bhutan
Language English THIMPU, Bhutan – Nuns might seem like the last people needing sexual and reproductive health education. But in the tiny, landlocked Himalayan nation of Bhutan, holy women are being empowered by this information – and they, in turn, are empowering the members of their communities. (Source: UNFPA News)
Source: UNFPA News - June 22, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Authors: zerzan Source Type: news

Africa: New Protocol Aims to Cut Trillion-Dollar Food Waste Bill
[IPS] Copenhagen -Four years ago, 27-year-old Tsering Dorji of western Bhutan's Satsam village took to organic vegetable farming. Since then, thanks to composted manure and organic pesticide, the soil health of his farm has improved, and the yield has increased manifold. (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - June 14, 2016 Category: African Health Source Type: news

Students Journey: A Step Closer to the SDGs in Rural India
A village in the Kalahandi district in the state of Odisha in India. The district still grapples with lack of basic amenities, low crop productivity, and malnutrition. The depleting harvest forces villagers to depend on other forms of manual labor. Credit: Smriti DasBy Smriti Das, Teri University New Delhi and Rose Delaney, IPSNEW DELHI, ROME, Jun 9 2016 (IPS)As the seventh largest economy in the world by nominal GDP, India has fared better than many. Through a mix of interventions from the public and private sector, India’s economy has promoted growth and welfare. However, in spite of these developments, the challen...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - June 9, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Authors: Smriti Das and Rose Delaney Tags: Asia-Pacific Development & Aid Economy & Trade Environment Featured Food & Agriculture Headlines Health Poverty & SDGs Trade & Investment Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) Source Type: news

New Protocol Aims to Cut Trillion-Dollar Food Waste Bill
Tsering Dorji works on his farm in western Bhutan’s Satsam village. Due to inadequate transportation and marketing opportunities, he loses half of what he produces every rainy season. Credit: Stella Paul/IPSBy Stella PaulCOPENHAGEN, Jun 8 2016 (IPS)Four years ago, 27-year-old Tsering Dorji of western Bhutan’s Satsam village took to organic vegetable farming. Since then, thanks to composted manure and organic pesticide, the soil health of his farm has improved, and the yield has increased manifold.Dorji, once a subsistence farmer, now has about 60 bags of surplus food every two months to sell and earn a profit.&...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - June 8, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Authors: Stella Paul Tags: Development & Aid Economy & Trade Energy Environment Food & Agriculture Global Global Governance Headlines Health IPS UN: Inside the Glasshouse Labour Natural Resources Population Poverty & SDGs Trade & Investment Water & San Source Type: news

Wellness, Well-Being... And What About Spa?
Recently I spoke at the Washington Spa Alliance Symposium in Washington, D.C. What drew me to participate was their theme: "The New Language of Spa". This is a topic about which I have thought a great deal over my many (don't ask how many!) decades in this industry. So I feel uniquely qualified to address what is now becoming an ongoing question: "What's the difference between wellness, and well-being...and where does that leave spa?" If you go by the book, here is how Merriam-Webster makes the distinction: "Well-being: the state of being happy, healthy, or successful" "Wellness: the qual...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - April 13, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

For The First Time In A Century, Wild Tiger Numbers Are On The Rise
For wild tigers, the numbers have not been kind. In 1900, an estimated 100,000 tigers roamed free on our planet. Yet within a hundred years, that number plummeted by more than 95 percent -- the result of rampant poaching and widespread habitat loss. But it seems the tide may finally be turning for the majestic cat. On Sunday, the World Wildlife Fund (WWF) announced that wild tiger numbers were on the rise for the first time in over a century. There are now an estimated 3,890 tigers in the wild, up from about 3,200 in 2010, said WWF, citing national tiger survey numbers.  The increase could partly be attributed to risi...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - April 11, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Why Does Happiness Inequality Matter?
By Kira M. Newman According to the World Happiness Report 2016 Update, happiness inequality is on the rise. According to the World Happiness Report 2016 Update, happiness inequality is on the rise. What is happiness inequality? It's the psychological parallel to income inequality: How much individuals in a society differ in their self-reported happiness levels -- or subjective well-being, as happiness is sometimes called by researchers. Since 2012, the World Happiness Report has championed the idea that happiness is a better measure of human welfare than standard indicators like wealth, education, health, or good governm...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - April 6, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Bhutan’s quest for alternative energy
Shrinking glaciers and a changing economy are forcing the Bhutanese to question their dependence on hydropower. (Source: SciDev.Net)
Source: SciDev.Net - March 21, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Blood alcohol and injury in Bhutan: targeted surveillance in a national referral hospital emergency department - Dorji G, Pradhan S, Tenzin T, Miller P, Connor J, Kypri K.
Bhutan is a low-middle-income country with poor roads, rapidly increasing motor vehicle use and heavy alcohol consumption. We estimated the proportion of emergency department patients presenting with injury who had positive blood alcohol. We sought to brea... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - March 20, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Tags: Alcohol and Other Drugs Source Type: news

An investigation into suicides among Bhutanese refugees resettled in the United States between 2008 and 2011 - Hagaman AK, Sivilli TI, Ao T, Blanton C, Ellis H, Lopes Cardozo B, Shetty S.
An increase of Bhutanese refugee suicides were reported in the US between 2009 and 2012. This investigation examined these reported suicides in depth to gain a better understanding of factors associated with suicide within this population. The study employ... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - January 27, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Tags: Economics of Injury and Safety, PTSD, Injury Outcomes Source Type: news

Sleep Is Up In Bhutan, Which May Be Why They're Happier
By Krishna N. Das NEW DELHI (Reuters) - People in Bhutan are happier now than they were five years ago according to a survey of social wellbeing released by the tiny Himalayan kingdom that, among other things, measures whether they are getting enough sleep. Mostly Buddhist Bhutan, wedged between China and India, launched the Gross National Happiness (GNH) index in 2010 to include indicators ignored by conventional GDP - the monetary value of all goods and services produced in a country. These range from quality-of-life indicators like leisure time and forest cover to whether people experience negative emotions like anger a...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - November 3, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Bhutanese getting more sleep, lifting happiness index: PM
NEW DELHI (Reuters) - People in Bhutan are happier now than they were five years ago according to a survey of social wellbeing released by the tiny Himalayan kingdom that, among other things, measures whether they are getting enough sleep. (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - November 3, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news

Clean, Fresh Water is Essential to Bhutan's Gross National Happiness
(Source: Medical News (via PRIMEZONE))
Source: Medical News (via PRIMEZONE) - October 30, 2015 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Hundreds Of New Species Have Been Found In The Himalayas In The Last 5 Years
A blue-eyed frog. A snake with jewel-like skin. A cute little monkey that just can't seem to stop sneezing. What sound like fantasy creatures are actually living, breathing animals--and they're just three of more than 200 new animal species discovered in the Eastern Himalayas during the past five years, according to a new report from the World Wildlife Fund. In all, 211 animal species have been discovered recently in the area, according to the report. The region, which spans Bhutan, northeastern India, Nepal, northern Myanmar, and southern Tibet, is considered one of the most biologically diverse places on Earth....
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - October 11, 2015 Category: Science Source Type: news

Sneezing monkey and walking fish among new species discovered in Himalayas
Species new to science found in the Eastern Himalayas over the past five years include 133 plants, 26 species of fish, 10 new amphibians – and one mammalA monkey which sneezes in the rain and a “walking” fish are among more than 200 new species discovered in the Eastern Himalayas in recent years.A report on wildlife in Nepal, Bhutan, the far north of Myanmar, southern Tibet and north-eastern India has revealed discoveries in the past five years including 133 plants, 26 species of fish, 10 new amphibians, one reptile, one bird and one mammal. Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - October 5, 2015 Category: Science Authors: Press Association Tags: Wildlife Environment Conservation Nepal Bhutan Myanmar Tibet India South and Central Asia World news Science Zoology Evolution Source Type: news

Chronic Pain in Refugees: Yoga-Based Group Therapy as a Culturally Appropriate Treatment for Bhutanese Women (Stephanie Gold MD)
This powerpoint presentation describes the background, design, and outcomes of a pilot intervention of yoga-based group visits for Bhutanese refugee women with chronic pain. (Source: Family Medicine Digital Resources Library (FMDRL) Recently Uploaded)
Source: Family Medicine Digital Resources Library (FMDRL) Recently Uploaded - September 30, 2015 Category: Primary Care Source Type: news

Mental health first aid training for the Bhutanese refugee community in the United States - Subedi P, Li C, Gurung A, Bizune D, Dogbey MC, Johnson CC, Yun K.
BACKGROUND: The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of Mental Health First Aid (MHFA) training for Bhutanese refugee community leaders in the U.S. We hypothesized that training refugee leaders would improve knowledge of mental health problems a... (Source: SafetyLit: All (Unduplicated))
Source: SafetyLit: All (Unduplicated) - May 23, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Tags: Suicide and Self-Harm Source Type: news

Holding Grudges Is Bad for Our Health
It might be hard to imagine, but somewhere between 50 and 80 percent of people will experience a trauma at some point in their lives. To make matters worse, most traumas are perpetrated directly by other people -- sometimes even acquaintances, friends, and family members. Given these depressing statistics, it may be tempting to become angry or resentful, to view people as threats and little more. That's what some victims of trauma do, of course. They may hold grudges, harbor life-long resentment, and even seek retribution. Who could blame them? Perhaps this is why some mental health professionals teach that forgiveness is...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - May 1, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Group Prenatal and Group Baby Care With Refugees (Roberta Matern MD)
Phoenix is a major recipient of refugees for resettlement in the US. The Family Medicine Residency at St. Joseph's Hospital and Medical Center works closely with the Arizona Health Department's Refugee Clinic and the International Rescue Committee (IRC). As such, we have many refugee patients from Burma, Bhutan, African nations and the Middle East. Recognizing the unique needs of these populations, especially for disease prevention and prenatal care, the residency and the IRC adapted Centering PregnancyTM and Centering ParentingTM to our refugees. For over 5 years, we have provided group prenatal and group baby care in a c...
Source: Family Medicine Digital Resources Library (FMDRL) Recently Uploaded - April 10, 2015 Category: Primary Care Source Type: news

Time Is Money
Photo: I. Rimanoczy We have all heard it -- and said it ourselves, or thought of it at different moments in our life. Time is money. While it sounds like a post-modern capitalistic axiom, the quote actually originates with Benjamin Franklin who articulated this idea in Advice to a Young Tradesman, Written by an Old One, a handbook printed in 1748. "Remember that Money is of a prolific generating Nature. Money can beget Money, and its Offspring can beget more, and so on", Franklin observed, in his early musings about the power and potential of money. He advocated for saving, hard work, paying debts on time. "...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - April 6, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

The Pursuit of Happiness: Why It Can Be a Gift That Keeps on Giving
The pursuit of happiness was a concept that the United States' founding fathers valued so much they made it a part of the Declaration of Independence from the British Empire. While the idea of the inalienable right of all human beings to pursue happiness is not an exclusively North American one (arguably the idea originated in Greece with the philosopher Epicurus), we must acknowledge that it is rare for any country to really look at the happiness of their citizens as a right. In fact, the real mover and shaker lately with regard to prioritizing the "pursuit of happiness" is the small Himalayan country of Bhuta...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - March 24, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

24 Hours of Happiness
Occasionally a new great song comes around that captivates me. Pharrell William's 2013 song "Happy" is one of those. It is infectious and immediately makes you feel happy; as a result it has taken the world by storm. The song currently has over 595 million views on YouTube and a dedicated website 24hoursofhappiness.com, co-branded with the United Nations Foundation. Many countries and cities have already made their own music video versions to Pharrel William's song. This wonderful song is truly spreading happiness around the world and is an example of the power of music to uplift and unify different cultures. Th...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - March 20, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Understanding Bhutanese refugee suicide through the interpersonal-psychological theory of suicidal behavior - Ellis BH, Lankau EW, Ao T, Benson MA, Miller AB, Shetty S, Lopes Cardozo B, Geltman PL, Cochran J.
This study sought to understand the apparent high rates of suicide among resettled Bhutanese refugees in the context of the ... (Source: SafetyLit: All (Unduplicated))
Source: SafetyLit: All (Unduplicated) - February 7, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Tags: Social Etiologies and Disparities Source Type: news

Notes from the Field: Update: Vitamin B12 Deficiency Among Bhutanese Refugees Resettling in the United States, 2012
(Source: CDC Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report)
Source: CDC Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report - July 17, 2014 Category: American Health Source Type: news

One World [Cup], One Red Cross
The FIFA World Cup took the world by storm, and the American Red Cross scored great stories, videos and resources to fuel your soccer appetite. The Red Cross Grand Canyon Chapter has a distinction within the American Red Cross – they have had the most Restoring Family Links (RFL) cases of any chapter across the country for the past two years. To help serve their community in a unique way, the chapter’s international services department reached out to the Iraqi American Society for Peace and Friendship (IASPF). The collaboration resulted in the Red Cross supporting a local soccer tournam...
Source: Red Cross Chat - July 3, 2014 Category: Global & Universal Authors: Sarah Layton Tags: Uncategorized refugees Restoring Family Links soccer world cup Source Type: news

DNA Study Proves Bigfoot Never Existed
In a stunning finding that set off shock waves of grieving through much of the world, University of Oxford researchers announced that the beloved bipedal cryptid known globally as Bigfoot is dead—or, more specifically, that he never existed. Mr. Foot, who also went by the name Sasquatch, or Sásq’ets in the original Halkomelem, was 4,000 years old. Or maybe not. The Oxford finding was the result of a three-year study that began in 2012 when researchers issued an open call for hair samples held in museums and private collections that were said to come from “an anomalous primate,” which is the k...
Source: TIME: Top Science and Health Stories - July 2, 2014 Category: Science Authors: Jeffrey Kluger Tags: Uncategorized animals Bigfoot DNA hoax myth Opinion Oxford University Sasquatch! Yeti Source Type: news

DNA Analysis Debunks Bigfoot Myth, Points to Unknown Bear Species
The legend of the enormous creature variously known as a yeti, Bigfoot or Sasquatch has long been a source of mystery. But now a study of supposed Bigfoot hair samples has revealed that they actually derive from known mammals including bears, cows, dogs or horses. A team of scientists led by Bryan Sykes, a human genetics professor at the University of Oxford, analyzed DNA from 30 samples of Bigfoot hair donated by museums and enthusiasts. Although this may come as a blow to cryptozoologists — those who search for creatures whose existence is unproven — the analysis may herald the discovery of a new species of b...
Source: TIME: Top Science and Health Stories - July 2, 2014 Category: Science Authors: melissahellmann Tags: Uncategorized animals big foot brown bear cyptozoology Polar Bear Sasquatch! Yeti Source Type: news

Geology spans the minute and gigantic, from skeletonized leaves in China to water on mars
(Geological Society of America) New Geology studies include a mid-Cretaceous greenhouse world; the Vredefort meteoric impact event and the Vredefort dome, South Africa; shallow creeping faults in Italy; a global sink for immense amounts of water on Mars; the Funeral Mountains, USA; insect-mediated skeletonization of fern leaves in China; first-ever tectonic geomorphology study in Bhutan; the Ethiopian Large Igneous Province; the Central Andean Plateau; the Scandinavian Ice Sheet; the India-Asia collision zone; the Snake River Plain; and northeast Brazil. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - April 3, 2014 Category: Biology Source Type: news

iSchool Project Launches with Ericsson, Bhutan Telecom and Bhutan's Education Ministry
(Source: Medical News (via PRIMEZONE))
Source: Medical News (via PRIMEZONE) - March 29, 2014 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Traditional medicine: a rare cause of lead poisoning in Western countries - Muller H, Regard S, Petriccioli N, Kherad O.
A 42-year-old man from Bhutan was admitted to the emergency department with a 5-day history of abdominal pain, nausea and vomiting. Enhanced abdominal CT scan was found negative, however laboratory tests showed hemolytic anemia and basophilic stippling whi... (Source: SafetyLit: All (Unduplicated))
Source: SafetyLit: All (Unduplicated) - February 23, 2014 Category: Global & Universal Tags: Home and Consumer Product Safety Source Type: news

Doctors Resist Deadly Vaccine
An infant in intensive care at the Holy Family Hospital in New Delhi. Indian hospitals prefer traditional DPT vaccines. Credit: Holy Family Hospital.By Ranjit DevrajNEW DELHI, Feb 8 2014 (IPS) A spate of sudden infant deaths following vaccination in India has prompted leading paediatricians to call for stronger regulatory mechanisms to evaluate new vaccines for safety and efficacy before their acceptance into the national immunisation programme. According to data obtained from the Union Ministry of Health and Family Welfare, over the last one year 54 babies are recorded to have died soon after receiving the newly introduce...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - February 8, 2014 Category: Global & Universal Authors: Ranjit Devraj Tags: Active Citizens Aid Asia-Pacific Civil Society Development & Aid Editors' Choice Featured Headlines Health Human Rights Population Regional Categories TerraViva Europe TerraViva United Nations Children India Vaccines Source Type: news