Medications After a Heart Attack
From: www.secondscount.orgYour heart attack recovery will include medications. Taking these medications exactly as prescribed is one of the best tools at your disposal for avoiding death in the months following a heart attack. According to an article published in Circulation, the journal of the American Heart Association, heart attack patients who had not filled any of their prescriptions within 120 days of being discharged from the hospital had 80 percent greater odds of death than those who filled all of their prescriptions.Medications you are likely to be prescribed after a heart attack fall int...
Source: Dr Portnay - January 23, 2015 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr Portnay Source Type: blogs

The March of Legal Settlements Continues into 2015 - Daiichi Sankyo Settles Charges of Kickbacks to Doctors for $39 Million
We are just into January and have our first legal settlement by a major health care corporation of charges of giving physicians kickbacks to spur use of a commercial product.  Like most such stories, this one got little notice.  The most extensive report was in Ed Silverman's PharmaLot blog on the Wall Street Journal site.The Summary and Allegations The basic summary...Daiichi Sankyo agreed to pay $39 million to the U.S. federal government and state Medicaid programs to settle allegations of paying kickbacks to physicians to prescribe several of its drugs. The allegations were ...that Daiichi initiated different ...
Source: Health Care Renewal - January 13, 2015 Category: Health Management Tags: conflicts of interest corporate integrity agreement Daiichi Sankyo impunity kickbacks legal settlements Source Type: blogs

Daiichi Sankyo Agrees to Pay $39 Million to Resolve Off-Label and Kickback Allegations; Enters into Corporate Integrity Agreement with OIG
Discussion programs, known as “PODs,” from Jan. 1, 2005, through March 31, 2011, as well as other speaker programs from Jan. 1, 2004, through Feb. 4, 2011.  The company allegedly made payments to physicians “when physician participants in PODs took turns ‘speaking’ on duplicative topics over Daiichi-paid dinners, the recipient spoke only to members of his or her own staff in his or her own office, or the associated dinner was so lavish that its cost exceeded Daiichi’s own internal cost limitation of $140 per person,” according to DOJ.  The complaint alleges that &qu...
Source: Policy and Medicine - January 13, 2015 Category: American Health Authors: Thomas Sullivan Source Type: blogs

Daiichi Sankyo Settlement and Corporate Integrity Agreement
Discussion programs, known as “PODs,” from Jan. 1, 2005, through March 31, 2011, as well as other speaker programs from Jan. 1, 2004, through Feb. 4, 2011.  The company allegedly made payments to physicians “when physician participants in PODs took turns ‘speaking’ on duplicative topics over Daiichi-paid dinners, the recipient spoke only to members of his or her own staff in his or her own office, or the associated dinner was so lavish that its cost exceeded Daiichi’s own internal cost limitation of $140 per person,” according to DOJ.  The complaint alleges that &qu...
Source: Policy and Medicine - January 13, 2015 Category: American Health Authors: Thomas Sullivan Source Type: blogs

FDA Once Again Reaches Conclusions At Odds With Its Own Staff
Once again the FDA has reached a conclusion that is directly opposed by some of its own scientists.  Last month the FDA affirmed the safety of olmesartan, a popular blood pressure lowering drug (sold as Benicar and other names). But that reassuring view is not shared by the  FDA scientists who performed the study that provided the basis for the review. And now outside experts are also raising concerns about the drug. Back in 2010 the FDA said that it was initiating a safety review of olmesartan due to troubling findings from 2 clinical trials that raised the More… (Source: CardioBrief)
Source: CardioBrief - July 14, 2014 Category: Cardiology Authors: Larry Husten Tags: People, Places & Events Policy & Ethics Prevention, Epidemiology & Outcomes benicar blood pressure david graham FDA hypertension Medicare olmesartan safety warnings Source Type: blogs

FDA Ends Olmesartan Safety Review, But…
The FDA announced on Tuesday that it had completed its safety review of the antihypertensive drug olmesartan (sold as Benicar and other names). The investigation was initiated in 2010 when results from the ROADMAP trial showed that patients with type 2 diabetes taking olmesartan had an increased risk of cardiovascular death. Now the FDA says that it “has found no clear evidence of increased cardiovascular risks associated” with olmesartan in diabetic patients. … Click here to read the full post on Forbes.     (Source: CardioBrief)
Source: CardioBrief - June 25, 2014 Category: Cardiology Authors: Larry Husten Tags: People, Places & Events Policy & Ethics Prevention, Epidemiology & Outcomes FDA olmesartan safety review Source Type: blogs

FDA Warns That Popular Blood Pressure Drug Can Cause Severe Diarrhea
The FDA is warning that the widely-used antihypertensive agent olmesartan (marketed as Benicar, Benicar HCT, Azor, Tribenzor, and generics) may cause severe diarrhea. According to an FDA safety announcement, olmesartan “can cause intestinal problems known as sprue-like enteropathy. Symptoms of sprue-like enteropathy include severe, chronic diarrhea with substantial weight loss.” The warning is being added to the label of drug products containing olmesartan. Olmesartan is a member of the class of drugs known as angiotensin II receptor blockers (ARBs). The FDA said that it has found no evidence that other an...
Source: CardioBrief - July 3, 2013 Category: Cardiology Authors: Larry Husten Tags: People, Places & Events Policy & Ethics Angiotensin II receptor antagonist Celiac Disease diarrhea FDA food and drug administration olmesartan Source Type: blogs

The glass ceiling
Female sales reps: Daiichi Sankyo discriminates TRENTON, N.J. -- Six current and former female sales representatives are accusing drugmaker Daiichi Sankyo of gender discrimination in a $100 million class action lawsuit. The lawsuit states the women are trying to end employment discrimination for themselves and several hundred other female sales reps who currently work for or have worked for the U.S. arm of Daiichi Sankyo Co. Ltd. The Japanese pharmaceutical company makes cholesterol and blood pressure drugs. The suit alleges that the company pays female sales staff less than men for the same work, promotes women more sl...
Source: PharmaGossip - February 12, 2013 Category: Pharma Commentators Authors: insider Source Type: blogs