Log in to search using one of your social media accounts:

 

20 Hotels You Didn ’t Know Were Owned by Celebrities
This article originally appeared on TravelandLeisure.com (Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories)
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - September 25, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Adeline Duff/ Travel + Leisure Tags: Uncategorized celebrities onetime onetimetravel Source Type: news

What Is Hispanic Heritage Month?
Hispanic Heritage Month is an official celebration of American citizens whose ancestry can be traced back to Spain, Mexico, Central and South America and the Caribbean. When is Hispanic Heritage Month? The festival now lasts from September 15 to October 15 every year, but it first started out as just a week long celebration of in 1968. Twenty years later, in 1988 it expanded to dedicate a whole four weeks for the celebration of being Hispanic. The celebration starts in the middle of the month, as opposed to the end, because the 15th marks the independence days of five Latin America countries: Costa Rica, El Salvador, Guate...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - September 15, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Rachel Lewis Tags: Uncategorized hispanic heritage month onetime Smithsonian Source Type: news

8 Trending Travel Destinations to Visit Right Now
This article originally appeared on BusinessInsider.com (Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories)
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - September 13, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Madeline Stone / Business Insider Tags: Uncategorized bi onetime onetimetravel Source Type: news

Our mosquito bites were infected with wriggling LARVAE
Katie and Ian McCabe assumed they'd been bitten by ordinary insects in Belize. But then they discovered it was a human botfly, which could lay larvae under human skin. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - June 19, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Thank You, Ivanka: From One Parent To Another
Dear Ivanka, I don’t know you. But I know some of the paths you walk: You’re a parent concerned about your children; you’re a child concerned about her dad; and sometimes what you wish for one of them conflicts with what the other wants for you. I’ve walked that tightrope myself. My daughter Lily is the light of my life. I knew that my mother, who I loved but with whom I sometimes clashed, adored her. So a few years back when my mom voted to ban gay marriage, it was painful; it took time and more than one very hard conversation for her to understand how her vote made families like her own granddaugh...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - April 11, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

Naked and Afraid star quits after attack by flies
Renowned surfer Anastasia Ashley, 30, made it six days out of the 14 in Belize before having to tap out due to a rash caused by sand flies - which can potentially be deadly. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - March 3, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Gorgeous Valentine's Day Video Shows A Love Parents Will Recognize Immediately
Love comes in many forms, but one of the purest examples is the love parents feel for their children. In honor of Valentine’s Day, UNICEF released a video that pays tribute to this bond. The video features parents in Belize as they describe their hopes for their kids, the obstacles they face, and the role they play in their lives. The emotional video is part of UNICEF’s #EarlyMomentsMatter campaign, which focuses on the ways that children’s early experiences ― like their interactions with caregivers ― influence their brain development.  “Investment in early childhood is one of the...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - February 14, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Little Boy Gives Away His Toys At Special 'Lemonade Stand'
After learning that many kids aren’t fortunate enough to have lots of toys, a 6-year-old boy decided to take action. Blake Work of Hudson, Florida set up a special “lemonade stand” to give away free toys to families in need. Blake’s mom Melissa told The Huffington Post her son came up with the idea one night when he snuck out of bed and went to his parents’ room.  “He was supposed to be sleeping, but the mantra, ‘If you don’t listen when they tell you the little things, they won’t tell you the big things,’ has always stuck with me as a parent,” Me...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - February 7, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Belize's Glover's Reef providing refuge for new generation of sea turtles
(Wildlife Conservation Society) A new generation of threatened hawksbill sea turtles is thriving in the protected waters of Glover's Reef Atoll, Belize, evidence that efforts to protect these and other marine species in one of the world's great barrier reef systems are working, according to WCS (Wildlife Conservation Society) and the Belize Fisheries Department. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - November 29, 2016 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Man describes seeing flesh-eating parasite ravaging his own skin  
WARNING: GRAPHIC CONTENT. Mark Ward, a firefighter from Prescott, Arizona, was in Belize when pin-sized spots appeared on his body. He ignored them, but it turned out to be a parasite. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - November 2, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Jaguar scat study suggests restricted movement in areas of conservation importance in Mesoamerica
(American Museum of Natural History) A research group led by the American Museum of Natural History and global wild cat conservation organization Panthera has published the largest gene-based survey of its kind on wild jaguar populations in Mesoamerica. The analysis is based on nearly 450 jaguar scat samples collected in Belize, Costa Rica, Guatemala, Honduras, and Mexico. This work identifies areas of conservation concern for Mesoamerican jaguars and underscores the importance of large-scale genetic monitoring efforts for this near-threatened, and elusive, carnivore species. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - October 26, 2016 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Ethnic and gender disparities in premature adult mortality in Belize 2008-2010 - Morey F, Hambleton IR, Unwin N, Samuels TA.
BACKGROUND: Data on disparities in mortality within low and middle income countries are limited, with little published data from the Caribbean or Central America. Our aim was to investigate disparities in overall and cause specific premature adult mortalit... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - October 20, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Tags: Risk Factor Prevalence, Injury Occurrence Source Type: news

Maya tomb uncovered holding body, treasure and tales of 'snake dynasty'
Find is ‘one of the largest burial chambers ever discovered in Belize’Hieroglyphic panels, skeleton and offerings hidden for 1,300 yearsArchaeologists have uncovered what may be the largest royal tomb found in more than a century of work on Maya ruins in Belize, along with a puzzling set of hieroglyphic panels that provide clues to a “snake dynasty” that conquered many of its neighbors some 1,300 years ago.Related:Liquid mercury found under Mexican pyramid could lead to king's tombContinue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - August 7, 2016 Category: Science Authors: Alan Yuhas in San Francisco Tags: Archaeology Science Belize Americas World news Source Type: news

Maya 'snake dynasty' tomb uncovered holding body, treasure and hieroglyphs
Find is ‘one of the largest burial chambers ever discovered in Belize’Hieroglyphic panels, skeleton and offerings hidden for 1,300 yearsArchaeologists have uncovered what may be the largest royal tomb found in more than a century of work on Maya ruins in Belize, along with a puzzling set of hieroglyphic panels that provide clues to a “snake dynasty” that conquered many of its neighbors some 1,300 years ago.Related:Liquid mercury found under Mexican pyramid could lead to king's tombContinue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - August 6, 2016 Category: Science Authors: Alan Yuhas in San Francisco Tags: Archaeology Science Belize Americas World news Source Type: news

Analogic to pay $15m to settle SEC charges over BK Medical ‘slush fund’
The U.S. Securities & Exchange Commission said today that Analogic (NSDQ:ALOG) agreed to pony up $15 million to settle civil and criminal charges brought over violations of the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act. The SEC said Peabody, Mass.-based Analogic’s Danish subsidiary, BK Medical, ran hundreds of sham transactions with distributors to funnel some $20 million to 3rd parties, “including individuals in Russia and apparent shell companies in Belize, the British Virgin Islands, Cyprus, and Seychelles.” Led by former BK Medical CFO Lars Frost, the Danish unit would issue fake, inflated invoices ...
Source: Mass Device - June 21, 2016 Category: Medical Equipment Authors: Brad Perriello Tags: Legal News Wall Street Beat Analogic Corp. BK Medical Dept. of Justice (DOJ) Foreign Corrupt Practices Act Securities & Exchange Commission (SEC) Source Type: news

Our Most Iconic Places Are Under Dire Threat From Climate Change
Dozens of the Earth's most cherished World Heritage sites are under dire threat from climate change -- and some may be damaged beyond saving, warns a report UNESCO released Thursday. The agency, alongside the Union of Concerned Scientists and the United Nations Environment Program, analyzed 31 natural and cultural World Heritage sites in 29 countries on six continent. The areas range from America's celebrated Yellowstone National Park and Venice's iconic Lagoon to the Galapagos Islands in Ecuador and the Ilulissat Icefjord in Denmark, all of which could be damaged by an onslaught of climate-related effects. Man-made climat...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - May 26, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Cross-cultural educational intervention and fall risk awareness - Howard BS, Beitman CL, Walker BA, Moore ES.
Aims: To determine if a two-visit, personalized falls prevention educational intervention affected awareness of fall risk in community-dwelling older adults in Belize. Secondary aim: to assess new learning in a cross-cultural context and willingness to mak... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - May 6, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Tags: Age: Elder Adults Source Type: news

Human psychology: Why do we have equivalents of bogeyman in so many countries around the world?
Bogeyman (also spelled bogieman, boogeyman, or boogie man) is a common allusion to a mythical creature in many cultures used by adults to frighten children into good behavior. This monster has no specific appearance, and conceptions about it can vary drastically from household to household within the same community. Parents may tell their children that if they misbehave, the bogeyman will get them. Bogeymen may target a specific mischief—for instance, a bogeyman that punishes children who suck their thumbs—or general misbehavior, depending on what purpose needs serving. Source: Wikipedia.Examples - by country -...
Source: Clinical Cases and Images - April 26, 2016 Category: Journals (General) Tags: Psychology Source Type: news

Mayo Clinic Minute: Zika Endemic Areas
Zika virus has been reported in Belize, adding to the number of countries where Zika-infected mosquitoes have been found to be spreading the disease. In the U.S., the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reports 358 travel-associated Zika virus cases, though none has been acquired locally. The concern is that the imported cases potentially could result in the [...] (Source: News from Mayo Clinic)
Source: News from Mayo Clinic - April 21, 2016 Category: Databases & Libraries Source Type: news

Almost Half Of World Heritage Sites Are Threatened, Report Finds
Nearly half of the planet's world heritage sites are threatened by development, despite international protections, according to a report released Wednesday by the World Wildlife Fund. The 229 heritage sites in 96 countries include Egypt's pyramids, Florida's Everglades National Park and Australia's Great Barrier Reef. The WWF report found that 114 of these sites are under threat from oil and gas development, illegal logging, overfishing or other industrial activities. Roberto Troya, WWF director for Latin America and the Caribbean, said the report points out that natural capital isn't valued as highly as industry in many r...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - April 6, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Colonists' religious architecture influenced by Maya traditions
The Mayas influenced the Spanish colonists' religious architecture. The research compares Spanish colonial churches and Maya dwellings on the Yucatán Peninsula in Mexico and Belize. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - March 31, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Colonists' religious architecture influenced by Maya traditions
(University of Gothenburg) The Mayas influenced the Spanish colonists' religious architecture. This is concluded in a new doctoral thesis in archaeology that compares Spanish colonial churches and Maya dwellings on the Yucatán Peninsula in Mexico and Belize. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - March 31, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

New Research Offers Much-Needed Hope For Our Oceans
Earth's fisheries are in bad shape -- populations of some stocks, including tuna and mackerel, declined 74 percent between 1970 and 2010. A new study, however, offers a glimmer of hope of what we could expect in the not-so-distant future if global action is taken. The study, published in Monday's issue of Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, finds that with better fishing practices, the majority of the world's fisheries -- 77 percent, to be exact -- could recover to a healthy state within a decade. And by 2050, global fish populations could double, resulting in a 204 percent profit increase for the wo...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - March 28, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Central American Universities Implement Standardized HIV Training for Health Workers
More than 20 higher education institutions across Central America have integrated a new HIV curriculum into their nursing, medical, or other health professional training programs thanks to IntraHealth International’s work on the USAID-funded Central America Capacity Project. The training curriculum—which covers a full range of HIV prevention and treatment services, including HIV counseling and testing, reduction of HIV stigma and discrimination, adherence to antiretroviral therapy, biosafety, and post-exposure prophylaxis—is the first of its kind in the region. IntraHealth International helped create this...
Source: IntraHealth International - March 1, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

U.S. securities regulator levels new charges in press release hacking case
(Reuters) — The SEC charged 9 new defendants in what it has called a more than $100 million international scheme to hack into newswires that distribute corporate press releases and to use stolen information to conduct insider trading. According to a complaint filed yesterday in the U.S. District Court for New Jersey, 5 traders and 4 companies they own made more than $19.5 million in illegal profits by trading in such companies as Edwards Lifesciences (NYSE:EW) and Align Technology (NSDQ:ALGN). The SEC said the trades were based on inside information provided...
Source: Mass Device - February 18, 2016 Category: Medical Equipment Authors: MassDevice Tags: Legal News Wall Street Beat Align Technology Inc. Edwards Lifesciences Insider Trading Securities & Exchange Commission (SEC) Source Type: news

Mexico’s murder rate has led to decrease in men’s life expectancy, UCLA-led study shows
Mexico’s staggering homicide rate has taken a toll on the mortality rate for men — and it could be even worse than the statistics indicate, a new study from the UCLA Fielding School of Public Health suggests. Improvements in living standards and in the availability of health care helped boost life expectancy throughout Latin America during the second half of the 20th century. But that trend slowed in the early 2000s and began reversing after 2005 due to the rising homicide rate in Central America and Mexico. In Mexico, that rate more than doubled from 9.5 per 100,000 deaths in 2005 to 22 per 100,...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - January 5, 2016 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Egypt To Scan Ancient Pyramids With Cosmic Rays
ImageContent(562de397e4b0aac0b8fd508e,562de058140000e800c7ac86,Image,HectorAssetUrl(562de058140000e800c7ac86.jpeg,Some(),Some(jpeg)),Credit: Donyanedomam/Getty Images,The Pyramid of Chephren, pictured here on the right, is one of four Egyptian pyramids to be scanned by scientists in the coming months.) The study of archaeology can be a double-edged sword. As renowned archaeologist Kristen Romey put it in 2012 while discussing the fate of the as-yet unopened tomb of China's first emperor, it’s “ultimately a destructive science. You have to destroy stuff in order to learn about it.” But ...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - October 26, 2015 Category: Science Source Type: news

IDWEEK: Smother and pull, but don’t chop – how to identify and remove botfly larvae
SAN DIEGO – Identifying a botfly infestation can be the toughest part of treating it. It’s not uncommon for travelers to return from Costa Rica, Belize, and other Central and South American countries with Dermatobia hominis infestations, but clinicians in North America are not necessarily... (Source: Skin and Allergy News)
Source: Skin and Allergy News - October 23, 2015 Category: Dermatology Source Type: news

How Fishermen Can Replenish the Seas
It may sound like a tall order: By 2020, the U.N. Sustainable Development Goal for oceans calls on the world to "manage and protect marine and coastal ecosystems...effectively regulate harvesting...end overfishing...restore fish stocks in the shortest time feasible...[and] produce maximum sustainable yield." Can we really meet those targets in five years? I believe we can. Promising signs, backed by groundbreaking research, show how quickly we can replenish the world's seas while providing enough seafood to feed an additional 600 million people at today's per capita consumption rate -- if we get the incentives ri...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - September 21, 2015 Category: Science Source Type: news

Fighting the Scourge of Phantom Boats on the High Seas
What a difference a decade makes. As the world stands poised to launch the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) aimed at transforming our planet by 2030, the ocean is at last firmly on the agenda. It's a welcome change from when the seas were woefully marginalized in the Millennium Development Goals. This time, the ocean is getting its own goal -- SDG 14 -- backed up by seven ambitious targets, including to combat the illegal fishing that is destroying vital stocks, and to protect far more of the ocean from exploitation. To help achieve these targets, governments should look to the collaborative initiatives already making...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - September 21, 2015 Category: Science Source Type: news

World 'well being' league suggests Brits would be happier in Belize, Gallup and Healthways find
The UK has ranked below Venezuela and Kyrgyzstan in a global index of well being.Britain came in 44th out of 145 countries which also places it lower than Nicaragua and Bolivia. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - June 26, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Into the light: how lidar is replacing radar as the archaeologist’s map tool of choice
A technology using rapid pulses of light is helping archaeologists to chart ancient settlements hidden beneath dense forest canopiesColorado State University archaeologist Chris Fisher found out about lidar in 2009. He was surveying the ruins of Angamuco in west-central Mexico the traditional way, with a line of grad students and assistants walking carefully while looking at the ground for bits of ceramics, the remains of an old foundation or even a tomb.He had expected to find a settlement, but instead he happened upon a major city of the Purepecha empire, rivals of the Aztecs in the centuries immediately preceding the Sp...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - June 20, 2015 Category: Science Authors: Guy Gugliotta for the Washington Post Tags: Archaeology Mapping technologies Science Technology Belize Mexico Source Type: news

Redefining "Sustainability" as More, More and, Well, More
Since its birth in 1987, for many, the term "sustainable development" has become synonymous with "less." "Sustainability" seemed to lock us into a static, zero-sum game of painful sacrifices. Facing finite or shrinking ecological limits, we felt forced to: ensure future food security only by inhibiting demands today; increase jobs and revenues only at the expense of wild nature; and restore wildness only by crimping economic growth. But this week, groundbreaking research redefines sustainability more positively. Two years' collaboration with university scientists revealed that, through a tr...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - June 5, 2015 Category: Science Source Type: news

Two new creeping water bug species found in Belize, Peru
Two new saucer bugs (also called the creeping water bugs) have been found in streams in western Belize and southeastern Peru. Now the scientists say that more needs to be done in order to obtain records of other insects that have not yet been discovered before it's too late. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - April 28, 2015 Category: Science Source Type: news

Two new creeping water bug species found in Belize and Peru
(Entomological Society of America) Two new saucer bugs (also called the creeping water bugs) have been found in streams in western Belize and southeastern Peru. Descriptions of the new species appear in the Annals of the Entomological Society of America. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - April 28, 2015 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Farming in the forest in Belize
A video on how integrating agriculture with the natural forest cycle can improve resilience and sustainability. (Source: SciDev.Net)
Source: SciDev.Net - March 25, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Watch Orderly Hermit Crabs Line Up Biggest To Smallest, Swap Shells In 'Conga Line'
Even hermit crabs, it turns out, aren't safe from a housing crisis. In the above clip from the BBC show, "Life Story," several hermit crabs on a small Caribbean island off the coast of Belize are shown in their quest for suitable shelter, which involves lining up according to size and swapping shells in an orderly fashion. Hermit crabs rely on shells (and flotsam, in some cases) to protect their soft abdomens from predators and the elements. They are always on the lookout for shells that might better suit their size and situation since, as the video states, "To be left without a shell is a death sentence....
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - March 6, 2015 Category: Science Source Type: news

Spiny lobster abundance study at Glover's Reef, Belize finds fishery in good shape
(Wildlife Conservation Society) A recent study conducted in the waters of Glover's Reef Marine Reserve in Belize by the Wildlife Conservation Society and its partners has revealed good news for spiny lobsters: the abundance of these commercially valuable crustaceans should support local fisheries into the future, an indication that no-take areas and other regulations are protecting the nation's marine resources. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 2, 2015 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Collapse of Mayan civilization likely due to drought, samples from Belize's Blue Hole reveal
(NaturalNews) Belize's famed "Blue Hole" is a magnet for scuba divers and tourists, but it also may now be providing some answers regarding the demise of the Mayan civilization.The Blue Hole is an underwater cave which lies at the center of an atoll roughly 40 miles from the Belize... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - January 13, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Great Blue Hole off Belize yields new clues to fall of Mayan civilisation
Research supports theory that drought and climate conditions reduced Mayans from a regional power to survivors abandoning cities to virtual extinction Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - January 3, 2015 Category: Science Authors: Alan Yuhas Tags: Belize Americas Sinkholes Natural disasters and extreme weather World news Drought Flooding Oceans Environment Water Science Archaeology Source Type: news

Belize's 'Blue Hole' May Help Solve Mystery Of Maya Downfall
Scientists know all about the sophisticated calendars and writing system of the Maya, as well as their ritual sacrifices. But as for exactly what caused the the ancient civilization to collapse around 900 A.D., that's long been a bit of a mystery. Now a team of researchers from Rice University and Louisiana State University think they may be one step closer to cracking the mystery, thanks in part to evidence from the "Great Blue Hole." The massive sinkhole located in the Caribbean Sea off the coast of Belize was made popular by pioneering conservationist Jacques Cousteau, who visited it in 1971 and declared it o...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - January 1, 2015 Category: Science Source Type: news

Using science to open way to 'blue economy'
This study developed the information the Belizean government sought to make informed management decisions. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - November 18, 2014 Category: Science Source Type: news

800 on flights linked to nurse contacted
Concerns about even remote chances of Ebola exposure rippled Friday from a U.S. airline to a cruise ship off Belize, with Frontier contacting hundreds who flew with an infected nurse and Carnival quarantining a health worker only tangentially linked ... (Source: WDSU.com - Health)
Source: WDSU.com - Health - October 18, 2014 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Ebola Scare Creates 'Utter Panic' on Caribbean Cruise Ship
There is "utter panic??? on the Carnival cruise ship where a Dallas hospital employee who came into contact with an Ebola patient???s blood test are now being sent back to Texas after they were turned away from both Belize and Mexico, one of the passengers said. (Source: ABC News: Health)
Source: ABC News: Health - October 17, 2014 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Health Source Type: news

Belize's lobster, conch, and fish populations rebuild in no-take zones
A new report shows that no-take zones in Belize can not only help economically valuable species such as lobster, conch, and fish recover from overfishing, but may also help re-colonize nearby reef areas. According to past studies, the recovery of lobster, conch, and other exploited species within marine protected areas with no-take zones, or fully protected reserves, could take as little as 1-6 years. Full recovery of exploited species, however, could take decades. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - July 13, 2014 Category: Science Source Type: news

Belize's lobster, conch, and fish populations rebuild in no-take zones
(Wildlife Conservation Society) A new report from the Wildlife Conservation Society shows that no-take zones in Belize can not only help economically valuable species such as lobster, conch, and fish recover from overfishing, but may also help re-colonize nearby reef areas. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - July 11, 2014 Category: Biology Source Type: news

The Last Coral Reefs
There’s only one way to lower a $20,000 custom-made camera from a swaying fishing boat into the open sea: very carefully. And that’s exactly how Manuel Gonzalez-Rivero’s colleagues handled the SVII camera as they nudged it overboard, into the bathtub-warm waters off the coast of Belize. Once submerged, the beach-ball-size camera snapped a photograph of the protected Glover’s Reef every three seconds. Later, computers would analyze the pictures, providing a close-up look at one of the most valuable marine ecosystems in the Caribbean. And we have to see it today, because coral reefs may not be here t...
Source: TIME: Top Science and Health Stories - April 3, 2014 Category: Science Authors: Megan Gibson Tags: Uncategorized Coral Reef Environment mapping Source Type: news

Climatic controls on hurricane patterns: A 1200-y near-annual record from Lighthouse Reef, Belize - Denommee KC, Bentley SJ, Droxler AW.
Tropical cyclones (TCs) are powerful agents of destruction, and understanding climatic controls on TC patterns is of great importance. Over timescales of seasons to several decades, relationships among TC track, frequency, intensity and basin-scale climate... (Source: SafetyLit: All (Unduplicated))
Source: SafetyLit: All (Unduplicated) - February 15, 2014 Category: Global & Universal Tags: Environmental Issues, Climate, Geophysics Source Type: news

Beyond Mendel
(National Science Foundation) On a cloudless day in Dangriga, a coastal city in southern Belize, a group of students are hard at work. One wall of their sun-strewn lab is lined with the usual gear of modern genetics: thermocycler, gel electrophoresis system, micropipets, test tubes. Swathed in purple gloves, they measure samples, mix gels and fill pipets with the utmost concentration. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - December 19, 2013 Category: Biology Source Type: news