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The World Health Organization Just Picked Its New Leaders. Most of Them Are Women
The World Health Organization announced its new senior leadership team Tuesday, and more than 60% of the appointees are women. “The team represents 14 countries, including all WHO regions, and is more than 60% women, reflecting my deep-held belief that we need top talent, gender equity and a geographically diverse set of perspectives to fulfill our mission to keep the world safe,” WHO Director-General Dr. Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus said in a statement. The five men selected to lead the agency are Dr. Peter Salama, Dr. Bernhard Schwartländer, Dr. Ranieri Guerra, Dr. Ren Minghui, and Stewart Simonson. WHO ...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - October 4, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Casey Quackenbush Tags: Uncategorized onetime United Nations women's empowerment Source Type: news

How Colonial Systems Hurt the Caribbean ’s Ability to Weather Hurricanes
This post is in partnership with History Today. The article below was originally published at History Today. For most of the 19th century, besides being aware of the hurricane season (June-November), there was little that those living in the Caribbean could do to predict the arrival of storms. As rains and winds began to pick up, the wealthy took shelter in the cellars of their stone houses, while the wooden shacks of the enslaved population offered almost no protection. When a storm hit, the majority of the enslaved population simply found themselves having to try and survive days and nights out in the open, exposed to th...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - September 27, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Oscar Webber / History Today Tags: Uncategorized Environment natural disaster Source Type: news

A Strengthening Hurricane Maria Closes in on Irma-Hit Caribbean
(SANTO DOMINGO, Dominican Republic) — The islands of the eastern Caribbean prepared Sunday to face another potential disaster, with forecasters saying newly formed and strengthening Hurricane Maria was headed for a hit on the Leeward Islands by Monday night. Hurricane or tropical storm warnings were posted for many of the islands, including those already coping with the devastation caused by Hurricane Irma, such as St. Barts and Antigua and Barbuda. The U.S. National Hurricane Center said Maria was expected to gain power and likely would be near major hurricane strength while crossing through the Leeward Islands late...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - September 18, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Associated Press Tags: Uncategorized Caribbean hurricane irma Hurricane Maria onetime weather Source Type: news

Brothers are set to row the Atlantic on a vegan diet
EXCLUSIVE Greg Bailey, 27, and Jude Massey, 18, from Lymington, Hampshire, will row 3,000 miles from Gran Canaria to Barbados. Only 317 crews have successfully crossed the second-largest ocean. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - September 8, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Disease Burden Growing as Vector Insects Adapt to Climate Change
Dry drains will reduce the numbers of mosquitoes breeding, but now the Aedes aegypti mosquito is going underground to breed underground in available water and flying to feed. Credit: Zadie Neufville/IPSBy Zadie NeufvilleKINGSTON, Jamaica, Apr 18 2017 (IPS)There were surprised gasps when University of the West Indies (UWI) Professor John Agard told journalists at an Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) meeting in late November 2016 that mosquitoes were not only living longer, but were “breeding in septic tanks underground”.For many, it explained why months of fogging at the height of Zika and Chikung...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - April 18, 2017 Category: Global & Universal Authors: Zadie Neufville Tags: Caribbean Climate Wire Climate Change Featured Headlines Health Latin America & the Caribbean Projects Water & Sanitation Chagas Disease Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) mosquitoes Zika Virus Source Type: news

Disabled Caribbeans Find Freedom in Technology
There is still need for better educational opportunities, housing, medical care, and everything that is extended to other citizens in the Caribbean. Credit: BigstockBy Jewel FraserPORT OF SPAIN, Trinidad, Mar 23 2017 (IPS)Visually impaired Kerryn Gunness is excited about the possibilities offered by a new free app that would serve as his eyes and enable people like him to enjoy greater independence.The Personal Universal Communicator (PUC) app is part of a new generation of cheaper assistive technologies making their way onto the market which allow people with disabilities to use technology that was formerly too expensive,...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - March 23, 2017 Category: Global & Universal Authors: Jewel Fraser Tags: Featured Headlines Health Latin America & the Caribbean Poverty & SDGs Disabilities ICT Source Type: news

Prince Harry and Rihanna get HIV tests in Barbados
Prince Harry and Rihanna have taken HIV tests together in Barbados to raise awareness on World Aids Day. (Source: BBC News | Health | UK Edition)
Source: BBC News | Health | UK Edition - December 1, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

This Could Revolutionize Your Yoga
Mound your glutes Breathe wide into your side or lateral ribs Bring the weight into the front of your paw hover your heels above the earth Draw the energy up the back of your legs Bend your knees Make a soft gentle fist Open your mouth Keep your eyes horizon Not your yoga teacher's classical alignment cues, right? There's a new yoga kid in town. At least in my town; Copenhagen. The movement system Bowspring is slowly starting to influence some of the teachers of the yoga community here. New movements, new cues, new sensations. The Bowspring is said to work on our default dominance; the position our body slides unco...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - October 27, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Featured Review: Interventions for patients and caregivers to improve knowledge of sickle cell disease and recognition of its related complications
Positive effects of educational interventions on improving patient knowledge of sickle cell disease and reducing depressionSickle cell disease is a lifelong, inherited disorder which can cause a number of complications throughout an individual's life. It may cause a huge burden on both the patient and their family, including frequent visits to healthcare facilities. The illness causes not just physical complications such as painful crises and strokes, but may have many other effects such as depression, poor quality of life, coping issues, and poor family relationships. When people with a chronic illness have better underst...
Source: Cochrane News and Events - October 17, 2016 Category: Information Technology Authors: mumoquit at cochrane.org Source Type: news

Treating cardiovascular disease in Barbados
The outwardly calm and relaxing Caribbean island of Barbados hides a pressure-cooker health crisis: more than one-third of Barbadians aged 25-70 years suffer from hypertension, the main risk factor for cardiovascular disease (CVD) – the world’s number one killer. (Source: WHO Feature Stories)
Source: WHO Feature Stories - September 29, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Tags: cardiovascular disease [subject], cardiovascular disease, heart attack, heart attacks, cvd, heart diseases, heart disease, high blood pressure, hypertension, rabies [subject], Barbados [country], Feature [doctype], Region of the Americas [region] Source Type: news

Two Barbados bird species enter the select club of string-pullers
The Barbados bullfinch and Carib grackle can pass the popular animal cognition test of string-pulling, but this ability may be unrelated to performance on six other cognitive tests, according a study. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - August 17, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Workplace violence against medical staff in healthcare facilities in Barbados - Abed M, Morris E, Sobers-Grannum N.
BACKGROUND: Anecdotal evidence suggests increasing workplace violence against healthcare workers in the Caribbean, but the prevalence is largely undocumented. AIMS: To determine the prevalence of workplace violence reported by medical staff at primary care... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - July 7, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Tags: Jurisprudence, Laws, Legislation, Policies, Rules Source Type: news

City Birds Are Smarter and Stronger Than Country Birds, Study Finds
City birds are smarter than country birds and have stronger immune systems, a small study has found. Researchers have discovered key differences in problem-solving ability and resistance to infection among birds that live in urban environments and those from rural landscapes. City birds performed better in cognitive tests and exceeded their country counterparts in exploiting new resources, according to a team of McGill University researchers. “We found that not only were birds from urbanized areas better at innovative problem-solving tasks than bullfinches from rural environments, but that surprisingly urban birds al...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - March 23, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Melissa Chan Tags: Uncategorized animals Source Type: news

Climate information may be key weapon in fight against Zika spread
BARCELONA (Thomson Reuters Foundation) - In the Caribbean island state of Barbados, rainwater collection has been promoted as a way to boost scarce supplies of fresh water. But there's a catch: environmental health officers then reported an increase in mosquitoes breeding in household water storage tanks. (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - February 29, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news

Number of Zika cases in Ireland rises to three, HSE says
Virus contracted during travel in Colombia and Barbados before patients returned here (Source: The Irish Times - Health)
Source: The Irish Times - Health - February 18, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

The Latest On Zika: Experts Are Divided Over Genetically Modified Mosquitos
The Zika virus, which is spread by the Aedes aegypti mosquito, is strongly suspected to be linked to a new wave of microcephaly cases in Brazil. Babies born with the birth defect have smaller heads and sometimes brains that aren't fully developed, which can result in life-long developmental problems.    Zika is currently spreading through Central and South America and the Caribbean, and with the high volume of news about the virus, it's tough to stay up-to-date. Check out our full coverage, or read our daily recaps. Here are four updates, opinions and developments to know about now:   1. ...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - February 16, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

What Pregnant Women Should Know About Zika Virus
On Monday, the World Health Organization declared a "public health emergency of international concern" due to the cluster of birth defects potentially linked to Zika virus.   No one is probably more concerned about this connection than the world’s pregnant women, especially those who are living in an area where there is ongoing Zika virus transmission. While the virus’ symptoms (fever, headache, joint pain, conjunctivitis) are no cause for alarm and rarely require hospitalization, the disease is suspected of causing severe birth defects like microcephaly, when a baby is born with an abnormally sm...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - February 2, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Patrick Haynes obituary
My father, Patrick Haynes, who has died aged 84, was an agronomist who specialised in tropical root crops and worked for international agencies around the world, helping farmers to get the most out of what they grew.One of Patrick’s most important contributions was his defence of subsistence crops being grown in developing countries, which he felt had been neglected in favour of cash crops. Partly as a result of his interventions, there is now much wider recognition of the importance of subsistence crops, as well as a change in funding priorities among development agencies. He was also a promoter of the benefits of t...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - February 2, 2016 Category: Science Authors: David Haynes Tags: Agriculture Farming Barbados United Nations Source Type: news

CDC expands Zika virus alert; more countries issue pregnancy warnings
Pregnant women should not travel to Barbados, Bolivia, Ecuador, Guadeloupe, Saint Martin, Guyana, Cape Verde and Samoa because of Zika virus, the CDC said Friday. (Source: CNN.com - Health)
Source: CNN.com - Health - January 22, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

An Illustrated Guide To The Zika Outbreak
In October 2015, Brazilian health authorities notified the World Health Organization that an alarming number of Brazilian babies had been born with microcephaly, a rare, debilitating birth defect with lifelong consequences. Researchers quickly linked the spike in birth defects to the outbreak of a little-known tropical disease called Zika virus, which is transmitted by mosquito. Since its discovery in Uganda in 1947, Zika virus has popped up in different African and Asian countries, but no widespread outbreaks had occurred until 2013, when the virus infected an estimated 11 percent of the population of French Polynesi...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - January 22, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

An Illustrated Guide To The Zika Outbreak
In October 2015, Brazilian health authorities notified the World Health Organization that an alarming number of Brazilian babies had been born with microcephaly, a rare, debilitating birth defect with lifelong consequences. Researchers quickly linked the spike in birth defects to the outbreak of a little-known tropical disease called Zika virus, which is transmitted by mosquito. Since its discovery in Uganda in 1947, Zika virus has popped up in different African and Asian countries, but no widespread outbreaks had occurred until 2013, when the virus infected an estimated 11 percent of the population of French Polynesi...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - January 22, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

C.D.C. Issues Travel Alert for 8 More Locations Over Zika Virus
The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention added eight destinations to a list of countries that pregnant women should avoid to prevent infection. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - January 22, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: CATHERINE SAINT LOUIS Tags: Travel Warnings Ecuador Centers for Disease Control and Prevention St Martin (Caribbean) Women and Girls Pregnancy and Childbirth Bolivia Guadeloupe Barbados Samoa Zika Virus Guyana Cape Verde Source Type: news

Zika virus infection – Guyana, Barbados and Ecuador
Between 14 and 15 January 2016, the National IHR Focal Points (NFP) for Guyana, Barbados and Ecuador notified PAHO/WHO of cases of Zika virus infection. On 14 January, the NFP for Guyana reported the first laboratory-confirmed case of locally-acquired Zika virus infection in the country. The case is a 27-year-old female from Berbice, Region 6, with onset of symptoms on 1 January. (Source: WHO Disease Outbreaks)
Source: WHO Disease Outbreaks - January 20, 2016 Category: Infectious Diseases Tags: pesticide [subject], insecticides, fungicides, risk factor [subject], risk, health risks, travel [subject], travel and health, air travel, Disease outbreak news [doctype], Ecuador [country], Region of the Americas [region] Source Type: news

Disaster risk reduction or disaster risk production: the role of building regulations in mainstreaming DRR - Chmutina K, Bosher L.
Whilst it has not experienced any major disasters in recent years, Barbados is prone to a number of hazards and has the highest proportion of its urban produced capital at risk in the Caribbean due largely to the island's high population density. One of th... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - January 18, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Tags: Disaster Preparedness Source Type: news

Ronald Frankenberg obituary
Academic whose book Village on the Border pioneered the application of anthropological methods to British societyIn the 1950s, British anthropologists normally conducted their fieldwork overseas. Ronnie Frankenberg, who has died aged 86, broke the rules by focusing on the former slate-mining community of Glyn Ceiriog, then in Denbighshire and now in Wrexham county borough, for his first book, Village on the Border (1957).In doing so, he showed how anthropological methods could be effectively applied to British society. His choice of subject was fortuitous: he had intended to write his doctorate on the Caribbean, but his ou...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - January 4, 2016 Category: Science Authors: Mike Savage Tags: Anthropology People in science Sociology Keele University Higher education Society Books Source Type: news

Looking To Paris For Our Very Survival
We are now mere days away from what could easily be described as the most important gathering for the year -- the 21st Conference of Parties (COP21) of the 196 Parties to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC). At the 30th Nov. to 11th Dec. meeting in Paris, it is imperative that parties sign a legally-binding accord to keep human-induced global temperature rise within levels that science says will avert catastrophic climate change. This is important for many reasons. My country, Antigua & Barbuda, and its Caribbean neighbours, already among the most vulnerable of Small States, face an even ...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - December 11, 2015 Category: Science Source Type: news

Looking To Paris For Our Very Survival
We are now mere days away from what could easily be described as the most important gathering for the year -- the 21st Conference of Parties (COP21) of the 196 Parties to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC). At the 30th Nov. to 11th Dec. meeting in Paris, it is imperative that parties sign a legally-binding accord to keep human-induced global temperature rise within levels that science says will avert catastrophic climate change. This is important for many reasons. My country, Antigua & Barbuda, and its Caribbean neighbours, already among the most vulnerable of Small States, face an eve...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - December 11, 2015 Category: Science Source Type: news

Launch of first World Antibiotics Awareness Week from 16 to 22 November 2015
On the occasion of the first World Antibiotics Awareness Week, from 16 to 22 November 2015, the findings of a new WHO multi-country survey on antibiotic resistance are released showing that most people are confused about this major threat to public health and do not understand how to stop it from growing. Almost two thirds (64%) of some 10 000 people who were surveyed across 12 countries say they know antibiotic resistance is an issue that could affect them and their families, but how it affects them and what they can do to address it are not well understood. For example, 64% of respondents believe antibiotics can be used...
Source: WHO EMRO News - November 16, 2015 Category: Middle East Health Source Type: news

“Human contact is one of the greatest things”
(Katherine C. Cohen/Boston Children’s Hospital) Yvonne Burrowes Lead Cashier, Food Services I’ve been working here for 14 years, since I came to the United States from Barbados. My mother also worked in Food Services here for 21 years until she retired. I like things to be orderly. I try to set a good example and make sure that whoever passes through this line gets a feeling of professionalism and friendliness. It can be overwhelming for parents here. Sometimes they may need comfort or someone to talk to. I’ll make a joke or say a word of comfort or give a hug. That’s a good feeling. Human cont...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - September 25, 2015 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Jenny Fernandez Tags: All posts Care Team Source Type: news

How did woman cope when plunged into shattering grief? By writing this journal 
Helen Bailey and her husband John, known as JS, were on holiday in Barbados in 2011, when John was swept out to sea by strong currents. He drowned, and Helen was left behind with her grief. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - September 24, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

19 Pet Peeves Every Nurse Will Understand
Nurses are pretty much unstoppable, but every so often, they get pissed off like the rest of us. Endless hospital shifts, vomiting patients and not enough time to pee will do that to a person.  To figure out just what makes them tick, we spoke to a number of nurses and rounded up a few pet peeves we've seen circulating on Facebook. Pseudonyms and nicknames were given to protect the overworked and tired. Without further ado, here are the things that get under nurses' skin the most:  1. "When patients confuse the hospital with a hotel." -- Ruth No, we can't get you snacks and a bathrobe. But we can get yo...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - September 15, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Assessing a Public Health Intervention for Children in Barbados, 2003–2008
(Source: CDC Preventing Chronic Disease)
Source: CDC Preventing Chronic Disease - August 28, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Sustainable Development Needs Sustainable Financing -- Tackling NCDs Is No Exception
I recently heard the story of Evelyne Musera, a woman being treated for her Type 2 diabetes in Nairobi. Like many Kenyans, Evelyne pays out of her own pocket for the visit, plus the medicines she needs. On top of that, her taxi fares eat into her hard-earned money, and when she skips work to visit the hospital, she is not getting paid. Many others are not so lucky, and are missing out on care altogether due to the relatively high health care costs involved. Evelyne's example offers a glimpse of what millions of people -- and the governments charged with their care -- are confronted by worldwide when it comes to generating ...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - August 5, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Africa: Aids Is a 'Human Rights Issue,' Ban Declares, Launching Major New UN Report in Barbados
[UN News] Ending the AIDS epidemic - in all places and all communities - is essential to realizing the vision of a life of dignity for all, Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon declared today in Barbados at the Caribbean region launch of a major new United Nations report the calls for scaling up an inclusive, rights-based and stigma-free response to wipe out the deadly disease. (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - July 6, 2015 Category: African Health Source Type: news

AIDS is a 'human rights issue,' Ban declares, launching major new UN report in Barbados
Ending the AIDS epidemic – in all places and all communities – is essential to realizing the vision of a life of dignity for all, Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon declared today in Barbados at the Caribbean region launch of a major new United Nations report the calls for scaling up an inclusive, rights-based and stigma-free response to wipe out the deadly disease. (Source: UN News Centre - Health, Poverty, Food Security)
Source: UN News Centre - Health, Poverty, Food Security - July 3, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Lessons to be learned from Caribbean treatment of mental health
With Caribbean people in the UK nine times more likely than white British counterparts to be diagnosed with schizophrenia, a mental health researcher has visited Jamaica and Barbados to find out what lessons can be learned. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - April 22, 2015 Category: Science Source Type: news

Father James Prior rows across Atlantic to raise £100k for research into son's illness
James Prior, 49, from London, rowed from Gran Canaria to Barbados to raise money for research into a cure for Fergus' Crohn's disease. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - April 4, 2014 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Has David Birnbaum solved the mystery of existence?
David Birnbaum made his fortune selling jewellery to movie stars. Now he has published a 'remarkable and profound' investigation into the origins of the universe. Is there any reason to take it seriously?In the summer of 2012, a number of philosophers at British and American universities received a bulky, unmarked package in the post. It contained a 560-page book, written in English but with the Latin title Summa Metaphysica, by an amateur whose name they didn't recognise: David Birnbaum. It isn't unusual for philosophy departments to get mail from cranks, convinced they have solved the riddle of existe...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - October 19, 2013 Category: Science Authors: Oliver Burkeman Tags: The Guardian Philosophy Culture Books Features Religion Science Source Type: news

Launch of the Caribbean Branch of the US Cochrane Center
The Caribbean Branch of the US Cochrane Center (CBUSCC) was launched on 6 June 2013.CBUSCC will represent and promote The Cochrane Collaboration across the English-speaking Caribbean. CBUSCC is located at the University of West Indies (UWI) in Mona, Jamaica. Members of the CBUSCC at UWI include the Co-Directors, Damian Francis and Marshall Tulloch-Reid, and staff member Nadia Bennett. Additional members include Chisa Cumberbatch, Health Planner for the Ministry of Health in Barbados, and Ian Hambleton, Professor at the University of West Indies Cavehill in Barbados.Contributor's Information Contributor's name:...
Source: The Cochrane Collaboration - Current news at The Cochrane Collaboration - June 11, 2013 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: nowens Tags: Current news Centres Cochrane contributors Low and middle income countries & Events Source Type: news

Philip Adey obituary
My father, Philip Adey, who has died aged 73, was a chemistry teacher turned educationist and author. He devoted the majority of his working life to researching and promoting the teaching of thinking skills in school. His work on science teaching methods produced significant gains at GCSE, not only in science but also in maths and English. The method was further developed for primary education.Philip was born in Sevenoaks, Kent. After attending Bryanston school, Dorset, he gained a BSc in chemistry and a PGCE and Academic Diploma in Education from the London Institute of Education. Appointed head of chemistry at the Lodge ...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - February 20, 2013 Category: Science Tags: King's College London Obituaries guardian.co.uk Exams Higher education GCSEs Schools Science Source Type: news

11 Weeks Post Hysterectomy – Karen’s Story
Hi my name is Karen. I am 39 years old and had an abdominal hysterectomy on 6th September due to large fibroids and very low iron. All seemed well when I woke up. I was discharged 48hrs after my op (Thursday) By the Sunday afternoon I was starting to feel very unwell and had pains in my leg and the whole of my tummy being black with bruises up to my belly button (if I could upload a photo I would). I went back to the hospital and was told I had an infection in my scar. I was given antibiotics and bloods taken and sent home. At 10 pm that evening I had a phone call from the doctor to inform me my bloods had dropped again f...
Source: The Hysterectomy Association - January 8, 2013 Category: OBGYN Authors: Linda Parkinson-Hardman Tags: Latest News Recovery Your Stories Source Type: news